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Trump fires Tillerson as Secretary of State

Trump fires Tillerson as Secretary of State.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: pep pepMar 13th, 2018

Japan bids farewell to Tillerson; South Korea awaits Pompeo

TOKYO/SEOUL — Japan’s foreign minister said on Wednesday he personally regretted the departure of “frank, trustworthy” US Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson ahead of a proposed summit between President Donald J. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Mr. Trump fired Mr. Tillerson on Tuesday after a series of public rifts over policy […] The post Japan bids farewell to Tillerson; South Korea awaits Pompeo appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMar 14th, 2018

Tillerson on Trump-Kim talk details: Stay ‘patient’

ABUJA/SEOUL — Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson said the US expects North Korea to be in direct touch after President Donald J. Trump agreed to Kim Jong Un’s invitation to meet, urging patience as preparations for the potentially historic handshake are worked out. “We’ve not heard anything directly back from North Korea, although we […] The post Tillerson on Trump-Kim talk details: Stay ‘patient’ appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMar 13th, 2018

US, Mexico play up increased security cooperation

MEXICO CITY: Secretary of State Rex Tillerson insisted Friday the US and Mexico are bolstering cooperation in the fight against drug trafficking, brushing aside concerns about the impact of his boss Donald Trump’s anti-Mexican barbs. The US-Mexican relationship has been strained by Trump’s attacks on Mexican immigrants and the North American Free Trade Agreement — [...] The post US, Mexico play up increased security cooperation appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 3rd, 2018

Seoul: North Korea to send delegation to Olympics in South

By Hyung-Jin Kim, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea agreed Tuesday to send a delegation to next month's Winter Olympics in South Korea, Seoul officials said, as the bitter rivals sat for rare talks at the border to discuss how to cooperate in the Olympics and improve their long-strained ties. The Koreas' first talks in two years were arranged after North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un recently made an abrupt push for improved ties with South Korea after a year of elevated tensions with the outside world over his expanding nuclear and missile programs. Critics say Kim may be trying to divide Seoul and Washington in a bid to weaken international pressure and sanctions on the North. During the talks, the North Korean delegation said it would send an Olympic delegation, which includes officials, athletes, cheerleaders, journalists and others, South Korea's Vice Unification Minister Chun Hae-sung told reporters, according to media footage from the border village of Panmunjom, the venue for the talks. The South Korean delegation, for its part, proposed North Korea send a big delegation and conduct a joint march during the Feb. 9-25 Game's opening and closing ceremonies, Chun, one of the five South Korean negotiators, said. He said South Korea also suggested resuming temporary reunions of families separated by war and offering military talks designed to reduce animosities in frontline areas. South Korea also stressed the need to achieve denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, Chun said. North Korea responded by saying the two Koreas must try to promote peace and reconciliation through dialogue, he said. The two sides were to continue their negotiations later Tuesday at Panmunjom, the only place on the tense border where North and South Korean soldiers are just feet away from each other. A North Korean soldier late last year defected to the South across Panmunjom amid a hail of bullets fired by his comrades. He was hit five times but survived. The meeting began with an amicable atmosphere Tuesday morning, with chief North Korean delegate Ri Son Gwon saying he hopes the talks would give "a New Year's first gift — precious results (of the talks) to the Korean nation." Ri's South Korean counterpart, Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon, said he also hopes they would come up with a "good gift" for people in both Koreas. The overall prospect for the negotiations was still unclear. The two Koreas have a long history of ending key talks without any agreement and failing to follow through with rapprochement accords. An agreement on the North's Olympic participation had been widely expected before the talks began, but the Koreas remain sharply at odds over how to improve their overall ties. North Korea is expected to demand rewards in return for South Korea's offer for family reunions and military talks, like Seoul halting propaganda broadcasts and scaling back or halting military drills with the U.S., observers say. Suspension of the military drills would be unacceptable for Seoul because that would seriously undermine the alliance with its chief ally the United States, which wants to put more pressures on Pyongyang. The North views the drills as a rehearsal for a northward invasion. President Donald Trump on Saturday expressed hope for some progress from the talks and said he was open to talking with Kim himself. But U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley later said the U.S. administration isn't changing its conditions regarding talks with North Korea, saying Kim would first need to stop weapons testing for a "significant amount of time." In his New Year's Day address, Kim said there is an urgent need to improve inter-Korean ties and that he is willing to send a delegation to the Pyeongchang Games. He urged Seoul to halt the military drills with the U.S. and said he has a "nuclear button" to launch missiles at any target in the United States. South Korean liberal President Moon Jae-in, who favors dialogue as a way to defuse the North Korean nuclear standoff, welcomed Kim's outreach and proposed talks at Panmunjom. Kim quickly accepted. "As President Moon has said, the improvement of relations between North and South Korea cannot advance separately from resolving North Korea's nuclear program," Brian Hook, a chief adviser to U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, told reporters in a conference call late Monday Washington time. "And so, we remain focused on our global pressure campaign. That campaign is designed to bring Kim Jong Un to the table for meaningful negations." The Trump administration agreed last week to delay springtime military drills with South Korea until after the Games. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis insisted the delay was a practical necessity to accommodate the Olympics, not a political gesture. Trump and Kim traded bellicose warlike rhetoric and even crude insults last year, as the North conducted it sixth and most powerful nuclear detonation and three tests of intercontinental ballistic missiles. The International Olympic Committee said Monday it has "kept the door open" for North Korea to take part in the Games. IOC spokesman Mark Adams said the registration deadline has been extended and that the Switzerland-based committee supports North Korean athletes in the qualification process, while respecting U.N. sanctions against North Korea......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Trump seeks to quash Tillerson sacking rumor

  WASHINGTON DC, USA – President Donald Trump on Friday, December 1, tried to shut down reports that he is on the verge of sacking or forcing out his chief diplomat, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Trump took to Twitter to brand reports of Tillerson's imminent replacement "FAKE NEWS!" – although the US leader's ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

Trump weighs plan to oust Tillerson, put CIA s boss at State

WASHINGTON — After months of clashes on policy and personality, President Donald Trump is considering ousting Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and replacing.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 1st, 2017

Asia’s rich and mighty exposed in Paradise Papers

Over a year-and-a-half after the Panama Papers leaks, another financial data leak by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) has bared the secret offshore activities of some of the world's most powerful people and companies. The Paradise Papers -- 13.4 million leaked documents -- have exposed the high and mighty who conduct businesses in known tax havens in order to avoid paying taxes. If last year's Panama Papers cost leaders in Iceland and Pakistan their jobs, the Paradise Papers have turned the heat on 13 members of the Trump cabinet, including Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Louis Ross Jr, who have been named in the leaks....Keep on reading: Asia’s rich and mighty exposed in Paradise Papers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

Trump dump delights peckish Japanese koi fish, outrages Twitter

US President DonaldTrumpsparked a feeding frenzy on social media Monday when he was photographed dumping a box of fish food into a pond ofkoicarp during his trip to Japan. Trumpand his Japanese host Shinzo Abe began by delicately spooning out the food into the pond to the waitingkoi, which had been rounded up by a clapping Japanese aide. The US leader apparently lost patience with this method and upended his entire wooden box into the pond. The incident caused outrage among fish lovers on Twitter, with many pointing out that fish cannot absorb a large amount of food at a time. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, standing just behindTrump, appeared to break out in lau...Keep on reading: Trump dump delights peckish Japanese koi fish, outrages Twitter.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 6th, 2017

Beijing says U.S. should abandon its biased views of China

BEIJING, China – China said Thursday, October 19, the United States should "abandon its biased views" towards the country, as it hit back at cutting remarks made by US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Ahead of his visit to India next week, President Donald Trump's top diplomat stated the US preference ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 19th, 2017

I m intact, Tillerson says, brushing off drama with Trump

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Sunday ducked, danced and sidestepped the question of whether he truly called President Donald Trump a "moro.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 16th, 2017

‘I’m intact,’ Tillerson says, brushing off drama with Trump

WASHINGTON --- Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Sunday ducked, danced and sidestepped the question of whether he truly called President Donald Trump a "moron," dismissing the brouhaha as the "petty stuff" of Washington. Though they keep coming, Tillerson insisted the persistent queries aren't hindering his mission as the nation's top diplomat. Asked about a leading GOP senator's comment --- "You cannot publicly castrate your own secretary of state" --- Tillerson would have none of it. "I checked. I'm fully intact." Again and again, Tillerson declined in a news show interview to attest to the accuracy of the report about his use of the word "moron" to describe the commander i...Keep on reading: ‘I’m intact,’ Tillerson says, brushing off drama with Trump.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 16th, 2017

US diplomacy with North Korea to continue until ‘first bomb drops’ – Tillerson

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Sunday that President Donald Trump had instructed him to continue diplomatic efforts to calm rising tensions with North Korea, saying “those diplomatic efforts will continue until the first bomb drops.” Source link link: US diplomacy with North Korea to continue until ‘first bomb drops’ – Tillerson.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsOct 16th, 2017

Trump s jibe deepens feud with Tillerson; he was joking?

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump challenged Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to "compare IQ tests," delivering a sharp-edged ribbing that threw a bright s.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 11th, 2017

Trump says envoy wasting his time talking to North Korea

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Sunday that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was "wasting his time" trying to negotiate with North Korea over its nu.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2017

Top US diplomat Tillerson to travel to China this week

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will visit China this week to discuss President Donald Trump's planned travel to the region and North Korea......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

Bolton says he’s no longer allowed to see Trump – CNN News

A hawkish ally of Donald Trump claims he cannot see the President due to &'8220;staff changes&'8221; at the White House. John Bolton, a former US ambassador to the UN who at one point was a candidate to lead the State Department, claimed in a National Review op-ed published Monday that his plan for the US to exit the Iran nuclear deal had to be presented publicly, because staff changes at the White House have made &'8220;presenting it to President Trump impossible.&'8221; CNN has reached out to the White House for comment. His alleged snubbing is the latest development in the tug-of-war for influence over Trump's White House between firebrands such as Bolton and those who have taken a more moderate approach to foreign policy, such as Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Defense Secretary James Mattis. Bolton's op-ed comes days after Sebastian Gorka, who advocated a hawkish stance against terrorism, left his position as a White House adviser. Chief of staff John Kelly, who assumed the role in late July, has been conducting a review of the West Wing that includes assessing individual staffers' portfolios. In a memo drawn up after a July directive from Steve Bannon, the recently ousted White House chief strategist, Bolton pushes for selling the idea of leaving the Iran deal to the public in a &'8220;white paper&'8221; and lays out a strategy for the &'8220;campaign&'8221; and its &'8220;execution.&'8221; Bolton has been frustrated at the rise of more traditional foreign policy thinkers within the White House, such as Mattis and Tillerson, who have favored remaining in the deal. The agreement curbs Iran's nuclear weapons program in exchange for the lifting of sanctions. Iran remains under multiple sanctions for terrorism-related activities. &'8220;Trump can and should free America from this execrable deal at the earliest opportunity,&'8221; Bolton writes. Where proponents of the deal, including lawmakers and former Obama administration officials, see the pact as a way to get visibility on Iran's nuclear activities, and, at least for the time being, stop it's nuclear program, Bolton sees only danger. &'8220;The JCPOA is a threat to US national-security interests, growing more serious by the day,&'8221; Bolton writes, though he doesn't offer evidence. &'8220;If the President decides to abrogate the JCPOA, a comprehensive plan must be developed and executed to build domestic and international support for the new policy.&'8221; His memo, he says, fills that function. &'8220;It is only five pages long, but like instant coffee, it can be readily expanded to a comprehensive, 100-page playbook if the administration were to decide to leave the Iran agreement,&'8221; Bolton writes. He adds that there is no need to wait for the next deadline in October, when the US must next certify that Iran is sticking to the deal. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, known as the JCPOA, was an international agreement hammered out over 20 arduous months of negotiations. China, France, Germany, Russia, the UK, the US, the EU and Iran reached a deal in July 2015 and it was implemented in January 2016. The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency has regular access to nuclear sites inside Iran and verifies that it is implementing its side of the deal; in exchange, the US, UN and EU lifted nuclear related sanctions. Every 90 days, the US president must certify that Iran is keeping up its end of the deal. Trump campaigned against the deal and continues to criticize it, but because Iran is complying, he has certified it twice on the advice of his national security staff. But officials in his administration have clearly been looking for ways to find wiggle room to get out of the deal. Some, like US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley, have used the line that Iran is not complying with the &'8220;spirit&'8221; of the deal, pointing to Tehran's activities in the region, including its support for Houthi rebels in Yemen and its backing of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Bolton says that Trump can bolster his case for abrogating the deal &'8220;by providing new, declassified information on Iran's unacceptable behavior around the world.&'8221; These activities, though, are not part of the JCPOA, deliberately left as a separate issue by the Obama administration and the other international negotiators, who said that to include every single gripe with Iran would make negotiations too unwieldy to resolve. Some proponents of the deal, watching the Trump administration's moves, are already campaigning to keep it. They point to the security consequences of an Iran without constraints on its nuclear weapons program and to the economic fallout as European and Asian firms would likely continue to do business with Tehran while US firms are shut out. &'8220;Accordingly,&'8221; Bolton writes, &'8220;we must explain the grave threat to the US and our allies, particularly Israel.&'8221; But many in Israel's security establishment argue for keeping the deal in place, and making sure its implementation is as rigorous as possible. Bolton makes the case for a four-step campaign that begins with &'8220;early, quiet consultations with key players such as the UK, France, Germany, Israel and Saudi Arabia, to tell them we are going to abrogate the deal based on outright violations and other unacceptable Iranian behavior, and seek their input.&'8221; That would be followed by a detailed white paper that includes declassified intelligence explaining why the deal hurts US security interests; a diplomatic campaign against the deal, especially in Europe and the Middle East; and efforts to sway lawmakers and the [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsAug 30th, 2017

Tillerson denies suggestions he will resign

WASHINGTON, D.C.: US Secretary of State on Wednesday (Thursday in Manila) Rex Tillerson denied suggestions that he plans to resign because of disagreement with the White House. &'8220;I'm not going anywhere,&'8221; Tillerson told reporters said as received Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al-Thani. Tillerson described his relationship with President Donald Trump as &'8220;good&'8221; [...].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 27th, 2017

Russia cancels meeting with US on improving relations amid updated sanctions – ABC News

The Russian deputy foreign minister has canceled his meeting with his American counterpart –- a long-planned summit to address more minor problems in the relationship –- because of the updated U.S. sanctions announced yesterday. Under Secretary of State Tom Shannon is traveling to London now, but he will not continue on to St. Petersburg Friday, as previously scheduled. The State Department officially announced his travel yesterday, seemingly caught off guard by Russia’s cancellation that dealt a serious blow to the Trump administration’s efforts to improve relations. In a strongly worded statement, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Rybakov said Russia was canceling the meeting because the U.S. ruined the circumstances by announcing updated sanctions yesterday and by not returning two Russian diplomatic compounds in Maryland and New York. &'8220;The new American jab will not go without reaction from our side, including practical reciprocal measures,&'8221; he warned. Rybakov went on to rail against America for the current state of poor relations between the two countries and declare that sanctions will never force Russia to &'8220;submit.&'8221; &'8220;In the U.S., of course, they can further soothe themselves with the illusions that they can 'pressure' Russia. Many previous 'waves' of American sanctions have not brought the result on which their initiators counted. Just as futile will be any new attempts to force the Russian side to 'submit,'&'8221; he said. But the State Department fired back, offering a strong defense of those sanctions, while clarifying that the announcement yesterday simply brought them up to date without adding anything new. The Treasury Department announced Tuesday that it was adding 38 pro-Russian individuals and entities to existing sanctions against Russia. &'8220;Let’s remember that these sanctions didn’t just come out of nowhere. Our targeted sanctions were imposed in response to Russia’s ongoing violation of the sovereignty and territorial integrity of its neighbor, Ukraine. If the Russians seek an end to these sanctions, they know very well the U.S. position,&'8221; said State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert in her own strongly worded statement. She added that the U.S. remains open to future discussions, but those sanctions will remain until Russia ends its occupation of Crimea and meets its obligations under the Ukrainian peace deal known as the Minsk agreement. President Trump and his Secretary of State Rex Tillerson have been advocating for improving relations with Russia, arguing that the world's two greatest nuclear powers should not be at odds and that there are areas of common grounds, like fighting ISIS. The planned meeting between Shannon and Rybakov would have been the second, after a May meeting in New York. The two senior officials were tasked by their bosses, Tillerson and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, to lead a working group to deal with &'8220;irritants&'8221; in the relationship -– including the Russian diplomatic compounds. The State Department confirmed earlier this month that returning those compounds would have been part of the discussions at Friday’s summit, despite bipartisan calls on Capitol Hill not to do so. Now, it seems, their return has become more uncertain. In addition to the current updated sanctions, the Senate voted overwhelmingly in favor of a bill last week that would expand sanctions on Russia and prevent the administration from making changes to any Russian sanctions without Congressional approval. The White House hasn't said if the president would sign the bill, but the Republican House leadership has held it up, citing a procedural issue that will delay a vote for now. Tillerson had expressed reservation about the legislation when testifying on the Hill last week, saying he needed &'8220;the flexibility to turn the heat up when we need to, but also to ensure that we have the ability to maintain a constructive dialogue.&'8221; After Russia scrapped Friday's summit, any sort of dialogue is expected to become more difficult.( The Russian deputy foreign minister has canceled his meeting with his American counterpart –- a long-planned summit to address more minor problems in the relationship –- because of the updated U.S. sanctions announced yesterday. Under Secretary of State Tom Shannon is traveling to London now, but he will not continue on to St. Petersburg Friday, as previously scheduled. The State Department officially announced his travel yesterday, seemingly caught off guard by Russia’s cancellation that dealt a serious blow to the Trump administration’s efforts to improve relations. In a strongly worded statement, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergey Rybakov said Russia was canceling the meeting because the U.S. ruined the circumstances by announcing updated sanctions yesterday and by not returning two Russian diplomatic compounds in Maryland and New York. &'8220;The new American jab will not go without reaction from our side, including practical reciprocal measures,&'8221; he warned. Rybakov went on to rail against America for the current state of poor relations between the two countries and declare that sanctions will never force Russia to &'8220;submit.&'8221; &'8220;In the U.S., of course, they can further soothe themselves with the illusions that they can 'pressure' Russia. Many previous 'waves' of American sanctions have not brought the result on which their initiators counted. Just as futile will be any new attempts to force the Russian side to 'submit,'&'8221; he said. But the State Department fired back, offering a strong defense of those sanctions, while clarifying that the announcement yesterday simply brought them up to date without adding anything new. The Treasury Department announced Tuesday that it was adding 38 pro-Russian individuals and entities to existing sanctions against Russia. &'8220;Let’s [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2017

Mosul battle,Iraqi forces have retaken the main government offices ,they captured the al-Hurriya – CNN News

US President Donald Trump signed a new executive order Monday that bans immigration from six Muslim-majority countries, dropping Iraq from January's previous order, and reinstates a temporary blanket ban on all refugees. The new travel ban comes six weeks after Trump's original executive order caused chaos at airports nationwide before it was blocked by federal courts. It removes out language in the original order that indefinitely banned Syrian refugees and called for prioritizing the admission of refugees who are religious minorities in their home countries. That provision drew criticism of a religious test for entry and would have prioritized Christians over Muslims fleeing war-torn countries in the Middle East. The new ban, which takes effect March 16, also explicitly exempts citizens of the six banned countries who are legal US permanent residents or have valid visas to enter the US &'8212; including those whose visas were revoked during the original implementation of the ban, senior administration officials said. &'8220;We cannot compromise our nation's security by allowing visitors entry when their own governments are unable or unwilling to provide the information we need to vet them responsibly, or when those governments actively support terrorism,&'8221; Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Monday. The new measures will block citizens of Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen from obtaining visas for at least 90 days. The order also suspends admission of refugees into the US for 120 days, directing US officials to improve vetting measures for a program that is already widely regarded as extremely stringent. Trump signed the executive order earlier Monday in the Oval Office outside the view of reporters and news cameras, after more than three weeks of repeated delays, the latest of which came after White House officials decided last week to delay the signing to avoid cutting into positive coverage of Trump's joint address to Congress. The delays also came amid an intense lobbying effort from Iraqi government officials, including from the country's prime minister, to remove Iraq from the original seven-state list of banned countries. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Iraq's removal from the list came after an intense review from the State Department to improve vetting of Iraqi citizens in collaboration with the Iraqi government, though he did not specify how vetting had been improved. &'8220;The United States welcomes this kind of close cooperation,&'8221; he said. &'8220;This revised order will bolster the security of the United States and our allies.&'8221; The rollout of the revised travel ban marks an important moment for the administration, which has little room for error after the chaotic debut of the original plan. That failure raised questions about the new White House's capacity to govern and to master the political intricacies needed to manage complicated political endeavors in Washington. It also brought Trump into conflict with the judiciary in the first sign of how constitutional checks and balances could challenge his vision of a powerful presidency built on expansive executive authority. Trump's travel ban: Read the full executive order The original order came under intense criticism as an attempt to bar Muslims from entering the country, and Trump's call during the campaign for a &'8220;Muslim Ban&'8221; was cited in court cases attacking the ban. The new order does not prioritize religious minorities when considering refugee admissions cases. Administration officials Monday stressed they do not see the ban as targeting a specific religion. &'8220;(The order is) not any way targeted as a Muslim ban &' we want to make sure everyone understands that,&'8221; an official told reporters. &'8220;The Department of Justice believes that this executive order just as the first executive order is a lawful and proper exercise of presidential authority,&'8221; Sessions said. Democrats responded by calling Trump's order a repeat version of the first attempt. &'8220;Here we go again&'Muslim Ban 2.0 'NoBanNoWall&'8221; tweeted Rep. Andre Carson of Indiana, one of two Muslims serving in the House of Representatives. The newly crafted order also revealed that the administration wasn't just paying attention to the legal criticism in the courts, but also recalibrating in light of the heavy political fire they faced after the first order's messy rollout. While administration lawyers argued the original travel ban went into effect immediately to prevent terrorists from rushing into the country, the revised ban will phase in after 10 days. The previous order will be rescinded on that date. Trump had previously said he opposed giving any advance notice of the ban. &'8220;If the ban were announced with a one week notice, the &'8220;bad&'8221; would rush into our country during that week. A lot of bad &'8220;dudes&'8221; out there!&'8221; he tweeted on January 30. The White House also abandoned the sense of urgency with which it implemented the first travel ban, delaying the signing of a new executive order multiple times over the last three weeks. Politics also came into play as White House officials delayed the signing from last Wednesday in part to allow positive coverage of the President's joint address to Congress to continue uninterrupted. &'8220;We want the (executive order) to have its own 'moment,'&'8221; a senior administration official told CNN last week. The President signed the action Monday morning without the fanfare he has given to other executive orders. No media was present during the signing at the White House, an administration official confirmed. White House spokesman Sean Spicer tweeted a picture of Trump signing the order. White House officials collaborated for several [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 7th, 2017

The World: Tillerson arrives in Bonn amid questions over US foreign policy

WASHINGTON -- Rex Tillerson arrived in Bonn on Wednesday on his maiden foreign trip as US secretary of state to attend a summit of G20 top economies at a time when many are wondering how far President Donald Trump's "America First" message will reshape US foreign policy......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2017