Advertisements


UAAP Cheerdance 2017 a storybook ending for graduating Salinggawi captain

"Surreal." UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe team captain Benjo Gutierrez could hardly catch his breath. "Feeling ko panaginip po ‘to. Hindi ko po inexpect." After falling just a few tenths of a point short for a podium finish in the 2016 UAAP Cheerdance Competition, Gutierrez and the Salinggawi Dance Troupe's tiger-inspired routine earned them a first runner-up finish in the 2017 UAAP Cheerdance Competition, Saturday evening at the Mall of Asia Arena.  For the graduating Gutierrez, who took to the Cheerdance floor one last time for 'Gawi, it was the perfect send off, especially since he wasn't expecting to make it back on the podium this year.  "Indescribable, sobrang hindi ko po ma-describe kasi hindi po kami nag-eexpect, gusto lang namin ng magandang run, pero yung mabalik sa podium, especially for me kasi graduating na ako," "Masarap umalis na nasa podium yung team niyo." Gutierrez added.  While there were a number of notable moments in UST's routine, Gutierrez says that his favorite part of it all wasn't anything that could be seen on TV or by the audience in attendance.  "Yung favorite ko siguro yung hindi nakikita ng mga tao, favorite part ko yung nag-uusap kami sa loob and nabubuo namin yung pyramids kasi yun yung isang sign na buo kaming lahat, nag-cheer kami for UST." Saturday night was the last time for Gutierrez to cheer for UST - in the UAAP CDC at least  - and while he'll be watching from the sidelines next year, the outgoing captain has some words of advice for his younger Salinggawi teammates.  "Keep passionate, trust the process, and trust yourselves.".....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnDec 2nd, 2017

UP Pep: ‘We’re going to work harder now everyone improved’

The UP Pep Squad remains the winningest team in the UAAP Cheerdance Competition. Much of the field is catching up to them, however. With a sixth-place finish in the 2017 edition of the event, State U was unable to add to its medal total of 20. That means that second-running UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe have pulled closer to them – with their silver medal in this year’s competition hiking their total to 17. Meanwhile, first-time champions Adamson Pep Squad have also joined in the gold medal tally. All told, the Fighting Maroons’ return didn’t go exactly as planned – in the official results, at least. For them, however, their comeback performance was all about expressing themselves to their beloved community. “Yun po talaga ang kwento namin sa UP – going through heartbreaks, going through sad and trying times, but at the end of the day, kailangan pa ring lumaban,” co-captain Megan Mendoza Cabrera said. And so, while many people did not get what the UP Pep Squad was going for, co-captain Thea Obanil still said they fulfilled their goal. “Selfish mang pakinggan, pero pinakita lang namin yung kwento namin. Mahirap kasi sa training, pero tuloy pa rin ang laban until the end,” she shared. She then continued, “Kung sinuman yung nasa taas, kung sinuman yung nagpo-podium finish, nandito pa rin kami para sa UP community.” Now they have gotten back a feel of the UAAP Cheerdance Competition, however, the Diliman-based squad said they will only do themselves better in the coming contests. “Siyempre, we’re going to work harder now that we know that everyone improved so much more. Siyempre, sa amin, nakaka-motivate ding makapagsabayan,” Cabrera said. That is even truer as in 2017, their routine was good for 575.50 points – 35 less than fourth and fifth-ranked NU Pep Squad and FEU Cheering Squad, 59 less than third-ranked UE Pep Squad, 63 less than second-ranked UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe, and 88 less than champion Adamson Pep Squad. “Sana next year, mas maganda mapakita namin. We’ll just keep working hard and still be the UP Pep Squad na alam ng mga tao,” their co-captain said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

UP Pep coach: ‘Wala kaming magagawa kundi i-represent ang UP’

Apparently, the UP Pep Squad had a routine ready to go for last year’s UAAP Cheerdance Competition. “Up to the last minute, we still wanted to compete. Ready na talaga kami to compete,” assistant coach Pio Opinaldo said. “But then, things were still not cleared so we just focused on yung ibang competition. Dun na lang namin nagamit yung routine namin.” State U’s pride pulled out of the 2016 iteration of the event as a form of protest. Then, they were still adamant that the results of the 2015 edition of the event “did not genuinely reflect adherence to the competition guidelines and criteria.” In 2015, the NU Pep Squad reigned supreme with a total score of 668. UST then snatched second-place with 651.5 points while the Diliman-based squad ranked third with 610.5 points. “Last year, ‘di sumali yung UP because we were questioning some parts of the rules that were left unanswered. We really wanted an answer not because we wanted to prove something, but because we wanted to clarify things,” Opinaldo said. He then continued, “We wanted to know kung may mali ba sa routine namin. Importante sa amin yun para maging maayos yung routine namin for the next season.” And so, rather than the UAAP, UP Pep instead competed in the Asian Cheerleading and Dancesport Competition. That was a painful decision for the squad. “Personally, masakit yung nangyari kasi maganda talaga yung theme namin. Alam ko, kakayanin namin nun,” Thea Obanil, now the team captain, recalled. Still, it was a painful decision that was shared by each and every member of the squad. “It was a unanimous decision not to join, to make that statement, na manindigan nga. It showed what UP Pep is all about,” Obanil said. Fast forward one year and not much has changed in the competition. Asked about the questions that led to their protest a year ago, Opinaldo answered, “’Di pa rin siya malinaw, pero wala na kaming magagawa kung ‘di masasagot yun.” In that light, the Fighting Maroons are will just lick their wounds and will just rush headfirst back into the UAAP CDC. “It’s our obligation to join the competition. As the official cheerleading team of UP, we are really obliged to join the competition,” the assistant coach. And whether or not their questions will have answers, Opinaldo said they will just fulfill what is expected of them – especially by the Diliman community. “Wala na rin kaming magagawa kundi mag-compete and represent the UP community,” he said. When UP Pep returns to action in the 2017 UAAP CDC on Deember 2 at the MOA Arena, they will be looking at a field that has improved – with the NU Pep Squad dominating, the FEU Cheering Squad and the UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe remaining as threats, and the Adamson Pep Squad opening eyes. For the winningest squad in the tournament, that is only good news. “The competition this time is different from the previous competitions. I’m really happen a sobrang nag-level up lahat,” Opinaldo said. Of course, all of the grace in the 2017 UAAP CDC will be on S+A, S+A HD, and sports.abs-cbn.com/livestream/cdc. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 24th, 2017

DE JESUS: Genius, disciplinarian, champion coach

This story was originally published on May 7, 2017 De La Salle University head coach Ramil De Jesus came inside the press room of the Big Dome for a post-game interview wearing the same smile he had in the past nine times the Lady Spikers closed the UAAP season as champions. The only difference in those championship interviews were the players that accompanied him to answer questions from reporters. From Iris Ortega-Patrona, Desiree Hernandez, Maureen Penetrante, the legendary Manilla Santos, the Big Three of Cha Cruz, Paneng Mercado and Jacq Alarca, to Michel Gumabao and beast-mode-don’t-care Aby Marano to Ara Galang, Mika Reyes, Kim Dy and gem of a setter in Kim Fajaro – all of them stood beside a genius and architect of DLSU’s successful volleyball program. Victory after victory, De Jesus built his reputation as a one of the best women’s volleyball mentors in the country. Last Saturday, De Jesus added another feather to his cap when he steered the Taft-based squad to back-to-back titles in the 79th UAAP women’s volleyball tournament at the expense of archrival Ateneo de Manila. Two decades since his arrival to the school of a different shade of green after playing for Far Eastern University, delivered 10 titles and brought the Lady Spikers to the Finals 17 times.   De Jesus shared the secret of his success. “Siguro, sistema siguro then hard work. And then, well-disciplined ‘yung mga bata. Siguro, ‘yun ‘yung key,” he said. His success earned him the respect of his peers including three-time UAAP men’s volleyball champion Oliver Almadro of Ateneo, who was once one of his lieutenants, and players alike. DLSU embraced him as one of its own. “Natutuwa ako kasi kahit hindi ako alumnus doon niyakap nila ako bilang parang doon na din nag-graduate,” said De Jesus. “Hindi ko naman napapansin ang mga nanyayari sa akin sila lang ang nakakapansin, binigyan nga ako ng award. Happy, very happy (ako).” De Jesus is known to be a no nonsense coach. Strict, straightforward and a disciplinarian – traits he inherited from FEU men’s coach Kid Santos.                He doesn’t like fanfare and as much as possible keeps attention away from him. De Jesus carefully chooses his words but when he gives one, everybody listens. He means business all the time.   Brilliance of De Jesus 246-65. De Jesus knows how to win and his career win-loss record says it all. The main reason why DLSU trusted De Jesus to handle the team for that many years – a rare feat considering that a UAAP coach’s tenure is very volatile.   It was summer 20 years ago when former basketball Olympian and influential DLSU sport personality Ramoncito Campos brought in a young mentor in De Jesus to save the school’s volleyball program, which then had yet to win a title since joining the league in 1986.           He entered the UAAP volleyball scene during the time when powerhouse teams Far Eastern University and University of Sto. Tomas, then mentored by legendary coach August Sta. Maria, were the ones lording over here the competition. Of course the road to glory didn’t come easy but his first tour of duty gave DLSU a chance to feel what it was to be in the Final Four when the Lady Spikers finished fourth a year when after strings of forgettable seasons. Quenching the thirst to salvage some pride in the sport that will eventually be DLSU’s second most valued contest next to basketball, the Lady Spikers began to hunger for the crown – something the school never felt before since winning it all back in 1976 as a member of the NCAA.   De Jesus submitted his team to Spartan-like training and hammering discipline and slowly molded the Lady Spikers to a championship-caliber squad. In Season 61, DLSU challenged FEU for the crown but the Lady Tamaraws’ championship experience prevailed. The loss only fueled De Jesus’ desire to bring the Lady Spikers to the throne even more. With the core of ace hitter Ortega-Patrona, setter Valerie Bautista, Sally Macasaet, Sheryl Magallanes, Demelle Chua, Hollie Reyes and then sophomore Ivy Remulla, De Jesus steered DLSU on the right track for another shot at the crown. Midway in the season Bautista got pregnant. De Jesus, calm and composed, knew what to do. He converted open spiker Reyes into a setter and the gambit worked as DLSU once again punched a ticket to the Finals, this time against UST – a very hungry team looking to reclaim the title. A year removed from the throne, UST was ready for the kill. But the Espana-based squad went against a famished team – DLSU will not leave the sweltering University of the Philippines Human Kinetics Gym without the championship trophy. In front of a crowd - dwarf-sized compared to the multitude of fans that troop bigger venues of today – the Lady Spikers wrote history. DLSU slew a giant in a thrilling five-set game behind the stellar performance of Ortega-Patrona, who won that Season’s Most Valuable Player award – the first of many incredible volleybelles that will bag the highest individual honor under De Jesus’ tutelage.     It was an incredible feat but it won’t see a repeat in the next three years.              Grand Slam After their breakthrough title, the Lady Spikers had three straight bride’s maid finishes behind FEU. Heartbreaks brought by Ortega-Patrona’s falling out with De Jesus over a disciplinary issue in Season 63 and the unstoppable power of FEU's Monica Aleta, who won three straight MVP awards while towing the Lady Tams to a three-peat. Like a chess master, De Jesus learned from his mistakes before pulling off a feat that will cement his name as one of the greatest. With Hernandez, Penetrante and a young Santos as his main pieces, he steered the Lady Spikers to a rare three-peat. DLSU brought into heel FEU, UST and Adamson to complete a grand slam. A four-peat loomed for the celebrated Lady Spikers but fate played a cruel trick on them after UAAP suspended DLSU in Season 69 because the Green Archers' basketball squad fielded two ineligible players the previous year.       When the ban was lifted in Season 70, De Jesus and the Lady Spikers were again under the radar as title contenders together with the defending champion UST, FEU and Adamson. But team was forced to file a leave of absence from the school while the tournament was ongoing because Alarca saw action despite incomplete academic credentials to be eligible to play. All of the team’s won games where Alarca played where forfeited and the Lady Spikers ended up at seventh place. It was a painful setback but it also served as a rallying point for DLSU. With Santos playing her final year and the emergence of enigmatic but then rookie libero Mel Gohing in Season 71, the Lady Spikers denied the then graduating Rachel Anne Daquis and FEU back-to-back crowns. DLSU relinquished the throne to the Angeli Tabaquero and Aiza Maizo-led Tigresses the following year. The Lady Spikers avenged their loss the next season in a rematch with UST behind Alarca, Mercado, Cruz, Gumabao and Gohing in the start of De Jesus’ second three-peat.   DLSU-Ateneo rivalry Nobody really knows when UAAP volleyball picked up the tremendous following it has today. Maybe it needed something for people to get hooked into. A continuous rivalry, perhaps? For six straight years DLSU and Ateneo did just that. The storied rivalry between La Salle and Ateneo spilled from the basketball court to the taraflex mat of volleyball. De Jesus had in his bench the core of veterans Cruz, Gumabao and Marano back and freshmen Galang, Reyes and Demecillo when they met in the Season 74 Finals a young and promising Lady Eagles side – much like the Lady Spikers De Jesus inherited 14 seasons back. Led by Fille Cainglet, Dzi Gervacio and a fresh recruit from University of Sto. Tomas high school Alyssa Valdez, Ateneo gave DLSU a tough challenge for two seasons but the Lady Spikers repelled them both times. Then came Lady Eagles Thai mentor Tai Bundit. For three years in a row, De Jesus’ system bested the rest of the field including that of then Ateneo coach Roger Gorayeb. However, a coach who barely spoke English or Filipino provided him a challenge in Season 76. DLSU with an intact core led by Marano, swept its way straight to the Finals with a thrice-to-beat advantage. Ateneo crawled its way to the championship round through a series of do-or-die games. De Jesus is an old-school type of coach. His system is hinged on well-planned strategies and tactics. He was pitted against Bundit’s Thai-style of play anchored on a heartstrong mantra and a ‘happy, happy’ approach of the game. Bundit dances on the sideline, an animated fellow during the matches. De Jesus is stoic as always. When the two collided for the title for the first time, Bundit shocked De Jesus and DLSU when Ateneo beat them thrice in a four-game series that went the full distance. Bundit and the Valdez-led Lady Eagles did it again the following year, completing a season sweep at the expense of the Lady Spikers, who struggled to pose any form resistance in the Finals after Galang went down with a season-ending ACL tear in the semis. It was a devastating loss to say the least. But De Jesus, a general who fought many battles for the green and white, stuck with the weapon that brought him success – his ability to adjust. Outdueled by Bundit in their last six matches, De Jesus found a way to stop the rampaging Lady Eagles in their first meeting in Season 78. Ateneo equalized in the second round and even took the top spot after the elimination. The Lady Spikers and the Lady Eagles would eventually meet in the Finals for the fifth year in a row. De Jesus was ready for Ateneo. He knew the strengths and weaknesses of the Lady Eagles and used it to his advantage to win the series opener. The then graduating Valdez brought Ateneo back in Game 2 to tie the series, but DLSU completed its long-awaited revenge in the decider and gave Reyes, Demecillo and Galang a fitting sendoff gift.                  Road to back-to-back Losing five veterans including three of their key players heading into Season 79 gave De Jesus one of the toughest challenges he ever faced as a DLSU mentor.  Setter Kim Fajardo returned for her swan song together with fourth year playes Kim Dy, Dawn Macandili and Majoy Baron. Desiree Cheng also came back after a year of absence due to a knee injury, but De Jesus was still left to navigate with a relatively young crew.  “Sa laht nang nai-form kong team, ito yung medyo (up and down) yung performance,” he said. “Sobrang babaw ng bench, wala ka halos (mahugot) pagtingin mo, wala ka makuha.” DLSU struggled early and was on the losing end of two elims matches against Ateneo. “Ateneo nu’ng buong elimination NU lang ang halos tumalo. Sabi ko ano bang meron ang team na ito?” he said. “Pinilit lang naming habulin.” “Kasi alam ko nag-start kami medyo hilaw ang team namin. Early part ng first round natalo kami sa UP sabi ko pukpok pa tayo, habol pa,” De Jesus added. “Ang nakakatuwa sa mga bata, ang determinasyon na humabol nandoon.” When the De Jesus found himself leading the Lady Spikers to a sixth straight title series against Bundit and the Lady Eagles, he knew his squad was ready to defend their crown. And protect it they did in a series sweep capped by a dramatic five-set victory.    “Siguro buong eliminations, nire-review namin ang mga games, nakikita mo yung difference, ‘yung advantage at disadvantage ng team, so siguro doon kami nag-focus, kung saan kami medyo dehado. Concentrate kami sa training,” he said. “Ine-explain ko rin sa players kung ano yung dapat naming gawin, although mahirap. So, tanggapin na lang nila.” In a rare moment, when Ateneo’s Jho Maraguinot sent her attack long that signaled DLSU’s back-to-back championships, De Jesus let his hair down a little. He was jumping, dancing, celebrating the victory and even held his hands up, both his palms wide open as confetti dropped and the deafening roar of the crowd and banging of the drums echoed inside the arena. De Jesus won his tenth title. When the celebration subsided, De Jesus fashioned the same smile he wore in his past nine championships as he was led inside the pressroom of the Big Dome. Only this time around, Fajardo, Cheng and Dy were the ones who followed him from behind.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 20th, 2018

UAAP Softball Finals: No matter when they hit, Adamson scores

For the first time since 2010, Adamson had their backs against the wall against UST. They trailed 1-0 in the UAAP Softball championship series for the first time ever. And long-time head coach Ana Santiago knows that changes had to be made if they want to extend their dynasty, much more stretch the series to even have a remote possibility of that happening. Santiago said she was restless on the night before Game 2 Friday, thinking on how to shake up her batting order, since making such a drastic change in her offense may spell doom for the dynasty. "Hindi talaga ako nakatulog kagabi, pinag-iisipan ko talaga yung batting order ko. Lahat nagbago sa batting order ko, ni-reshuffle ko talaga. Even me na-surprise na ganito yung nangyari," the Blu Girls head coach said after their 8-5 win. One of her most drastic changes was putting senior Riezel Calumbres, who has been the designated top batter for most games, and relegated her to be the eight hitter, which is second to the last. Calumbres wasn't exactly coming off from a good Game 1, as she was 0-4 on hit attempts and was struck out two times. So the veteran did not think twice of accepting her coach's decision of sending her in the bottom of the batting order. "Pero kahit na may changes, tinanggap namin yun," the graduating Calumbres said. "Kahit saan kami mapunta. Basta maglaro tayo. Ilalaban natin to para sa team, hindi para sa sarili lang natin." Calumbres, who was seemingly woken up by her terrible performance the previous game, woke up and drilled three hits, including an RBI single that put the Lady Falcons on the board. The second baseman knows she had to make the Game 2 count, because she would not want her and her four other graduating teammates end their playing careers with a loss. But their collective minds scrambled to a frenzy when UST zoomed to a 3-0 lead from a CJ Roa three-run home run. 'May doubt. Hindi mo talaga masisisi na may doubt, tatlo. Sabi ko, wow, tatlo agad. Sabi ko okay lang isa-isa lang, step-by-step, mahahabol namin sila. Nakikita ko sas bawat teammate ko na 'lalaban kami, babawi kami'." With the game tied a 3 apiece headed to the sixth inning, Adamson knew that they had to score, and score they did. They tallied five runs, blowing the game wide open, sealing the victory for the seven-time defending champions. "Nandoon yung eagerness namin. Bawat. Sa susunod na batter, pumatong ka lang, itutulak kita. Nandoon kami. Yung 6th inning, crucial talaga siya sa amin. Pag naka-score kami, mananalo kami. Yan ang lagi sabi ni coach Ana sa amin." Now that she faces her final game donning the blue on Tuesday, she hopes for storybook ending to her five-year career -- another championship for the Queens of the collegiate softball scene. -- follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 16th, 2018

From the lowest of lows, Adamson Pep now on the highest of highs

Before 2017, the Adamson Pep Squad has never placed alone atop the leaderboard in the UAAP Cheerdance Competition. And before 2016, Adamson Pep has only stood on the podium once in the annual event that first took place way back in 1994. So safe to say, their third-place finish in 2016 and championship in 2017 have been the best years for the San Marcelino-based squad. That is even truer as from 2002 to 2014, they have had to settle for five sixth-place finishes, one seventh-place finish, and two last-place finishes. Without a doubt, that 12-year stretch were trying times and current head coach Jeremy Lorenzo knows that full well. “Ang pinaka naging motivation ko ay yung winless na experience ko buong college life ko,” he shared. He then continued, “Kaya given the opportunity na mag-apply (as coach), naging inspiration ko na ibawi yung mga panahong nakaramdam ako ng talo.” Lorenzo was a member of Adamson Pep from 2007 to 2012 – experiencing three finishes at fifth, one finish at sixth, and two finishes at eighth. And so, when he took over as mentor for the Soaring Falcons in 2016, he didn’t waste time in lighting a fire under his wards. That pretty much showed in last year’s UAAP Cheerdance as Adamson was a pleasant surprise for just about everybody. Making it a point to make waves, their fluid and flawless water-themed routine proved to be more than enough for the bronze – their first medal since 2001 Only a year later, Lorenzo and his wards did themselves better, blowing everybody out of the water for their very first title – besting modern-day dynasty NU Pep Squad as well as traditional powerhouses UP Pep Squad, UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe, and FEU Cheering Squad. For the former squad member and now squad mentor, it was a dream come true. “Hindi ko alam kung nanaginip ako. Sana ako na laging UP o UST o NU,” he shared. He then continued, “It was surreal. Sobrang magical ng feeling.” While it was magical, that breakthrough win cemented Adamson Pep’s status as a force to reckon with in UAAP Cheerdance. “Kung mahilera kami sa NU, UP, UST, it’s very flattering and overwhelming,” Lorenzo said. Still, their head coach said they remain well aware that they can only get better. As he put it, “We still have more room for improvement. Bilog ang bola; we got the title so mag-strive pa kami para ma-sustain namin kung anong level yung meron kami ngayon.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 4th, 2017

UAAP Finals: Graduating Ikeh and Tolentino write storybook ending to collegiate career

Nothing could have made the final game of Chibueze Ikeh and Vince Tolentino any sweeter than a victory against the De La Salle Green Archers in Game 3 of the UAAP Finals. They just wanted to exact revenge on their crushing Game 2 loss, which saw them give away a 21-point advantage and a delayed chance to win the championship. Recovering from such a brutal fall was a monumental task, but it was a task they were willing to accomplish. “For us, it wasn't over. The motto of this team is always to believe, and even though we didn't finish the job in Game 2 and La Salle gave us a really good fight, we never stopped believing,” Tolentino said after their celebration.  As their coach Tab Baldwin said, the Blue Eagles left their inner demons in the locker room after the Game 2 loss and already moved on. “We were ready come next day to get into the gym and listen to what Coach Tab has to say. Listen to our mistakes, because that's who we are, that's what we're willing to do. We just had the mentality that it's not over.” As for playing for such a seasoned coach as Baldwin, Tolentino could not have picked a better coach in steering their ship, keeping them on track, and made sure that they would not sink, calling the former Gilas Pilipinas coach amazing, and one of his best mentors. Baldwin in return praised the graduating forward for being a voice on the locker room, a thing which Baldwin admitted was an integral part in the team’s “leadership by committee.” “[Tolentino] said to me, ‘Coach, I don’t know if I could be an upfront leader for you but I’ll do everything what you’ll ask me to do and I’ll lead by example.,” Baldwin said. As for Ikeh, who finished wirh 12 points and 13 rebounds, he could only relish the love of the crowd, as they serenaded his last name during the closing minutes of the game, calling the Ateneo community “one of a kind.” In the moment Thirdy Ravena was awarded Finals MVP, the third-year guard shared a moment with his graduating center, calling him during the awarding. “I wasn't expecting that, but he's been one of a kind. For him to share that moment with me, it feels so great. I really appreciate that." ---- follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2017

Salinggawi coach not expecting podium finish

MANILA, Philippines - After the dust settled in the 2017 UAAP Cheerdance Competition, two things were clear for the UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2017

Adamson Pep wanted to win hearts and trophies – and they did just that

The Adamson Pep Squad placed for the very first time in the UAAP 80 Cheerdance Group Stunts. “The moment na tinawag kami for Group Stunts, I was already thankful kasi sa tinagal-tagal na may Group Stunts, we never stepped sa podium. We were very thankful na nag-silver kami agad,” coach Jeremy Lorenzo said after the San Marcelino-based squad got the silver medal in the Group Stunts. As it turns out, however, Adamson had much more to be thankful for as not long after, the Adamson Pep Squad also won the UAAP Cheerdance Competition itself for the very first time. “Nung in-announce na gold kami, sabi ko sa sarili ko, ‘Lord, totoo ba ‘to? Gisingin niyo ako!’ I was really speechless,” Lorenzo said after his crew bested all of second-place UST, third-place UE, and traditional powerhouses NU, FEU, and UP. The Soaring Falcons took everybody to the 1980s before taking their first-ever gold medals. And in the end, they scored 663.50 – 25 better than their closest competitor. Lorenzo and the squad should have seen their breakthrough win coming as they wowed the crowd the most of all teams with a perfectly pulled off routine. Asked about it afterward, he answered, “Technically, sobrang mild errors kasi, ‘di naman mawawala sa team yun.” Still, the coach said they weren’t thinking that they were the winners until the announcement itself. As he put it, “At first talaga, after ng performance, sobrang sabaw ko. Nanonood lang ako ng performance ng ibang team.” He then continued, “I was not assessing kung ano ranking namin. Basta natuwa lang kaming maganda ang run namin.” Right then and there, Lorenzo said Adamson Pep was nothing but satisfied with the show they put on. “It’s not (about) how intense or serious the theme is. It’s about how you win hearts of the people,” he said. He then continued, “Yun yung pinaka-motto ng Adamson – to win hearts and trophies.” That, they did, and much of the venue was chanting “Adamson! Adamson! Adamson!” right before the announcement of the champions.   Most of the MOA Arena wanted Adamson to win. Most of the MOA Arena got their wish! #UAAAPCDC2017 pic.twitter.com/WI0kenS546 — Normie Riego (@riegogogo) Disyembre 2, 2017   With that, the Soaring Falcons have reached the mountaintop – just a year after returning to the podium for the first time since 2001. “Last year talaga, sobrang stepping stone nung mag-second runner-up kami,” Lorenzo said. Now, Adamson Pep can say they have the title that had been held at least once by the UP Pep Squad, the UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe, the NU Pep Squad, and the FEU Cheering Squad. “Kung mahilero kami sa mga yun, it’s very flattering and overwhelming. We go the title and mag-strive pa kami para ma-sustain ‘to,” their mentor expressed. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

UAAP CDC 2017: New UST Salinggawi coach debuts with a first runner-up finish

Talk about making an immediate impact.  Just seven months after taking over as the new head coach of the UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe, Mark Chaiwalla has already brought a silver medal back to Espanya after their first runner-up finish in the 2017 UAAP Cheerdance Competition, Saturday evening at the Mall of Asia Arena.  "Kanina, I was just praying for the best, sabi ko ano man maging result, tanggapin naming buo," Chaiwalla told the media after the event. "Sabi ko sa team na the fact nag perform kayo with all your heart you had fun, you offered it to the Lord, that’s enough." Chaiwalla is no stranger to the UAAP CDC atmosphere.  A former member of Salinggawi himself, the nursing graduate says that he's experienced the peaks and the valleys of the team. Chaiwalla was part of Salinggawi from 2009 to 2013, and in his final year, 'Gawi finished in seventh place, their lowest in UAAP Cheerdance Competition history.  "I’ve been through the highest and lowest of 'Gawi. Last year ko lowest place ng 'Gawi." In his first year at the helm, Chaiwalla gets a silver finish, the highest he's ever reached as part of the team.  "What matters is ibigay lahat, leave no regrets on the floor, and mag enjoy lang kayo, the place is more than enough to be thankful." If Chaiwalla's debut is any indication of the direction that the UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe is headed, then the Thomasian faithful have a lot to be excited about. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

UE Pep Squad earns bronze that glittered like gold

Fifteen years. University of the East Pep Squad waited that long to step on the podium. When their school was called as the bronze medal winners in the 2017 UAAP Cheerdance Competition, the Recto-based squad finally ended a long thirst. It was a bronze finish that glittered like gold. “Syempre naman wala na kaming ibang sasabihin kundi ang saya, sobrang saya,” said UE coach Dico Ili Saturday after his squad bagged third place behind new champion Adamson Pep Squad and second-placers University of Sto. Tomas Salinggawi Dance Troupe at the MOA Arena. “We are hopeful talaga, that’s totally the honest thing na pwede naming sabihin,” he added. “Hopeful kami pero shocked kasi syempre ang tagal naming inantay, 15 years na wala ang UE Pep Squad sa podium kaya ngayon sobrang saya.”      UE finished fifth in the last two editions of the event and it was a decade and a half since the school’s best finish – a runner-up to UST, which then was in its first of historic five-peat.     “Worth it ang lahat ng pagod. Parang mas nakaka-excite na, excited na kami agad for next year,” Ili said. UE tallied 634.50 points – a good 24 points ahead of dethroned four-time champions National University Pep Squad and former two-time winner Far Eastern University. UE, which had a phoenix-themed routine, topped the tosses category and had decent scores in tumbling, stunts, pyramids and dance with only a 5-point deduction.     --- Follow this writer o Twitter, @fromtheriles     .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

IN GIFs: Best moments during UAAP Cheerdance Competition 2017

MANILA, Philippines – The Adamson University Pep Squad made history after emerging as champions in the UAAP Cheerdance Competition 2017 held at the Mall of Asia Arena on Saturday, December 2. ( READ: Adamson University is UAAP Season 80 cheerdance champion ) This is Adamson's first-ever cheerdance title in school history.  The University of Santo Tomas Salinggawi Dance Troupe is back ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

INFOGRAPHIC: UAAP Cheerdance Competition 2017 Primer

We’re one day away from the most anticipated one-day event in the UAAP season, and social media is ablaze with all the Cheerdance Competition talk. The CDC is not short of storylines to follow as well, with teams either gunning to keep their winning tradition intact, or looking to just break out of a long drought, and everything in between. Check out what UAAP CDC squads will be fighting for this year, with our handy guide:  University of the Philippines Pep Squad (8 titles)  University of Santo Tomas Salinggawi Dance Troupe (8 titles) National University Pep Squad (4 titles) Far Eastern University Cheering Squad (2 titles)  Adamson University Pep Squad University of the East Pep Squad Ateneo de Manila University Blue Babble Battalion De La Salle University Animo Squad   Make sure to catch the UAAP Cheerdance Competition LIVE this Saturday, December 2 at 2:00 P.M. on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23, ABS-CBN S+A HD channel 166, and via livestreaming on sports.abs-cbn.com/livestream/uaap.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 1st, 2017

NU Pep Squad s plan to make history: start first, end at first

Will there be another fairy tale ending for the NU Pep Squad? The once whipping team of the UAAP Cheerdance Competition has dominated for four straight years. Come Saturday at the expected sold out MO Arena, they shoot for a five-peat and history.     NU is once again out to put on a fantastic show to wow the audience and the judges. With another win in this year's competition, they can finally sit beside the UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe in the elite club of five-peat winners. The Espana-based squad lorded the contest from 2002 to 2006, a feat the Sampaloc-based squad wants to duplicate.      NU will perform first in a complete field of competitors with the return of the UP Pep Squad which took a leave of absence last year. Outdoing themselves  For four straight years and since the implementation of a new judging format, the NU Pep Squad seemed to have mastered how to hit each criteria and earn the necessary points to emerge victorious. The rest of the field, on the other hand, has struggled.   With the NU Pep Squad setting the standard, the challenge of outdoing themselves has been getting harder and harder each year.     “Pinakamahirap ‘yun, to compete with ourselves,” said NU coach Ghicka Bernabe. “Kasi minsan alam mo na ang capacity mo, alam mo na ang weakness mo. Pero may mga times na hindi pa pala yun ang limit namin.” “Sometimes we argue amongst ourselves na, ‘Hanggang dyan na lang ba? Ito na ba ang best?’ Pero kasi dito sa NU walang word na the best. Hindi nagi-exist ang word na ‘best’,” she added. “Kasi sabi nga nila it’s a process of learning. ‘Yung pag-champion mo after that day tapos na ‘yun, hindi ka na champion. ‘Yun lang sa araw na ‘yun.” “Kinakalaban namin ang standard namin in a way na hindi kami pwedeng ma-satisfy kung ano lang ang mayroon kami ngayon. Kailangang mag-exceed kami doon sa limit. Kailangang mag-exceed kami sa imagination and mag-exceed kami sa expectations ng lahat ng supporters namin.” Into the blue NU has been setting the bar higher each year. From Arabian nights, to Pocahontas, to cavemen, and to beyond outer space, NU Pep Squad's themes have left its indelible mark on the audience.   With their concepts turning into hits and putting on a show that always seemed to top their previous performances, one could just imagine the time and effort spent by Bernabe and her coaching staff to concoct something fresh and new.    The mentor admitted that they had sleepless nights deliberating and debating on what concept and theme to use the past four years but not on this one. The coaching staff this time didn’t need to dig deep in their seemingly bottomless bag of tricks for a magical theme. This one has been in their list of options since Day 1 of their dynastic rule of the competition. “Siguro ‘yung concept namin ngayon, every year naming nagiging idea pero hindi natutuloy. Siguro kasi hindi pa niya panahon,” said the former FEU flyer. “So siguro dumating na ang time niya. Ito na ang right timing, ang tamang panahon.” “Kasi for four years na nag-champion kami lagi siyang part ng option pero never siyang nanalo na maging theme namin for that season,” she added. “Ito lang ‘yung year na wala kaming pinagdiskusyunan, we never had any argument or long discussion.” “Nu’ng sinabi namin na, ‘I think chance na nung theme na to na maipakita ng NU’. Ito ang pinaka-shortest na brainstorming ng mga coaches. Yun nga ito na yung tamang panahon para sa concept.” But aside from the extravagant costumes and props that they’ll use in the performance, it’s how they intend to execute the mix of the theme, music and their routines that's Bernabe’s most proud of. “Mahirap siyang i-execute kasi eh,” said the mentor. “Parang lahat kami paano natin ipapakita ang theme? From outer space, another something new. Something under naman tayo ngayon.” Breaking the curse For Cheerdance Competition pundits, no team has ever won the title performing first. NU is looking to break that curse. “May isa ngang nag-comment sa social media na, ‘Wag kayong magpakampante kasi wala pang nag-champion na first performer,’” said Bernabe, who was the one who drew NU’s order of performance during the drawing of lots. NU will open the competition followed by the DLSU Animo Squad, Adamson Pep Squad, FEU Cheering Squad, UE Pep Squad, UP Pep Squad, UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe, and Ateneo Blue Babble Battalion. But even with the odds of the draw going against them, Bernabe is optimistic that their performance won’t be easily forgotten by the judges. “May sumagot nga doon sa nagsabi nu’n (na wala pang nanalo na first performer) na supporter naman ng NU na, ‘Oo ngayon mo pa lang masasaksihan.’ Something na ganoon na ngayon pa lang mangyayari and mayroon namang nagsabi na, ‘Kayo ang magsi-set ng standard, NU.’ So parang positive pa rin naman yun,” Bernabe said. “Pero still ‘di naman kami robot na insensitive, manhid o walang pakiramdam. Nandoon pa rin ang pressure, never mawawala ‘yun. Nandoon din ang kaba, nerbiyos at fear,” added the mentor......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 1st, 2017

UST Salinggawi presses refresh for this year’s UAAP Cheerdance

Despite a coaching overhaul that saw the departure of longtime coach Ramon Pagaduan IV for the DLSU Animo Squad, a rejuvenated UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe is ready to make another leap in this year’s UAAP Cheerdance Competition. Last year’s fourth-placers will now be led by nurse and Salinggawi alumnus Mark Chaiwalla and squad president Benjo Gutierrez said the team has already been reaping in the rewards. “Very refreshed. Parang pinindot ang F5 10 times. Bagong-bago. Bago lahat – bagong latag, bagong piyesa, bago lahat, pero same culture pa rin,” Gutierrez said. Contrary to Pagaduan’s more polished and basic routines, the Salinggawi will now attempt more difficult, “buwis-buhay” stunts that will surely raise the eyebrows of the UST community – and just about everybody. In preparing for the six-minute routine, the graduating Gutierrez said there is no room for error or injury right now since there are no available replacements. Members of the team could only sacrifice their bodies to go for another podium finish – which will be its second in three years. Gutierrez however is not worried since Chaiwalla is a registered nurse and has been working at the UST Hospital before he was appointed last June. As such, he regularly checks in on his crew if they can take the practices physically. Since Chaiwalla’s arrival, there has been no time wasted as the team has already been preparing for the annual event since the third week of July. Although he estimates the team to be 87 percent polished at the time of the interview, he expects the team to be all-out when it’s their turn to present their routine. “Pag one-time, big-time, wala ka nang choice kung hindi ibigay ang lahat eh. Saka may adrenaline din naman sa competition.” Gutierrez said. The journalism major also praised the new coaching staff of Chaiwalla which includes assistant coach Dan Dimaculangan who has had experience working for Disney and is currently taking a vacation just to help out his alma mater. Alongside a new coaching regime, the Salinggawi president has noted that the team is tighter and closer than ever and that only reinforces their renewed sense of purpose for a “people’s coach.” While this will be Chaiwalla’s first coaching stint, the mindset of the team is not to just show up for the competition, but to try and dislodge the NU Pep Squad from the top. If not, at the very least, compete for a podium finish. “Yung routine na mismo namin ang magasasabi kung gaano kalaki ang ipinagbago namin from last year eh,” Gutierrez said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 28th, 2017

Change has come for much-improved DLSU Animo Squad

After another sixth-place finish in the UAAP Season 79 Cheerdance Competition, it seemed as though something needed to change for the DLSU Animo Squad. True enough, change did come, in the form of a familiar face in comebacking head coach Ramon Pagaduan. A tenured coach with a wealth of experience, Pagaduan was responsible for steering the famed UST Salinggawi Dance Troupe to a runner-up finish in 2015, a third-place finish in 2014, and fourth-place finishes in 2012 and 2017. Now, Pagaduan hopes to be able to bring the same level of success to Taft Avenue. This won’t be his first time at the helm for the Animo Squad as Pagaduan served as their head mentor from 2002 to 2007. “It feels good to be back, and I’m blessed that I was given the opportunity to coach them this year,” Pagaduan told ABS-CBN Sports. He firmly believes that his high-level experience can prove beneficial as the green and white attempts to reclaim lost glory. “It will definitely be a big help, in terms of discipline, choreography, and technique,” he said. Pagaduan immediately implemented his brand of leadership, which starts with the Animo Squad members’ lives outside of cheerdance. “Bumalik yung long hours of training, no to vices such as smoking and drinking and as much as possible dapat student-athlete lang sila. Any other extracurricular activities will not help the squad,” he said. Tough as it may sound, Pagaduan’s methods have worked, and his success with Salinggawi as well as with the four-peat champion St. Paul College Pasig Pep Squad and the Girls’ National Team should be a testament to how effective it is. It’s a new season, a new(-ish) coach, and a new start for the Animo Squad, and already Pagaduan promises that this season’s cheerdance competition will showcase DLSU’s improvement. “Better dance and transitions and clean execution with a pinch of difficulty sa cheer elements,” Pagaduan shared. “Hopefully, healthy lahat during the competition day and ma-hit yung routine accordingly.” And in the 2017 UAAP CDC, Pagaduan and the DLSU Animo Squad will try to get back on track to cheerdance excellence, but it won’t come any easier, as this year will also see the return of powerhouse University of the Philippines. “Good that they’re back.” Pagaduan said. Can the returning Pagaduan finally steer DLSU back to a top-three finish? We’ll find out soon enough......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 26th, 2017

LOOK: UP Pep Squad members celebrate graduation in cheerdance fashion

The past weekend was a special one for a number of Iskos and Iskas, as the University of the Philippines held their graduation rites.  For the students who finally completed their studies, the ceremony was the culmination of years of hard work and sacrifice to be able to call themselves UP graduates.  And among those who put on their Sablay for graduation were members of the UP Pep Squad, and of course, they celebrated being done with school the way only they know how...   At sumablay din! Ahhh what a feeling. Salamat UP 😊❤️💚 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ (sorry Oble. 😅) A post shared by Kar (@karlenesison) on Jun 24, 2018 at 3:08am PDT In front of the Oblation, former UP Pep Squad captain Karlene Sison and her fellow Pep Squad members formed a pyramid for a very unique graduation photo op.  Here's one they did at the UAAP Season 80 Cheerdance Competition, just for comparison.  Plus points for these gals and guys for pulling this off while wearing less-than-optimal Cheerdance attire. (AKA Barongs and dresses.) Congratulations to Karlene, the former UP Pep members, and each and every Isko and Iska that made it through last weekend!  Mabuhay kayo! .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 26th, 2018

LOOK: Former Lady Maroon Kathy Bersola survives 1st year of med school

From success inside the volleyball court and in her undergraduate studies, looks like Kathy Bersola has completed her first step towards her dream in the medical field The UAAP Season 76 Best Blocker bared that she had successfully endured and survived the first year of medicine proper at the University of the Philippines College of Medicine, and we're not really surprised.   Ya girl survived first year med student-athlete ++ life ✅💯💪🏻👩🏻‍⚕️🏐🏋🏻‍♀️ The year for me was all about adjustment, making big decisions, and new beginnings. It was never easy and I had to learn (the hard way) how to get used to this "new" life. It was extra hard during Volleyball season and when I had to rest because of an injury (also whenever exam results came out loljk 😆). Nevertheless, I enjoyed LU3 and I've learned and seen so much. I know I'm in the right place. 😌 Beyond grateful for everything this past year. 👆🏻#ByeLU3 #MedLife #TheDream #UPCM2022 #STP ❤️💚 A post shared by Kathy Bersola (@kb08_) on Jun 15, 2018 at 6:06am PDT UP's team captain for UAAP Season 78 graduated summa cum laude with a Sports Science degree from UP College of Human Kinetics. LO AND BEHOLD. This year's 36 summa cum laude graduates. pic.twitter.com/NPdwsTMIKi — The Diliman Files (@kwentongupd) June 19, 2017 She also bared to ABS-CBN Sports' Mark Escarlote last year that she wanted to pursue orthopedic and sports medicine specialties, proving that sports is really still close to her heart. “I’m planning to lean to orthopedic and sports medicine so I could help other athletes as well,” she then said. Once she completes everything, Bersola may now help athletes who suffer severe injuries, like herself in 2014, and help them towards taking the next step to recovery. We wish you the best of luck, KB!  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

UAAP wars

2017-2018 UAAP Chess Championship (Men’s) 2nd Flr., QPAV Building, UST, España St., Manila Feb. 17-April 8, 2018 Final Standings 1. National University (NU), 41.5/56 Bd01 IM Paulo Bersamina 14/14, Bd02 Robin Ignacio 4/8, Bd03 FM Austin Jacob Literatus 12/14, Bd04 Rafael Caneda 0/1, Bd05 Ryan Christian Magtabog 9.5/14, Bd06 Neil Conrad Pondoc 2/5. Team Captain: […] The post UAAP wars appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018

PVL: Can Vice Ganda’s magic touch turn men’s volleyball into a blockbuster?

A volleyball fan at heart and a low-key supporter of Far Eastern University’s stable of athletes, Vice Ganda needed no further convincing when approached to form his own team for the second edition of the Premier Volleyball League.  The ABS-CBN’s prized talent said yes no sooner than Berlin Paglinawan, a former PVL best opposite spiker, had made the request.   Paglinawan began his collegiate career playing for FEU, Vice Ganda’s alma mater, before transferring to National University. And that’s their connection.  This explains why the core of the Vice Company Blockbusters is made up of mainstays of the FEU Tamaraws who finished second in the UAAP last season.     Men’s volleyball fans until now are cheering the entry of Vice Ganda in the PVL, a two-year-old groundbreaking project of Sports Vision, the sports outfit that through its successful series of V Leagues has largely helped steer women’s volleyball to unprecedented popularity.    Everyone seems privy to how Vice Ganda has risen to the top of the local entertainment world, how he almost singlehandedly pushed the Kapamilya noontime show, It’s Showtime, to the pinnacle of the ratings game, and how his movies kept breaking box office records. With his official involvement in volleyball as a club owner and player – he is listed as a player wearing jersey no. 1 -- can his golden touch pull in the crowds for men’s volleyball? That’s the question foremost in every volleyball aficionado’s mind.   Shared passion  Another connection between Vice Ganda and Paglinawan, his team captain, is their common passion for volleyball.     The TV host-actor-standup comedian would be seen time and again rushing from his afternoon television program to wherever the volleyball action may be.     After helping win the NU Bulldogs’ back-to-back championships and eventually graduating from the UAAP, Paglinawan never stops from playing -- for different clubs in the defunct Spikers’ Turf, another event organized by Sports Vision, and now the PVL.  For his present ballclub, Paglinawan said he shed 10 kilos in one month to keep fit and sharp. He insisted that he did it for volleyball, not for health reasons. If that’s not passion for volleyball, then what is?    To the FEU Tamaraws’ juggernaut, Paglinawan, who did the recruiting for Vice Co., has added the tested might of middle blocker Kim Malabunga of reigning UAAP titlist NU and high-flying Paolo Publico of Adamson U, a discovery from Vigan City. The full lineup: Vice Ganda, Richard Solis, Cian Silang, Owen Suarez, Rikko Marmeto, Jude Garcia, JP Bugaoan, Redijohn Paler, Paolo Pablico, Jayson Ramos, Jack Kaligking, Berlin Paglinawan, Peter Quiel and Kim Malabunga. Sammy Gaddi, team manager; Rei Diaz Jr., head coach; Manolo Refugia and Brendon Santos, assistant coaches; and EJ Ramos, therapist/trainer......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018