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Tiger back in the hunt

WITH KOEPKA AHEAD There’s a lot of star power and it should be. It’s a major championship and you should see the best players in the world come to the top. ST. LOUIS, United States — Two-time US Open champion Brooks Koepka seized a two-stroke lead after Saturday’s third round of the PGA Championship while […].....»»

Category: newsSource: tribune tribuneAug 12th, 2018

Nicklaus cautions from experience against a Masters letdown

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press Tiger Woods built his comeback around the Masters, as was the case even in healthier years. He took a step back at Augusta National, not breaking par until the final round and finishing 16 shots behind Patrick Reed, the most he has trailed the Masters winner. Woods wasn't alone in his disappointment. Jordan Spieth geared his early part of the year toward being ready for the Masters, the major he says he most wants to win. He had a two-shot lead after the first round, and rounds of 74-71 meant even that closing 64 wasn't enough. Phil Mickelson took himself out of the hunt with a 79 in the second round. Jack Nicklaus can understand how they feel, and his message for anyone who puts so much emphasis on a green jacket is that the show goes on. "I had to learn that there were other tournaments in the country after Augusta," Nicklaus said at the Masters after hitting the ceremonial first tee shot. "I played Augusta a lot of times and lost. I won in '63, '65 and '66, and I just expected to win every year. I thought I would just continue to do that." Nicklaus missed the cut in 1967. He says that started a three-year trend in which it took him longer than it should have to get over not winning the Masters. "That was a humbling experience to miss the cut after you've won it twice in a row," he said. "But then the next couple of years, I think that it probably destroyed the rest of my year. Because I was so disappointed at not winning at Augusta that I had a downer most of the year." There's some truth to that. He didn't go more than two tournaments before winning again after the 1963, 1964 and 1965 Masters. After he repeated at Augusta in 1966, he ran off five consecutive top fives before winning the British Open at Muirfield to complete the career Grand Slam. But after missing the cut in 1967, he went five tournaments without winning and had one stretch of 10 straight rounds in which he failed to break 70. The following year when he tied for fifth at the Masters, Nicklaus didn't win again until the Western Open the first weekend in August. And after a tie for 23rd in the 1969 Masters, he didn't win again until the Sahara Invitational in October. "I put such a buildup to this tournament and the importance of winning that first major that it was to my detriment more times than a positive," he said. Nicklaus figured it out. Over the next four years, he never went more than three events after the Masters before winning again. Twice, in 1971 and 1973, he won in his next start after failing to win the Masters. CURTIS CUP Four years after Lucy Li qualified for the U.S. Women's Open at age 11, the Californian is headed to her first Curtis Cup. Li was among eight women selected for the June 8-10 matches against amateurs from Britain and Ireland at Quaker Ridge in New York. Li is the first 15-year-old to make the American team since Lexi Thompson in 2010. The other Americans selected for the team are UCLA star Lilia Vu, Andrea Lee, Jennifer Kupcho, Kristen Gillman, U.S. Women's Amateur champion Sophia Schubert, Lauren Stephenson and Mariel Galdiano. Lee and Galdiano played in the most recent Curtis Cup, which Britain & Ireland won in Ireland. AS THE WORLD TURNS For the second time since the World Golf Championships began in 1999, the PGA Tour is converting one of its regular tournaments into one of the four WGCs with a big purse ($10 million this year) and a limited field with no cut. Doral had been longest-running PGA Tour event on the Florida Swing until it morphed into the WGC-CA Championship in 2007. Now it's happening in Memphis, Tennessee. Bridgestone chose not to renew its increasingly expensive title sponsorship of the WGC at Firestone, which had hosted an elite event since 1976. Starting next year, the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational will move to the TPC Southwind in Memphis. That will assure the strongest field for Memphis, which dates to 1958. But much like Doral in 2007, it becomes off-limits to PGA Tour regulars. Based on this week's world ranking, only 16 players in the field for the St. Jude Classic last year would be eligible at a World Golf Championship. BALANCE AT THE TOP Each generation believes it had stronger and deeper competition, though there at least appears to be more balance. Perhaps one way to measure that is through Tiger Woods. When he won the 2008 U.S. Open for his 14th major, only seven other players in the top 20 in the world ranking had combined for 13 majors. Phil Mickelson (No. 2), Ernie Els (No. 5) and Vijay Singh (No. 9), each had three majors. Geoff Ogilvy (No. 4), Jim Furyk (No. 10), Padraig Harrington (No. 13) and Trevor Immelman (No. 15) each had one. Just like then, four of the top five in the world have won majors (all but 23-year-old Jon Rahm). However, 12 of the top 20 in the world from this week's rankings have won majors. The top 20 includes Mickelson (now with five majors), Rory McIlroy (four majors), Jordan Spieth (three majors) and Bubba Watson (two majors). Eight other players have won at least one major. It's certainly younger at the top. Woods was 32 when he won his last major, and only three players from the top 10 were in their 20s — Scott, Sergio Garcia and Justin Rose. This week, seven of the top 10 in the world are in their 20s. MANAGEMENT MOVES Jordan Spieth's manager has come full circle and is returning to IMG, and Jay Danzi is bringing his top client with him. Danzi has become a partner with California-based William Morris Endeavor, which owns IMG. Included in the move is Jordan Lewites, who was handling much of Spieth's day-to-day operations, and Laura Moses, who heads up Spieth's foundation. Spieth will be represented by WME and IMG. "Jordan is a world-class talent, and we're excited to welcome him to the family," said Patrick Whitesell, executive chairman of Endeavor. "When you look at what he and Jay have already accomplished and consider WME and IMG's ability to amplify Jordan's reach across entertainment and sports, the possibilities are endless." Danzi previously worked for IMG as global head of recruiting for its golf business. He left the Cleveland-based agency for Wasserman, and then started his own company (Forefront Sports Group) when he signed Spieth. The centerpiece of getting Spieth was a bold endorsement with Under Armour. Lagardere bought Forefront in 2013. Along with managing the three-time major champion, Danzi was in charge of Lagardere's brand consulting, sales and golf consulting groups. He left Lagardere last month. DIVOTS Ted Potter Jr. tied for 16th in the RBC Heritage, notable because he had missed his last five cuts dating to his victory in the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am. ... Satoshi Kodaira was the first player without PGA Tour status to win a regular PGA Tour event since Arjun Atwal at the Wyndham Championship in 2010. ... Cameron Smith, a 24-year-old from Australia, tied for 32nd at Hilton Head last week and moved past Jack Nicklaus on the PGA Tour career money list. ... Bryson DeChambeau moved into the top 50 in the world ranking for the first time, at No. 48. ... With his tie for fifth in the Masters, Bubba Watson became the 16th player to surpass $40 million in career earnings on the PGA Tour. STAT OF THE WEEK Rickie Fowler has been in the top 10 on the leaderboard in 20 out of the 32 rounds he has played this season. FINAL WORD "I will probably not wear it every day. But it is special." — Satoshi Kodaira on the tartan jacket he received for winning at Harbour Town......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 18th, 2018

UAAP: NU out to pound on already grounded La Salle

Games on Wednesday at the MOA Arena 2:00 PM – UE vs Adamson 4:00 PM – La Salle vs NU National University has a golden opportunity to send traditional powerhouse De La Salle University to a 0-2 start on the UAAP 81 Men’s Basketball Tournament. Of course, the Green Archers will have something to say about that and will go all-out to prevent the Bulldogs from doing just that on Wednesday at the MOA Arena. NU (1-0) is on the hunt for back-to-back wins just as La Salle (0-1) is on a search for its first win of the season at 4:00 PM. As always, all of the action will be on S+A, S+A HD, and livestream. Meanwhile, Adamson University (1-0) battles University of the East (0-1) as tournament action resumes at 2:00 PM. In the women’s games, the FEU Lady Tamaraws and the La Salle Lady Archers are determined to stay hot up against the Adamson Lady Falcons at 8:00 AM and the UE Lady Warriors at 10:00 AM, respectively. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

UAAP: Who is UST super rookie CJ Cansino?

Get to know just who UST super rookie CJ Cansino is by looking back at these stories: Good news for UST? Tiger Cub star CJ Cansino wants to stay HIGH SCHOOL MIXTAPE: UST’s CJ Cansino UST’s CJ Cansino leads Ateneo’s Kai Sotto by 26 points in MVP race Jrs. MVP leader Cansino already in touch with new UST coach Ayo UST coach Cantonjos says Cansino, not Sotto, should have topped NBTC 24 CJ Cansino is UST’s first UAAP Jrs. MVP since Kevin Ferrer Should MVP CJ Cansino of UST be in the top five of the NBTC 24? UST still frontrunner for MVP Cansino; three other schools also interested It’s Sotto-Cagulangan vs Gozum-Cansino in SLAM Rising Stars UST gets to keep UAAP Jrs. MVP CJ Cansino.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 31st, 2018

One of those weeks : Woods doing well except with putter

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press PARAMUS, N.J. (AP) — Tiger Woods has shown he can put together a series of sub-par rounds. Contending in consecutive tournaments has been more difficult. Woods took small consolation Saturday after his first bogey-free round of the year, mainly because he managed only three birdies at The Northern Trust on a soft Ridgewood Country Club that is yielding plenty of them. He made a 6-foot birdie putt on his last hole — no sure thing the way his week has been going — for a 3-under 68. That gives him seven birdies for 54 holes. "That's not going to get it done," Woods said. "As soft as it is, these guys are making a boat load of birdies. And I just haven't made any." It wasn't a lack of chances. Woods missed six birdie putts from about 12 feet or closer. He has hit nine out of 14 fairways all three rounds, and he rarely was out of position when he did miss the greens in the third round. He's just not seeing many putts go in, mainly because he says he can't get the right line with the right speed. On a few occasions, he's asked caddie Joe LaCava to help read the putts. It hasn't mattered. "I'm just not seeing the lines this week," Woods said. "Just the way it goes. I've called Joey in a few times this week. 'Joey, I see three different breaks here.' He said, 'Yeah, so do I.' I'm hitting in these spots where I've had double-breakers, if not triple-breakers, and I'm just not seeing or feeling correctly through those areas." Such is golf. Woods chalked it up on more than one occasion to "one of those weeks." But it extends a peculiar pattern this year of looking as though he were on the verge of winning, and then taking a step back. He had two straight weeks at the end of the Florida swing where he got within one shot of the lead on the back nine, and then he showed up at the Masters and finished in the middle of the pack. Woods showed plenty of momentum at The Players Championship (65-69 weekend) and the Memorial (67-68 in the middle two rounds), and then he missed the cut at the U.S. Open. One week after he briefly had the lead in the final round at the British Open, he tied for 31st at Firestone on a course where he has won eight times. He was runner-up at the PGA Championship in his most recent start, and now is playing for little more than pride or FedEx Cup points. Woods finished two hours before the leaders — Brooks Koepka and Jamie Lovemark — even teed off. His 68 at least allowed him to sleep in a little more on Sunday for the final round, though Woods all but conceded he was out of it. His hope was to finish at 10 under, which would mean a 64 in the final round. That would at least give him some good vibes going to the TPC Boston, where he won 12 years ago. "I think that would be a nice way to end the week," he said. "It's not going to win, but at least I can get some good momentum going into Boston." He started the FedEx Cup playoffs at No. 20, and with only 30 players advancing to the Tour Championship, he still has some work left......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 26th, 2018

Rondina-Barbon, Gervacio-Tan reach BVR on Tour Manila Open quarterfinals

University of Santo Tomas bets Sisi Rondina and Babylove Barbon and Perlas' Dzi Gervacio and Bea Tan led the early quarterfinalists in the Beach Volleyball Republic on Tour Manila Open Saturday at Sands SM By The Bay. Rondina and Barbon prevailed over Gen Eslapor and MJ Ebro in an all-UST clash, 21-10, 21-14, for their second straight win, Gervacio and Tan scored a 24-22, 21-10 victory of Smart's Grethcel Soltones and Alyssa Eroa to also remain perfect. Far Eastern University's Ivana Agudo and Marianne Calinawan needed a couple of three-setters to squeeze into today's quarters, outlasting University of the Philippines 2's Abi Goc and Mikee Osorio, 21-16, 19-21, 15-5, to follow up last Saturday's 17-21, 21-11, 15-11 victory over Rizal Technological University's Macie Candido and Jona Mae De Lima. Kempal's Roma Doromal and Chantal Rodriguez rallied from a set down to beat Adamson University's Hannah Nicole Infante and Gracelchen Ave, 21-23, 21-13, 15-7 and advance to the next round. Doromal and Rodriguez swept University of the East's Rhea Manalo and Lyen Shan Ritual, 21-15, 21-16, on opening day. Four other pairs rebounded from their first defeats to stay in the hunt for the remaining four quarterfinals berths. Air Force's Anna Abanto and Jennifer Manzano-Acain overcame University of Perpetual Help System Dalta's Princess Deana Estanislao and Janine Padue, 21-15, 19-21, 15-12, while National University's Klymince Orilleneda and Antonnete Landicho showed the door on UP's Jessma Ramos and Justine Dorog, 21-17, 21-17. Ateneo's Ponggay Gaston and Jules Samonte extended their campaign with a 21-13, 21-23, 15-12 squeaker over RTU's Candido and De Lima, while UE's Manalo and Ritual turned back College of Saint Benilde's Felicia Cui and Kaila Mendoza, 21-19, 21-10. In the men's division, Bryan Bagunas and James Natividad of reigning UAAP champions NU, Krung Arbasto and Jaron Requinton of UST, Ranran Abdilla and Jessie Lopez of Air Force, and Jayjay Solamillo and Gilbert Balmores of Perpetual Help locked up their spots in the round of eight after winning two matches last Saturday. The knockout quarterfinals is set at 8 a.m. on Sunday, while the semifinals and finals - which is also one-match affairs - is scheduled in the afternoon. The winner in the three-day, double gender tournament will claim the P20,000 top prize......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Phoenix set to unleash the ‘Beast’

PBA Governor’s Cup back-to-back champion Barangay Ginebra remains as the team to beat with import Justin Brownlee back in action. Meralco, which finished runner-up to Ginebra in the last two years, will also be in the hunt with Allen Durham returning. And San Miguel Beer will be San Miguel Beer,… Source link link: Phoenix set to unleash the ‘Beast’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 16th, 2018

Phoenix set to unleash the ‘Beast’

PBA Governor's Cup back-to-back champion Barangay Ginebra remains as the team to beat with import Justin Brownlee back in action. Meralco, which finished runner-up to Ginebra in the last two years, will also be in the hunt with Allen Durham returning. And San Miguel Beer will be San Miguel Beer,….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

GM Gonzales, WGM Frayna and IM Miciano turn back respective foes

GRANDMASTER (GM) Jayson Gonzales destroyed Anusha Narava Lakshmi of India to re-enter the top 10 even as Woman GM Janelle Mae Frayna and International Master (IM) John Marvin Miciano turned back their respective foes to stay in the hunt after six rounds of the Burgse Meesters in Burges, Belgium Tuesday night. The post GM Gonzales, WGM Frayna and IM Miciano turn back respective foes appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

Koepka holds off Woods to win 100th PGA Championship

ST. LOUIS, USA – Brooks Koepka, holding his nerve to fight off dramatic challenges from Tiger Woods and Adam Scott, won a thrilling back-nine battle Sunday, August 12, to capture the 100th PGA Championship. The 28-year-old two-time US Open champion sealed his third major title by firing a 4-under-par 66 ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 13th, 2018

Woodland sets PGA record but leads by only a stroke at PGA

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press ST. LOUIS (AP) — Sirens blared across Bellerive, putting the second round of the PGA Championship on hold and ending a day of scoring rarely seen in a major. Gary Woodland set the 36-hole record — for now, anyway — after a round where his driver wasn't as reliable, he didn't see many putts drop and he didn't hit the ball quite as well as the day before. "I can live with that," he said Friday after a 4-under 66. That put him at 10-under 130, breaking by one the PGA Championship record and tying the 36-hole score for all majors. And it was only good for a one-shot lead over Kevin Kisner. There were two rounds of 63, one 64 and six 65s. And that was only half of the 156-man field. Still to be determined was whether Woodland's score even holds up as the lead. Storms arrived forcing a two-hour suspension, and the PGA of America declared the rest of the day a wash when rain pounded the course. Rickie Fowler had just birdied the 10th hole and was at 7 under. Tiger Woods had three birdies through seven holes as he tried to get in range. "I felt I was headed in the right direction," said Woods, who was at 3 under. "Tomorrow is going to be a long day for a lot of us." The second round was to resume at 7 a.m. local time. The greens would be slightly smoother, the course slightly longer, the approach unchanged — see flag, aim at flag. Perhaps it was easy for Woodland not to be overly impressed. He was playing with Kisner, who shot 29 on the back nine and was in the middle of the ninth fairway — his final hole — needing a birdie to become the first player to shoot 62 in the PGA Championship. He came up short of the green, chipped too strong and made bogey for a 64, leaving him one shot out of the lead Friday. Right in front of them was U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka, who had a 20-foot birdie putt he wanted to make for no other reason than he likes to make birdies. This one missed, and only later did Koepka realize it was for 62. Instead, he was the 15th player to shoot 63 in the PGA Championship. "My caddie said something walking off," Koepka said. "I didn't even think of it. I've been so in the zone, you don't know where you are." And then Charl Schwartzel made it 16 players with his eight-birdie round of 63. No one from the afternoon draw completed more than 12 holes. The plan was to finish the second round, make the cut and then immediately start the third round in threesomes off both tees. "I feel like we're in a good spot," Fowler said. "But the nice thing about the delay and going back out tomorrow morning, we'll get fresh greens." Bellerive really had no defense. Woodland and Kisner played in the same group, and they offered a great example that Bellerive is accommodating to just about any game. Woodland is among the most powerful players in golf. Kisner is not. He relies more on a clean hit with his irons and a great short game. The course is so soft — not so much from Tuesday's rain, but the extreme heat that requires more water on the turf — that every flag is accessible provided players find the ample fairways. "Greens are receptive, so my 4-iron stops as quick as his 7-iron," Kisner said. "If they were firm, I don't think I would have a chance with the way the greens are situated and the places they're putting the flags. But being receptive, that's my only hope." Woodland's 36-hole score broke the PGA record by one shot, most recently set by Jimmy Walker and Robert Streb at Baltusrol. It also tied the 36-hole record for all majors, matching Jordan Spieth at the 2015 Masters, Martin Kaymer at the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 and Brandt Snedeker (Royal Lytham & St. Annes in 2012) and Nick Faldo (Muirfield in 1992) at the British Open. Koepka was at 8-under 132, two shots behind. Dustin Johnson, the world's No. 1 player, had a 66 and joined Schwartzel and Thomas Pieters (66) at 133. Spieth still has hope in his second try at a career Grand Slam. Spieth didn't get under par for the tournament until his seventh hole Friday — the par-3 16th hole — and he managed to do enough right for a 66 to get within seven shots of the lead. Spieth has battled with his game all year, and his confidence isn't at its peak. It's the nature of the course that makes him feel he has a farther climb than the seven shots that separate him from Woodland. "A little frustrated at this place in general," Spieth said. "This course would be phenomenal — and probably is phenomenal — if it's not playing soft. You get away with more. You don't have to be as precise. ... Personally, I would prefer more difficult and firmer, faster conditions on the greens. Having said that, I would have shot a much higher score yesterday." Defending champion Justin Thomas was at 2 under through seven holes, while Rory McIlroy was frustrated with all pars in his seven holes. On a day like this, that meant losing ground. "It's been 16 pars in a row from yesterday to today, so hopefully I can break that run in the morning," McIlroy said. Midway through the afternoon round, the cut was projected to be even par. Woodland, even with the lowest 36-hole score in 60 years of stroke play at the PGA Championship, still had a long way to go. In conditions like Bellerive, no lead was safe. "I feel safe because I feel safe where my game is," Woodland said. "I'm not too worried with what anyone else is doing out there.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

Lady Maroons back in hunt, trip Stags

    MANILA, Phiippines – University of the Philippines waylaid a hapless San Sebastian side, pouncing on its sloppy reception and token defense to fashion out a 25-15, 25-13, 25-16 romp in the lone women’s match in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference at the Filoil Flying V Center on ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 8th, 2018

Thomas takes over at Firestone as Woods fades away

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press AKRON, Ohio (AP) — Justin Thomas and Rory McIlroy have become friends more by location than youth. They live near each other in South Florida and said they spent last weekend practicing together at The Bear's Club. Sunday at Firestone will be the eighth time this year they play together in a tournament, and the number grows next week when they play the opening two rounds with Tiger Woods at the PGA Championship. But this is the first time a trophy is at stake. Thomas pulled away from the pack with five birdies in the middle of his round Saturday for a 3-under 67, giving him a three-shot lead over McIlroy and Ian Poulter going into the final round of the Bridgestone Invitational. "We've played together a lot in tournaments, but never in this kind of situation," Thomas said. McIlroy played bogey-free on a Firestone course that finally started to get firm, atoning for a few missed birdie chances with key par putts. He already has won at Bay Hill this year, though he felt he should have won more. He has been runner-up three times, most recently at the British Open two weeks ago. "I played well enough to win a few times this year and I only got over the line once," McIlroy said. "Tomorrow is a great opportunity to try and win again. I'll need a good round. I'm still a few behind. But yeah, I'm getting a little sick of the second places." McIlroy made up three shots in the final round in 2014 when he rallied to beat Sergio Garcia at Firestone. It might be a taller order to take on Thomas, who already has won twice this season and appears to have found his touch with the putter. Starting with a pitching wedge from 129 yards into the breeze to 6 feet at No. 6, Thomas made birdie on every other hole through the 14th to pull away. No one could keep pace with Thomas, least of all Tiger Woods. Starting the third round Saturday five shots behind, Woods didn't make a birdie until a 12-foot putt on the 12th hole, and he didn't make another. He wound up with a 73, leaving him 11 shots back and ending his streak of 10 straight rounds at par or better dating to the U.S. Open. "It was very similar to the first day," Woods said. "Wasn't very sharp that first day, but I made everything. So today was about the same, and I didn't make anything." That wasn't a problem for Thomas, whose six birdies included a chip-in from 30 feet behind the green on the par-3 12th. He was at 14-under 196. Thomas fell behind early with two bogeys in three holes, and a 10-foot par save in between from behind the fourth green kept him from falling farther behind. Poulter set the pace early and had a three-shot lead at one point until he dropped his shot from the bunker on the par-3 seventh, and then had a mixed bag of birdies and bogeys that kept him from getting closer to the lead. Jason Day, who threw away a chance to win the Bridgestone Invitational two years ago, had a 69 and was four shots behind. Marc Leishman, who played alongside Woods, shot 67 and joined Kyle Stanley (70) five shots behind. The course started to get a little firmer. Poulter had a 62 on Thursday. Tommy Fleetwood shot 63 on Friday. The best anyone could do in the third round was a 65 by Rickie Fowler, which only got him within six shots. Thomas figured that out quickly. He made an unusual birdie on the par-5 second by hitting his tee shot in the first cut of the third fairway. Blocked by threes, he opted for a 5-wood that started out toward the third tee and sliced over the trees to the rough, pin-high about 15 feet away from an up-and-down. After a bogey from the trees at No. 3, Thomas went at a back pin on the tough fourth hole and the ball bounded over the green in thick rough. He chopped at his chip and did well to run it 10 feet by the hole, making it for par. He bogeyed the next from a bunker, and fell three shots behind, but that par save on No. 4 helped by not dropping a shot, and by understanding how the course was playing. Thomas said he told caddie Jimmy Johnson, "We can't see pin, hit pin." Fleetwood went so far long on the fourth hole that it went 30 yards over the green. He chipped 50 feet by the hole and three-putted for a double bogey, the start of what turned out to be a sloppy day and a 74 that dropped him seven shots behind. Poulter already has won at the Houston Open in what has been a big turnaround for the Englishman, who is on the cusp of qualifying for the Ryder Cup. He made a pair of medium-length birdie putts to offset bogeys from the bunkers, but fell out of a chance to be in the last group when he missed a 6-foot par putt on the 17th. "I'm going to have a chance," Poulter said. "So starting this week, tied 13th I think was my best ever result. I'm tied second right now, so huge improvement and a little bit of work left to do. And hopefully, we can do it.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 5th, 2018

Thomas, Fleetwood, Poulter share lead at Firestone

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press AKRON, Ohio (AP) — Nobody has a better scoring average Saturday on the PGA Tour than Tiger Woods, and the Bridgestone Invitational would be a good time to keep that up. Woods might not have a choice. Neither will Rory McIlroy, Jason Day or anyone else wanting to keep pace. Tommy Fleetwood took advantage of another soft day of good scoring at Firestone with a 7-under 63. So did PGA champion Justin Thomas, who was particularly sharp with his putter for a 64. They shared the lead with Ian Poulter, who had a head start with his career-low 62 and backed it up decently enough Friday with a 67. They all played early and finished at 11-under 129. No one could catch them, mainly because there was just enough breeze to cause just enough doubt. Even so, 45 players from the 71-man field were under par, a rarity at Firestone. Woods, whose last victory was five years ago when he won this World Golf Championship for a record eighth time, got within four shots of the lead with a tee shot to 2 feet on the par-3 12th hole. He went 1 over the rest of the way for a 68, leaving him five shots behind. Is another Saturday move in the works. "I'm going to have to," Woods said. "The golf course is playing very soft, very receptive. And when you're able to hit 5-irons and they only roll out about a foot, the guys are going to put up good scores. There's 40-plus guys under par. That's never the case here at Firestone. So tomorrow is going to be one of those days I'm going to have to go out there and post a low one and see what happens." Fleetwood, the runner-up at the U.S. Open, was most pleased to see nothing higher than 4s on his scorecard. He made it look easy, except for a few times he was slightly out of position, and hit perhaps his best shot with a 6-iron to a back-left pin that settled 3 feet below the cup. "My irons, I just tended to hit exactly where we were picking the spots and I holed a few putts," Fleetwood said. "You've got days like that where it's going well, and you've just got to make the most of them." Day, who threw away a chance to win at Firestone two years ago, did make as many as he would have liked. He still had a 66 playing in the same group with Woods, and joined Kyle Stanley (68) two shots behind the leaders. McIlroy was another shot behind after a finishing a day of frustration with two birdies. He was in position to make birdies, especially that 380-yard drive he launched at the 482-yard eighth hole that left him only a sand wedge in. It came up short, rolled down a slope and left him 45 feet away. He blasted a 319-yard drive down the middle at the 10th, only to hit sand wedge just over the green and made bogey. His finish began with a tee shot on the 17th hole that landed closer to the 16th fairway. His approach went into the front bunker, and he holed out for birdie. Then, he stuffed one on the 18th for another short birdie at a 67. "An adventure to say the least," McIlroy said. "I was 1 under standing on the 17th tee and I think if I had to finish 1 under, it would have felt like the worst I could have shot today. So to get those two birdies on the last two holes is obviously very nice and gets a couple closer to the lead." Woods opened with a bogey, bounced back with three birdies over his next four holes and looked like he might make a move with his birdie on the 12th. Two holes later, he faced such an awkward lie from the top collar of a bunker that he wasn't sure how to stand or how hard to hit it. He hit it too hard, through the green, made bogey and missed birdie chances coming in. This is only the fourth time he has been five shots or closer going into the weekend this year, but there are plenty of others around him. Also five shots back were Jon Rahm of Spain, who had a sloppy finish for a 70, Tony Finau (68) and Players champion Webb Simpson (65). The only regret for Thomas was a mistake that didn't cost him as much as it could have. He was in the rough off the tee at the par-5 16th and still had some 284 yards to reach the green, with a pond in front. The distance wasn't an issue, but Thomas said later that odds were against him making a birdie, and the safer route would have been to lay up and rely on his wedge. He hit 3-wood too far right and into the water. "We were lucky to get up-and-down for 6, but that was a stupid decision," Thomas. The rest of his game, especially with the putter, was sharp. "It was definitely one of the better putting days I've had in a while," Thomas said. "I just hit a lot of quality putts. That's what's most important. I've had days where I've missed more but putted better. ... To me, that's not as frustrating as what I was doing yesterday — just hitting bad putts.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

Prepare for the biggest, boldest stunts yet. Ethan Hunt is back for Mission: Imp…

Prepare for the biggest, boldest stunts yet. Ethan Hunt is back for Mission: Impossible Fallout, now showing at #SMCinema! Book tickets via smcinema.com or the SM Cinema App. #EverythingsHereAtSM #ILoveSMManila #EatPlayShopInTheCity Source link: Prepare for the biggest, boldest stunts yet. Ethan Hunt is back for Mission: Imp….....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 26th, 2018

Molinari rises to 6th in world ranking

PARIS, France — Newly-crowned British Open champion Francesco Molinari climbed to a career-high world ranking of sixth while 14-time major winner Tiger Woods edged back into the top 50. Molinari became the first Italian in history to win one of golf’s four majors on Sunday with a flawless final-round 69 at Carnoustie, and has jumped […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

Molinari survives wild day to win British Open

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland --- Francesco Molinari didn't get the loudest cheers for the best golf at British Open. He was overlooked for so much of Sunday playing alongside Tiger Woods, who caused pure pandemonium at Carnoustie by taking the lead in the final round of a major for the first time in nine years. Molinari settled for the best cheer of them all. The last one. Amid so much chaos --- seven players atop the leaderboard, six of them still tied on the back nine --- Molinari played a steady hand by going the entire weekend without a bogey and finishing with a5-foot birdieputt that secured his place in history as Italy's first major champion. "Clearly, in my group, the attention wa...Keep on reading: Molinari survives wild day to win British Open.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

Woods creates buzz at Carnoustie

For 20 minutes on a warm Saturday afternoon at the British Open, Tiger Woods’ name was back atop a leaderboard at a major championship and Carnoustie was buzzing. Woods creates buzz at Carnoustie CARNOUSTIE, Scotland — For 20 minutes on a warm Saturday afternoon at the British Open, Tiger Woods’ name was back atop a… link: Woods creates buzz at Carnoustie.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2018

Johnson and Kisner, housemates and British Open leaders

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press CARNOUSTIE, Scotland (AP) — A light rain in the morning that gave way to soft sunlight in the afternoon took some of the sting out of Carnoustie. Just not all of it. Kevin Kisner found that out with one swing that erased his two-shot lead Friday in the British Open and left him tied with housemate Zach Johnson. He hit an 8-iron that only needed to go 150 yards to clear the Barry Burn in front of the 18th green. Instead, it floated out of the yellow grass to the right, bounced off the base of the rock wall that frames the winding stream and led to a double bogey. Disappointed but not down, Kisner removed his cap behind the green and scratched his head as if he wondered what hit him. "They call it 'Car-nasty' for a reason," he said after signing for his 1-under 70. "Even when you think you've got it, it will jump up and bite you." It took a chunk out of Dustin Johnson and Justin Thomas, the Nos. 1 and 2 players in the world who won't be around for the weekend. Johnson finished with a double bogey to miss the cut by one. Thomas made three straight double bogeys on the front nine and missed by one. And it left a wide-open weekend on a course with a history of crazy finishes. Zach Johnson, whose name already is on the claret jug from his playoff victory at St. Andrews three years ago, played in the morning under an umbrella and finished with a 30-foot birdie putt for a 67. Johnson and Kisner are staying in a house of seven players — five of them major champions — and share the lead at 6-under 136. They played on different ends of a day that started gray and ended with shadows. Scotland's unusually dry summer finally got a reprieve. There wasn't enough rain to turn brown fairways green, though it at least kept shots from rolling endlessly. They head into a weekend with endless possibilities. One shot behind were Tommy Fleetwood (65), Pat Perez (68) and Xander Schauffele (66). Perez was tied for the lead until he hit into a bunker on the 18th hole and took bogey. Rory McIlroy, pledging to "go down swinging" to rid himself of a bad Masters memory this year, had another 69 and was part of a large group two shots behind. Jordan Spieth also is in the mix in his bid to take the claret jug back home to Texas. Spieth hit 8-iron through a gap in the trees for a birdie-birdie start to the back nine, and he dropped only one shot — not four like he did on Thursday — over the four closing holes at Carnoustie for a 67. He goes into the weekend just three shots back. "Very happy to be back in the tournament," Spieth said. Tiger Woods still has work to do after a rugged start, good recovery and then a mix of birdies and bogeys that left him stuck in neutral on a better day for scoring. Woods had another 71 and was six shots behind, with 28 players between him and the lead. "We've been fortunate with the conditions. It hasn't blown yet," Kisner said. "I think it will blow this weekend and make it even more difficult. Who knows what's going to happen? We're going to just keep trying to get after it." Carnoustie was a far different test from the opening round, when sunshine baked the fairways crisp and it was difficult to figure out how far the ball was going when it hit the ground. The steady, light rain made them a little slower and a lot more predictable. The greens held shots a little better. Strategies changed. Slightly softer conditions meant power players who were driving beyond the trouble hit more irons off the tee, and shorter players hit more drivers and fairway metals. Kisner hit 5-iron off the first tee Thursday. He hit 3-wood Friday. "Hit the same club as the approach," Kisner said. "That's a pretty dramatic difference in distance." Kisner is a newcomer to what amounts to an American fraternity house at golf's oldest championship the last three years. Four of them are among the top 11 on the leaderboard going into the weekend with Spieth and Rickie Fowler, who shot 69 and was at 3-under 139. As for talking shop after work? Nothing is off limits. "Everybody will tell their horror stories and good stories, and we'll laugh and eat a big old meal and sit around and watching something stupid," Kisner said. Thomas will have one of the horror stories. The PGA champion took three to get out of a pot bunker from the fairway on the par-5 sixth hole, making the first of three straight double bogeys. Johnson became the first No. 1 player to miss the cut since Luke Donald in 2011, and it was the second straight that the top two players in the world ranking missed the cut in a major. The way golf has been going, it would be reasonable to see the name "Johnson" atop the leaderboard and assume it belonged to the top-ranked player. But not necessarily at the British Open. "I've been called Dustin many times," Zach Johnson said. "I doubt he's been called Zach that many times." Johnson overcame a bogey on the opening hole with birdies on the third and fourth holes, and he never put himself under too much pressure the rest of the way. Already a two-time major champion with titles at St. Andrews and Augusta National, the 42-year-old from Iowa now has made the cut 12 straight times in the British Open, a streak that began at Carnoustie in 2007. His low ball flight, grinding nature and good putting give him the right ingredients. Kisner is no stranger to pressure at a major. He had at least a share of the lead after each of three rounds at the PGA Championship last summer until a bogey on the 70th hole ruined his chances. "Hopefully, I'll have another chance to prove that I can do it here," Kisner said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 21st, 2018

The British Open returns to the nasty links of Carnoustie

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press Carnoustie is known as much for the calamity it causes as the British Open champions it crowns. Any mention of Carnoustie immediately brings back that image of Jean Van de Velde, equal parts tragedy and comedy, standing in Barry Burn on the 18th hole with water up his shins and rising. He made triple bogey to lose a three-shot lead, and then completed as great a collapse as can be found in a major championship by losing in a three-man playoff in 1999. Just don't get the idea Van de Velde owns all the rights to bad endings at Carnoustie. Jose Jurado was the first victim. He had a three-shot lead going into the final round in 1931 and was still two shots clear late in the round until coming undone in the brutal closing stretch, topping one shot on the 17th hole into the burn. He lost out to Tommy Armour. More recently was Padraig Harrington , only it worked out well for him in 2007. Playing the 18th with a one-shot lead, the Irishman hit his tee shot into the Barry Burn. He took a penalty drop and then hit his next shot into the winding stream. Harrington managed the best double bogey of his life. It got him into a playoff when Sergio Garcia made bogey from the bunker, and Harrington went on to win his first major. Of the six previous Opens on these menacing links, Ben Hogan is the only winner to hold a 54-hole lead. For most everyone else, Carnoustie always seem to dish out its share of carnage. Rod Pampling once opened with a 71 and had the lead. He followed with an 86 and missed the cut. Phil Mickelson still hasn't seen a weekend at Carnoustie. Garcia made his major debut as a professional at Carnoustie. He shot 89. "That's a brutal course," Bernhard Langer said. He speaks from experience in 1999, when Langer had his third-highest score of the 23 Opens he completed. He shot 297, and he tied for 18th that week. The first time Tiger Woods went an entire round without a birdie in a major was in 1999 at Carnoustie. "I think I made one birdie on the weekend and I finished three or four back of the playoff," Woods said. "That was ridiculous how hard it was." One month after Shinnecock Hills was punishing as ever in the U.S. Open, golf's oldest championship doesn't figure to be much of a reprieve. Scotland has been going through a warm, dry patch of weather, which figures to make it firm and bouncy. Mickelson, who played Carnoustie a week before the Open, said it was unlikely he would even carry a driver. "I'm either going to carry a driver or that hot 3-wood, but there's only two or three holes — there's actually only two holes I plan on using it, both par 5s. I have a low 1-iron that I've been putting in the bag and ... it's very low. Gets on the ground quick. I'll hit that on probably the last ten holes, almost every hole." Carnoustie in any conditions is regarded as a beast, with a reputation as the toughest links in the world. Sir Michael Bonallack, the former R&A secretary, might have sized it up the best when he said, "When the wind is blowing, it is the toughest course in Britain. And when it's not blowing, it's probably still the toughest." In recent Opens, it has picked up a nickname: Car-nasty. For so much of the field, it will be a new experience. Only two players from the top 10 in the world have played a British Open at Carnoustie — Justin Rose and Rory McIlroy , who was an 18-year-old amateur in 2007 and immediately showed his potential when he opened with a 68. He tied for 42nd that week. Only 33 players in the 156-man field have played an Open at Carnoustie, and only 12 have played it twice. Defending champion Jordan Spieth only knows it from television. He was 13, just starting to blossom as a junior, and he watched the Open from home as Garcia and Harrington tried to survive the finish. "I remember ... how good of a score par was on that hole and will continue to be for Opens going forward," Spieth said. "It's one of probably the toughest closing holes in the Open Championship anywhere, and that creates some drama when it comes down to Sunday, as we've seen. And I don't think it will be any different this year." Carnoustie gets its mean streak from the way the course was set up in 1999, with narrow fairways and high grass. But its strength comes from the wind, like most links courses, and this course near the North Sea is particularly exposed. It measures 7,402 yards, which is 19 yards shorter — yes, shorter — than it was in 2007, the last time the Open was at Carnoustie. Spieth will try to become the first player in 10 years to repeat as British Open champion, and right now he'd simply settle for a chance. Since his closing 64 at the Masters to finish third, Spieth has finished at least 12 shots out of the lead in four of his seven tournaments. He missed the cut in the other three. Like most majors these days, the Open figures to be wide-open. Dustin Johnson, who lost a four-shot lead over the final two rounds at Shinnecock, is back to No. 1 in the world and eager to pick up another major. He has not played since the U.S. Open. The next three players behind him in the world ranking — PGA champion Justin Thomas, Rose and U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka — all have a chance to replace him at No. 1. Recent history would suggest a young American — the last five majors have been won by Americans in their 20s. "It's definitely been pretty one-sided, and the Americans are dominating," Rose said. "So it would be lovely to turn that around next week." Woods is happy to get another crack at it. Carnoustie was his first experience with links golf in 1995, when he was still at Stanford and came over for the Scottish Open at Carnoustie ahead of the British Open at St. Andrews. He opened with a 69, closed with a 78 finished 48th. "Carnoustie is an unbelievable driving golf course," Woods said. "You have to drive the ball well there, but also it's not your traditional in (and) out golf course. It's a lot of different angles, so a lot of different crosswinds. I have to be able to maneuver the golf ball both ways there efficiently. You just have to hit the golf ball well." There is no faking. Nothing comes easily. No one really conquers Carnoustie. It's more about survival. The highest compliment might have come from Tom Watson, who won his first major at Carnoustie in 1975 in a playoff over Jack Newton. "Carnoustie is like an ugly, old hag who speaks the truth no matter how painful," Watson once said. "But it's only when you add up your score, you hear exactly what she thinks of you.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

PACQUIAO WATCH: Manny in the company of many

GENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews / 10 July) – A few months back, I wrote about the three great athletes that broke into the sporting world at about the same time. That was in 1996. Kobe Bryant, Tiger Woods and Derek Jeter. Soon thereafter, they became iconic figures in their respective pro sports disciplines. Kobe would […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsJul 10th, 2018