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Using Filipino values, food key to better heart health — study

HONOLULU -- Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Filipino American males and second among Filipino American females. Filipinos also have a high prevalence of hypertension resulting from obesity, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity. The good news: A University of Hawaii at Manoa study has found that food and family are key factors in improving Filipino heart health. The study, published in "Preventing Chronic Disease,"found that the Filipino American community responds better to interventions based on Filipino cultural values and the incorporation of traditional foods. Values such as strong family ties, empathy, a tradition of obligation and reciprocity as ...Keep on reading: Using Filipino values, food key to better heart health — study.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerAug 22nd, 2018

Using Filipino values, food key to better heart health — study

HONOLULU -- Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Filipino American males and second among Filipino American females. Filipinos also have a high prevalence of hypertension resulting from obesity, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity. The good news: A University of Hawaii at Manoa study has found that food and family are key factors in improving Filipino heart health. The study, published in "Preventing Chronic Disease,"found that the Filipino American community responds better to interventions based on Filipino cultural values and the incorporation of traditional foods. Values such as strong family ties, empathy, a tradition of obligation and reciprocity as ...Keep on reading: Using Filipino values, food key to better heart health — study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 to engange Pinoy youth and coaches nationwide

Jr. NBA PH press release MANILA, PHILIPPINES, Dec. 23, 2017 – Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska will tip off Jan. 13 at Don Bosco Technical Institute in Makati and runs through May 2018 as part of the league’s effort to encourage youth basketball participation. This year’s program is set to reach more than 250,000 participants and 900 coaches across the country.  Online registration is open now at www.jrnba.asia/philippines. Jr. NBA, the league’s global youth basketball participation program for boys and girls, teaches the fundamental skills and core values of the game at the grassroots level in an effort to enhance the youth basketball experience for players, parents and coaches.  During the 2017-18 season, the NBA will reach more than 26 million youth in 71 countries through a variety of camps, clinics, skills challenges, league play and outreach events.   The program remains free and open to boys and girls ages 10-14 throughout its four stages: skills clinics in schools and communities, Regional Selection Camps, a National Training Camp and an NBA experience trip.  Since its launch in 2007, Jr. NBA clinics have been implemented in 110 cities and municipalities across the country and the 2018 program will return to key provinces including Agusan Del Norte, Batangas, Benguet, Cavite, Misamis Oriental, and Negros Occidental.  Regional Selection Camps will be held in Bacolod (Feb. 10-11), Butuan (Feb. 24-25), Baguio (March 17-18) and Metro Manila (April 7-8), with the top 37 boys and 37 girls advancing for the National Training Camp in Manila in May 2018, which will feature an NBA and WNBA player or legend.  The program will culminate with the selection of 16 Jr. NBA All-Stars, comprised of eight boys and eight girls, who will embark on an overseas NBA experience trip with fellow Jr. NBA All-Stars from Southeast Asia.  Prior editions of the Jr. NBA Philippines program have featured notable alumni including Aljon Mariano, Kobe Paras, Kiefer and Thirdy Ravena, Ricci Rivero, and Kai Sotto.  “For the past 10 years, Jr.  NBA Philippines has established itself as a platform to improve the youth basketball experience and promote an active and healthy lifestyle among the Filipino youth,” said NBA Philippines Managing Director Carlo Singson.  “Together with Alaska, we are committed to providing proper guidelines to how the game should be played and taught to more youth, coaches and parents in the country.” “As part of our long-standing partnership with the NBA, Alaska Milk Corporation is proud to play an active role in shaping the basketball players of tomorrow through good nutrition and proper life values,” said Alaska Milk Corporation Marketing Director Blen Fernando.  “We look forward to making a lasting impact on the lives of aspiring athletes on and off the court through the Jr. NBA program.” The 2018 edition of Jr. NBA Philippines will also include the Jr. NBA Coach of the Year program, led by Jr. NBA Head Coaches Carlos Barroca and Alaska Power Camp Coach Jeff Cariaso, to provide training for 14 Jr. NBA coaches during the National Training Camp, with two Jr. NBA Coaches of the Year awarded with an NBA experience trip.   Jr. NBA Philippines furthers the mission of Alaska Milk’s NUTRITION.ACTION.CHAMPION. program that highlights the nutritional benefits of milk, encourages physical activity through play, and instills values that are essential to becoming a champion.   AXA, CloudFone, Gatorade and Panasonic serve as Official Partners of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines, while Spalding is a Supporting Partner.  ABS-CBN Sports + Action, Basketball TV and NBA Premium TV are the Official NBA Broadcasters of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines.  Coaches and participants can now register the Jr. NBA program online at www.jrnba.asia/philippines, where the program terms and conditions can be found.  Fans can also follow Jr. NBA on Facebook and the NBA at www.nba.com and on Facebook and Twitter. To learn more about the Alaska Milk Corporation, visit www.alaskamilk.com and follow PlayPH at www.playph.com and on Facebook and Twitter. About the NBA The NBA is a global sports and media business built around four professional sports leagues: the National Basketball Association, the Women’s National Basketball Association, the NBA G League and the NBA 2K League, set to launch in May 2018.  The NBA has established a major international presence with games and programming in 215 countries and territories in 50 languages, and merchandise for sale in more than 125,000 stores in 100 countries on six continents.  NBA rosters at the start of the 2017-18 season featured 108 international players from a record 42 countries and territories.  NBA Digital’s assets include NBA TV, NBA.com, the NBA App and NBA League Pass.  The NBA has created one of the largest social media communities in the world, with 1.4 billion likes and followers globally across all league, team, and player platforms.  Through NBA Cares, the league addresses important social issues by working with internationally recognized youth-serving organizations that support education, youth and family development, and health-related causes. About Alaska Milk According to the 8th National Survey of FNRI and DOH (as of 2013), obesity is one of the most prevalent nutritional problems of Filipino children and adults, with about 5 out of 100 Filipino children being classified as overweight. Obesity can lead to different health problems like heart diseases and even diabetes at a young age, which could lead to serious health, economic and social implications later on in life. In line with Alaska Milk’s mission to bring affordable nutrition and a love of active play to every Filipino household, powering the Jr. NBA is a major part of Alaska’s “NUTRITION. ACTION. CHAMPION.” initiative. By highlighting milk’s nutritional benefits and encouraging children to go out and play, Alaska consistently works to instill the values Determination, Hard Work, Teamwork, Discipline and Sportsmanship in tomorrow’s champions......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 23rd, 2017

How Running May or May Not Help the Heart – New York Times

If 50 men run 3,510 marathons over the course of three decades, will their heart health suffer or improve? A new study delving into precisely that questionconcludes that the answer is simultaneously reassuring and complicated, with long years of endurance training seeming not to harm runners’ hearts, but also not necessarily to benefit them in the ways that the runners themselves probably expected. Over the past 40 years or so, attitudes about the effects of strenuous exercise on the heart have whipsawed. At one point, many people believed that endurance exercise would be a panacea for heart problems. A 1977 report in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, for example, intimated that marathon running and a healthy diet would immunize runners completely against atherosclerosis, or the buildup of plaques in the arteries that is the hallmark of heart disease. But after some runners died of heart attacks, including, famously, Jim Fixx, the author of “The Complete Book of Running,” in 1984, many scientists, physicians and athletes began to worry that long-term, strenuous exercise might actually be bad for the heart. In support of that idea, a few studies in recent years have found that the hearts of lifelong male endurance athletes may contain more plaques or other signs of heart problems, such as scarring, than the hearts of less-active men of the same age. A small study presented at a recent meeting of the Radiological Society of America, for instance, found that among a group of middle-aged male triathletes, those who most often trained and competed showed slightly more scarring inside their hearts than the other athletes. But, adding still more complexity to the issue, other recent studies have indicated that, even if longtime endurance athletes do develop heart problems such as atherosclerosis, their version of the disease may be different from and more benign than the types of heart disease that develop in less active people. It was in hopes of bringing more clarity to the increasingly tangled question of how endurance training affects hearts that researchers from the University of Minnesota, Stanford University and other institutions decided, for the new study, to zero in on a unique group of runners: men who had participated in at least 25 consecutive Twin Cities marathons in Minneapolis-St. Paul. These 50 runners, identified by marathon participation logs, turned out to have completed, collectively, 3,510 marathons, with each runner, individually, having finished anywhere from 27 to 171 of the races. The men obviously were experienced endurance athletes. They had trained for at least 26 years, and some for more than 50. Many had started competing in high school or earlier, but others had come to the sport much later, often, the researchers report, in hopes of ameliorating the effects of past lifestyle choices, such as smoking or junk food diets. Most were lean at the time of the study, but a few qualified as overweight, based on their body mass indexes. Most ran 30 miles per week or more. The researchers had each of these runners fill out detailed questionnaires about their training routines, as well as their general health history and habits. Then they scanned the runners’ hearts to look for atherosclerosis. Sixteen of the runners proved to have no plaque in their arteries at all. The rest had some deposits, with 12 displaying slight amounts, another 12 moderate levels, and 10 having worrisomely large deposits of plaques. When the scientists compared the men’s running histories to their scan results, however, they found little relationship between how much they had run overall and how much plaque they had in their arteries. Those men who had run the greatest number of marathons did not tend to have less, or more, arterial plaque than the men who had run fewer races, indicating that extreme running itself had not increased the severity of heart disease. On the other hand, a history of heavy smoking and high cholesterol was linked to greater levels of plaque, especially in the men who had begun running later in life. The good news was that these findings suggest that years of hard running had not harmed the men’s hearts, says Dr. William O. Roberts, a professor of family and community medicine at the University of Minnesota, who led the study, which was published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Indeed, all that running probably helped to keep some runners’ arteries clear. But the exercise also had not inoculated those with a history of unwise lifestyle choices, especially smoking, against developing heart disease. “You can’t just outrun your past,” Dr. Roberts says. Of course, this study was relatively small and focused on Caucasian men with the physical, economic and psychological wherewithal to run competitively for years. Whether the results apply equally to other people and other sports is unclear. (Dr. Roberts and his collaborators published a small study earlier this year of female marathon runners that found almost no plaques in their hearts.) This type of study also can show only relationships between running and heart health. It cannot prove that running directly caused any changes in the heart. Still, the results may help to quell some runners’ and their families’ worries about the cardiac demands of long-term training. But if you misspent your youth smoking and eating poorly or have a family history of cardiac disease, you might want to talk with your physician about having your heart assessed, Dr. Roberts says, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Filipino Inventors Pilot Rapid Dengue Test Kit in W. Visayas

Western Visayas is one of the three pilot sites for the Filipino-invented and more affordable rapid test kit to detect the deadly dengue hemorrhagic fever. Biotek-M is now a “matured” technology, having been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), adopted by the Department of Health (DOH), and now in the pilot implementation, said […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsNov 8th, 2018

Confidently successful

The now iconic Miss Universe phrase, “confidently beautiful with a heart,” may be said of Filipino-Persian orthodontist Dr. Shideh L. Nikbin. Add to that “confidently successful.” A doctor of dental medicine in both Philippines and Iran, Dr. Nikbin specialized in aesthetic medicine and is the chief executive officer of Fashion Smile Dental Health and Wellness, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 21st, 2018

Lecture: Perpetuation of Sexism in Tagalog/Filipino language

HONOLULU -- There is a common notion that the Tagalog/Filipino language is nonsexist because it has generic nouns and pronouns. But upon closer inspection, instances of sexism are present in Filipino and are perpetuated consciously or unconsciously. The sexual stereotypes and patriarchal values reflected in some of these words may be outmoded, but their definitions are still maintained in the dictionary. In this lecture, Pia Arboleda discusses her study of words and definitions from three major dictionaries: Vicassan Pilipino-English Dictionary (1978), Diksyunaryo ng Wikang Filipino (1989) and UP Diksiyonaryong Filipino (2001). She will also provide recommendations for language ad...Keep on reading: Lecture: Perpetuation of Sexism in Tagalog/Filipino language.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018

E-cigarette users have double the risk of a heart attack

A new large-scale US study has found that daily e-cigarette use can nearly double the risk of a heart attack compared to those who have never used e-cigs, with the risk even higher for those who also continue to smoke conventional tobacco cigarettes. Led by researchers at University of California San Francisco along with a team from George Washington University, the study is the first to look at the relationship between e-cigarette use and heart attacks. For the research the team gathered data from 69,452 participants who were interviewed about their e-cigarette and tobacco cigarette use, and whether they had ever been told by a health professional that they had had a...Keep on reading: E-cigarette users have double the risk of a heart attack.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

Even low levels of air pollution could cause serious changes to the heart, finds new research

New United Kingdom research has found that even air pollution levels that fall well within U.K. guidelines could cause changes in the structure of the heart, similar to those seen in the early stages of heart failure. Led by Queen Mary University of London and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), the new study looked at data from 3,920 participants in the long-term health study, U.K. Biobank. Participants were asked to provide a range of personal information, including their lifestyles, health record and details on where they have lived, in addition to completing blood tests and health scans. All participants were free from pre-existing cardiovascular disease. ...Keep on reading: Even low levels of air pollution could cause serious changes to the heart, finds new research.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 6th, 2018

New report investigates which of latest food trends can benefit heart health

A new United States review has investigated some of the health benefits and controversies associated with some of the latest food trends, with the authors offering their advice on foods such as legumes, coffee and alcohol. Carried out by researchers from the American College of Cardiology Nutrition and Lifestyle Workgroup of the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Council, this is their second paper looking at potential heart health benefits of controversial nutrition trends. "The current nutritional recommendations show a heart-healthy diet is high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts in moderation," said Andrew Freeman, the review's lead author. "However, there are m...Keep on reading: New report investigates which of latest food trends can benefit heart health.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 25th, 2018

Pacquiao dismisses health concerns: ‘I feel great’

Manny Pacquiao on Saturday dismissed health issues and assured those concerned that he is not in harm's way. Pacquiao's comments about his health came on the heels of a report saying that the Filipino ring legend had been diagnosed with a serious heart ailment a week before his title fight with Lucas Matthysse. "I feel fine. I feel great. I thank God for giving me strength everyday and keeping me protected through all the years of my life. Winning by knockout over Matthysse was a bonus," said the 39-year-old Pacquiao. READ:Pacquiao heart ailment almost canceled fight The report also said Pacquiao went against the doctors' order and that the Matthysse fight nearly got canc...Keep on reading: Pacquiao dismisses health concerns: ‘I feel great’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 21st, 2018

FDA warns of toxic skin whiteners

How far would you go to achieve a fair and radiant skin? It appears thousands of Filipinos are willing to take potential health risks on banned beauty products simply because they offer celebrity-like glowing skin and are cheap at that. Take, for instance, skin-whitening and beauty product Goree, which remains popular among Filipino consumers despite findings that it contains high levels of mercury, thanks or no thanks to its affordable price of P150 and hyped efficacy on social media. Notwithstanding warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) against the use of Goree, Ruvilma Entero, who is working overseas, and her friends continued to patronize the product. "...Keep on reading: FDA warns of toxic skin whiteners.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

Sleep quantity, quality linked to heart health in adolescents

WASHINGTON — Both the quantity and quality of sleep in adolescents had significant effects on aspects of cardiovascular health such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels and abdominal fat deposition, according to a study published in the latest issue of Pediatrics. Researchers focused on the amount of the time of sleep, and the percentage of sleep […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

Sleeping too much or too little can increase risk of various health conditions, finds new study

New research has linked a lack of sleep to increased cravings for junk food and nighttime snacks, potentially increasing the risk of obesity. Image: OcusFocus/Istock.com via AFP Relaxnews New Korea.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

‘Citizen Jake’ could’ve been two movies

Your mantra for the week: "My acts of kindness make me healthy."   As more Filipinos turn health-conscious, getting into the keto and intermittent fasting diets, I suggest another system that does not involve food, but its practice could have immeasurable benefits in one's life, not to mention, its specific impact on one's health. It is what IAMISM calls planting-of-the-good, which means unlimited acts of kindness from one's thoughts, feelings, words and actions.   Here are 10 specific benefits one can expect:   1) An increased and enhanced immune system   2) Strengthened heart because you are doing loving things   3) Lower cholester...Keep on reading: ‘Citizen Jake’ could’ve been two movies.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 9th, 2018

May 13th declared Day of Courage

MANILA, Philippines,  – Allianz has declared May 13 as a Day of Courage, with three events that are designed as a test of mettle and to encourage more Filipinos to live a healthy lifestyle. These three events, the PHA Heart Run Powered By Allianz together with the Philippine Heart Association (PHA) at SM By the Bay; the Allianz Conquer Challenge in Vermosa, Laguna; and the Bayanihan Walk in Singapore, will help bring out the best in the participants as they challenge not only physical limits but also to promote the value of courage.  The PHA Heart Run powered by Allianz, which will be held at the SM By The Bay area gives participants the opportunity to become Heart Warriors and bring awareness to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) that are affecting many Filipinos today. Doctors and healthy heart advocates from the PHA will be joined by running coaches Toni and Jim Saret, in a race that will be led by heart condition survivors who will run in the 1k advocacy division in a bid to shine a light on the prevention and primary care of CVDs. Allianz PNB Life President Olaf Kliesow reiterates the need for Filipino families’ to monitor their health conditions and be wary of increasing medical expenses, especially for a great majority whose savings and insurance protection levels are very much wanting. To make the fun run more exciting, Allianz will be giving out P100,000 worth of personal accident life insurance to all participants, and two lucky 21k and 10K participants will win all-expense paid trips to Thailand, to join the Allianz Ayudhaya World Run! Those who want to level up their game may register at the Allianz Conquer Challenge, an obstacle course race that tests speed, endurance and strategy. The race is made even more special with the participation of Jamil Faisal Saro Adiong, a recipient of the Sultan Kudarat Award for Peace and Community Development. Marawi City, his home province of Lanao del Sur, was besieged with a very big challenge last year, as it was still reeling from the effects of a tropical storm, it was also battered by a war. Jamil is one of the local heroes who was involved in Marawi’s rehabilitation efforts. “I am offering my participation in the race to all my fellow Maranaos, in the hope that we may all triumph in our aspirations with mutual respect through harmonious relationships and inclusive economic development as we rise stringer and more resilient than before,” he shares. Joining the obstacle course race is a testament to his own journey and a call to all Filipinos to embrace peace and tolerance amidst diversity. As with the PHA Heart Run, Allianz will be giving out P100,000 worth of personal accident life insurance to all participants of the challenging course race that has divisions for kids, beginners, and pros. To further amplify their message to dare to take on life’s challenges because Allianz is there to support your family and your life’s dreams, Filipinos in Singapore are invited to join the Allianz PNB Life and Philippine Embassy–supported Bayanihan Walk, which will take place at the Labrador Park. The 3.88km fun walk aims to raise funds to support the Philippine Bayanihan Society Singapore’s charity works and for the maintenance of the Bayanihan Centre. Rei Abrazaldo, Allianz PNB Life Brand Communications and Digital Director, shares that the company’s mission is to empower Filipinos to face new experiences and daily challenges with courage. “We enable every Filipino the courage to live a healthy lifestyle as embodied in our collaboration with the Philippine Heart Association in the upcoming PHA Heart Run Powered by Allianz.  We inspire Filipinos the courage to overcome obstacles as exemplified in our partnership with Conquer Challenge Philippines in the approaching Allianz Conquer Challenge Race, and we empower Filipinos overseas to have the courage to be there for each other in our alliance with the Philippine Bayanihan Society,” Abrazaldo explains. He further emphasizes that at Allianz they believe that life would be better if people had more courage than fear. “There is no better time to agree that we need more courage, to experience that there is more to life than what we were thought of to just be content and not aspire for something better,” he adds. Allianz is the Filipinos’ partner in finding that courage, he says. “Our customers and prospects want to have an insurance which supports them, backs them up, which helps them to live their life to the fullest – and does not scare them or stop them from doing what they want to do. Each one of us has the capacity and the capability to explore life. With the coverage that we provide our clients, they do not need to be alone in exploring life.”  - RELEASE.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 11th, 2018

Feeling annoyed about noise pollution could increase risk of heart flutter

New European research has found that exposure to annoying levels of noise could increase the risk of atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm irregularity also known as heart flutter which can lead to stroke, heart failure and other serious health conditions. Carried out by researchers from the Department of Cardiology at the Mainz University Medical Center, Germany, the team looked at data taken from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS), one of the largest studies of its kind which has already looked at the effects of noise pollution on health. For the new research the team surveyed 15,010 men and women aged 35 to 74 taking part in the GHS, asking them how much they had been annoyed in...Keep on reading: Feeling annoyed about noise pollution could increase risk of heart flutter.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 6th, 2018

CCT, health programs benefit poor Pinoy kids

Poor Filipino children under the government’s conditional cash transfer (CCT) and health care programs now have better acess to health care, the Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS) said. In a study, the state think tank said the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) had a positive impact on these children, as it enrolled them in [...] The post CCT, health programs benefit poor Pinoy kids appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsApr 4th, 2018

Three cups of coffee a day lowers risk of clogged arteries, says study

Are you one of those who love to drink coffee, taking it three or more times a day? Well, this research may benefit you. Scientists from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil have found that drinking three cups of coffee a day can lower the risk of having clogged arteries and combat heart disease. Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association last Saturday, the study was done to evaluate the links between coffee intake and coronary artery calcium (CAC). Around 4,400 residents of Sao Paulo participated in the study, answering a food frequency questionnaire and having their CAC readings through computed tomography. Based on the gathered data, the researchers found...Keep on reading: Three cups of coffee a day lowers risk of clogged arteries, says study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 31st, 2018

International Women’s Day 2018: 5 ways women can protect their health

Thursday, March 8, marks International Women's Day, and with women at a greater risk of certain conditions than men, now is a good time for females around the world to take charge of their own health. Here are some ways women can reduce their risk of conditions like high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Maintain a healthy weight A European study published earlier this year found that although being overweight or obese increases the chance of suffering from heart disease or cancer for both sexes, the risk is even greater for women. When compared to women of normal weight, obese women were five times more likely to suffer cardiovascular disease, and 12 times ...Keep on reading: International Women’s Day 2018: 5 ways women can protect their health.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 7th, 2018