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Unique at the Shang

Unique at the Shang.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: thestandard thestandardOct 11th, 2018

Love (local) in the time of K-pop

FILIPINO fashion brand, Bench, has mastered the art of fostering nationalism while keeping up with the trends. Its mantra, “Love Local,” has a unique twist in that while Bench is a homegrown line, it has partnered with Asian superstars to beef up marketing. The formula has worked -- and continues to work -- making Bench the brand of choice in its target segments......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2019

Jordan s weight reaches farther than court in NC

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CHARLOTTE -- Unlike Mark Cuban and James Dolan, the host of the 2019 NBA All-Star Game was voted in 14 times to participate and played in 13. Quite different from Micky Arison and Glen Taylor, the team owner whose arena and city will be the center of All-Star 2019 averaged 20.2 points in those 13 All-Star appearances, was named MVP three times and posted the first triple-double in the game’s history (1997). And not at all like Steve Ballmer and Joe Lacob, the guy most often credited with making Charlotte All-Star worthy this weekend ignited the annual Slam Dunk Contest with his takeoff from the foul line in 1988. He also regularly irritated former NBA commissioner David Stern into a series of fines for golfing when he should have been sitting through mandatory Friday media sessions. With a level of celebrity as arguably the game’s greatest player ever, morphed now into an off-radar role as owner of the Charlotte Hornets, Michael Jordan remains as famous, as popular and as successful as any or all the active All-Star participants who’ll cavort at the Spectrum Center in the city’s Uptown business district. Ain’t no other NBA owner who can say that. “You think about all these wealthy, successful owners in our league,” said Hornets president Fred Whitfield, “no one knew who any of them were, really, until they bought their team. Everybody in the world knew who Michael Jordan was before he bought his team.” Jordan’s place in the All-Star galaxy in the coming days is reflective of his unique position among those who oversee the NBA’s 29 other franchises. His impact on the team, on its fans, on their city and on the state in returning to his native North Carolina -- he grew up in coastal Wilmington before attending college in Chapel Hill -- to anchor and lend stability to the Hornets will be on full display, even if he’s hard to spot this weekend. It’s all a reminder, too, of the old movie line from a remarkably blessed character, wondering “What do you do when your real life exceeds your dreams?” Most don’t dare to imagine playing in an All-Star Game, never mind hosting one as the owner of the local team. “No,” Jordan told some Charlotte reporters Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), coming forward for one of his few appearances of the week. “As a kid growing up here in North Carolina, the first thing [was] playing basketball. And then things evolved from there -- from the University of North Carolina to Chicago. Obviously you know the history from that. “[The] opportunity to represent North Carolina in an All-Star Game from a different seat is truly amazing. It tells the path that I have taken. It gives me great pleasure to give that back to the community. It’s been a long-traveled road.” The celebration of the league’s brightest stars, and the ubiquitous banners and signage devoted to it will make it even harder than usual to visibly spot signs of Jordan’s ownership of the Hornets. For a typical regular season game, you might spy a flag emblazoned with his well-known “Jumpman” logo. Occasionally he’ll watch part of the game, rarely all, from seats at the end of his team’s bench, though he’s as likely to retreat to his suite atop the arena’s lower bowl. An in-game, timeout scoreboard video meant to stoke the crowd includes shots of GM Mitch Kupchak (“Architect of Champions”) and coach James Borrego (“Elite Pedigree”) but ends right about the time you expect some dramatic silhouette of His Airness to appear. It’s as if Jordan is as protective of his brand in running the Hornets as he is in maintaining its exclusivity in the marketplace. Doesn’t matter, though. His fingerprints are all over the franchise, as a basketball team, as a business enterprise and as a member of the community. On court, Jordan trusts his team Jordan’s greatest notoriety as an owner in a basketball setting may have come in December, when he was courtside for a tense game against Detroit. Guard Jeremy Lamb drained a 22-foot jumper with 0.3 seconds left, sending reserves Malik Monk and Bismack Biyombo onto the floor in celebration of what would be a 108-107 home victory. Trouble was, that sliver of time on the clock. Too many men. The Hornets were whistled for a one-shot technical foul and Jordan impulsively smacked Monk lightly, twice, on the back of the head. Any other owner does that, the player’s agent might file a grievance with the players union. Jordan does it and, thanks to his in-the-trenches, in-the-fraternity credibility, it comes across as a goof. “A tap of endearment,” Jordan called it later in a statement. “It was like a big brother and little brother tap. No negative intent. Only love!" Said Monk: “Big, big, big brother. But it was nothing. He was just playing.” The arc of Jordan’s career and his reputation as a stone-cold competitor make it OK if he wants to vent -- or swipe -- when things don’t go the Hornets’ way. Doesn’t matter that Jordan, who will turn 56 on All-Star Sunday, is old enough to be any of his players' dad. He still carries himself like an athlete, and their frame of reference remains, “That’s Mike.” “I’ve seen kids come up through camps,” said Buzz Peterson, Charlotte’s assistant general manager under Kupchak. “You could say Julius Erving, you could say Larry Johnson, Karl Malone, whatever, and the kids’ eyes are like, ‘Who?’ But you say Michael Jordan, they’re gonna know. That’s the separation there.” Peterson is among Jordan’s closest friends -- he beat him out as North Carolina’s prep player of the year in 1981, won an NCAA title with him as a Tar Heels teammate and is described by those who know both as someone who can disagree with the boss while staying comfortably in the inner circle. For Borrego, Charlotte’s first-year coach, interviewing to run Jordan’s team could have been intimidating. “We’re all human beings -- there’s a presence that comes with ‘Michael Jordan’ when he’s around,” Borrego told NBA.com in January. “But it’s healthy. He comes with a competitive spirit that you feel. “Michael was straight with me from Day 1. When I interviewed, he said, ‘I’m going to give you space to do your job. Whatever you need, you come to me. I’ll give you the resources you need.’ He has not tried to interfere one time. I feel his full support. … We’re starting to speak each other’s language, which is pretty healthy for us now.” Jordan keeps the coach apprised of his interactions with players, Borrego said. Other coaches should have such a resource at the ready. Hornets guard and 2019 All-Star starter Kemba Walker probably has benefited most from Jordan’s counsel. They text frequently, a pinch-me arrangement to this day for Walker. “I grew up wearing Jordans, grew up wanting to be like Jordan,” Walker said recently. “So for me to get this opportunity to be on his team means the world to me. He’s the one who believed in me -- I had no idea where I was going to go on draft night and he traded up for me. I’ve always heard the story, he was the one who actually drafted me. So it’s unbelievable. “He’s such a good dude. He understands what it is to be good. His delivery is always good. Only in a positive way, honestly.” Said rookie wing Miles Bridges: “You think there’ll be a lot of pressure having MJ as an owner. I’d seen how he got on his teammates when he played. So I was nervous, thinking if I had a bad game, he’d go at me like, ‘What’re you doing?’ But after meeting him and bonding with him, I feel like he’s the coolest owner out there. I don’t feel any pressure, I feel like he wants the best for us.” Big man Frank Kaminsky typically sits at the end of the bench, which puts him cheek to cheek with Jordan when he’s courtside. “He’s talking about what he’s seeing out on the court. Talking to the refs,” Kaminsky said. “Things other players don’t necessarily see. He still thinks the game. “You see things on the court that he sees. One game, the roll, pocket-pass, skip to the corner was open. He was saying that. We made an adjustment in a timeout, but he saw it a couple plays before that. At the end of that game, we had a big play that was a roll, pocket-pass, into the corner that put the game away. It worked the way he’d seen it.” The Hornets’ struggles during Jordan’s tenure as owner wouldn’t suggest it -- the last time this organization won a playoff series (2002), Jordan still was a player -- but there is a prestige to playing for his team. It’s not unlike being welcomed onto the list of elite athletes who endorse Jordan Brand. “I’m one of the lucky ones who’s in both,” Kaminsky said. “You’re talking about the most iconic player in sports history -- I might be biased because I grew up in Chicago -- but when you have his approval, it means a lot. You have it in the back of your mind that he wants you here.” Head smack or no head smack. Jordan grows as owner, businessman Basketball is a zero-sum game and the NBA is full of stars, even if none shines quite as brightly as Jordan. But business has room for negotiation and compromise, and deals get struck daily that leave both sides happy. There, Jordan has been beyond clutch. Funnel down everything he’s accomplished -- six NBA championships, the league’s highest career scoring average (30.1), five MVP awards, six Finals MVP, 10 scoring titles, nine All-Defensive team nods -- and it invariably ends with clammy hands. The “wow” factor is real and the Hornets are extremely careful about leveraging it. “It gives our organization a certain cachet,” said Whitfield, another longtime friend who goes back more than 35 years with Jordan. “For him to be majority owner, for him to do it in his home state as a local hometown hero, and to be able to come back and not just lead the team and the rebranding from the Bobcats to the Hornets, but his commitment to the community in giving back, it’s something that’s so special.” That’s a lot to unpack. When Jordan initially signed on with the Hornets, he did so as head of its basketball operations in 2006, purchasing a small minority stake in the team. The team was bad, the business was worse and trending down. “Back in ’08-09, the economy was in the tank and I was mandated to ‘displace’ 42 of our executives here on the business side,” Whitfield said. “When Michael bought the team, we were losing $30 million a year.’ Brought back into the league in 2004 two years after the original Hornets (1988-2002) were moved to New Orleans by reviled owner George Shinn, the Charlotte expansion team was owned -- and nicknamed -- by Bob Johnson, a co-founder of the BET television network. The Bobcats excelled only at losing and were 122 games under .500 in their first five seasons. The front office was understaffed, Spectrum Center (then known as Time Warner Cable Arena) needed renovations almost from its inception and there was a real sense that, if a buyer with deep pockets and a commitment to the area weren’t found, the franchise could be moved. In March 2010, Jordan ponied up the cash to become majority owner. But it says something that the deal stands as one of the few, if ever, instances of an NBA franchise being sold at a discount. Johnson paid $300 million for the team; Jordan purchased it for $275 million. Forbes.com recently had Charlotte worth $1.25 billion -- which ranks 28th. And Jordan reportedly has one of the biggest stakes of all NBA owners, with his share estimated at upwards of 90 percent, possibly as high as 98 percent. That’s a lot of success in nine years, despite the basketball team’s mostly middling performance. “With MJ being with the team, you got instant credibility in the marketplace,” said Pete Guelli, the chief operating officer who started on the job about 10 months before Jordan took ownership. “There had been a lot of uncertainty previously, but with his brand and his resources and his commitment, that just dissipated immediately. It was much, much easier to walk in the door and tell people about our vision for this franchise.” Rebranding the team as “Hornets” gave the franchise an existential boost -- it suddenly had a history again, complete with records, archives and true alumni. The arena got a makeover and, per Guelli, is credited for events there that generate an alleged $1 billion in revenues for local businesses. “Fortunately, we’ve been profitable pretty much since [Jordan took over],” Whitfield said. “That’s huge, especially since we haven’t gotten where we want to be on the basketball side.” Closing a new kind of game now It’s hard to overstate Jordan’s added value, not so much as some corporate or financial whiz but as a presence who brought instant motivation and energy to the staff. He imported executives with whom he had developed relationships at Nike or in other ventures and, after taking early criticism for an uncertain level of involvement, has been more diligent in recent years. “I love seeing him sitting at the end of the bench encouraging his players when he attends a game” said Charles F. Bowman, Bank of America’s market president for Charlotte and North Carolina. “And as a business person what impresses me is that he has empowered his management team to focus not only on the court but also on building bridges with the community. “He had a vision for where he was taking the team and a clear plan to get there. He has hired good people, gives them latitude to make decisions and he expects them to perform. Michael is unique -- the best player ever who is determined to keep getting better year over year as an owner.” The NBA has gotten a taste of Jordan’s growth and transition at some pivotal times. This is the legendary voice of the players who, during rancorous negotiations in the 1998 lockout, countered Washington owner Abe Pollin’s gripes about losing money by telling Pollin to sell his team. By the lockout of 2011, Jordan had moved to the other side of the table. But several members of the National Basketball Players Association’s executive committee saw him not as an opponent or turncoat but as a role model: someone who had transformed himself from employee to employer at the game’s highest level. “The players understood, he had been in their shoes,” Whitfield said. “He’s not forgetting what it meant to be a player. He was in the process of learning what it meant to be an owner.” When the current collective bargaining agreement was negotiated with commissioner Adam Silver and union director Michele Roberts leading the talks, Jordan was an active, powerful voice. He is an influential member of the NBA’s labor relations and competition committees. One Charlotte insider spoke to Jordan’s clout with his fellow owners in getting this weekend’s showcase -- jeopardized by a political squabble in 2017 -- back onto the league’s short list. “There’s no All-Star Game here in Charlotte if it’s not for MJ,” the person said. Last summer in Las Vegas, Silver lauded Jordan for his ability to straddle the basketball and business worlds. “He brings unique credibility to the table when we're having discussions [with the players],” he said, “and even just among the owners, he's able to represent a player point of view… Michael can say, 'Well, look, this is how I looked at it when I was a player, and these are the kind of issues we need to address if we're going to convince players that something is in everyone's interest.’ ” Jordan’s powers of persuasion apparently have been even more impressive in Charlotte and North Carolina. The executives are careful about relying on him too often -- Jordan’s most precious commodity, now that his net worth is estimated to be upwards of $1.7 billion -- is his time. But when they need Mariano Rivera to walk in from the bullpen, he is lights out. “We’ve had corporate sponsors at a golf outing, and he’s been there, maybe stayed at one hole to tell off with everybody,” Whitfield said. Or they’ll invite certain corporate sponsors to one of a few games each season in which “Club 23” is up and running at the Spectrum Center, a private club built for such purposes. They get a chance to visit, talk with and pick Jordan’s brain on the Hornets and much more. “We’ve closed all those deals,” Whitfield said. Then there was the time a local CEO wanted to finalize a sizeable sponsorship deal with the team, and had his No. 2 invite Jordan over to their headquarters for the meetings. Whitfield told the tale: “This guy says, 'You have to come to our office. Our CEO is the man in our business.' But we’re like, 'Nah, typically, CEOs come and meet in Michael’s office or in ‘Club 23’ over here.' He said no, that wasn’t going to work for them. “So Pete Guelli said, 'Let’s make a deal: We’ll take your CEO and drop him off in Beijing. And we’ll drop off Michael in Beijing. Then we’ll see who more people gravitate to. Whoever gets the least people, he has to come to the other guy’s office.'” Point made. Point taken. Said Whitfield: “The guy says, ‘You know what, I got it. We’ll be over 10 o’clock Friday morning.’” A community he calls home The Michael Jordan who once seemed determined to float above cultural and political frays as the most prudent way to serve commerce has not held back in recent years from making his presence felt. He has been more philanthropist than activist and, let’s face it, in times of the most dire need, cash beats talk every time. Charity and investing in the community can be good for business, sure. Making that a priority after Guelli’s arrival and Jordan’s purchase helped the Hornets build bridges with fans and merchants that Shinn and the original franchise’s departure had torched. More than that, though, giving back for Jordan and his team at this point in his life was the right thing to do. And do, and do, and do. The list of charitable and civic efforts Jordan and the Hornets have undertaken is long, with few outside the region or state aware of most of it. Among the highlights: - Donating $2 million to relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Florence, particularly meaningful because of the damage it did in Jordan’s hometown of Wilmington. - Dedicated $7 million in partnership with Novant Health to fund two Michael Jordan Family Clinics, set to open in Charlotte in 2020. - Serving as Make-A-Wish’s Chief Wish Ambassador since 2008, while donating more than $5 million to the organization. His relationship with Make-A-Wish began more than 30 years ago. - Contributing $5 million as a founding donor of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. - Addressing the issue of police shootings and community policing in 2016 by donating $1 million each to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. After the hurricane in September devastated so many homes and businesses in and near Jordan’s roots, he wanted to do more than to stroke a fat check. In a meeting covered by The Associated Press, he met with Stephanie Parker and her family, including four young children, after they lost their apartment in two feet of flooding. A call from the director of the Cape Fear chapter of the Red Cross brought them together. The meeting took place at a Lowe’s home improvement store. “I look around the corner, and it’s Michael Jordan. ‘Oh my God!’" Parker said. “I look at my kids, ‘It’s Michael Jordan!’ I’m not going to lie, some tears came in my eyes, because the first thing that went through my mind was when I was younger, his last game when he was on the Chicago Bulls team, and that flashback just came right in my mind.” Afterward, Jordan was coaxed by the Charlotte Observer to talk about why that disaster resonated so deeply for him. “You gotta take care of home,” he said. “Wilmington truly is my home. Kept thinking about all those places I grew up going to … You don’t want to see any of that anywhere, but when it’s home, that’s tough to swallow.” There’s basketball, there’s business and then there’s real life, which sometimes intrudes in the most desperate ways. “We didn’t know how many people in our community were hungry,” Whitfield said. “There are people in dire need, and it’s special to have that hometown hero have in his heart that ‘This is where I can help.’ “It gives not only him as a person but our organization a platform to really speak out. That commitment is what has made him a special owner, and why he’s even more beloved in our community.” Winning title No. 7 drives Jordan now To date, Jordan’s greatest achievements have come elsewhere, at least since his baseline shot as a freshman propelled North Carolina to the 1982 NCAA championship. Those Bulls championships, the “Dream Team” magnificence, his partnership with that sneaker company in Beaverton, Ore., his Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction, shooting “Space Jam,” all of it -- his legacy has been crafted with others, for others, mostly far from home. (For the record, Jordan, his wife Yvette and their two daughters own a mansion outside Charlotte and an estate in south Florida). “Look, this has always been home for him,” Whitfield said. “Even though he was drafted by Chicago, WGN became a very popular station. And he just continued to elevate, so people in this state were proud to say, even though he’s a Bull, we love him. When the Bulls would come here and play at the old Coliseum, these fans who were avid Hornets fans were all pulling for Michael Jordan. “He’d score, they’d cheer loudly. The Hornets would score, they’d cheer loudly. North Carolina always felt like he was their native son who went off and achieved greatness.” Coming back first to head the franchise’s basketball operations and then as owner, Jordan’s role -- in light of the modest results on the court -- has been custodial. Yes, the club’s improved financial stability is important. But for this driven winner and NBA owner unlike all others, custodial isn’t going to cut it for long. “He did an interview with Cigar Aficionado magazine a while back,” Peterson said, “and the question was asked, ‘What would you like to do?’ And he said, ‘Win a seventh championship. Win as an owner.’ So for me, every day, I’m thinking, here’s a close friend and you want to make your friends happy, right? So each day I think, do the best you can to reach this goal for him.” Said Hornets wing Nicolas Batum: “I understand. He wants to win. He wants to compete since he was born.” It hasn’t been for lack of trying, although Jordan has made sure to keep fiscal responsibility high on every agenda. The team’s payroll for 2018-19 is approximately $122.3 million, which ranks near the middle of the NBA pack. “That Michael Jordan is one cheap dude,” said an impassioned cab driver on a recent airport run. “He’s only going to spend so much and the players they get shows it.” The Hornets never have spent into the league’s luxury-tax, and if Walker is retained when he hits free agency this summer, he’ll likely become the first Charlotte player to sign a full maximum-salary contract (though the five-year, $120 million deal Batum landed in 2016 came awfully close). Injuries and dubious moves have taken a toll, a situation that Kupchak, Borrego and their staffs have been tasked with fixing. Jordan, by all accounts, is engaged yet patient, with a playoff berth and potentially a record above .500 within reach. “I’m sure he feels like,” Whitfield said, “if he were still 30 years old and could lace ‘em up and get out there, he’d help us get over the hump. I think he would cherish it as much or more than the first six. Because I think he realizes how hard it is to get it done. “But it doesn’t bother us if the fans see his frustration sitting next to our bench. It’s important to us that they see he’s not only invested, he’s vested in what our team is trying to do. They can relate to him because they’re feeling that same frustration.” Jordan is theirs again and that’s what matters. For basketball, for business, for community and in time, just maybe, in championship. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2019

Liam Neeson on a Vengeance Spree Against Influential Drug Cartel in “Cold Pursuit”

Vengeance knows no boundaries, Liam Neeson’s latest action thriller “Cold Pursuit” bleeds the drug cartel dry as the man known with a unique set of skills takes on the role of Nels Coxman, a snowplough driver whose only son was murdered by a powerful drug cartel in their town. This twisted revenge story swirls around […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2019

Mixed Up: Being half Filipino makes me a more palatable black woman - Metro News

Mixed Up: 'Being half Filipino makes me a more palatable black woman' Metro.co.uk Welcome to Mixed Up, a series looking at the highs, lows and unique experiences of being mixed-race. Mixed-ra.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2019

Get your child into sports this 2019!

MILO Philippines is getting ready to kick off the break with the launch of the 2019 MILO Summer Sports Clinics, held Thursday, February 7th at the MILO Stadium in KidZania, BGC.  The yearly program, which is on its 36th installment, continues to encourage children to participate in various sporting activities throughout the summer vacation.  With the campaign's thrust of "Get Your Child into Sports", the Sports Clinics aim to strengthen and highlight the importance of sports in the holistic development of today's youth.  "Getting children involved in sports would be a more enjoyable and productive way to healthy living," said MILO Philippines Business Unit Manager Willy De Ocampo. "We believe that physical and social development lay the foundation for a child's growth, which is why our MILO Summer Sports Clinics teachers children the fundamentals of various sports in a unique and scientific way and helps them develop character-forming values."  In 2019, MILO makes the Summer Sports Clinics more available to a wider scope of young aspiring athletes, as they continue to expand in the Visayas and Mindanao regions.  Beginning late March, the clinics will commence in over 700 venues which will be accessible to more than 30,000 children nationwide.  This year will also mark the addition of new sports such as Arnis, Ultimate Frisbee, and Wushu, strengthening the already wide offering of sports, which includes Basketball, Volleyball, Badminton, Chess, Fencing, Football, Futsal, Karatedo, Taekwondo, Swimming, and many others. Aiding in the development and progress of the participatign children are experienced mentors coaches, and instructors who have proven their abilities on the international stage and have excelled in the highest level such as the Southeast Asian Games and the Olympics.  Among those notable figures who have gone through the MILO Summer Clinics are PBA star and BEST Center Graduate Chris Tiu, SEA Games medalist and Taekwondo clinic graduate Japoy Lizardo, and SEAG Games gold medalist Kaitlyn De Guzman, who is an alumni of the Gymnastics clinic.  "We look forward to nurture more children to be champions, not just as athletes, but also as individuals," expressed MILO Sports Executive Luigi Pumaren. "We encourage parents to introduce their kids to a fun, active, and healthy lifestyle and make their summer worthwhile with the MILO Summer Sports Clinics."   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2019

OPINION: Davao City’s Bulk Water Project by Jun Ledesma

DAVAO CITY is providentially endowed with great and unique resources: fertile soil, rivers and streams, forest reserves where lies the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2019

Pope arrives in the UAE

Pope Francis landed on Sunday in Abu Dhabi on the first-ever papal trip to the Arabian Peninsula, where he is seeking to turn a page in Christian-Muslim relations while also ministering to a unique, thriving Catholic community. Abu Dhabi’s powerful crown prince, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, greeted the pontiff at the airport with […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2019

Pope embarks on historic UAE visit

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis is seeking to turn a page in Christian-Muslim relations while also ministering to a unique, thriving island of Catholicism as he embarks on the first-ever papal trip to the Arabian peninsula, the birthplace of Islam. While Francis is building on two of his priorities with his Sunday-Tuesday visit to the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsFeb 3rd, 2019

Trust the Priority for Facebook With Earnings Due

Winning back trust is seen as the key priority for Facebook as the world's biggest social network readies its financial update on the final months of 2018 Wednesday. Facebook is looking to rebound from a horrific year marked by a series of scandals over data protection and privacy, and concerns that it had been manipulated by foreign interests for political purposes. Facebook so far has been able to keep revenue momentum thanks to its unique advertising model. Its global user base has risen to more than 2.2 billion, although growth has stalled in North America and Europe. In the quarter that ended in September, Facebook saw a profit of $5.14 billion on revenue that leaped 33 per...Keep on reading: Trust the Priority for Facebook With Earnings Due.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 1st, 2019

Lillard s latest shoe to show unique chapters in his life

The unique chapters in the life of Portland Trailblazers guard Damian Lillard will be on display through his fifth shoe, the adidas Dame 5. The Dame 5 is designed for ultimate control, focused on comfort, stability and traction. And just as Dame controls the court, he is the Master of Ceremonies in his game, life and world. Dame is a captain, leader, brother, father and emcee. The Dame 5 represents these unique pieces of his life, creating a collage of who Dame is both on and off the court. Dame’s latest signature features full-length Bounce cushioning and a lateral banking barrier for on-court stability. The upper is designed with lightweight materials, a padded collar and internal pod system for comfort and support. The silhouette is also constructed with a zonal herringbone traction pattern for enhanced grip and energetic color palettes. Below are some of the different colorways. People’s Champ (Feb. 1): Celebrating Dame’s passion for boxing, People’s Champ pulls on both classic boxing elements and Rip City for color inspiration.  All Skate (Feb. 1): Growing up in Oakland, everybody skated. All Skate takes a different spin on skate culture and one of Dame’s favorite off-court hobbies. YKWTII (Feb. 1): Dame Time. Lillard Time. No matter the label, You Know What Time It Is. YKWTII pays homage to one of the league’s most clutch scorers and his infamous celebration. Suga Gee (March 1): Honoring Dame’s mom Gina aka Suga Gee with one of her favorite colors DameGoose (April 5): Inspired by his favorite childhood bike, DameGoose features unique colors from the one that almost got away. “Somebody stole that bike, and I went searching. We went around the neighborhood and found it. You ain’t keeping this one. That’s ours.” La Heem, The Dream (May 3): Designed with black and gold accents, the colorway features “La Heem” and “The Dream” along the heel and outsole. “La Heem is my alter ego. It’s a Muslim word, but it just started cause my cousin would always say La Heem. It [represents] the best of the best. It’s a Muslim word that means to be ahead of or to be passing. It’s kind of [become] my thing. It’s like everything else I do, I’m La Heem.” Dame 5 (Php 6,000) will be available beginning February 1 at adidas.com, with additional colorways dropping throughout 2019. Follow the conversation @adidasph or @adidashoops on Twitter and Instagram with #Dame5.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 31st, 2019

10 BeiDou satellites up by 2019

BEIJING — China will send 10 satellites to join the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) through seven separate launches this year, the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) announced Tuesday. The launches will help complete the BDS global network by 2020, said Shang Zhi, director of the Space Department of the CASC, at a […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJan 31st, 2019

Matthew Slater carries proud family football tradition

By Barry Wilner, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Matthew Slater is more than halfway to his father's longevity as an NFL player. He doesn't plan to equal it. The star special teamer of the New England Patriots just completed his 11th pro season, and he's at his fifth Super Bowl, with two wins. In his dad Jackie's 20-season NFL career, he made one Super Bowl — coincidentally, with the Rams in 1980 — and lost to Pittsburgh. "That's a long time to do anything," Matthew Slater said Tuesday. As for the New England kick coverage ace lasting so long, he added with a laugh: "Absolutely not." Of course, when your team becomes a regular visitor to the Super Bowl, it lengthens the season by more than a month. No one in the NFL would want to pass on that, but in reality Slater has played nearly 12 seasons, making All-Pro in 2016 and being voted to seven Pro Bowls. Not bad for someone whose Hall of Fame father didn't necessarily want Matthew to play football. "He felt that way for two reasons," Matthew Slater says. "First, he didn't want me to feel the pressure of living up to his name. He thought the expectations could be unfair. "He also wanted me to avoid injury. He knew the toll it takes on you physically." Matthew and his brother played plenty of sports, and guess who usually was the coach. Yep, Jackie. "Sports have always been a big part of my life and have so many life lessons from being on a team, and the disciplines of preparing to compete and how you compete, and having teammates around you. I thought they were good lessons to learn," Jackie Slater said. "I discouraged them to play football. I didn't think (Matthew) would be big enough to play football. I coached in basketball, soccer, track and field, even some flag football. I didn't see football as something that he would excel. But when he played flag, he had good speed and he caught the ball and ran well." Matthew kept improving in high school and grew, though not to Jackie's offensive tackle measurements. Because Jackie was unfamiliar with the kind of skills his son possessed, he turned to teammates Ron Brown — a 1984 Olympic champion speedster, who played wideout and returned kicks — and outstanding cornerback LeRoy Irvin. Brown refined Matthew's technique and speed, and Irvin worked with him on back-pedaling and breaks for receivers. "Things I was not familiar with," says Jackie, who recalled watching Matthew leave everyone behind in a 100-meter race, only to have Brown say "he did everything wrong. "I knew I needed to get out of the way." Not really. Matthew, now 33, credits pretty much everything he has achieved in football to his father, who entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2001. "He made every effort to be present," the son says. "That's what I appreciate the most: He was a father first. So many young kids ... many black kids ... I see they don't have a presence like that. "Anytime I have success, certainly my dad is sharing in it. It all goes back to my dad; I wouldn't be playing this game without him. It's pretty unique, a son being able to do something his dad did. We are enjoying this ride together." For sure. But on Sunday, well, Jackie admits to being a bit torn when the Rams — his team — take on the Patriots — Matthew's team. You see, Jackie Slater still has plenty of millennium blue and new century gold running through his veins. "This is a win-win situation for me," the elder Slater notes. "If my son loses, it's not as if he hasn't experienced the thrill of victory in a Super Bowl, something I never did. And if he loses, it hurts, but he has a great attitude about it. It helps me live with the defeats he has. "If the Rams win, I will be happy because I have been pulling for this team for more than 40 years. My first hero in the game was Tom Mack, who I actually played with for three years. "You know, he has an unbelievable opportunity to experience things I never did. I don't know what it is like to win the Super Bowl beyond the joy my son had when he won on two occasions. That's almost as good as me winning, I felt.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 30th, 2019

Leganes Highlights Long-Standing Religious Tradition Through Saad Festival

Text and photos by: Bombette G. Marin LEGANES, Iloilo plays host to one of the unique religious celebrations in Iloilo. The celebration of Saad Festival, is an important religious festival for the province every year. Celebrated this year on January 23-31, the festival highlights the cultural dance presentation on January 31, a Thursday at 4:30 p.m. […] The post Leganes Highlights Long-Standing Religious Tradition Through Saad Festival appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJan 28th, 2019

HIRINUGYAW-SUGUIDANUNAY: Keeping Calinog’s Culture Alive and Relevant

Text and photos by: Bombette G. Marin CALINOG, ILOILO is one of the municipalities that is well known for its unique annual festival celebration. The annual Hirinugyaw-Suguidanonay Festival celebrated this year on January 25 – Feb 3, 2019 celebrates the legendary epic of Hinilawod where the indigenous culture of Panay Bukidnons or the Sulodnons are brought […] The post HIRINUGYAW-SUGUIDANUNAY: Keeping Calinog’s Culture Alive and Relevant appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJan 28th, 2019

Office 365 now available for download from Mac App Store

Better late than never. Apple has at last announced that Office 365 will now be available from the Mac App Store. Apple computer users will now be able to take full advantage of the Microsoft office suite without having to buy it in a box. The entire suite of Microsoft's popular office applications, namely Word, Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote, will now be available for download and installation on Mac computers. All of the new software has been specifically designed to support features that are unique to the Mac experience; features like Dark Mode and Continuity Camera in macOS, as well as the MacBook Pro Touch Bar. From now on, Office 365 will thus be available for Mac, i...Keep on reading: Office 365 now available for download from Mac App Store.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 27th, 2019

Versatile forward Lamar Odom sees self in Warriors Draymond Green | Inquirer Sports

MANILA, PhilippinesLamar Odom no doubt is one of the better forwards of his era. The 6-foot-9 forward is one of the most versatile players and he used his unique skill set to being named the Sixth Man.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJan 26th, 2019

This Heartwarming Story Between A Blind Dog And His Best Friend Will Make Your Day

We are very sad to announce that the beloved CARA Welfare Philippines Ambassadog Ginger has crossed the rainbow bridge. She was 13 years old. Together with her soul sibling Kimchi, she has given us much joy and inspiration over the years. Theirs is a unique story. Kimchi was blind when she was rescued. Ginger immediately… link: This Heartwarming Story Between A Blind Dog And His Best Friend Will Make Your Day.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJan 26th, 2019

Tabo Sa Iodine-Rich Food to Highlight 2019 Gaw Celeb

Highlighting the Goiter Awareness Week (GAW) celebration in Central Visayas is a unique food bazaar dubbed “Tabo sa Iodine-rich Food” that will feature foods rich in iodine abundant in select barangays in the region. The Tabo will be held on Friday, 25 January 2019 between 8:00 – 11:00 A.M at the Lapu-Lapu City Sports Complex, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJan 26th, 2019

NaFFAA cheers naming of 2 Fil-Ams to White House advisory body

WASHINGTON, DC-- The National Federation of Filipino American Associations (NaFFAA) commended President Donald Trump on the appointmentof two prominent Filipino Americans to the President's Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs): Utah Attorney General Sean D. Reyes and Herman Martir of Texas.   "We are proud that President Trump has selected two exceptional Filipino American leaders to represent our vibrant community on his AAPI Advisory Commission," said NaFFAA National Chairman Brendan Flores. "Attorney General Reyes and Pastor Martir are dynamic leaders of our community, equipped with a unique understanding of the issues and policies tha...Keep on reading: NaFFAA cheers naming of 2 Fil-Ams to White House advisory body.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 23rd, 2019

CLAPCLAPCLAP! finds IV of Spades battling anxiety and identity

Having experienced enormous success after the release of just a handful of songs, pop rock band IV of Spades faces the unique challenge of risking a sophomore slump with their debut album. The trio (composed of vocalist and bassist Zild Benitez, guitarist Blaster Silonga, and drummer Badjao de Castro) has ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 22nd, 2019