Advertisements


Underprivileged kids from Marawi, Metro Manila, and Batangas participate in Real Madrid-sponsored camp

The two-day YKK Asia Group Kids Football Clinic came to a close last Sunday with 300 underprivileged kids getting the rare opportunity to learn football the Real Madrid way at the McKinley Hill Stadium in Taguig City. Two kids from previously war-torn Marawi City were among those who experienced the world-class football training from coaches of the most multi-titled La Liga team in history with 33 Championship titles to its name.  Children from Gawad Kalinga communities were first to undergo the clinics on Saturday, followed by children from lakeshore communities in Batangas on Sunday morning.  Homeless children who live and sleep on streets and places like Luneta and the Bonifacio Monument in Caloocan, and are cared for by Child Hope Asia Philippines had their own exhilarating football experience in the afternoon. Mohammed Faried Anganto and Alintor Bangote were brought by their coach, Espiridion Paran under the auspices of Gawad Kalinga. “Football was one way for the kids to cope and transcend the experience of the past,” said their coach.  “It was special for them to experience the YKK Football Clinic conducted by Real Madrid coaches because they learned new skills and trained with professional football gear. They’re used to playing with makeshift equipment, using tennis balls and playing barefoot,” he added. Real Madrid Foundation coaches Pablo Gomez Revenga, Santiago Sanchez Martin and Hector Vicente were assisted by 30 local coaches who shared and demonstrated world-class training methodologies and training techniques throughout the sessions. The Real Madrid Foundation coaches also promoted values through sports and education, teaching the kids about commitment, responsibility and teamwork, all while having fun.  All participants in the kids clinic received a full set of YKK/Real Madrid Foundation football kits, which include football boots, cap and socks. Everyone received a certificate at the end of the session. The Most Valuable Participants in the morning and afternoon sessions received Real Madrid t-shirts and bags......»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnJun 25th, 2018

YKK Asia kids boot camp under way

Cristiano Ronaldo-wannabes from the underprivileged sector get a taste of learning and playing football the Real Madrid way with the staging of the YKK Asia Group Kids Football Clinic beginning today at McKinley Stadium in Taguig......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2018

Meet the 2018 batch of Jr. NBA PH All-Stars

Jr. NBA PH press release PASAY CITY, METRO MANILA – Eight boys and eight girls were named as Jr. NBA Philippines All-Stars from a total of 74 participants during the Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska National Training Camp to become the eleventh batch of Jr. NBA All-Stars. Headlined by Sacramento Kings center Willie Cauley-Stein and WNBA Hall of Famer Sheryl Swoopes, the National Training Camp was held at the Gatorade Hoops Center on May 18, at Don Bosco Technical Institute on May 19 and SM Mall of Asia Music Hall on May 20. The National Training Camp players were the top performers in Regional Selection Camps in Bacolod, Baguio, Butuan, Metro Manila and Alaska Power Camp, which were led by Jr. NBA Coaches Carlos Barroca and Rob Newson, together with Alaska coaches led by PBA Legend Jeffrey Cariaso. Jr. NBA alumni were in attendance throughout the camp with Thirdy Ravena and Ricci Rivero visiting the Gatorade Hoops Center and Kai Sotto and Rhayyan Amsali highlighting the participants of the Jr. NBA Alumni All-Star Game in SM Mall of Asia. The Jr. NBA All-Stars showcased skills on the court and exemplified the Jr. NBA core S.T.A.R. Values of Sportsmanship, Teamwork, a positive Attitude, and Respect. Prince Ray Alao, 14, of San Beda University; Ethan Rod Alian, 14, of La Salle Greenhills; John Lester Amagan, 14, of St. Robert’s International Academy of Iloilo; Seven Gagate, 14, of Chiang Kai Shek College; Nathan Jan Jundana, 14, of Bacolod Tay Tung; Christian Joi Mesias, 14, of Jose Maria College of Davao; Kim Aaron Tamayo, 13, of National University; and Rhon Khaniel Telles, 13, of St. Anthony de Carmelli Academy of Cavite topped the boys division, while Madelyn Flores, 14, of Bukidnon National High School; Gin Kayla Huelar, 13, of St. La Salle University, Bacolod; Aishe Solis, 13, of Corpus Christi School in Cagayan De Oro; Pauline Angelique Valle, 13, of Misamis Oriental General Comprehensive High School; Christine Nichole Venterez, 12, Baguio City National High School; Marielle Vingno, 14, of Escuela de Sophia of Caloocan Inc.; Amber Esquivel, 14, and Kyla Marie Mataga, 13, of De La Salle Zobel were the outstanding performers in the girls’ division. Pauline Angelique Valle and Prince Ray Alao were named this year’s Jr. NBA Most Valuable Players while Marielle Vingno and Ethan Rod Alian were selected as Alaska Ambassadors. Hazel Yambot of Baguio and Mark “Tata” Belangel of Bacolod were chosen as the Coaches of the Year. In addition, special awards were handed out to Kayla Marie Mataga and Javier Louis Jugo as Gatorade Hustle awardees, Merylle Cuasay and Czarlo Salvador as Panasonic Rising Stars, and Aishe Solis and Kim Aaron Tamayo, Cloudfone Awesome Players of the Game. “The Jr. NBA program gives us the opportunity to contribute to our goal of getting more kids to play the game of basketball and help them understand how working hard on their craft can open doors and unlock greater opportunities in life,” said Hall of Famer Sheryl Swoopes.  “I came here to inspire you but your passion and eagerness to learn inspire me and I’m so grateful for that,” shared Sacramento Kings center Willie Cauley-Stein to the campers. An NBA experience trip in Shanghai, China awaits the All-Stars in October where they will be joined by other Jr. NBA All-Stars from Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam in training and friendly competitions as they catch the NBA China Games 2018 featuring the Philadelphia 76ers and the Dallas Mavericks. Jr. NBA Philippines presented by Alaska, the league’s global youth basketball participation program for boys and girls, continues to promote proper nutrition and an active lifestyle, serving as an effective platform in implementing Alaska Milk’s NUTRITION.ACTION.CHAMPION. program that helps address the issue of overweight and undernourished children in the country. AXA, Cloudfone, Gatorade, Globe Telecom and Panasonic serve as Official Partners of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines, while Spalding is a Supporting Partner. ABS-CBN Sports + Action, Basketball TV and NBA Premium TV are the Official NBA Broadcasters of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines. Fans can also follow Jr. NBA at www.jrnba.asia/philippines and on Facebook. For all the latest news and updates on the NBA, visit www.nba.com and follow the league on Facebook and Twitter. To learn more about the Alaska Milk Corporation, visit www.alaskamilk.com and follow PlayPH at www.playph.com and on Facebook and Twitter......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 21st, 2018

Drug war tallies 87 fallen heroes

FOR Police Officer 2 Juan dela Cruz (not his real name), kissing his wife and two kids and bidding them goodbye each time he leaves their rented apartment has been a ritual since he became a member of a drug enforcement unit of a police station in Metro Manila.“One foot….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsApr 3rd, 2018

3rd Jr. NBA PH 2018 selection camp slated for Benguet

Jr. NBA PH press release Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska goes north for its third Regional Selection Camp of the year. Young cagers ages 10-14 years old from northern provinces and interested participants outside the region are invited to attend the camp on March 17-18 at the Benguet State University in La Trinidad, Benguet from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Boys and girls born 2004-2008 are encouraged to participate in the league’s global youth basketball participation program to learn the fundamental basketball skills set and the Jr. NBA S.T.A.R values of Sportsmanship, Teamwork, a positive Attitude and Respect. Managing the Regional Selection Camp will be Jr. NBA Coaches Carlos Barroca and Rob Newson together with Jr. NBA coaches from presenting partner Alaska led by PBA Legends Jeffrey Carriaso and Tony de la Cruz. Registration and participation are free. The first day will see participants being measured against a series of vitals tests and skills challenges that will determine their inclusion in the following day to undergo advanced basketball drills and team exercises.  On the second day, the remaining players will immerse in drills and showcase team and individual skills in the scrimmages. The camp’s top performers will be given the opportunity to represent Northern Luzon in the National Training Camp in Manila on May 18-20. The Jr. NBA National Training Camp will select the most outstanding eight boys and eight girls as Jr. NBA All-Stars from the Regional Selection Camps, with the fourth and final camp set for Metro Manila on April 7-8 at the Don Bosco Technical Institute in Makati. The Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 All-Stars will embark on a unique, overseas NBA experience with fellow Jr. NBA All-Stars from Southeast Asia later in the year. Qualified boys and girls can still register at www.jrnba.asia where the program terms and conditions can be found. Fans can also follow Jr. NBA on Facebook, the NBA at www.nba.com and on Facebook and Twitter. To learn more about the Alaska Milk Corporation, visit www.alaskamilk.com and follow PlayPH at www.playph.com and on Facebook and Twitter......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 13th, 2018

Jr. NBA PH sends 11 from Agusan selection camp to Manila

Jr. NBA PH press release A record-breaking 1,505 young basketball players across Mindanao welcomed the Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska at Fr. Saturnino Urios University in Butuan City on Feb. 24-25. Boys and girls from Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Bukidnon, Davao, Sarangani and other cities and provinces in Mindanao, including young Higa-onon, Manobo and Banwaon players, participated in the first-ever Jr. NBA Regional Selection Camp in Butuan City, Agusan Del Norte. 11 aspirants got the nod from Jr. NBA Coaches Rob Newson and Jeffrey Cariaso as they excelled in two days’ worth of intense basketball training and scrimmages. They also exemplified the Jr. NBA core S.T.A.R. values of Sportsmanship, Teamwork, a positive Attitude and Respect throughout the camp. Traveling to Manila for the National Training Camp on May 18-20 are Richard Carvero III, 13, and Paolo Matthew Kho, 13, of Corpus Christi School; Christian Joi Mesias, 14, of Jose Maria College; Zhan Paolo Moreno, 13, of Xavier University; Michael John Sarmiento, 13, of Father Saturnino Urios University; Klein Tyrone Tagotongan, 13, of St. Mary’s School; and Vince Uchi, 14, of Alabel National Science Highschool for the boys division and Madelyn Flores, 14, of Bukidnon National Highschool; Aishe Solis, 13, of Corpus Christi School; Mikylla Taborada, 13, of Kauswagan National Highschool; and Pauline Angelique Valle, 13, of Misamis Oriental General Comprehensive Highschool for the girls division. “There’s a lot of talent here. We were really impressed with at least three of the kids who were selected that we really feel have the natural ability to make it until the end. The kids love the game. They worked really hard and I’m excited to see them in Manila,” said Coach Newson. Boys and girls aged 10-14 who want to join the NBA’s free youth basketball program can still participate in the two remaining Regional Selection Camps in Baguio on March 17-18 and Manila on April 21-22. Interested participants can still register online at www.jrnba.asia, where the program terms and conditions can be found. For more information, fans can follow Jr. NBA on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jrnbaphilippines and Twitter at www.twitter.com/nba_philippnes. For all things NBA, fans can visit www.nba.com, like the NBA on Facebook at www.facebook.com/philsnba and follow www.twitter.com/nba_philippines on Twitter. To learn more about the Alaska Milk Corporation, visit www.alaskamilk.com and www.playph.com......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 26th, 2018

Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 to engange Pinoy youth and coaches nationwide

Jr. NBA PH press release MANILA, PHILIPPINES, Dec. 23, 2017 – Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska will tip off Jan. 13 at Don Bosco Technical Institute in Makati and runs through May 2018 as part of the league’s effort to encourage youth basketball participation. This year’s program is set to reach more than 250,000 participants and 900 coaches across the country.  Online registration is open now at www.jrnba.asia/philippines. Jr. NBA, the league’s global youth basketball participation program for boys and girls, teaches the fundamental skills and core values of the game at the grassroots level in an effort to enhance the youth basketball experience for players, parents and coaches.  During the 2017-18 season, the NBA will reach more than 26 million youth in 71 countries through a variety of camps, clinics, skills challenges, league play and outreach events.   The program remains free and open to boys and girls ages 10-14 throughout its four stages: skills clinics in schools and communities, Regional Selection Camps, a National Training Camp and an NBA experience trip.  Since its launch in 2007, Jr. NBA clinics have been implemented in 110 cities and municipalities across the country and the 2018 program will return to key provinces including Agusan Del Norte, Batangas, Benguet, Cavite, Misamis Oriental, and Negros Occidental.  Regional Selection Camps will be held in Bacolod (Feb. 10-11), Butuan (Feb. 24-25), Baguio (March 17-18) and Metro Manila (April 7-8), with the top 37 boys and 37 girls advancing for the National Training Camp in Manila in May 2018, which will feature an NBA and WNBA player or legend.  The program will culminate with the selection of 16 Jr. NBA All-Stars, comprised of eight boys and eight girls, who will embark on an overseas NBA experience trip with fellow Jr. NBA All-Stars from Southeast Asia.  Prior editions of the Jr. NBA Philippines program have featured notable alumni including Aljon Mariano, Kobe Paras, Kiefer and Thirdy Ravena, Ricci Rivero, and Kai Sotto.  “For the past 10 years, Jr.  NBA Philippines has established itself as a platform to improve the youth basketball experience and promote an active and healthy lifestyle among the Filipino youth,” said NBA Philippines Managing Director Carlo Singson.  “Together with Alaska, we are committed to providing proper guidelines to how the game should be played and taught to more youth, coaches and parents in the country.” “As part of our long-standing partnership with the NBA, Alaska Milk Corporation is proud to play an active role in shaping the basketball players of tomorrow through good nutrition and proper life values,” said Alaska Milk Corporation Marketing Director Blen Fernando.  “We look forward to making a lasting impact on the lives of aspiring athletes on and off the court through the Jr. NBA program.” The 2018 edition of Jr. NBA Philippines will also include the Jr. NBA Coach of the Year program, led by Jr. NBA Head Coaches Carlos Barroca and Alaska Power Camp Coach Jeff Cariaso, to provide training for 14 Jr. NBA coaches during the National Training Camp, with two Jr. NBA Coaches of the Year awarded with an NBA experience trip.   Jr. NBA Philippines furthers the mission of Alaska Milk’s NUTRITION.ACTION.CHAMPION. program that highlights the nutritional benefits of milk, encourages physical activity through play, and instills values that are essential to becoming a champion.   AXA, CloudFone, Gatorade and Panasonic serve as Official Partners of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines, while Spalding is a Supporting Partner.  ABS-CBN Sports + Action, Basketball TV and NBA Premium TV are the Official NBA Broadcasters of the Jr. NBA in the Philippines.  Coaches and participants can now register the Jr. NBA program online at www.jrnba.asia/philippines, where the program terms and conditions can be found.  Fans can also follow Jr. NBA on Facebook and the NBA at www.nba.com and on Facebook and Twitter. To learn more about the Alaska Milk Corporation, visit www.alaskamilk.com and follow PlayPH at www.playph.com and on Facebook and Twitter. About the NBA The NBA is a global sports and media business built around four professional sports leagues: the National Basketball Association, the Women’s National Basketball Association, the NBA G League and the NBA 2K League, set to launch in May 2018.  The NBA has established a major international presence with games and programming in 215 countries and territories in 50 languages, and merchandise for sale in more than 125,000 stores in 100 countries on six continents.  NBA rosters at the start of the 2017-18 season featured 108 international players from a record 42 countries and territories.  NBA Digital’s assets include NBA TV, NBA.com, the NBA App and NBA League Pass.  The NBA has created one of the largest social media communities in the world, with 1.4 billion likes and followers globally across all league, team, and player platforms.  Through NBA Cares, the league addresses important social issues by working with internationally recognized youth-serving organizations that support education, youth and family development, and health-related causes. About Alaska Milk According to the 8th National Survey of FNRI and DOH (as of 2013), obesity is one of the most prevalent nutritional problems of Filipino children and adults, with about 5 out of 100 Filipino children being classified as overweight. Obesity can lead to different health problems like heart diseases and even diabetes at a young age, which could lead to serious health, economic and social implications later on in life. In line with Alaska Milk’s mission to bring affordable nutrition and a love of active play to every Filipino household, powering the Jr. NBA is a major part of Alaska’s “NUTRITION. ACTION. CHAMPION.” initiative. By highlighting milk’s nutritional benefits and encouraging children to go out and play, Alaska consistently works to instill the values Determination, Hard Work, Teamwork, Discipline and Sportsmanship in tomorrow’s champions......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 23rd, 2017

Indonesian terrorist nabbed in Marawi detained in Camp Crame

MANILA, Philippines (UPDATED) – Alleged Indonesian terrorist Muhammad Ilham Syahputra will be detained in Camp Crame, Quezon City. This was announced by Philippine National Police (PNP) deputy spokesperson Superintendent Chai Madrid on Thursday, November 2. According to Madrid, he was brought the previous night and is undergoing "documentation" at the PNP's ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2017

Champions On and Off the Pitch: Milo, FC Barcelona train young footballers in Road to Barcelona Camp

div> MANILA, Philippines, 20 September 2017 – Inspired by MILO and FC Barcelona’s (FCB) shared values of humility, effort, ambition, respect, and teamwork, over 140 kids participated in the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Camp last September 2 to 3 at the Mckinley Hill Stadium in Taguig. The weekend training saw young footballers from Metro Manila, Cavite, Laguna, IloIlo, and Cebu gather to showcase their skills and embrace life values in sports, with the hopes of being nominated to the team representing the country in the FCB Escola Camp in Barcelona happening in October.  The four-year values-driven partnership between MILO and FC Barcelona was formally launched globally earlier this year, aiming to help more young Filipinos aspire to be the best they can be and realize their dreams through sports and the programs of MILO and FCB. The MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Camp provided free world-class training to deserving young Filipino football players under the tutelage of esteemed FCB Escola Camp Coaches from Barcelona, Spain. These athletes were exposed to playing the Barca way while also getting the opportunity to make new friends among their peers from different clubs, all in the spirit of fun and friendly competition. Aside from this one-of-a-kind training session, the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Team will also be on the lookout for two of the most deserving players who will stand a chance to get an all-expense paid trip to Barcelona, Spain. They, along with other identified players from the other MILO markets worldwide, will get to go on a once-in-a-lifetime experience to train in Camp Nou, the home stadium of FC Barcelona, in October. A selection panel led by the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Team will help identify the players who will be included in the event. Just as important as skill, the principal values that define the spirit of FCB and the essence of MILO, will be included in the criterion for selection of the said players. Joining MILO and the Philippine Football Federation in the selection camp were FC Barcelona coaches Arnau Blanco and Marti Vila, who’ve previously held international FCB Escola camps in Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia. Arnau and Marti conducted football drills for the kids which included theoretical concepts that underlined the football club’s system and culture. Bannered by the message of 'TEAMMAKESME, the young athletes were also taught the value and role of their team around them—teammates, coaches, family, and friends who play an important role in their holistic growth to be come champions on and off the field. “You see the kids smiling, improving, enjoying, trying to understand our philosophy, and it really is fulfilling for us coaches. Having them play together as a team and learn the values and skills in football is amazing to witness. For us, it is important that we help Filipinos experience the Barca way through our program,” said FCB Escola Camp coach Arnau Blanco. “We are grateful and honored to have had the opportunity to do this for the local football community. With the our partners, FC Barcelona and the Philippine Football Federation, MILO is eager to search for the most deserving players to send to a once-in-a-lifetime experience in Camp Nou. It is truly encouraging to see these  athletes from all walks of life come together, and we send a big thank you to their supportive parents and coaches who joined them in this journey.The selection process will be a challenging one, but we’re looking forward to providing Filipino athletes a platform to share their talents on a world stage and benefit from the life-changing opportunity this partnership offers,” said de Robbie De Vera, Sports Marketing Executive of MILO Philippines. /div>.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

The search is on for the first ever Fudgee Barrkada!

Get your chance to cast your vote for the very first teen ambassadors for Fudgee Barr, one of the country's most-loved packaged cake brands, while watching good friends strut their stuff and show the rest of the country what they're made of! Fudgee Barr is looking for its next set of high school barrkada who each have their own personal advocacies. These kids from Greater Manila Area (GMA), Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao are selected by their schools to participate in the competition. Enter the adventurous trio of hosts at the first-ever Fudgee Barkada: OBarr sa Galing Squad series, bound to get you waiting for episode after episode. Ladies first: Quirky-perky-matchy-matchy My...Keep on reading: The search is on for the first ever Fudgee Barrkada!.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 16th, 2018

Young Pinoy booters cherish FC Barcelona experience

Ten lucky kid footballers took part in a once-in-a-lifetime experience of training in Barcelona, Spain under the tutelage of esteemed FC Barcelona Youth Academy coaches. The kids returned to Manila recently after their global training camp that ran from November 4 to 12 and happily shared their memorable experiences, meeting other young athletes from around the world and ultimately watching their football heroes play live. “We’ve made a lot of friends there and learned a lot of things from our coaches. It was a memorable experience for us,” said Jelena Loren Soon of Singapore School Cebu and a member of the USPC Panthers and Cebu Elite Girls Team, who was the only girl in the batch that flew to Spain through the joint initiative of FC Barcelona and Milo. Soon was joined by Lien Dale Manuel, Alexander David Villarosa, Breindel Medina, Heaven Andrei Teodosio, Tristan Ybanez, Juan Pablo Unlay, Dylan Wong, Carlo Bongocan and Daniel Cagaanan  in the press conference held for the kids on Wednesday.   The Pinoy booters were carefully chosen by an expert panel from Milo, Cebu Football Association and FCB Academy in Cebu from almost 240 participants in Cebu last September.   The junior booters were immersed in a series of training sessions both on the pitch of Ciutat Esportivo, the home of La Maisa, FCB’s youth academy, and in the classroom at Camp Nou. The Filipinos joined other young delegates from Chile, Colombia, Jamaica, Malaysia, Maldives, South Africa, Trinidad and Tobago and Venezuela. There, coaches instilled to the young booters the Barca methodology of creative passing and attacking while underscoring the importance of positive values. The Filipinos also played a friendly match against young players of Fundacion Marcet Football Academy. The game was played in four quarters with the Pinoy representatives winning the final frame, 4-0.      But the ultimate experience for these young athletes was their exclusive training with former Brazil and Barca player and legend, Juliano Belleti, capped by watching Lionel Messi and Barca play live against Betis in their La Liga duel.       As an added treat, the kids were given a chance to visit the FC Barcelona locker room – a unique and unforgettable experience. “Milo hopes that these young delegates will continue to work hard and aspire to be the best version of themselves,” said Milo Philippines Consumer Marketing Manager. “We also hope that these kids can share their experience and learnings to help uplift Philippine football and build ambition for others to reach their dreams.”   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 14th, 2018

First PH ‘landport’ promises to help ease Metro Manila traffic

The country's first "landport," the Paraaque Integrated Terminal Exchange (PITX), opened on Monday to great fanfare and a bold pledge that it would not just be a world-class transport hub, but also a crucial step toward easing congestion in Metro Manila. The PITX, situated on Coastal Road in Paraaque City, is an intermodal facility that houses buses, jeepneys, taxis and UV shuttles capable of ferrying 200,000 passengers daily between the capital and the nearby provinces of Cavite and Batangas. Airport-like A project of the Department of Transportation and MWM Terminals Inc., the PITX looks and feels strikingly similar to an airport---complete with boarding gates, separate ar...Keep on reading: First PH ‘landport’ promises to help ease Metro Manila traffic.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 5th, 2018

Country’s first landport ready to roll

The daily commute from Cavite and Batangas to Metro Manila is expected to improve as the country’s first landport, done through a collaboration of the public and private sectors, opens on Nov. 5......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018

MAJOR POINT: Finding Family Away From Home

I’ve been in the Philippines now for over 21 years. I can’t believe it has been that long, but I just checked my passport stamp the other day and sure enough my arrival stamp says August 2, 1997. So many things have happened since then that it puts me in this weird nostalgic state of mind thinking back to how I was back then. I had no idea what was in store for me when I decided to try my luck in professional basketball in the Philippines. I thought I knew. I thought I knew everything, but I really had no clue. I was recruited by a Filipino agent living in the United States to come to the Philippines to play basketball. This made me feel pretty special. I had put together a solid playing resume in high school and college and had played a year professionally in Denmark. I thought I would come to the Philippines, play basketball for 11 years, retire, go back to Michigan and get into coaching. That was my plan. It was pretty simple to me. I never thought about the people I’d meet or the relationships I’d build during my stay in the Philippines. And even though I knew nobody in the Philippines, I didn’t hesitate to take the opportunity to go to the Philippines to play basketball. There were a few things I underestimated when I came to the Philippines back in 1997. Being from Michigan, the heat was a often times painful adjustment to get used to. I had never lived in a big city before, so Manila and its traffic was also something to get used to. I don’t speak Tagalog, so getting around that can still be difficult at times. The style of play here in the Philippines is different than I was used to, so I had to get used to that. But, the biggest adjustment for me was that I knew absolutely no one when I came to the Philippines. I had no friends. My mom is from Lawaan, Eastern Samar. She had only been back once since she had left the Philippines in the late 1960s. Most of my relatives on her side of the family still live in the province. So while, I have family in the Philippines, I don’t have any relatives in Metro Manila. So, here I was, on the other side of the planet with no family and no friends. Like most people, I like having friends. I had always had a close group of friends in high school and college. Playing a year in Denmark, not having my friends around was probably my biggest adjustment and I went through a rough period of homesickness there. Now that I was in the Philippines, I was in a different, but also similar situation. In my early years here in the Philippines, I played for two great teams. My first team was Tanduay Rhum. My first coach was Alfrancis Chua and my first boss was Boss Bong Tan. Both of those guys took great care of me. After four years with them, I was then traded to Barangay Ginebra. My boss there was Boss Henry Cojuangco. He also took great care of me. I had many great teammates through the years, including my years on those two teams. My teammates were very welcoming of me and I enjoyed my time on the court with those guys. However, when practice ended. My teammates would go back to their friends, family and responsibilities and I would go back to an empty condo unit. Everyday I would have practice in the morning from 9-12. After practice, I’d eat and then go find a gym to workout in. By the time I was done with my workout at 3 or 4 in the afternoon, I would then have to figure out what to do from 3 or 4 until the time I went to bed around 10 or 11. I thought a lot differently back then than I do now, so most of that time was wasted. I spent a lot of that time alone, bored, in front of the TV, just waiting for the day to end, so I could get up and do it again the next day. Although I was living my dream of playing professional basketball, it was strange for me to be living that life day after day after day. My first couple of years here, I didn’t have a car. I didn’t know my way around Manila. I didn’t know anybody outside of my team. I was living in Quezon City in a non-walkable area. It was a grind. I often wondered how long I could continue to stay on that type of grind. It wasn’t until after 18 months of living that way that I started to meet other Filipino-Americans that were going through similar experiences. In the late 1990s, the PBA landscape was much different than it is today. One thing that was a lot different, was there weren’t as many Fil-Ams as there are today. Having Fil-Am players playing in the PBA was still a new thing. There was a novelty about us. We were the new kids in school, in a way. Guys like Jeff Cariaso, Andy and Danny Seigle, Nic Belasco, Ali Peek, Noy Castillo, Rudy Hatfield and myself had played college basketball in the United States. The basketball fans here in the Philippines didn’t know who we were before we went high in the PBA Draft and then started playing in the PBA. Most of us were the only Fil-Americans on our teams. Upon meeting them, I found out that these guys were living the similar grind I had been going through. It’s hard to explain, but after meeting some of the other Fil-American basketball players, my life instantly got better. It was so refreshing to hear about their experiences. Although, we were all different and from different areas of the US, we were basically going through the same thing at near the same stage of our lives. We were all out here on our own trying to make it in professional basketball in country that was new to us. I found comfort in learning that other people were struggling with similar things that I was struggling with. There is always pressure to win in professional sports. My new friends helped me deal with that pressure. Learning about other peoples experiences in similar situations, having an outlet and having fun with new friends off of the court, helped bring balance to my life. I related to those guys. I smiled and laughed more when I was around those guys. Two guys in particular that helped me were Jeffrey Cariaso and Andy Seigle. Both of those guys are older than me and had been in the country and the PBA before I was. I looked to both of them for advice and valued their opinions. Jeff is from San Francisco was drafted in the PBA in 1995. By the time I had met Jeff in 1999, Jeff had won the PBA Rookie of the Year, had won multiple championships and was a multiple time PBA All-Star. Jeff was always a guy I respected for the way he handled himself on the court and off of it. Jeff was also a leader in the Fil-Am community here, organizing dinners and get togethers. Even today, it is nice to be able to message Jeff and he is still always willing to listen or give advice. Jeff will always shoot you straight. A friend like him is hard to find. Andy was the number one overall pick in the 1997 PBA Draft. At 6 for 10 Andy was the first Fil-Am from my generation to have big expectations put on his shoulders the very first day he stepped on a PBA court. Dealing with that pressure must have been tough, but Andy was one of the most accommodating, giving people I have ever met. Whenever he was doing something, he would invite me. Random days out of the blue, he would invite me to his house to have dinner with his family. Andy would host dinners at his house for holidays, where families from different teams would get together to celebrate. I was fortunate enough to eventually play with Andy at Ginebra, where we won three championships together. Having him in practice and as a friend made my life better in the Philippines. Just as Jeff and Andy helped me, I also tried to help new Fil-Americans that came to the Philippines after me. Rudy Hatfield came to Tanduay a couple of years after I had been there and I tried to show him the ropes. We became very close friends. When Jimmy Alapag and Harvey Carey were new to the country in 2002 and 2003, respectively, I tried help where I could. I can’t say I ever really mentored anybody, but I always tried to listen, and share. Even if I can only help you laugh or smile more, I know that can help. Those guys have also become close friends of mine. I know they have also helped others that have come after them. Since Alapag and Carey arrived, there have already been a couple generations of new Filipino American basketball players. I still see the younger Fil-Ams from different teams hanging out together. While I’ve heard that some people view that as Fil-Ams trying to separate themselves, I don’t believe that is true. Just like guys from the same province or same school are more likely to hang out together, young Fil-Ams are more likely to hang out together. It’s a natural thing to gravitate to things and people you relate to and have something in common with. It’s not the easiest thing to do, to go to a foreign country where you have no family and friends to start a new career. I know. I’ve been there. A lot of things have changed for me since 1997, when I first came to this country. I am now married and have two small children of my own. My wife, kids and her family provide my support system now, as I do for them. However, there was a time and a long time where I didn’t have that. My Fil-American friends were my family and support system. And while that wasn’t ideal, I was always taught to do the best with what you had. I’m thankful for what I had. Eric Menk played in the PBA from 1999 to 2016. Menk is a four-time PBA champion, three-time PBA Finals MVP and one-time PBA MVP (2005). He currently writes for ABS-CBN Sports weekly. Menk also has his podcast Staying MAJOR as welll as his own YouTube channel ......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018

NEDA body approves Marawi rehab work

THE NATIONAL Economic and Development Authority’s (NEDA) Investment Coordination Committee-Cabinet Committee (ICC-CabCom) has approved new road and drainage projects for the rehabilitation of Marawi City, as well as the next phase for the flood management project in Metro Manila and repair of roads in other conflict-affected areas in Mindanao......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsOct 30th, 2018

Real Madrid fires coach Lopetegui after big loss to Barca

By Tales Azzoni, Associated Press MADRID (AP) — In just months, Julen Lopetegui has lost two of the most high-profile coaching jobs in the world. Lopetegui was finally fired by Real Madrid on Monday, less than five months after he was sacked by Spain before the World Cup for not telling federation officials he accepted the Madrid job. The latest firing followed a meeting by the club's board of directors on Monday, a day after the team was crushed by Barcelona 5-1 at Camp Nou Stadium. Santiago Solari, coach of Real Madrid B, will take charge for the Copa del Rey match against third-division club Melilla on Wednesday. Spanish media speculated Solari, a former Madrid player, was in the running for the permanent job along with former Chelsea manager Antonio Conte and Belgium manager Roberto Martinez. The firing caps a horrible few months for Lopetegui and is likely to deal a significant setback to his career. After doing well with Spain's youth teams, he had a lackluster stint with Portuguese club Porto, but gained prominence after revamping Spain and turning it into a contender entering the World Cup. "I want to thank the club for the opportunity it gave me and the players for their effort," Lopetegui told the local news agency EFE. "I wish the team the best for the rest of the season." Madrid said in a statement it sacked 52-year-old Lopetegui to "change the team's dynamic while all of its objectives for the season were still reachable." The board of directors believed there was a huge difference between the quality of the squad and the results it was achieving. The board noted the team has eight players nominated for the Ballon d'Or award, something unprecedented in the club's history. They have lost five of their last seven matches. "We know that results are important for a coach," Madrid captain Sergio Ramos said after the Barcelona match. Lopetegui, who led the team practice on Monday morning, was hired by Madrid to replace Zinedine Zidane, who quit after leading the club to the last three Champions League titles. Losing the clasico left Madrid ninth in the Spanish league, seven points behind leader Barcelona after 10 rounds. It hasn't won in five straight league matches, with four losses, and recently reached its worst scoring drought ever. The club had a decent start to the season but things went sour as the squad struggled to produce goals in its first season without Cristiano Ronaldo in nearly a decade. Madrid didn't replace the superstar; its only high-profile signing was goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois. In 14 matches with Lopetegui, Madrid won six, lost six, and drew two. After the Copa match on Wednesday, Madrid hosts Valladolid in the Spanish league, and visits Viktoria Plzen in the Champions League. "We have to move on as soon as possible because there is a lot of season left," Ramos said. To make things worse, veteran left back Marcelo is expected to be out for a few weeks because of a muscle injury. Forward Mariano Diaz is also injured and is likely to be out for at least a week. Solari, aged 42, is a former Argentina midfielder who played for Real Madrid in the early 2000s and helped the team win the 2002 Champions League. He also played for Atletico Madrid and Inter Milan. He has been coaching Real Madrid B since 2016, taking over not long after Zidane left to coach the main squad. Lopetegui is the second La Liga coach to be fired. The first was Leo Franco of promoted club Huesca, currently last in the 20-team standings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 30th, 2018

Suarez hits hat-trick as Barcelona blows away Madrid

BARCELONA, Spain – Barcelona ran riot in the Clasico on Sunday, October 28, as Luis Suarez scored the hat-trick that will surely spell the end of Julen Lopetegui's time as Real Madrid coach. Barcelona were 5-1 winners, dominant at Camp Nou for all-but a 15-minute period after halftime when the otherwise ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 29th, 2018

Junsay leads Pasay derby today

A big group of Batangas cockers, led by multi -titled Jimmy Junsay, collides with Metro Manila derbyists in today’s AEJ and Pasia Brothers 5-Stag Derby at Pasay City Cockpit......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 28th, 2018

Junsay leads Pasay derby today

A big group of Batangas cockers, led by multi -titled Jimmy Junsay, collides with Metro Manila derbyists in today’s AEJ and Pasia Brothers 5-Stag Derby at Pasay City Cockpit. Source link link: Junsay leads Pasay derby today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsOct 28th, 2018

Watch out for wounded Madrid, warns Barcelona coach

      BARCELONA, Spain – Barcelona coach Ernesto Valverde has warned his team to beware a "wounded" Real Madrid side as the hosts head into Sunday's Clasico at the Camp Nou without the injured Lionel Messi on October 28. "We know what Madrid are like, they are more dangerous when they are ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 28th, 2018

NBA Asia Managing Director Levy: We don t take the Pinoy fanbase lightly

The Philippines is unique, among the countries Scott Levy, NBA Asia Managing Director, handles. Tasked to oversee the development and expansion of the NBA's strategic initiatives in Asia (with the exception of Greater China and India), the Philippines is a different situation for Levy, compared to say, Thailand, or Malaysia. Unlike other countries in the region, basketball is well-engrained in the local Philippine culture, as is the NBA. In that regard, the job is easy. But diehard fans, and this country is full of diehard NBA fans, want different things, and want much more of it. And Levy and the rest of the NBA Asia office know it's important to keep them happy. Speaking to reporters as part of a roundtable Q&A session, Levy admitted that satisfying Philippine demand continues to be the biggest challenge. Citing the league's local TV partners, which include ABS-CBN, Solar, and FOX, as well as the implementation of League Pass via mobile companies Smart and Globe, Levy said, "We want to make sure that there are enough games, and that there are enough outlets [to get those games], that people can continue to interact and really get to know [the NBA] beyond maybe what the scores are. "We want to bring more players here, bring the real experiences. So we bring NBA players during the year, we bring NBA legends (the league directly brings around 3-4 players and legends to the country each year), we have dance teams, we have mascots [so that] people can get very close to the game." This differs very much from other countries in Asia. Whereas in other countries, NBA Asia devotes resources to growing the game, often teaming up with local governments' sports ministries, there's no need to teach the basics here. "That just means we take a higher level approach to coaching and make sure that there's another step that they may [take]," said Levy, who cited the example of bringing in Fil-Am coach Erik Spoelstra of the Miami Heat into the Philippines to help impart higher-level coaching techniques. Because the country is further down the line in terms of hoops techniques, the league's Jr. NBA program which is presented in the Philippines by Alaska, has played a huge role in recent years. "Nearly two million kids have come through the program...to improve their skill level. Many of our players have moved on to play in the UAAP, in the NCAA. Some are now in the PBA. So we want to contribute to the existing strength of the basketball community here," Levy said. It hasn't always been smooth sailing though. Recently, ventures like the NBA Cafe and the NBA Stores in the Philippines saw their licenses expire and close. For Levy though, it's similar to the familiar "shoot your shot" maxim in hoops. "We're willing to try things and if they're successful, great, we'll continue them," he said. "But if we think there are better ways to engage, we'll do that." Levy added that while the physical stores may be gone, fans can still purchase NBA merch through NBAStore.com, and other places like Nike, Toby's and Titan. Levy also applauded how knowledgable local fans are with regards to players and teams. While it's often thought that a large chunk of Pinoy fans are Lakers fans, Levy said that when you look at the data, it's winning teams that are able to capture the attention of Filipinos, with the obvious exception of teams in areas with large Filipino communities, such as San Francisco and the Golden State Warriors. "For me, here in the Philippines, we don't have to do much more than just make sure the players and the teams are exposed, because Filipino fans understand great play, and they understand great players. And when teams win, or players do amazing things, they become popular here," he said.   Looking ahead to the future, Levy believes that mobile will still be the way to go, though with a caveat. "As the streaming speeds continue to improve...then we'll be able to deliver more content," Levy said. "We'll continue to adjust the delivery of our product as the speeds improve." He added that the league wants to look into more basketball mobile games, even locally or regionally developed ones, to help educate fans on players and give them more ways to interact. To sum it up, Levy once again reiterated that the Philippines is "incredibly important," to the Association. "It probably is the market with the highest fan affinity for basketball, and that's daunting. To satisfy everybody, that's a full-time job. "We don't take the fanbase here lightly. We are focused on making sure that everybody is happy with what they have available and we're listening for the things that we need to do better."   Without a doubt, that's music to the Philippine fans' ears. SIX SHOTS Here are six other topics Levy touched on during the interview: 1. On the Philippines hosting another NBA Global Games "The challenge with [the Global Games] is always, there's 15,000 people in that building, and there's a hundred million Filipinos that we're trying to engage around the NBA. So while the games are great, we are really spending our time figuring out how we can engage a hundred million Filipinos. "But it's always in consideration and hopefully at some point in the future, we'll be able to bring the game back here again." 2. On the impact of a full-Pinoy player making it in the NBA "That question has always perplexed me, because the fanbase here is so strong already. I mean clearly Jordan Clarkson is very popular here, but he's not the most popular NBA player [in the Philippines]. So would a Filipino player be the most popular player? If he was the best player in the NBA, he'd probably be the most popular player, but if he's not, I think Filipinos will follow that player, and will continue to follow the best players in the NBA because that's the expectation here in the Philippines - 'I'm looking for the best players and the best teams and that's who I want to follow.' "But [by] the number of people who are playing in this country, I think it's just a matter of time before we have multiple local Filipinos playing in the NBA. It's definitely going to happen. The game is getting better, the coaches are getting better, the level of talent in the PBA continues to go up, and there are more Filipino players coming to the US and playing in university [NCAA] so it's definitely going to happen." 3. On the passing of FIBA Secretary General Patrick Baumann "I personally knew Patrick and there was nobody that spent more time and energy and basically dedicated their life to the sport of basketball and had such a great impact on the sport of basketball around the world. It’s a tragic loss. Personally, I will miss Patrick and he worked very closely with NBA Commissioner Adam Silver and Deputy Commissioner Mark Tatum. They had just seen him in a FIBA conference in Xi’an, China a few days before and typically with Patrick he was off in Argentina in another basketball event. I mean, he just, he was tireless in his efforts and he had tremendous success and it’s a tremendous loss to the entire basketball community." 4. On the NBA expanding the game towards female fans in the Philippines. "[For the Jr. NBA PH program] our goal is always 50-50, boys-girls. We haven’t yet achieved that here in the Philippines but again, working closely with the schools, working with Alaska, working with SM...the percentage continues to increase. I'm not exactly sure what the [numbers are] last year, but it's still too low. "I think that’s why it’s a little bit of frustrating here. In countries like Thailand and Indonesia, where, well Thailand has more than 50 percent girls, and in Vietnam and Indonesia it’s over 40 percent right now. So, again, our goal is 50-50. This sport is gender neutral, we bring WNBA players into market, we’ve done that many times already and now we’re going into schools to really try to encourage young girls to play the game." 5. On giving tips to local leagues to become more successful "We’re not here to dictate how a league should be run. What we’re trying to do is understand where we can be helpful, if they’re looking for assistance in building an arena, we’re happy to help with that. If they’re looking [at] how to enhance ticket sales, how to expand the live in-arena experience. Whatever it is that they may ask for our assistance, we are here to help. We support local basketball in every way we can but we’re not being prescriptive in saying this is how you should run a league in the Philippines. There’s way more knowledge on the ground here in the country than we have about what’s successful here." 6. On sports stars from other leagues interacting with NBA players "Our players are incredible. They are global icons, they’re incredible on social media which continues to grow their fanbase….because our players are active on social and they’re interested, personally interested in fashion and technology and gaming, and music and they have relationships with Jay-Z and with Usher, with every other top performer and other athletes are also interested because they’re fans. So when we do an event in London, we get calls from players on Chelsea, and on Tottenham and on Liverpool and on Man U and say “Hey, we wanna come to the game because we wanna see these athletes play. "So, anytime there is an athlete that is a fan of the NBA we will look to engage them. We work with all other sports leagues and we’re also fans. Our players are fans. There’s an opportunity to go to Camp Nou in Barcelona, our players want to be there. So, this is more driven by the players, their personal interests in other sports and other athletes and luckily our athletes are generally pretty popular around the world, and we’ll encourage that engagement and facilitate some particularly social media moments where Neymar comes into the locker room and exchanges a jersey with Steph Curry. We had Ronaldinho wearing a Carmelo Anthony jersey, dribbling a basketball on his head. All these moments are really special for the crossover fans from one sport to another. But it’s really driven by our players’ personal interest or other athletes’ personal interest in basketball.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 25th, 2018