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Trump scrambles as ‘shithole’ slur fuels global outrage

WASHINGTON, D.C.: US President Donald Trump sought to quell a global firestorm over his reported denunciation of immigration from “shithole countries” – a slur slammed at home and abroad as racist. The reported remarks – which drew unanimous condemnation from African nations at the UN and resulted in at least two US diplomats being called [...] The post Trump scrambles as ‘shithole’ slur fuels global outrage appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource: manilatimes_net manilatimes_netJan 13th, 2018

Trump scrambles as ‘shithole’ slur fuels outrage

WASHINGTON, D.C.: US President Donald Trump sought Friday to quell a global firestorm over his reported denunciation of immigration from “shithole countries” — a slur slammed at home and abroad as racist. Trump tweeted a convoluted denial early Friday about the comments allegedly made on Thursday at a White House meeting with lawmakers on immigration [...] The post Trump scrambles as ‘shithole’ slur fuels outrage appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Trump scrambles as ‘shithole’ slur fuels global outrage

WASHINGTON, D.C.: US President Donald Trump sought to quell a global firestorm over his reported denunciation of immigration from “shithole countries” – a slur slammed at home and abroad as racist. The reported remarks – which drew unanimous condemnation from African nations at the UN and resulted in at least two US diplomats being called [...] The post Trump scrambles as ‘shithole’ slur fuels global outrage appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Ad-hoc Trump fuels White House meltdown

WASHINGTON, USA – A White House lurching from crisis to crisis appeared close to complete meltdown Friday, March 2, as Donald Trump's staff struggled to limit damage from two impulsive moves with far-reaching consequences. Trump's off-the-cuff enticement of a global trade war  and calls for limits on the constitutional right to bear arms cleaved a schism between the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 3rd, 2018

U.S. Ambassador voices regret to African UN envoys after Trump slur

UNITED NATIONS, USA – US Ambassador Nikki Haley expressed regret on Thursday, January 18, to African ambassadors who were outraged by President Donald Trump's alleged description of African countries as "shithole" nations, the head of the African Group said. Haley asked to meet the African ambassadors at the United ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 19th, 2018

African countries unite at UN against Trump slur

New York - All African countries at the United Nations unanimously demanded on Friday that US President Donald Trump retract and apologise for his reported denunciation of immigration from "shithole".....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Raptors president Ujiri among NBA figures to decry Trump shithole slur

LOS ANGELES, USA – The Toronto Raptors' Nigerian president Masai Ujiri was just one NBA figure with a strong response on Friday, January 12, to US President Donald Trump's reported denunciation of immigration from 'shithole countries." While Trump took to Twitter to deny using the specific term, Democratic Senator Dick Durbin ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Trump uses slur to describe immigrants from Haiti, Africa

WASHINGTON DC, USA – President Donald Trump reportedly lashed out in a meeting on Thursday, January 11, with lawmakers about immigration reform, demanding to know why the US should accept citizens from what he called "shithole" countries. The comments, first reported by The Washington Post, sparked anger among Democrats and Republicans ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Climate envoys move forward, despite Trump

BONN: Negotiations to bolster the climate-saving Paris Agreement, crafted over two decades, closed in Bonn Saturday, deflated but not derailed by Donald Trump’s rejection of the treaty and defense of fossil fuels. The US President’s decision to yank the United States from the hard-fought global pact cast a long shadow over the talks, which ran [...] The post Climate envoys move forward, despite Trump appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 18th, 2017

Humans driving climate change: 50 US scientists’ report disputes Trump’s view

The rapid pace of global climate change is almost certainly driven by human activity, like burning fossil fuels, according to a US government report that contradicts assertions by President Donald Trump and members of his administration......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsNov 4th, 2017

US warns of unilateral Syria moves if UN fails to act – Al Jazeera

The United States has warned it could take unilateral action if the United Nations fails to respond to a suspected chemical attack on a rebel-held town in Syria that killed more than 80 people, including many children. &'8220;When the United Nations consistently fails in its duty to act collectively, there are times in the life of states that we are compelled to take our own action,&'8221; US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley said on Wednesday. The warning came during an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council called by France and Britain after an early morning attack on Tuesday in Khan Sheikhoun in Idlib province. Britain, France and the US presented a draft resolution demanding a full investigation of the attack, which they blamed on the Syrian government. But talks ended without a vote after Russia, an ally of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, said the text was &'8220;categorically unacceptable&'8221;. Syria has denied the allegations, while Russia had blamed the rebels, saying the deaths occurred when a government shell hit a rebel chemical weapons depot. Haley lashed out at Moscow for failing to rein in Damascus, standing in the council chamber to hold up photographs of victims &'' one showing a young child lying lifeless, a mask covering his face. &'8220;How many more children have to die before Russia cares?&'8221; she asked. &'8220;If Russia has the influence in Syria that it claims to have, we need to see them use it,&'8221; she said. &'8220;We need to see them put an end to these horrific acts.&'8221; The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitoring group said at least 86 people, including 30 children, were killed in the raid on Khan Sheikhoun. Dozens more were left gasping for air, convulsing, and foaming at the mouth, doctors said. If confirmed, it will be be the worst chemical weapons attack in Syria since 2013, when sarin gas was used on a rebel-held area of Damascus. &'8220;If we are not prepared to act, then this council will keep meeting, month after month to express outrage at the continuing use of chemical weapons and it will not end,&'8221; Haley said. &'8220;We will see more conflict in Syria. We will see more pictures that we can never unsee.&'8221; The draft resolution backs a probe by the Organisation of the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) and demands that Syria cooperate to provide information on its military operations on the day of the assault. Russia's Deputy Ambassador Vladimir Safronkov told the council the proposed measure was hastily prepared and unnecessary, but voiced support for an investigation. &'8220;The main task now is to have an objective inquiry into what happened,&'8221; he said. Negotiations continued on the proposed resolutions throughout most of Wednesday. Diplomats said it could come up for a vote at the council as early as Thursday. In a press conference at the White House later in the day, US President Donald Trump said the chemical attack had crossed &'8220;many, many lines&'8221; and had abruptly changed his thinking about Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. &'160; Only days earlier multiple members of Trump's administration had said Assad's ouster was no longer a US priority, drawing outrage from Assad critics in the United States and abroad. But Trump said Tuesday's attack &'8220;had a big impact on me &'' big impact&'8221;. &'8220;My attitude towards Syria and Assad has changed very much,&'8221; he said, but refused to telegraph any potential US military retaliation. Since the attack, Trump has been under increasing pressure to explain whether it was egregious enough to force a US response. Robert Ford, former US ambassador to Syria, expressed scepticism that Trump would resort to military action. &'8220;As a presidential candidate he could not have been more clear that he wanted to avoid military involvement in the Syrian civil war,&'8221; he told Al Jazeera. &'8220;For him to order military strikes, even limited military strikes, in response to the chemical attack in Idlib, would be a gigantic change and not one that I'm at all sure that the administration is actually going to do.&'8221; Ford said all fingers point to the Syrian government as the culprit of the attack. &'8220;I find it laughable that governments such as Russia would suggest that rebels have a chemical weapons capacity but they always seem to use it on their own people and never on the Syrian army,&'8221; he added. Idlib hospitals overwhelmed after suspected gas attack Trump's first reaction to the attack was to blame former president Barack Obama's &'8220;weakness&'8221; in earlier years for enabling Assad. Obama had put Assad on notice that using chemical weapons would cross a &'8220;red line&'8221; necessitating a US response, but then failed to follow through, pulling back from planned air strikes on Assad's forces after Congress would not vote to approve them. Trump and other critics have cited that as a key moment the US lost much global credibility. &'8220;I now have responsibility,&'8221; Trump said. &'8220;That responsibility could be made a lot easier if it was handled years ago.&'8221; Joshua Landis, director for the Centre of Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, told Al Jazeera that the US would likely warn Moscow if it was to resort to using military might in Syria. &'8220;They have to disambiguate and they have to make sure that they don’t hurt any Russian soldiers,&'8221; he said. &'8220;But there’s a wide palette of things they can do. They can bomb airports and destroy the [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 6th, 2017

Koreas extend conciliatory steps to Asian Games

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — With the Koreas, there's no separating their sports from their politics. The war-separated rivals will take their reconciliation steps to the Asian Games in Jakarta and Palembang, Indonesia, where they will jointly march in the opening ceremony and field combined teams in basketball, rowing and canoeing. "Sports have played the role of peacemaker between the Koreas," said Kim Seong-jo, vice chairman of South Korea's Olympic committee and the country's chef de mission at the Asian Games. "If the combined teams put out good performances and win medals, that would be putting the cherry on the top." North and South Korea have used sports diplomacy this year in a bid to decrease animosity and initiate a new round of global diplomatic efforts to resolve the nuclear standoff with Pyongyang. South Korea leaders consider goodwill gestures as crucial to keep the positive atmosphere alive for what could become a long and difficult attempt to persuade the North to give up its nuclear and missile programs. There's not much Seoul can do beyond such gestures, though, as joint economic projects are out of the question when lifting sanctions against North Korea is far beyond the South's control. The more substantial discussions on the North's denuclearization — including what, when and how it would occur— are always going to be between Washington and Pyongyang. Here's a look at what the Koreas are planning for the Asian Games and their ebbs and flows in sports diplomacy: ___ BLUE FLAGS AND COMBINED TEAMS In the opening ceremony in Jakarta, athletes from North and South Korea will parade together under the flag featuring a blue map that symbolized a unified Korean Peninsula. It will be virtual repeat of the joint march during February's Winter Olympics in the South Korean ski resort of Pyeongchang, minus the gloves, parkas and fur hats. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent hundreds of athletes, artists and government officials to the Pyeongchang Olympics. The Koreas also fielded their first combined Olympic team in women's ice hockey, which drew passionate support from crowds despite losing all five of its games with a combined score of 28-2. At the Asian Games, the Koreas will be expected to deliver more than just feel-good stories. There's pressure for the investment to yield gold. A group of 34 North Korean athletes, coaches and officials have been in South Korea since last month for combined teams in women's basketball and the men's and women's events in rowing and canoeing. Coach Lee Moon-kyu, who has retained a core of South Korean players who won gold at the 2014 Asian Games at home in Incheon, got a first-hand look at North Korean players during exhibitions in Pyongyang in early July. Lee later picked three North Korean players for the Asian Games squad, including center Ro Suk Yong. Lee will also have a North Korean assistant coach on his bench. The Koreans will face Taiwan, Indonesia, Kazakhstan and India in their preliminary group. South Korean forward Lim Yung-hui said the chemistry between the players has been improving. "The Northern players share the same goal of the gold medal and we talk a lot about how we should be putting out a good performance there," Lim said. "We weren't given much time, but we are practicing hard in a positive atmosphere." The Koreas will field combined teams in dragon boat events in canoeing and the lightweight men's four, lightweight men's eight and lightweight women's double sculls in rowing. If a combined team wins gold, athletes on the podium will hear the traditional folk song of "Arirang,"used in both Koreas as an unofficial anthem for peace, instead of their respective national anthems. The Korean athletes are likely to become an attraction at the Asian Games, where the international media will follow closely. At the Pyeongchang Olympics, South Korean figure skater Kam Alex Kang-chan created a media frenzy by taking a selfie with North Korea's Kim Ju Sik and posting it on Instagram. The photo recalled a famous 2016 selfie taken by two North and South Korean gymnasts at the Rio Olympics which International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach described as a "great gesture." ___ THEY DON'T ALWAYS PLAY NICE The Koreas have a history of using sports to foster diplomacy since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. The 1991 world table tennis championships in Japan were the first time the Koreas fielded a combined team at a major international event. The atmosphere wasn't always friendly, though. During the height of their Cold War rivalry and recurring periods of animosity since, sports often became an alternate political battlefield. North Korean athletes and coaches would reject handshakes with their South Korean competitors and berate South Korean reporters during news conferences. The sports detente of 1991 evaporated when a North Korean athlete who competed at the world judo championships in Barcelona defected and arrived in South Korea amid heavy media coverage. North Korea boycotted the 1986 Asian Games and the '88 Summer Olympics in Seoul, and relations dramatically worsened on the eve of the Seoul Olympics with the bombing of a South Korean passenger jet that killed all 115 aboard in December 1987. The inter-Korean warmth heading into this year's Asian Games contrasts with the awkwardness between the rivals surrounding the 2014 Asiad held in South Korea. Seoul's then-conservative government invited North Korean athletes to compete, but made it clear it had no interest in joint marches or combined teams. North Korean subsequently withdrew an offer to send its all-female cheering squad to Incheon after squabbling with the hosts over costs. North Korean leader Kim did send a senior government delegation to the closing ceremony, but they returned home without meeting then-South Korean President Park Geun-hye. The North was still seething over the Asian Game treatment years later as it gleefully observed Park's presidency crashing over a corruption scandal. "The Park Geun-hye group's mad confrontational racket is to blame for why (the North Korean) visit to Incheon did not result in improved relations," the North said in a statement in April last year. ___ WILL THE GOOD TIMES LAST? Kim has found a willing counterpart in Moon, a liberal who won the presidential by-elections to replace Park last year. Since the Pyeongchang Olympics, Kim has met Moon twice and leveraged the summits to get to U.S. President Donald Trump. After their June summit in Singapore, Kim and Trump issued a vague aspirational goal for a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula without describing specific plans. Sports exchanges and other goodwill gestures are important policy tools for Moon, who wants Seoul to be in the "driver's seat" in international efforts to deal with Pyongyang. The Koreas have also agreed to resume temporary reunions between relatives separated by the war and are holding military talks to reduce tensions across their heavily armed border. "Hopefully, (the Asian Games) will provide an opportunity to use sports to facilitate diplomacy and cooperation," Moon said while meeting Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi in Seoul last month. Seoul's presidential office hasn't announced yet whether Moon would attend the opening ceremony in Jakarta on Aug. 18. Whatever happens in Indonesia or with nuclear negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang, the Koreas will always have those heartening selfies posted by athletes. "Sports can be used to build momentum and trust, but they don't solve fundamental problems," said Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University and a policy adviser to Moon. "There's not much South Korea can currently do, but at least it's trying to actively do the things it can to keep the positive atmosphere alive. ".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Trump, EU trade talks excite markets; PSEi rushes past 7,600 level

The stock barometer rallied to the 7,600 level yesterday as foreign funds started flowing back to large-cap stocks while global trade tension eased. The main-share Philippine Stock Exchange index (.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 27th, 2018

Trump and CNN: A quarrel that s both good and bad

NEW YORK, USA – Donald Trump has been at frequent loggerheads with CNN since taking office, but their feud has become increasingly bitter as the channel's acerbic White House coverage fuels a boom in viewers. From reportedly raging that CNN was on the first lady's television set, to refusing to take ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 27th, 2018

Leading the charge towards decarbonization

There is an ongoing revolution in the global energy industry. Countries like Germany, Chile, India, and even China are weaning themselves off conventional fuels like oil and coal and are switching to renewable energy sources. Worldwide, massive efforts are being made to relieve the environmental pressures brought about by the world’s reliance on conventional fossil […] The post Leading the charge towards decarbonization appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJul 27th, 2018

China s Xi says no winner in any trade war

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa – China's President Xi Jinping on Wednesday, July 25, said there would be "no winner" in any global trade war, in a direct warning to US President Donald Trump who has threatened to slap levies on all Chinese imports . "A trade war should be rejected because there ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 25th, 2018

What to watch in commodities: Iran, big oil, miners, gold, crops

It’s getting ugly out there. Commodities are getting shaken up as investors fret about the fall-out from the global trade war, and as the White House turns up the heat against Iran. President Donald Trump just fired off a blunt, tweeted threat to counterpart Hassan Rouhani, and US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo upped the […].....»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

US dollar down on as Trump makes fresh threats vs China

The dollar dropped against the euro as comments by US President Donald Trump risked ratcheting up trade war tensions, while stocks diverged. Artjom Hatsaturjants, research analyst at Accendo Markets, said "market sentiment soured on President Trump criticising the Fed for hiking rates and threatening to go 'whole hog' on imposing tariffs on all $500 billion of Chinese imports to the US, further inflaming global trade tensions and putting at risk central bank independence". In an interview with CNBC television broadcast Friday, Trump threatened to slap all Chinese imported goods with tariffs, risking an escalation in global trade war tactics. "I'm ready to go 500," the Republican...Keep on reading: US dollar down on as Trump makes fresh threats vs China.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

Donald Trump’s many trade wars: A summary

As the Group of 20 finance ministers and central bankers prepare to meet in Buenos Aires, the United States is likely to face intense questions over its aggressive tariff policies. The US-China spat is the largest and broadest of several trade fights picked by President Donald Trump, who threatened on Friday to escalate even further. The growing share of international trade under threat has raised the prospect the escalating trade war could harm the global economy, shrinking investments and undermining supply chains. Here is a summary of Trump's multi-front trade conflicts: China After weeks of apparently fruitless negotiations, the United States early this month imposed 25 per...Keep on reading: Donald Trump’s many trade wars: A summary.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

At historic summit, Trump refuses to confront Putin on vote row

HELSINKI, Finland – To outrage in Washington, President Donald Trump on Monday, July 16, lent weight to Russian denials of meddling in US elections at his inaugural summit with Vladimir Putin , where the pair championed a fresh start in relations between the world's leading nuclear powers.  The US and Russian presidents came out ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

EU takes anti-Trump trade show to China and Japan

BRUSSELS: The European Union’s top officials will meet the leaders of China and Japan next week to boost ties in the face of fears that US President Donald Trump will spark an all-out global trade war. The trip by EU Council President Donald Tusk and Commission head Jean-Claude Juncker includes the signing of a free [...] The post EU takes anti-Trump trade show to China and Japan appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsJul 14th, 2018