Trump comments highlight racial impact of migration platform

DENVER --- For years, a movement to limit the number of migrants into the US and end a system that favors family members of legal residents has had to fend off criticism that it's as a poorly veiled attempt to produce a whiter America. Then its most prominent supporter told members of Congress in the Oval Office this week that the US needs fewer immigrants from Haiti and Africa and more from places like Norway. President Donald Trump's use of a vulgar term to describe African countries triggered widespread condemnation, and left the small cluster of immigration hard-line groups whose agenda Trump has embraced scrambling to distance themselves from the president. "They say it...Keep on reading: Trump comments highlight racial impact of migration platform.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJan 13th, 2018

Trump's comments about anthem, Curry inflame sports stars

CATHERINE LUCEY, Associated Press br /> TIM REYNOLDS, Associated Press br /> SOMERSET, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump sharply criticized protests by NFL players for a second straight day and rescinded NBA star Stephen Curry's White House invitation on Saturday in a series of tweets that outraged football and basketball stars and even prompted LeBron James to call the president a 'bum.' Trump started by announcing that Curry, the immensely popular two-time MVP for the Golden State Warriors, would not be welcome at the White House for the commemorative visit traditionally made by championship teams. Later, Trump reiterated what he said at a rally in Alabama the previous night that NFL players who kneel for the national anthem should be fired, prompting immediate condemnation from a handful of team executives, the league commissioner and its players' union. The Warriors said it was made clear to them that they were not welcome at the White House. They said that when they go to Washington this season they will instead 'celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion — the values that we embrace as an organization.' Curry had said he did not want to go to the White House anyway, but the Warriors had not made a collective decision before Saturday. 'U bum @StephenCurry30 already said he ain't going!' James tweeted in a clear message to the president — a post that Twitter officials said was quickly shared many more times than any other he's sent. 'So therefore ain't no invite. Going to White House was a great honor until you showed up!' James also released a video Saturday, saying Trump has tried to divide the country. 'He's now using sports as the platform to try to divide us,' James said. 'We all know how much sports brings us together. ... It's not something I can be quiet about.' Warriors general manager Bob Myers said he was surprised by the invitation being pulled. 'The White House visit should be something that is celebrated,' Myers said. 'So we want to go to Washington, D.C., and do something to commemorate kind of who we are as an organization, what we feel, what we represent and at the same time spend our energy on that. Instead of looking backward, we want to look forward.' Added Warriors coach Steve Kerr, after his team's first practice of the season: 'These are not normal times.' As a candidate and as president, Trump's approach has at times seemed to inflame racial tensions in a deeply divided country while emboldening groups long in the shadows. The latest sports comments come a little over a month after Trump came under fire for his response to a white supremacists' protest in Charlottesville, Virginia. Trump later pardoned Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Arizona's Maricopa County, who had been found guilty of defying a judge's order to stop racially profiling Latinos. Trump's latest entry into the intersection of sports and politics started in Alabama on Friday night, when he said NFL players who refused to stand for 'The Star-Spangled Banner' are exhibiting a 'total disrespect of our heritage.' Several NFL players, starting last season with then-San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick, have either knelt, sat or raised fists during the anthem to protest police treatment of blacks and social injustice. Last week at NFL games, four players sat or knelt during the anthem, and two raised fists while others stood by the protesters in support. Other players have protested in different ways over the past season since Kaepernick began sitting during the 2016 preseason. 'That's a total disrespect of everything that we stand for,' Trump said, encouraging owners to act. He added, 'Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, you'd say, 'Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He's fired.' On Saturday, Trump echoed his stance. 'If a player wants the privilege of making millions of dollars in the NFL, or other leagues, he or she should not be allowed to disrespect our Great American Flag (or Country) and should stand for the National Anthem,' Trump wrote in an afternoon pair of tweets. 'If not, YOU'RE FIRED. Find something else to do!' Trump has enjoyed strong support from NFL owners, with at least seven of them donating $1 million each to Trump's inaugural committee. They include New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft, who Trump considers a friend. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell strongly backed the players while New York Giants owners John Mara and Steve Tisch said the president's comments were inappropriate and offensive. Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, who has supported the players who have knelt, said the country 'needs unifying leadership right now, not more divisiveness,' and San Francisco 49ers CEO Jed York ripped Trump's comments as 'callous.' 'Divisive comments like these demonstrate an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL, our great game and all of our players, and a failure to understand the overwhelming force for good our clubs and players represent in our communities,' Goodell said in a statement. Plenty of other current and former stars from across sports weighed in Saturday. Richard Sherman of Seattle Seahawks said the president's behavior is 'unacceptable and needs to be addressed.' In his Friday remarks, Trump also bemoaned what he called a decline in violence in football, noting that it's 'not the same game' because players are now either penalized or thrown out of games for aggressive tackles. 'No man or woman should ever have to choose a job that forces them to surrender their rights,' DeMaurice Smith, the NFL Players Association executive director, said Saturday. 'No worker nor any athlete, professional or not, should be forced to become less than human when it comes to protecting their basic health and safety.' Trump has met with some championship teams already in his first year in office. Clemson visited the White House this year after winning the College Football Playoff, some members of the New England Patriots went after the Super Bowl victory and the Chicago Cubs went to the Oval Office in June to commemorate their World Series title. The Cubs also had the larger and more traditional visit with President Barack Obama in January, four days before the Trump inauguration. North Carolina, the reigning NCAA men's basketball champion, said Saturday it will not visit the White House this season. The Tar Heels cited scheduling conflicts. Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, said Trump has 'taken indecency to a new low.' 'I think that the president has forgotten that he is the standard bearer for our country, that little boys and little girls look up to the president,' he said. 'Little boys and little girls want to be like the president. They want to talk like the president. I think that the president has insulted the American people with this low level of verbiage.' Warriors forward Draymond Green said the good news was that Golden State won't have to talk about going to the White House again — unless they win another title during the Trump presidency. 'Michelle Obama said it best,' Green said. 'She said it best. They go low. We go high. He beat us to the punch. Happy the game is over.' ___ Reynolds reported from Miami. AP Sports Writer Janie McCauley in Oakland, California, and AP writer Corey Williams in Detroit contributed to this story. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2017

Twitter: Trump speech leads to 4.5 million tweets

        WASHINGTON---President Donald Trump's first State of the Union is the most-tweeted joint address to Congress ever, according to Twitter.   The social network says 4.5 million tweets were sent around the annual event, surpassing last year's record of 3 million for Trump's first address to Congress --- which wasn't technically a State of the Union.   According to the platform, the most tweeted moment of the speech came as Trump waded into the culture wars over racial injustice protests and the national anthem. That was followed by his discussion of his immigration reform proposal and his condemnation of the international cri...Keep on reading: Twitter: Trump speech leads to 4.5 million tweets.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 31st, 2018

Carroll still believes Seahawks can be title contender

By Tim Booth, Associated Press RENTON, Wash. (AP) — Pete Carroll insisted again that he's not going anywhere. He's intent on remaining the leader of the Seattle Seahawks even if it means many of the faces he spoke to this week while closing out the 2017 season are gone by the time Carroll finally gets to coach his team again. "I'm pumped up about it. I'm excited about that challenge," Carroll said Tuesday. "I'm upset that we have to face it this early. I'd like another six weeks here, that would be nice. But that's not what this one is. We got to go after it. Nothing's going to change other than maybe our resolve." For just the second time in his eight years in Seattle, Carroll spent Tuesday explaining why the Seahawks were not in the postseason. It's the first playoff miss for Seattle since the 2011 season and with the rapid rise of division foe Los Angeles indicated — at least for one year — a significant change in the hierarchy of the NFC West. Injuries played a major role in Seattle's slide to 9-7. So, too, did inconsistency on offense, continued problems with penalties and salary cap constraints that limited adjustments the Seahawks could make during the season. It's likely to be a busy offseason as Seattle attempts to manage its tight cap situation while making key decisions about how to move forward and if it still is a championship contender needing slight tweaks or a major overhaul. "I think there is a championship team sitting in this meeting room right here," Carroll said. Here are some of the issues to know about Seattle's 2017 season and going into next year: REDISCOVER THE RUN: Perhaps nothing irritated Carroll more, or had a great impact on the efficiency of the offense, than Seattle's inability to run. It's been a staple of Carroll's program from the day he arrived in Seattle. This year the Seahawks had one rushing touchdown by a running back. Quarterback Russell Wilson was the leading rusher with 586 yards, 346 more than any other player. Seattle had hopes for promising rookie Chris Carson, but he was sidelined by an ankle injury early in the season and never made it back. The lack of a running game affected Wilson as a passer as well, as defenses didn't have to commit an extra safety to stopping the run, leading to smaller throwing windows and some tentative decisions by Wilson. "There are tremendous examples of teams around the league that have turned their fortunes around with a formula that should sound familiar to you: teams running the football, playing good defense and doing the kicking game thing," Carroll said. INJURY CONCERNS: Carroll wouldn't get into specifics, but there is a chance Cliff Avril and Kam Chancellor have played their final games. Avril and Chancellor suffered neck injuries during the season. Carroll said on the radio Tuesday that both would have a "hard time" playing football again. A couple of hours later, he softened his stance, saying each have quality-of-life decisions to address with their football future. "Both those guys are marvelous people and competitors and all that. We'd love to see them through the rest of their career. I don't know what's going to happen there," Carroll said. LEGION OF WHOM: If Chancellor does not return, it could be the start of a major makeover for Seattle's secondary. Richard Sherman is coming off a torn Achilles tendon and was openly shopped by Seattle last offseason. Earl Thomas is entering the last year of his contract and his actions toward the end of the season indicated a desire to be elsewhere for the 2018 season. A big key will be if Seattle can re-sign versatile safety Bradley McDougald after he played both free and strong safety this season. HOME-FIELD AVERAGE: Seattle went 4-4 at home, its first .500 record at CenturyLink Field since 2011. The Seahawks have always thrived at home, but some of their uglier performances this year came in front of their own fans. OFF THE FIELD: Seattle was among the most active teams in the league with a significant number of players participating in national anthem protests. The protests, on top of the incident Michael Bennett had with police in Las Vegas in August, created a number of unexpected issues. Carroll said he believed that only once this season — Seattle's loss at Tennessee — did discussions of off-field issues affect the team's performance. Seattle had long discussions following comments by President Donald Trump about NFL players and opted to remain in the locker room as a team during the anthem before that game. "That was an extraordinarily heated time," Carroll said. "I think that was a different amount of emotional output that occurred before the game and it looked like it the way we played.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 3rd, 2018

3 UCLA players face punishment at home after China incident

By Beth Harris, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — Three UCLA basketball players detained in China on suspicion of shoplifting have been allowed to return home, where they may be disciplined by the school as a result of the international scandal. Freshmen LiAngelo Ball, Jalen Hill and Cody Riley were on a plane back to Los Angeles that was due to land late Tuesday afternoon after a 12-hour flight from Shanghai. Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said the matter "has been resolved to the satisfaction of the Chinese authorities." The players were detained in Hangzhou for questioning following allegations of shoplifting last week before the 23rd-ranked Bruins beat Georgia Tech in their season-opening game in Shanghai as part of the Pac-12 China game. The rest of the UCLA team returned home last Saturday. A person with knowledge of the Pac-12's decision said any discipline involving the trio would be up to UCLA. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the conference doesn't plan any sanctions. UCLA Chancellor Gene Block said the school is weighing its options. "I want to be clear that we take seriously any violations of the law," he said in a statement. "In this particular case, both Athletics and the Office of Student Conduct will review this incident and guide any action with respect to the involved students. Such proceedings are confidential, which limits the specific information that can be shared." There was no immediate word on the trio's status for the team's home opener Wednesday night against Central Arkansas. The school said the three players, along with coach Steve Alford and athletic director Dan Guerrero, will make their first public comments about the matter at a campus news conference Wednesday, but won't take questions. Scott thanked President Donald Trump, the White House and the State Department for their efforts in resolving what he called "the incident with authorities in Hangzhou, China." He indicated that UCLA made "significant efforts" on behalf of its athletes. It wasn't clear under what terms the players were freed to return to the U.S. "We are all very pleased that these young men have been allowed to return home to their families and university," Scott said. Trump said Tuesday he had a long conversation about the three players' status with Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping. Ball, Hill and Riley were expected to have an immediate impact as part of UCLA's highly touted recruiting class. Instead, they are being talked about solely for their actions off the court. Ball, a guard whose brother Lonzo is a rookie for the Los Angeles Lakers, averaged 33.8 points as a high school senior. The elder Ball played one season in Westwood and left early for the NBA draft. The Balls' outspoken father, LaVar, was in China at the time of the incident. He spent some time promoting the family's Big Baller Brand of athletic shoes with his youngest son, LaMelo, while his middle son was detained. Forwards Hill and Riley, both four-star recruits, figure to bolster 7-foot senior Thomas Welsh in the frontcourt. The Bruins traveled to China as part of the Pac-12's global initiative that seeks to popularize the league's athletic programs and universities overseas. The China Game is in its third year, and while the scandal was developing the league announced that California and Yale will play in next year's edition. The game is sponsored by Alibaba Group, the Chinese commerce giant that both UCLA and Georgia Tech visited before the shoplifting incident occurred......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2017

First-time NFL protesters explain how they became woke

The Associated Press - Football coaches warn players not to say anything that could wind up on the opposing team's bulletin board. When he set out to challenge NFL protesters, Donald Trump took the opposite tack. He put up a billboard. The president essentially called out-of-work quarterback Colin Kaepernick 'an SOB' for taking a knee to protest racial injustice during the national anthem. And any player who followed him? 'Fire 'em!' Trump said. He may have wound up inspiring them instead. Almost all of the 200 players who took part in protests during Sunday's games were doing so for the first time. They became 'woke.' In follow-up interviews, Seattle coach Pete Carroll and linebackers Von Miller of Denver and Lorenzo Alexander of Buffalo discussed why their thinking changed, what they hoped to accomplish and whether they intend to continue protesting. Not everyone kneeled, a gesture Kaepernick began during the Obama administration, when he still had a job and few followers. This time, there was plenty of support and their defiance ran the gamut, from raising fists to staying seated to not showing up for the national anthem. There were loud discussions in some locker rooms before teams arrived at a consensus about what to do. They were greeted by boos in more than one stadium. Some teams issued statements explaining their decisions. Eight owners linked arms with their players. Even Tom Brady got involved. 'We understand why people are upset about it,' Carroll said . 'It is not about denigration of the flag, the country or anything that stands for. It's not about that at all. 'It's about trying to get your feelings out and your ideas across. Protests, just by the nature of the word, not everybody is going to agree — that's why it's a protest,' he added. Following are lightly edited transcripts: ___ strong>Pete Carroll, 66, coach, Seattle Seahawks /strong> 'This isn't about the kind of salaries they make; they're very fortunate to be where they are and they know it and they have the courage to speak out. . 'I think it's extraordinary that this is happening and I think it's a moment that we all can learn what we want to learn out of this. I hope we learn about empathy, to listen, to come to an understanding what someone else feels without passing judgement. It doesn't mean you're going to agree. That's OK. That's OK. 'Hopefully, like I said, the compassion part will come about in the proper manner and there will be action taken and there will be movement made, and we'll come to an understanding. It's hard. It's hard, but it's good. . 'Sports has always been the uniter. It has never been the divider, it's been the uniter. And to make it something other than that is a terrible mistake because it's an institution in our culture and in others around the world. . It demonstrates all of the beautiful things about culture and all of the beautiful things about bringing people together from different backgrounds and all and rallying for common goals.' ___ strong>Von Miller, 28, linebacker Denver Broncos /strong> 'Me and my teammates, we felt like President Trump's speech was an assault on our most cherished right, freedom of speech. Collectively, we felt like we had to do something for this game, if not any other game, if not in the past, in the future. At this moment in time, we felt like, as a team, we had to do something. We couldn't just let things go. 'I have a huge respect for the military, our protective services and everything. I've been to Afghanistan; I've met real-life superheroes. It wasn't any disrespect to them, it was for our brothers that have been attacked for things that they do during the game, and I felt like I had to join them on it. . 'I felt like it was an attack on the National Football League as well. You know, he went on and talked about ratings. This is my life, and I love everything about the National Football League. From the commissioner, all the way down to the field tech guys and the chefs in the kitchen. .. I try to keep out any politics or social issues and just try to play ball. But I feel like it was an attack on us. 'If I'm not going to do anything in the future, if I haven't done anything in the past, I feel like this was the time to do something.' ___ strong>Lorenzo Alexander, 34, linebacker, Buffalo Bills /strong> 'Me taking a knee doesn't change the fact that I support our military. I'm a patriot and I love my country. But I also recognize there are some social unjustices in this country. I wanted to take a knee in support of my brothers who have been doing it. 'I won't continue to do it, but I just wanted to show them that I was with them — especially in the backdrop of our president making the comments about our players, about their mothers. And then you put that in conjunction with how he tried to gray-area neo-Nazism and KKK members as being fine people, I had to take a knee. 'And I was very emotional about it all day. It wasn't like a kneejerk reaction. I really had to think about what I wanted to do today. . People always say words never hurt, but words are very divisive, and it creates a lot of issues domestically and internationally. He needs to really control himself.' ___ em>AP Sports Writers Tim Booth and John Wawrow contributed to this report. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

Oakland's Maxwell first MLB player to kneel during anthem

GIDEON RUBIN, Associated Press br /> OAKLAND, California (AP) — Bruce Maxwell of the Oakland Athletics became the first Major League Baseball player to kneel during the U.S. anthem on Saturday, pulling the league into a polarizing protest movement that has been criticized harshly by President Donald Trump. Before a home game against the Texas Rangers, Maxwell dropped to a knee just outside Oakland's dugout, adopting a protest started by former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick in response to police treatment of blacks. The rookie catcher pressed his right hand against his heart, and teammates stood in a line next to him. Teammate Mark Canha, who is white, put his right hand on one of Maxwell's shoulders, and the two hugged after the anthem finished. 'Everybody watches sports and so everybody loves sports, so I felt this was the right thing for me to do personally,' Maxwell said. Maxwell's protest comes after Trump blasted American football players and rescinded a White House invitation for NBA champion Stephen Curry in a two-day rant that targeted top professional athletes. 'That's a total disrespect of everything that we stand for,' Trump said of kneeling through the anthem. He added, 'Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, you'd say, 'Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He's fired.' Maxwell informed A's manager Bob Melvin and general manager David Forst of his intention to kneel before Saturday's game. He also held a team meeting in which he addressed questions from teammates. Maxwell did not play in Oakland's 1-0 win. Canha approached Maxwell after the meeting to offer his support. 'I could tell he was getting kind of choked up and emotional about his beliefs and how he feels about the racial discrimination that's going on in this country right now,' Canha said. 'I felt like every fiber in my being was telling me that he needed a brother today.' The Athletics released a statement on Twitter shortly after the anthem, saying they 'respect and support all of our players' constitutional rights and freedom of expression' and 'pride ourselves on being inclusive.' The league also issued a statement: 'Major League Baseball has a longstanding tradition of honoring our nation prior to the start of our games. We also respect that each of our players is an individual with his own background, perspectives and opinions. We believe that our game will continue to bring our fans, their communities and our players together.' Maxwell was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, while his father was stationed there in the Army, but he grew up in Huntsville, Alabama, which is where Trump made his statements at a rally on Friday. 'The racism in the South is disgusting,' Maxwell said. 'It bothers me, and it hits home for me because that's where I'm from. The racism in the South is pretty aggressive, and I dealt with it all the way through my childhood, and my sister went through it. I feel that that's something that needs to be addressed and that needs to be changed.' League executives and star players alike condemned Trump's words on Saturday, and Maxwell predicted on Twitter that athletes would begin kneeling in other sports following 'comments like that coming from our president.' A few hours later, he followed through. 'This now has gone from just a BlackLives Matter topic to just complete inequality of any man or woman that wants to stand for Their rights!' Maxwell wrote. Maxwell is decidedly patriotic and comes from a military family. His agent, Matt Sosnick, told The Associated Press that 'the Maxwells' love and appreciation for our country is indisputable.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 24th, 2017

Palestinian president calls US ambassador to Israel ‘son of a dog’

RAMALLAH, Palestenian Territories: Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas labelled the US ambassador to Israel David Friedman a “son of a dog” on Monday during an attack on Donald Trump’s policies. The scathing comments come with US President Trump still expected to launch a plan for peace between Israel and the Palestinians despite Abbas boycotting his administration [...] The post Palestinian president calls US ambassador to Israel ‘son of a dog’ appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsMar 20th, 2018

Trump s pick to lead UN agency says has trust of Muslim states

GENEVA, Switzerland – Donald Trump's nominee to lead the UN migration agency said Monday that he has convinced member states that he holds no anti-Muslim views, after a series of reports accused him of prejudice against Islam. Ken Isaacs, who has a long record of humanitarian work with the Christian charity Samaritan's ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

China shrinks steel industry slowly, drawing Western ire

China’s steel mills, a target of US President Donald Trump’s ire, are their industry’s 800-pound gorilla: They supply half of world output, so every move they make has a global impact. #BeFullyInformed China shrinks steel industry slowly, drawing Western ire BEIJING — China’s steel mills, a target of US President Donald Trump’s ire, are their… link: China shrinks steel industry slowly, drawing Western ire.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Chinese dissident artist: Even changing leaders won’t change China

SYDNEY (AP) --- Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei said Monday that it doesn't matter whether or not China has a change in leadership, the culture and the system will always remain the same. Ai's comments came a day after China's rubber-stamp lawmakers passed a historic constitutional amendment abolishing a presidential two-term limit that will enable Xi Jinping to rule indefinitely. "China has always been, you know, emperor state... So a change leader or not change leader, the system and as a culture always stays the same," Ai told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Sydney, where he was launching an exhibition to highlight the international refugee crisis. In 2011, ...Keep on reading: Chinese dissident artist: Even changing leaders won’t change China.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Trump predicts tremendous success in North Korea talks

WASHINGTON, United States – President Donald Trump predicted "tremendous success" Saturday, March 10 in upcoming groundbreaking talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un , adding that the reclusive state had promised not to shoot missiles in the interim. The comments came after the American leader said he has received encouragement from the leaders of China and ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 11th, 2018

Trump to EU: We ll drop our tariffs if you drop yours

WASHINGTON, United States – President Donald Trump renewed his demand Saturday, March 10 that the European Union halts its trade barriers to United States products in order to spare his allies new steel and aluminum tariffs . The American president made his comments after crunch talks in Brussels between EU negotiators and US ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 11th, 2018

North Korea vows sanctions will ‘never work’

GENEVA, Switzerland --- North Korea told a United Nations disarmament forum on Tuesday that sanctions over its nuclear program would "never work", as it voiced further defiance against President Donald Trump's "maximum pressure" campaign. The "US should (be) aware that sanctions and pressure will never threaten (North Korea) and never work", said Han Tae Song, Pyongyang's envoy to the in Geneva. The comments came days after Trump unveiled what he described as the "heaviest sanctions ever" levied on North Korea. That may be an overstatement given past tough measures against Pyongyang approved by Washington, but Trump's administration has confirmed that the new sanctions targe...Keep on reading: North Korea vows sanctions will ‘never work’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

Trump son-in-law Kushner loses top security clearance  

    United States President Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior aide Jared Kushner has lost his top-level security clearance, sources familiar with the matter said on Tuesday, a decision with potentially profound implications for the administration.   Two sources, who could not speak on record because the status of security clearances is classified, confirmed US media reports that the 37-year-old White House aide will no longer be able to access America's most closely protected secrets. The White House -- up to and including the president himself -- refused to comment on the record, but officials insisted that the decision would not have any impact on Kus...Keep on reading: Trump son-in-law Kushner loses top security clearance  .....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

Local solar panel maker downplays US tariff impact

SOLAR PHILIPPINES Power Project Holdings, Inc. remains confident about its business prospects despite Washington’s decision last month to impose a tariff on imported solar panels. US President Donald Trump on Jan. 22 imposed a tariff of up to 30% on imported solar cells and panels for the next four years, lower than the US International […] The post Local solar panel maker downplays US tariff impact appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2018

Trump turns on FBI over school shooting after criticism from survivors

FORT LAUDERDALE, USA (UPDATED) – US President Donald Trump said Saturday, February 17, the FBI was so caught up in the Russia probe that it failed to heed signs which could have prevented the Parkland school shooting. His comments came as he faces criticism from survivors of the attack over ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2018

Trump praises White House aide accused of domestic abuse

WASHINGTON DC, USA (UPDATED) – A second White House staffer in a week resigned on Friday, February 9, over domestic abuse claims, in a widening scandal that called into question the president's judgment and tainted his chief of staff John Kelly and longtime aide Hope Hicks. Hours after Trump's comments about staff ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2018

Canada axes $1,000 fee for hiring foreign caregivers

RED DEER, Alberta -- Canada is eliminating the $1,000 market test fee for hiring foreign caregivers, to help middle-income Canadian families and individuals with physical or mental disabilities. The fee, also known as the Labor Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) has been heavily criticized by immigrant rights advocates as an undue obstacle to labor migration and for increasing the risk of abuse and overall burden to foreign caregivers and employers. The government made the announcement on December 27, following a move to enhance the 2017 federal budget towards improvements to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP). Financial assistance In 2017, an improved budget to the...Keep on reading: Canada axes $1,000 fee for hiring foreign caregivers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2018

Trump attacks Britain s public healthcare system

WASHINGTON, DC, USA – US President Donald Trump on Monday, February 5, attacked Britain's public healthcare system in comments that are likely to call his much-delayed visit to the country further into doubt. "The Democrats are pushing for Universal HealthCare while thousands of people are marching in the UK because their ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2018

North Korea slams Trump s sinister State of the Union address

SEOUL, South Korea – North Korea hit back at US President Donald Trump on Sunday, February 4 after he slammed rights abuses under the hermit regime in his State of the Union address, with Pyongyang describing the speech as "screams of Trump terrified" by the North's power. The comments follow months ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2018