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Vietnamese activist faces 14 years in jail for anti-pollution protest livestream

An activist in central Vietnam has been sentenced to 14 years in prison on Tuesday for livestreaming a protest against a Taiwanese steel company's spill of toxins into the ocean. Hoang Duc Binh was convicted of "abusing democratic freedomsto infringe on the interests of the state, organisation and people and opposing officers on duty," lawyer Ha Huy Son said in a report byThe South China Morning Post. His fellow activist, Nguyen Nam Phong, was sentenced to two years for "opposing officers on duty." The protest comes after Formosa Plastics Group, a steel complex which in total is worth $10.6 billion (around P546 billion), dumped toxins such as phenol and cyanide into the ocean i...Keep on reading: Vietnamese activist faces 14 years in jail for anti-pollution protest livestream.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerFeb 8th, 2018

Vietnam jails activist after rights groups barred from WEF

HANOI, Vietnam --- A Vietnamese dissident was jailed Wednesday for 12 years on charges of trying to overthrow the state, days after the communist country refused entry to rights campaigners for a major business forum in Hanoi. Vietnam has a dismal rights record and has come under fire for a brutal crackdown against critics in the past two years that has seen scores jailed. Earlier this week it barred two rights campaigners from entering the country for the World Economic Forum attended by regional leaders--- many of whom face criticism for their own rights record at home. Nguyen Trung Truc, a member of the Brotherhood for Democracy group, was sentenced to 12 years in jail for at...Keep on reading: Vietnam jails activist after rights groups barred from WEF.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

Vietnam Jails Activist for Livestreaming Pollution March

HANOI - A court in central Vietnam has sentenced an activist to 14 years in jail for livestreaming fishermen marching to file a lawsuit against a Taiwan-owned steel plant's spill of toxins into the o.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2018

Vietnam rejects anti-China activist appeal

HANOI, Vietnam – A Vietnamese court on Friday, December 22, rejected the appeal of a dissident sentenced to 9 years for anti-state propaganda, capping a grim year for activists in the one-party state. Vietnam's communist government has been accused of intensifying a crackdown on its critics in 2017, jailing at ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2017

Vietnam jails activist for 7 years over toxic leak protests

HANOI, Vietnam – A Vietnamese court on Monday jailed a blogger for 7 years for disseminating anti-state "propaganda" including articles which supported protests against a Taiwanese firm responsible for a toxic leak. Space for free expression is shrinking in the Communist country, with at least 15 activists and dissidents having been ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 28th, 2017

Inside Indonesia’s LGBT crackdown – BBC News

In less than 18 months, being gay in Indonesia has gone from widely tolerated to just plain dangerous. An unprecedented wave of police raids, vigilante attacks, and calls for the criminalization of homosexual sex have left many in the country's LGBT community fearing for their safety. &'8220;(Gay Indonesians) are exhausted and they're horrified,&'8221; Kyle Knight, a Human Rights Watch researcher with the LGBT rights program, told CNN. &'8220;Even the activists I know who started the very first organizations in the 1980s say they've never seen anything like this.&'8221; It's a dark turn for a country that for decades prided itself on its diverse, heterogeneous society. The world's largest Muslim democracy, Indonesia is often considered something of a bulwark of tolerance amid growing conservatism elsewhere in the Islamic world. But that perception is now shifting, amid increasing verbal attacks on minority groups and the growing implementation of Islamic bylaws by regional governments. In less than two weeks, two young men were seized by vigilantes who burst into their home in Aceh province, then taken to authorities who caned them for having homosexual sex. In a separate incident, later in the month, attendees at an alleged gay party in a Jakarta sauna were arrested and images of their faces were disseminated online by Indonesian police. Homosexual sex is not illegal in the majority of Indonesia, except in the extremely conservative province of Aceh. Jakarta is not part of any province; it is controlled by the central government. One week ago, West Java Police Chief Anton Charliyan announced that he would create a special taskforce to crack down on LGBT people. &'8220;They will face the law and heavy social sanctions. They will not be accepted by society,&'8221; he said. It wasn't always this way. Despite being a Muslim-majority country, only small parts of Indonesia — such as Aceh province — follow strict Islamic law. Same-sex relations have never been illegal either, even if a 2013 Pew survey found that 93% of the country refused to accept homosexuality. Jonta Saragih a former LGBT activist from Sumatra, now studying in the UK, said while his family weren't quick to accept him when he came out, Indonesians used to have a live and let live attitude to their country's LGBT population. &'8220;[Even] a few years ago, when I was in Jakarta, though homosexuality was not recognized by the law, there was no one talking about it,&'8221; he told CNN. Indonesian human rights activist Tunggal Pawestricorroborates this notion that homosexuality was previously frowned upon but tolerated. &'8220;Since my childhood I was told that LGBT people are sinful, being a homosexual is sinful but of course &' it doesn't mean you have to criminalize them,&'8221; she said. So what changed? The problems began in early 2016, when a number of high-profile Indonesian politicians, including several government ministers, suddenly started to make unprompted attacks on Indonesia's LGBT community. Among them was the Defense Minister, Ryamizard Ryacudu, who said Indonesia's LGBT movement was more dangerous than &'8220;a nuclear war.&'8221; &'8220;In a nuclear war, if a bomb is dropped over Jakarta, Semarang will not be affected &'8212; but (with LGBT rights) everything we know could disappear in an instant &'8212; it's dangerous,&'8221; he said, according to the state Antara news agency. Soon, the country's medical professionals joined in. The Indonesian Psychiatrists Association issued a statement in February saying people who were gay or bisexual had &'8220;psychiatric problems.&'8220; By August, a group of conservative activists had taken a case to the Constitutional Court to call for homosexual sex to be made illegal in Indonesia. Knight said it's hard to tell why the sudden wave of anti-LGBT feeling swelled up across the country, but where it was heading appeared much clearer. &'8220;This is fueled not just by bigotry and misunderstanding but by public officials &' I think that's the really scary thing as we go forward. It's fair game to go after LGBT people in Indonesia,&'8221; he said. More than a dozen gay dating apps, including Grindr, were banned in Indonesia in late 2016, Jonta said, making it harder for gay men and women to communicate with each other. &'8220;(I have) some good friends &' we started discussing these issues on social media, eventually some of them deleted me on Facebook. They said we are not friends anymore,&'8221; Jonta said. Conservative Islam is a growing political force in Indonesia. The arrest and later conviction of former Jakarta governor Basuki 'Ahok' Tjahaja Purnama in April this year, on charges of blasphemy, followedhuge protests instigated by conservative groups. Pawestri blamed vocally conservative politicians and an &'8220;irresponsible&'8221; media for the rise in anti-LGBT rhetoric. &'8220;Before LGBT Indonesians had quite a lot of confidence, now they're very careful and cry to me, calling me at night. We've been trying to do whatever we can to avoid (criminalization),&'8221; Pawestri said. Criminalization might be closer than most would expect. Since August, a team of lawyers has been arguing in Indonesia's Constitutional Court, on behalf of 12 individuals, to change the criminal code. Prosecution legal team spokesman, Feizal Syahmenan, told CNN they would like three articles changed in the criminal code &'8212; one to outlaw sex outside of marriage, one to outlaw homosexual rape and one to outlaw homosexual sex entirely. Two of those 12 individuals are members of the AILA, the Family Love Alliance, a prominent conservative Islamic group. Syahmenan told CNN homosexuality is just not Indonesian. &'8220;All of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 1st, 2017

Vietnam jails activist after rights groups barred from WEF

: A Vietnamese dissident was jailed Wednesday for 12 years on charges of trying to overthrow the state, days after the communist country refused entry to rights campaigners for a major business for.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

Pussy Riot activist treated for possible poisoning

MOSCOW --- Russian news reports say a member of Russian punk protest group Pussy Riot has been hospitalized in grave condition for what could be a possible poisoning. Ekho Moskvy radio and online news portal Meduza reported Wednesday that Pyotr Verzilov has been in emergency care since late Tuesday. They quoted a fellow Pussy Riot member, Veronika Nikulshina, as saying Verzilov's symptoms included losing his eyesight and ability to speak. Nikulshina said Verzilov was being treated in the toxicology unit of a Moscow hospital, indicating a suspected poisoning. Verzilov, Nikulshina and two other activists served 15-day jail sentences for disrupting July's World Cup final. Th...Keep on reading: Pussy Riot activist treated for possible poisoning.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

Over 100 rights groups urge Bahrain to free activist Nabeel Rajab

PARIS, France – More than 100 rights groups urged Bahrain on Wednesday, August 29, to "immediately release" high-profile activist Nabeel Rajab, who is serving two separate jail sentences for alleged anti-government statements.  The call by 127 non-governmental organizations came after the United Nations denounced the Shiite opposition leader's detention as "arbitrary" ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 30th, 2018

SKorean ex-president Park’s sentence extended

SEOUL: A South Korean appeal court on Friday extended ex-president Park Geun-hye’s prison sentence for corruption and abuse of power by one year. The decision by the Seoul High Court means the former head of state, who was ousted after a sprawling graft scandal triggered mass protests, faces 25 years in jail in the case. [...] The post SKorean ex-president Park’s sentence extended appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsAug 24th, 2018

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ author wanted in Singapore over national service

The author of "Crazy Rich Asians," which has been adapted into a hit Hollywood movie, is wanted in his native Singapore for allegedly dodging mandatory national service, authorities said Wednesday. Kevin Kwan, who has lived in the US since he was 11 but is still a Singapore citizen, faces up to three years in jail and a hefty fine if convicted, the city-state's defense ministry said. The movie adaption of his bestseller, which focuses on the glamorous world of Singapore's super-rich, was released in the United States last week and has been hailed as a watershed for Hollywood diversity due to its mostly Asian cast. The film had its Singapore premiere Tuesday, with some of its...Keep on reading: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ author wanted in Singapore over national service.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

ABS-CBN Sports, Garena partner for 2018 Globe Conquerors Manila LoL tournament

Another major eSports event will soon be watched on ABS-CBN S+A as ABS-CBN Sports and Garena come together for the “2018 Globe Conquerors Manila” League of Legends (LoL) tournament this August. Fans of the popular multiplayer online video game can witness the best teams in Southeast Asia battle for pride and prize when the tournament goes LIVE from the Mall of Asia (MoA) Arena on ABS-CBN S+A, as well as via livestream and YouTube live for the semifinals and finals this Saturday (August 18) and Sunday (August 19). Garena is exclusive operator of top tier games in Southeast Asia and a leading advocate of eSports in the region. For this tournament, it brought eight teams from the Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Thailand who have already started battling it out in the preliminaries happening at the Sofitel Philippine Plaza Manila until Friday (August 17). S+A’s coverage on Saturday (August 18) will start at 10 am for the opening ceremonies of the semifinals. The semifinals will be a best of five series between the Group A toppers and Group B 2nd placer in the morning, while the second seed of Group A faces the top seed of Group B in the afternoon. Viewers can also catch the celebrity showmatch featuring popular gamer, musician, and cosplayer Ashley Gosiengfiao, comedian Empoy Marquez, and James Reid’s brother, Jack, among other personalities. On Sunday (August 19), the victors in the semifinals will figure in another best of five series at 2 pm for the right to book a trip to the 2018 League of Legends World Championships in South Korea as the Southeast Asian representative. There will also be band performances for those who will troop to the venue while it will be hardcore battles for those tuning in to S+A. eSports has been a rising phenomenon all over the world, especially in the last few years, where events such as the League of Legends World Championship can draw over 30 million viewers to rival traditional sports. S+A, which also previously aired a major DOTA 2 event, is committed to helping strengthen the local gaming community and promote eSports as a legit and competitive sporting event.   ---- Don’t miss the heart-pounding action of the various heroes in the virtual world of League of Legends in the live broadcast of the semifinals and finals of the “2018 Globe Conquerors Manila” LoL tournament this Saturday (August 18) starting 10 am and on Sunday (August 19) at 2 pm LIVE on S+A and S+A HD, as well as via livestream and YouTube live. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 14th, 2018

SC sends Carlos Celdran to jail for offending religious feelings

MANILA, Philippines – Renowned tour guide and activist Carlos Celdran faces imprisonment after the Supreme Court upheld the decision of the Court of Appeals that found him guilty of “offending religious feelings.” In the resolution posted by Celdran on Twitter, Monday, August 6, the Supreme Court noted that it agrees with ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 6th, 2018

DHL heir pleads guilty to drugs charges

KOROR, Palau: DHL heir Larry Hillbroom Jr. was Wednesday sentenced to 10 years’ probation in Palau after pleading guilty to drug charges, and faces jail unless he completes a rehabilitation program. The probation period will be reduced to seven years if Hillbroom completes the program. If he does not he will be jailed for five [...] The post DHL heir pleads guilty to drugs charges appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Man charged in theft of Frances McDormand’s Oscar

Terry Bryant, 37, faces up to three years in county jail if convicted......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsMar 7th, 2018

Filipinos facing threat worse than Martial Law

MANILA, Philippines – Exactly 32 years after the People Power Revolution that toppled strongman Ferdinand Marcos, the Philippines faces a threat worse than military rule under the late dictator.  "We are threatened by something worse than Martial Law," said activist nun Sister Mary John Mananzan. "We ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 25th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Turkey seeks to jail Knicks player Enes Kanter for insulting Erdogan

ANKARA, Turkey - Turkish prosecutors demanded on Wednesday, December 20 over 4 years jail for Turkish NBA player Enes Kanter on charges of insulting President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, state media reported. The 25-year-old basketball player faces up to 4 years and 8 months ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 21st, 2017

Militant coalition to hold human rights day rally on Dec. 10 amid priest’s killing

A militant anti-tyranny coalition is set to stage its human rights day rallyonSunday, Dec. 10in the wake of the killing of an activist priest and a pastor.     In a statementon Wednesday, the Movement Against Tyranny (MAT) said itsSunday protest would be heldfrom3:00 to 5:00 p.m.at the Bonifacio Shrine beside the Manila City Hall.     "We will mark International Human Rights DayonDecember 10with a heightened sense of urgency given the killings of known human rights activists Catholic priest Fr. Marcelito Paez in Nueva Ecija last Monday and Elisa Badayos in Negros Oriental last Nov. 28. Also killed was Born-Again pastor Lovelito Quiones in Occiden...Keep on reading: Militant coalition to hold human rights day rally on Dec. 10 amid priest’s killing.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 6th, 2017

Priest faces sanction for unwittingly bringing cigarettes into Bohol District Jail

TAGBILARAN CITY, Bohol --- The chaplain of the Bohol District Jail (BDJ) in Barangay Cabawan, Tagbilaran City is facing sanction after heunwittingly brought in cigarettes and dried tobacco leaves, which are banned inside the facility. Fr. James Darunday would not be allowed to hold Mass and other ministry works at the BDJ pending investigation, Chief Insp. Felipe Montejo, jail warden, said on Monday. "I am waiting for the final results of the investigation of the disciplinary board," Montejo said. Darunday, who has been BDJ chaplain for seven years, said that a woman from Barangay Baang in Catigbian town approached him before heading to the facility to officiate the9 a.m.Mas...Keep on reading: Priest faces sanction for unwittingly bringing cigarettes into Bohol District Jail.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 27th, 2017

Anger as Swedish neo-Nazis prepare for Yom Kippur march – Al Jazeera

Swedish anti-racist politicians, watchdog groups and Jewish organisations have expressed anger as self-professed National Socialists prepare for a rally slated to take place on the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur in the country's second-largest city. The Nordic Resistance Movement (NRM), which anti-racist organisations describe as neo-Nazis, is holding a demonstration on September 30 in Gothenburg, which is located on Sweden's western coast. They have dubbed the event &'8220;Revolt against the traitors&'8221;. The event will be a rally against &'8220;the politicians in the Swedish parliament as well as the European Parliament&'8221; who &'8220;have flung our nation's borders wide open to an unprecedented invasion&'8221;, the NRM said in a statement, referring to the country's acceptance of refugees and migrants fleeing war and economic devastation in recent years. The statement added, &'8220;Today's politicians and journalists are nothing short of robbers and traitors!&'8221; At the time of publication, the NRM had not replied to Al Jazeera's repeated requests for additional comment. Linda Snecker, a spokesperson for Sweden's Left Party, described the NRM as &'8220;a threat against our democracy and open society&'8221;. Speaking to Al Jazeera by telephone, she said, &'8220;It's a threat against all of us who are anti-racists, who are feminists, [and those] who celebrate LGBTQ society. The neo-Nazis are a threat against all of those values that we believe and fight for.&'8221; Police have changed the NRM's planned route, prompting the group to hold a flash demonstration in Gothenburg on September 17, with some 60 demonstrators marching through the city centre. In a video posted on the NRM's YouTube channel, the demonstrators waved flags and chanted against immigration. When angry passers-by confronted them, an NRM protester threw a woman to the pavement. Although the NRM has been active for two decades, Snecker said the group is attempting to capitalise on the rise of the far-right Sweden Democrats Party, which has 49 seats in the national legislature, and the wave of far-right populism that has hit parts of Europe and the US in recent years. &'8220;Their agenda is violence, to scare people, to show you can't protest against them and that they have a violent capacity,&'8221; she said. &'8220;That's really scary.&'8221; The demonstration was set to pass near a synagogue in the city centre, which has prompted faith leaders to express concern for the city's Jewish community. However, a court ruled on Monday that the route would have to be changed. Aron Verstandig, chairman of The Official Council of Swedish Jewish Communities, and Allan Stutzinky, chairman of the Jewish Community in Gothenburg, decried the police's decision to grant the NRM a permit in an opinion article published by the Svenska Dagbladet newspaper earlier this month. &'8220;Aside from out of fear for our own security, it evokes uncomfortable associations for us Jews. During the Holocaust, it wasn't unusual for the German Nazis to conduct their horrendous atrocities on the most important days of the Jewish calendar,&'8221; they wrote. Henrik Dahlberg, a media spokesperson for the City of Gothenburg, said it does not have the legal authority to prevent the march from taking place. &'8220;Demonstrations such as this one have a very strong protection in the Swedish constitution,&'8221; he told Al Jazeera by email. &'8220;Therefore, the march in and of itself cannot be stopped.&'8221; In 2016, the anti-racist magazine Expo documented 3,064 instances of neo-Nazi activities in Sweden. The bulk of the activities involved spreading propaganda, such as distributing flyers and posting stickers. In a December 2016 study that examined the profiles of 159 NRM members, Expo found that more than a quarter of them had previously been charged with violent crimes, while 56 percent had been convicted of a crime. Explaining that the group had grown in recent years, Expo added that a third of active NRM members in 2015 had not previously had any documented connections to neo-Nazi organisations. Last week, Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven called for action to combat the rise in far-right activity in the country. &'8220;When we now see an escalation of these extremist forces, and we are moving towards a normalization of racist parties too, then we must do something,&'8221; he said. Daniel Wiklander, Expo's acting managing editor, described the NRM's upcoming demonstration as &'8220;an outrage&'8221;. Wiklander explains that the NRM draws on the ideological traditions of the German National Socialists, American white supremacist groups that were prevalent in the 1980s and other European fascist organisations that were active in the lead-up to and during World War II. &'8220;At this point, it's the only national socialist organisation, but they exist within a larger white nationalist and far-right alignment,&'8221; he said. &'8220;For a long time, they were a fringe movement because they were very hostile to [far-right] competition and mostly stuck to their own. In the last 10 years, they've [benefited from] different [white supremacist] groups coming together.&'8221; The NRM was founded as the Swedish Resistance Movement in 1997 by Klas Lund, who has previously spent time in prison for bank robbery and manslaughter for the 1986 killing of an anti-racist organiser who intervened to stop the harassment of migrants. More recently, the NRM has established a branch in neighbouring Finland, where its members have attacked anti-racist demonstrations and LGBTQ pride events. The group advocates Sweden's exit from the European Union, the mass deportation of all refugees and migrants and what it describes as &'8220;Nordic self-sufficiency&'8221; based on National Socialist ideology, among other far-right policies. In July 2017, a court in [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017