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Trump, oldest first-time US president, turns 72

WASHINGTON, United States — President Donald Trump turned 72 on Thursday, having returned to the fray of Washington politics after his grueling trip to Singapore for the summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Trump in 2016 was the oldest person to assume the US presidency — he was 70 then — although Ronald […].....»»

Category: newsSource: tribune tribuneJun 14th, 2018

Trump turns down his ‘probable’ choice as Time’s ‘Person of the Year’

WASHINGTON, D.C.: US President Donald Trump on Friday (Saturday in Manila) said he turned down being named Time’s “Person of the Year” after the magazine asked him for an interview and photo shoot but did not confirm he would be chosen. This file photo obtained December 7, 2016 courtesy of TIME shows then US president-elect… link: Trump turns down his ‘probable’ choice as Time’s ‘Person of the Year’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsNov 26th, 2017

Opinion: Trade Tripper -- Jemy Gatdula: "Trump's foreign policy benefits the Philippines"

The oldest man to be US President was sworn in at noon last Friday (Washington time) at the Western front of the Capitol. And Donald Trump's inaugural speech, to be polite, wasn't the soaring rhetoric normally associated with the occasion. But perhaps it was the right kind of speech for the times......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJan 26th, 2017

U.S. denies China policy change after Taiwan leader speech in LA

WASHINGTON DC, USA – President Donald Trump's administration denied Tuesday, August 14, any change to its "One-China" policy after Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen made a political speech in the US, the first time in 15 years a Taiwanese leader has done so. Beijing said that it had lodged an official ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated News10 hr. 50 min. ago

Trump intent on projecting he’s hard at work – at golf club

BEDMINSTER, New Jersey --- President Donald Trump is spending his summer vacation at his golf club in New Jersey. Wait, don't call it "vacation." Trump, who is loath to admit to sleeping -- let alone taking time off -- has spent his week away mixing downtime and golf rounds with meetings and dinners, intent on projecting the image that he's been hard at work. Ensconced at his private club, he's surrounded by a clutch of unofficial Bedminster advisers, who have unusual levels of access to a president with the propensity for mixing business with leisure. Not that it was his idea to leave Washington anyway, he contends. "We're renovating the White House, a long-term project ...Keep on reading: Trump intent on projecting he’s hard at work – at golf club.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

Koreas extend conciliatory steps to Asian Games

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — With the Koreas, there's no separating their sports from their politics. The war-separated rivals will take their reconciliation steps to the Asian Games in Jakarta and Palembang, Indonesia, where they will jointly march in the opening ceremony and field combined teams in basketball, rowing and canoeing. "Sports have played the role of peacemaker between the Koreas," said Kim Seong-jo, vice chairman of South Korea's Olympic committee and the country's chef de mission at the Asian Games. "If the combined teams put out good performances and win medals, that would be putting the cherry on the top." North and South Korea have used sports diplomacy this year in a bid to decrease animosity and initiate a new round of global diplomatic efforts to resolve the nuclear standoff with Pyongyang. South Korea leaders consider goodwill gestures as crucial to keep the positive atmosphere alive for what could become a long and difficult attempt to persuade the North to give up its nuclear and missile programs. There's not much Seoul can do beyond such gestures, though, as joint economic projects are out of the question when lifting sanctions against North Korea is far beyond the South's control. The more substantial discussions on the North's denuclearization — including what, when and how it would occur— are always going to be between Washington and Pyongyang. Here's a look at what the Koreas are planning for the Asian Games and their ebbs and flows in sports diplomacy: ___ BLUE FLAGS AND COMBINED TEAMS In the opening ceremony in Jakarta, athletes from North and South Korea will parade together under the flag featuring a blue map that symbolized a unified Korean Peninsula. It will be virtual repeat of the joint march during February's Winter Olympics in the South Korean ski resort of Pyeongchang, minus the gloves, parkas and fur hats. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent hundreds of athletes, artists and government officials to the Pyeongchang Olympics. The Koreas also fielded their first combined Olympic team in women's ice hockey, which drew passionate support from crowds despite losing all five of its games with a combined score of 28-2. At the Asian Games, the Koreas will be expected to deliver more than just feel-good stories. There's pressure for the investment to yield gold. A group of 34 North Korean athletes, coaches and officials have been in South Korea since last month for combined teams in women's basketball and the men's and women's events in rowing and canoeing. Coach Lee Moon-kyu, who has retained a core of South Korean players who won gold at the 2014 Asian Games at home in Incheon, got a first-hand look at North Korean players during exhibitions in Pyongyang in early July. Lee later picked three North Korean players for the Asian Games squad, including center Ro Suk Yong. Lee will also have a North Korean assistant coach on his bench. The Koreans will face Taiwan, Indonesia, Kazakhstan and India in their preliminary group. South Korean forward Lim Yung-hui said the chemistry between the players has been improving. "The Northern players share the same goal of the gold medal and we talk a lot about how we should be putting out a good performance there," Lim said. "We weren't given much time, but we are practicing hard in a positive atmosphere." The Koreas will field combined teams in dragon boat events in canoeing and the lightweight men's four, lightweight men's eight and lightweight women's double sculls in rowing. If a combined team wins gold, athletes on the podium will hear the traditional folk song of "Arirang,"used in both Koreas as an unofficial anthem for peace, instead of their respective national anthems. The Korean athletes are likely to become an attraction at the Asian Games, where the international media will follow closely. At the Pyeongchang Olympics, South Korean figure skater Kam Alex Kang-chan created a media frenzy by taking a selfie with North Korea's Kim Ju Sik and posting it on Instagram. The photo recalled a famous 2016 selfie taken by two North and South Korean gymnasts at the Rio Olympics which International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach described as a "great gesture." ___ THEY DON'T ALWAYS PLAY NICE The Koreas have a history of using sports to foster diplomacy since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. The 1991 world table tennis championships in Japan were the first time the Koreas fielded a combined team at a major international event. The atmosphere wasn't always friendly, though. During the height of their Cold War rivalry and recurring periods of animosity since, sports often became an alternate political battlefield. North Korean athletes and coaches would reject handshakes with their South Korean competitors and berate South Korean reporters during news conferences. The sports detente of 1991 evaporated when a North Korean athlete who competed at the world judo championships in Barcelona defected and arrived in South Korea amid heavy media coverage. North Korea boycotted the 1986 Asian Games and the '88 Summer Olympics in Seoul, and relations dramatically worsened on the eve of the Seoul Olympics with the bombing of a South Korean passenger jet that killed all 115 aboard in December 1987. The inter-Korean warmth heading into this year's Asian Games contrasts with the awkwardness between the rivals surrounding the 2014 Asiad held in South Korea. Seoul's then-conservative government invited North Korean athletes to compete, but made it clear it had no interest in joint marches or combined teams. North Korean subsequently withdrew an offer to send its all-female cheering squad to Incheon after squabbling with the hosts over costs. North Korean leader Kim did send a senior government delegation to the closing ceremony, but they returned home without meeting then-South Korean President Park Geun-hye. The North was still seething over the Asian Game treatment years later as it gleefully observed Park's presidency crashing over a corruption scandal. "The Park Geun-hye group's mad confrontational racket is to blame for why (the North Korean) visit to Incheon did not result in improved relations," the North said in a statement in April last year. ___ WILL THE GOOD TIMES LAST? Kim has found a willing counterpart in Moon, a liberal who won the presidential by-elections to replace Park last year. Since the Pyeongchang Olympics, Kim has met Moon twice and leveraged the summits to get to U.S. President Donald Trump. After their June summit in Singapore, Kim and Trump issued a vague aspirational goal for a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula without describing specific plans. Sports exchanges and other goodwill gestures are important policy tools for Moon, who wants Seoul to be in the "driver's seat" in international efforts to deal with Pyongyang. The Koreas have also agreed to resume temporary reunions between relatives separated by the war and are holding military talks to reduce tensions across their heavily armed border. "Hopefully, (the Asian Games) will provide an opportunity to use sports to facilitate diplomacy and cooperation," Moon said while meeting Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi in Seoul last month. Seoul's presidential office hasn't announced yet whether Moon would attend the opening ceremony in Jakarta on Aug. 18. Whatever happens in Indonesia or with nuclear negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang, the Koreas will always have those heartening selfies posted by athletes. "Sports can be used to build momentum and trust, but they don't solve fundamental problems," said Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University and a policy adviser to Moon. "There's not much South Korea can currently do, but at least it's trying to actively do the things it can to keep the positive atmosphere alive. ".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

South Korea’s diehard Trump supporters hail “guardian of liberty”

SEOUL — Every time an image of U.S. President Donald Trump appears on TV in South Korea, 69-year-old Vietnam War veteran Chung Seung-jin solemnly salutes. The US flag Chung keeps in his home in Seoul gets similar respect every morning. “I salute President Trump and the U.S. flag every day to show how much I […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsAug 6th, 2018

3 hurdles to clear on the road to U.S. immigration reform

Immigration is one of the most hotly debated issues of our time, often dividing Republicans and Democrats as reform measures are discussed. Rather than build a wall along the border as President Donald Trump, for economic reasons alone, it's time to put politics aside and build consensus for immigration reform. As a conservative, free-market proponent, Mexican American lawyer and Trump supporter, I'm passionate about positive immigration reform because its economic benefits would be extraordinary. Reforming our immigration system will ensure that businesses have access to those workers and that our economy thrives. Immigrants comprise about 25 million people in the Americ...Keep on reading: 3 hurdles to clear on the road to U.S. immigration reform.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

Trump ready to meet Iran leader

“They want to meet, I’ll meet. Any time they want. WASHINGTON — US President Donald Trump said here on Monday that he is ready to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani without preconditions. “I’d meet with anybody. I believe in meeting,” Trump told a joint news conference with visiting Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte, when […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 1st, 2018

Trump says willing to meet with Iran leaders any time

WASHINGTON DC, USA – Donald Trump seemed to jettison threats of impending war with Iran on Monday, July 30, saying he was willing to meet the country's leaders without precondition, a dramatic about-face by the enigmatic US president. Barely a week after warning Iran it would ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

Pressure mounting, former Trump ’fixer’ turns aggressive

WASHINGTON --- The hiring of a Washington insider to be a public attack dog. Tantalizing leaks to the media. Puzzling allegations of actions that could fell a president. Talk of more to come. What is Michael Cohen up to? President Donald Trump's ex-lawyer has largely stayed out of the spotlight in the months since federal agents raided his office and hotel room and seized scores of records about his work for Trump. But this week, he has taken a sharply more aggressive and public turn, seeming to wage open warfare with the White House while weighing whether to cooperate with investigators. The moves suggest Cohen is looking for a way out of looming trouble. But his behavio...Keep on reading: Pressure mounting, former Trump ’fixer’ turns aggressive.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 28th, 2018

Roseanne Barr will appear on TV for first time since firing

LOS ANGELES (AP) --- Roseanne Barr will appear on television for the first time since she was fired from ABC and her namesake show was canceled. Barr will be a guest on the Fox News show "Hannity" on Thursday at 9 p.m. EDT. ABC canceled its successful reboot of "Roseanne" in May following the star's racist tweet likening former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to a cross between the Muslim Brotherhood and a "Planet of the Apes" actor. Barr recorded a podcast interview last month in which she said she feels remorse about the tweet. During the live interview Thursday, she's expected to discuss the tweet as well as President Donald Trump. ABC said it ordered 10 episodes of a...Keep on reading: Roseanne Barr will appear on TV for first time since firing.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 25th, 2018

What to watch in commodities: Iran, big oil, miners, gold, crops

It’s getting ugly out there. Commodities are getting shaken up as investors fret about the fall-out from the global trade war, and as the White House turns up the heat against Iran. President Donald Trump just fired off a blunt, tweeted threat to counterpart Hassan Rouhani, and US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo upped the […].....»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

Few good options on anthem protests for NFL owners

By Jimmy Golen, Associated Press The controversy over NFL players protesting during the national anthem isn't going away, despite — or perhaps because of — team owners' efforts to stop players from using the forum to speak out on political causes. The league's attempt to turn responsibility for disciplining protesters over to individual teams backfired on Thursday when the Miami Dolphins tried to categorize raising a fist or kneeling during the anthem as "conduct detrimental to the club." That gave them the right to punish a player with a fine or up to a four-game suspension — one game more than Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston got when he was accused of groping an Uber driver. Hours after The Associated Press reported on Miami's rules, the NFL and the players union issued a joint statement saying they were putting any anthem conduct policy on hold to see if they could come up with a compromise. But the owners aren't left with many good options to diffuse the controversy, especially with President Donald Trump eager to fan the flames. Here's a look at some of them: LEAVE IT TO THE TEAMS The Plan: The league's solution, which the NFL Players Association challenged, was to allow each team to determine whether to punish its own players for protesting during the anthem. The policy adopted in May by team owners subjected clubs to fines and required players to stand if they are on the field during "The Star-Spangled Banner," though it allowed players to stay in the locker room if they wished. This would have given hard-line owners in conservative regions a chance to clamp down while allowing teams in more liberal areas to let their players have their say. As it turned out, all it did was punt the ball down the road. The Winners: None. With players punished in some cities and protesting freely in others, there would always be plenty to complain about for those inclined to do so. And everyone seems inclined to do so these days. The Losers: NFL owners. Any punishment is destined to divide the locker room and the fandom; should a team actually suspend a significant contributor, it would only be hurting itself. And the guarantee of unequal treatment between and within teams would surely keep the issue in the news for yet another season. GO BACK TO THE OLD WAY The Plan: Ask players to stand at attention during the national anthem, and hope that they do. The Winners: Players, who would retain the ability to call attention to causes they believe in, namely racial inequality and police brutality . And President Trump, who gets applause any time he attacks the protesting players as he stumps for Republicans in the November midterm elections. The Losers: NFL owners, or at least those like Houston's Bob McNair who have chafed at the notion of the "inmates running the prison." They lose control and remain a subject of Trump's ridicule. KEEP PLAYERS IN THE LOCKER ROOM DURING THE ANTHEM The Plan: Players can't protest during the anthem if they aren't on the field during the anthem. Or so the theory goes. But the demonstrations were never about the anthem itself; it started as a way for 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick to protest racial inequality and expanded into a league-wide us-vs.-them after Trump's hollered at one rally: "Get that son of a bitch off the field." The Winners: Fans who were triggered by the sight of players kneeling during the song. And players, who could surely find another forum for their protests. The Losers: NFL owners. The president has already said this isn't patriotic enough for him, so there's little hope of him easing up on his criticism. And it would cost them the connection to the flag and country they have worked hard to cultivate. COMPROMISE The Plan: Other sports worked with their players so that they didn't have to protest to be heard. Maybe the owners make a donation to the players' pet projects, play a video on the scoreboard, or otherwise give them a forum for their concerns. The Winners: Players. It's not about the protest, it's about the cause. The Losers: NFL owners. Even if they could stomach the loss of control, the political intrusion on the sport is bound to alienate some fans. STOP PLAYING THE ANTHEM BEFORE GAMES The Plan: Join almost every other country in the world and skip the forced display of patriotism that demands players stand at attention while fans check their phones, finish their hot dogs or take the opportunity to visit the bathroom. If teams want to honor the military or local first-responders, let them do so free from marketing deals. The Winners: Fans who don't consider the anthem an integral part of the sports experience, giving them another 90 seconds in to spend in game day traffic without missing anything. The Losers. NFL owners. Concessionaires. And a whole generation of American Idol also-rans......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 21st, 2018

Trump s latest spelling blunder: collusion as colusion

It seems hardly surprising now that United States President Donald Trump made another spelling blunder, this time beyond the realm of Twitter: in a press conference with lawmakers. ........»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 18th, 2018

WORLD CUP KICKOFF: A look at the World Cup’s final day

MOSCOW (AP) — Here’s a look at what’s coming up at the World Cup , which is down to its final day, featuring the title match Sunday in Moscow between France and Croatia. PUTIN REAPPEARS The Russian president has kept a fairly low profile at the World Cup considering he’s more or less the man behind the tournament. Vladimir Putin attended the opening match a month ago in Moscow, a 5-0 win over Saudi Arabia that kicked off a surprising quarterfinal run for the home team. That’s evidently the only soccer he’s seen in person, though he has hosted a handful of events involving FIFA officials in and around Red Square, including a Saturday evening concert at the Bolshoi Theater. Putin was to meet with French President Emmanuel Macron and Croatian President Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic on Sunday ahead of the final, then attend the match at Luzhniki Stadium a short drive from the Kremlin before heading off to meet U.S. President Donald Trump in Finland on Monday. WORLD CUP-CLASS ENTERTAINMENT If Putin is into Puerto Rican pop, he’s in for a treat. The tournament’s official song, “Live It Up,” has showed up at World Cup stadiums about as often as Putin himself. It will be showcased Sunday when Will Smith joins singers Nicky Jam and Era Istrefi in performing it during the closing ceremony. The song is innocuous enough, but that doesn’t mean some controversy couldn’t crop up. Though the three avoided anything sensitive during their news conference this week, Istrefi has ruffled feathers in the past on a topic that caused problems earlier in the tournament: An ethnic Albanian from Kosovo, she upset some conservative Serbs last year when she shot a music video inside an Orthodox Church. FIFA fined several Swiss players, also ethnic Albanians, who made pro-Albania symbols with their hands in a comeback win over Serbia in the group stage. WHO’LL TAKE HOME THE HARDWARE England’s Harry Kane has six goals to his credit, making him a near lock to win the Golden Boot , awarded to the tournament’s top scorer. The awards based on judgment calls are more up in the air. Croatia midfielder Luka Modric is a good bet to be named player of the tournament if he plays well again and Croatia wins. But the Golden Ball could just as easily go to Kylian Mbappe or Antoine Griezmann if France triumphs. Best goalkeeper? Maybe the toughest call of all. The two playing Sunday — France captain Hugo Lloris and Croatian sensation Danijel Subasic — and England’s Jordan Pickford all have strong cases in a tournament where several ’keepers have excelled. OH, AND THAT OTHER TROPHY Will France win its second World Cup, or Croatia its first? That could come down to the Croats’ stamina. No team has played three extra-time matches in the same World Cup, as Croatia has done in its past three contests. Moreover, France has had one more day to prepare because its semifinal preceded Croatia’s. “An extra 24 hours is a really big thing at this stage of the tournament,” Belgium coach Roberto Martinez noted Saturday, allowing for what edge his side might’ve had in its 2-0 win over England in the third-place match. On the other hand, Croatia has defied logic on this once already. It was faced with a fast, younger, relatively rested team in its semifinal against England, just as it is against France. After going down a goal, the Croats steadily grew stronger, controlling the game and beating opponents to the ball as if they were the ones with fresh legs, finally getting the winner in extra time. France will be favored for a lot of other good reasons , but another upset shouldn’t surprise anyone who’s been watching Croatia or the rest of this upset-filled World Cup. Catch the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ Final between France and Croatia on July 15, Sunday, 11 PM LIVE on S+A, S+A HD, LIGA, LIGA HD and via livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 15th, 2018

No shove, but Trump body language speaks to frosty relations

He didn’t shove anyone this time, but President Donald Trump’s body language during NATO events Wednesday suggested his relationships with key U.S. allies aren’t exactly buddy-buddy. No shove, but Trump body language speaks to frosty relations He didn’t shove anyone this time, but President Donald Trump’s body language during NATO events Wednesday suggested his relationships… link: No shove, but Trump body language speaks to frosty relations.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

Trump orchestrates a 'Supreme' show at a critical time

In this Jan. 31, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, to announce Judge Neil Gorsuch, standing with his wife Louise, as his nominee for.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

Bolton: US plans to dismantle North Korea nukes in year

WASHINGTON, United States --- The United States has a plan that would lead to the dismantling of North Korea's nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs in a year, President Donald Trump's national security adviser said Sunday, although U.S. intelligence reported signs that Pyongyang doesn't intend to fully give up its arsenal. John Bolton said top U.S. diplomat Mike Pompeo will be discussing that plan with North Korea in the near future. Bolton added that it would be to the North's advantage to cooperate to see sanctions lifted quickly and aid from South Korea and Japan start to flow. Bolton's remarks on CBS' "Face the Nation" appeared to be the first time the Trump admin...Keep on reading: Bolton: US plans to dismantle North Korea nukes in year.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

Global stocks sink on festering trade war

New York — World stock markets sank Monday (US time) on worries over a festering global trade war amid reports President Donald Trump plans new curbs on Chinese investment in America. The selloff, which began in Asia, and continued through the European and US sessions, rendered trading screens a sea of red across the globe. […].....»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJun 26th, 2018

Trump pushes tough immigration stance in Nevada appearance

LAS VEGAS --- Eager to keep the Republican Party in control of the Senate, President Donald Trump pressed his tough anti-illegal immigration stance before supporters Saturday, saying "we have to be very strong" as he sought to help boost the candidacy of a one-time critic. Trump was in Las Vegas to assist Dean Heller, the only Republican U.S. senator seeking re-election in a state that Democrat Hillary Clinton won in 2016. Trump and Heller have papered over their once prickly relationship to present a united front in their shared goal of helping Republicans maintain, if not expand, their thin 51-49 majority in the Senate in November's congressional elections. Heller was among t...Keep on reading: Trump pushes tough immigration stance in Nevada appearance.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 24th, 2018