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The week in photos: September 16-22, 2017

The week in photos: September 16-22, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerSep 23rd, 2017

The week in photos: September 23-29, 2017

The week in photos: September 23-29, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 30th, 2017

The week in photos: September 16-22, 2017

The week in photos: September 16-22, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2017

The week in photos: September 9-15, 2017

The week in photos: September 9-15, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 16th, 2017

The week in photos: September 2-8, 2017

The week in photos: September 2-8, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 9th, 2017

The week in photos: August 26-September 1, 2017

The week in photos: August 26-September 1, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2017

The week in photos: December 2-8, 2017

                          – Rappler.com.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 9th, 2017

IN PHOTOS: The national costumes at Miss Universe 2017

MANILA, Philippines – The 92 candidates of the Miss Universe 2017 pageant showed off their respective national costumes last Saturday, November 18 (broadcast a week later, early Sunday, November 26 in Manila). The Philippines' bet Rachel Peters showed off the gold sarimanok ensemble by fashion designer Val Taguba. ( LOOK: Rachel Peters' national costume for Miss Universe 2017 )   Asian ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 26th, 2017

The week in photos: November 18-24, 2017

        – Rappler.com  .....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 25th, 2017

Hidilyn Diaz eyes medal for Team PHI in world weightlifting championships

Three-time Olympian Hidilyn Diaz is hard at work to represent the Philippines for the upcoming International Weightlifitng Federation World Championships set next week. The 2016 Olympic silver medalist has been on a tough grind leading up to the meet, and she's been hitting the gym daily in the hopes of making a return trip to the Olympic stage. 2016 Olympic silver medalist Hidilyn Diaz now in the US preparing for next week’s International Weightlifing World Championship in Anaheim. 🇵🇭💪🏼🏋🏻‍♀️ pic.twitter.com/sI8WtHN3aV — Steve Angeles (@StevieAngeles) November 21, 2017 Alongside her is 21-year-old Kristel Macrohon, who took home a bronze medal for the Philippines last September from the Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games in, Turkmenistan Strong outings from the Filipincas can help them secure points needed to qualify for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. According to their coach Tony Agustin, focusing on their training is key to help the lifters achieve their peak performance. "We’re focusing on what they’re going to do to perform. Yung Target naman natin is to achieve yung goal namin [and] makuha nila yung highest performances talaga," Agustin shared. Diaz, 26, took home bronze in the 2015 championships in Houston, Texas and she’s confident that she can climb up the podium this year.  "Siyempre ibang level to. World championship to at tsaka 'yung expectation and pressure mahirap," she bared. "Pero kinakaya." Diaz is set to compete 53-kilogram category on November 30th, while Macrohon takes the 69-kilo platform on December 2nd at the Anaheim convention center in California.   With a report from Steve Angeles, ABS-CBN North America Bureau......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 21st, 2017

The week in photos: November 11-17, 2017

      – Rappler.com.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 18th, 2017

The week in photos: October 28-November 3, 2017

The week in photos: October 28-November 3, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 4th, 2017

The week in photos: October 7-13, 2017

The week in photos: October 7-13, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 14th, 2017

Anger as Swedish neo-Nazis prepare for Yom Kippur march – Al Jazeera

Swedish anti-racist politicians, watchdog groups and Jewish organisations have expressed anger as self-professed National Socialists prepare for a rally slated to take place on the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur in the country's second-largest city. The Nordic Resistance Movement (NRM), which anti-racist organisations describe as neo-Nazis, is holding a demonstration on September 30 in Gothenburg, which is located on Sweden's western coast. They have dubbed the event &'8220;Revolt against the traitors&'8221;. The event will be a rally against &'8220;the politicians in the Swedish parliament as well as the European Parliament&'8221; who &'8220;have flung our nation's borders wide open to an unprecedented invasion&'8221;, the NRM said in a statement, referring to the country's acceptance of refugees and migrants fleeing war and economic devastation in recent years. The statement added, &'8220;Today's politicians and journalists are nothing short of robbers and traitors!&'8221; At the time of publication, the NRM had not replied to Al Jazeera's repeated requests for additional comment. Linda Snecker, a spokesperson for Sweden's Left Party, described the NRM as &'8220;a threat against our democracy and open society&'8221;. Speaking to Al Jazeera by telephone, she said, &'8220;It's a threat against all of us who are anti-racists, who are feminists, [and those] who celebrate LGBTQ society. The neo-Nazis are a threat against all of those values that we believe and fight for.&'8221; Police have changed the NRM's planned route, prompting the group to hold a flash demonstration in Gothenburg on September 17, with some 60 demonstrators marching through the city centre. In a video posted on the NRM's YouTube channel, the demonstrators waved flags and chanted against immigration. When angry passers-by confronted them, an NRM protester threw a woman to the pavement. Although the NRM has been active for two decades, Snecker said the group is attempting to capitalise on the rise of the far-right Sweden Democrats Party, which has 49 seats in the national legislature, and the wave of far-right populism that has hit parts of Europe and the US in recent years. &'8220;Their agenda is violence, to scare people, to show you can't protest against them and that they have a violent capacity,&'8221; she said. &'8220;That's really scary.&'8221; The demonstration was set to pass near a synagogue in the city centre, which has prompted faith leaders to express concern for the city's Jewish community. However, a court ruled on Monday that the route would have to be changed. Aron Verstandig, chairman of The Official Council of Swedish Jewish Communities, and Allan Stutzinky, chairman of the Jewish Community in Gothenburg, decried the police's decision to grant the NRM a permit in an opinion article published by the Svenska Dagbladet newspaper earlier this month. &'8220;Aside from out of fear for our own security, it evokes uncomfortable associations for us Jews. During the Holocaust, it wasn't unusual for the German Nazis to conduct their horrendous atrocities on the most important days of the Jewish calendar,&'8221; they wrote. Henrik Dahlberg, a media spokesperson for the City of Gothenburg, said it does not have the legal authority to prevent the march from taking place. &'8220;Demonstrations such as this one have a very strong protection in the Swedish constitution,&'8221; he told Al Jazeera by email. &'8220;Therefore, the march in and of itself cannot be stopped.&'8221; In 2016, the anti-racist magazine Expo documented 3,064 instances of neo-Nazi activities in Sweden. The bulk of the activities involved spreading propaganda, such as distributing flyers and posting stickers. In a December 2016 study that examined the profiles of 159 NRM members, Expo found that more than a quarter of them had previously been charged with violent crimes, while 56 percent had been convicted of a crime. Explaining that the group had grown in recent years, Expo added that a third of active NRM members in 2015 had not previously had any documented connections to neo-Nazi organisations. Last week, Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven called for action to combat the rise in far-right activity in the country. &'8220;When we now see an escalation of these extremist forces, and we are moving towards a normalization of racist parties too, then we must do something,&'8221; he said. Daniel Wiklander, Expo's acting managing editor, described the NRM's upcoming demonstration as &'8220;an outrage&'8221;. Wiklander explains that the NRM draws on the ideological traditions of the German National Socialists, American white supremacist groups that were prevalent in the 1980s and other European fascist organisations that were active in the lead-up to and during World War II. &'8220;At this point, it's the only national socialist organisation, but they exist within a larger white nationalist and far-right alignment,&'8221; he said. &'8220;For a long time, they were a fringe movement because they were very hostile to [far-right] competition and mostly stuck to their own. In the last 10 years, they've [benefited from] different [white supremacist] groups coming together.&'8221; The NRM was founded as the Swedish Resistance Movement in 1997 by Klas Lund, who has previously spent time in prison for bank robbery and manslaughter for the 1986 killing of an anti-racist organiser who intervened to stop the harassment of migrants. More recently, the NRM has established a branch in neighbouring Finland, where its members have attacked anti-racist demonstrations and LGBTQ pride events. The group advocates Sweden's exit from the European Union, the mass deportation of all refugees and migrants and what it describes as &'8220;Nordic self-sufficiency&'8221; based on National Socialist ideology, among other far-right policies. In July 2017, a court in [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

The week in photos: August 12-18, 2017

The week in photos: August 12-18, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 19th, 2017

The week in photos: August 5-11, 2017

The week in photos: August 5-11, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 12th, 2017

The week in photos: July 29-August 4, 2017

The week in photos: July 29-August 4, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 5th, 2017

The week in photos: July 22-28, 2017

The week in photos: July 22-28, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 29th, 2017

Marines facing ‘discouraging’ challenges in Afghanistan – CNN News

The plume of smoke and dust rose over the runway, high above the now-deserted but once costly and vital control towers. Then a second rocket slammed into the tarmac just feet away from where a C130 cargo plane would imminently land to ferry us out. The Marines with us at first appeared unfazed. Some were perhaps young and new to it all, while the older ones stood tall, not flinching. I crouched behind a wheel until those tires were used to race us back toward a shelter. Seven years ago, it would have been mere minutes before that Taliban rocket team was bombed in retaliation by US forces protecting a thousands-strong base. But in 2017, the US Marines here &'8212; all 300 of them &'8212; seem oddly vulnerable. They don't leave the wire much, mostly just to train and advise, leaving the fighting to the Afghans. Yet all the same, three separate rocket attacks hit their bases in three days &'8212; two near us &'8212; one injuring 10 Afghan soldiers, and another an 8-year-old boy. This is the painful reality of Afghanistan 2017. The country is in one of the most violent periods of its recent history, and its challenges are deepening. But the sense of exhaustion, of solutions long having lost their sparkle, pervades. And as President Trump weighs his first move in America's longest war, its 15 years make it absolutely nothing new to many of the Marines currently at its sharp end. Here's how one hardened, normally optimistic Marine commander, Col. Matthew Reid, talked about lost friends. &'8220;I don't think I've ever bothered to count. Too many, between here and Iraq,&'8221; he said. &'8220;A lot of blood in the ground.&'8221; Born on September 11, Reid is back in Afghanistan's Helmand Province for the second time. He quips that the 300 Marines he works with now are the number that &'8220;ran the chow hall&'8221; when he was last there in 2010. I asked: How does it feel to have to go at it all over again? &'8220;Discouraging,&'8221; he said. &'8220;There is a definite feeling of a sense of obligation to get this right because of those who have gone before us.&'8221; The Helmand district of Nawa was retaken last week by Afghan National Security Forces, yet at about the same time nearby Gereshk district was attacked by the Taliban, with multiple checkpoints hit, and at one point six overrun. Things are better, but not good. Helmand will probably never be good any time soon, but the Marines' presence and massive aerial firepower have arguably stopped the entire opium-rich region from being swallowed by the Taliban But the Marines are only one part of the picture in a country where, according to the US government's own auditors, the Taliban influence or control about half the land. ISIS too, intermittently rises, and then, after coalition airstrikes, falls &'8212; competing to be the most extreme actor in a crowded marketplace. The government in Kabul is weak, ridden by conflict and rivalry between senior players. And the West's ideas for stabilizing the country are running out But really it is the mood in the capital which tells you things are still slipping, yet again. Long-term Afghan friends discussing for the first time how they might leave. A top executive saying his employees are leaving their large, high-profile Afghan company to protect themselves from possible attack at their central offices. This is not a time for optimism. There is no sign the Taliban are weakened, even though one Afghan official told me hundreds of mid-level leaders have been taken out in raids over the past year. Their leadership is more radical than ever, and they are likely to see handsome funds from a productive opium harvest, possibly boosted by a new poppy seed that blooms more quickly, massively increasing production. Afghanistan's bleed is slow, and perhaps hidden or ignored by much of the world, but happening all the same. Take this final anecdote from our visit to Helmand, when the Marines took us to a remote outpost where they were advising the Afghan army. We were there to see them pull out, removing themselves from a flat stretch of what Colonel Matthew Grosz called &'8220;Taliban country&'8221; &'8212; a main thoroughfare between insurgent strongholds. But their advisory mission seemed to have run into one issue: There weren't many Afghans to advise. A US Marine stands at the back of a Chinook helicopter en route to Shorsharak. On paper there were 500 Afghan troops, and 45 US marines. But as Grosz told me: &'8220;There's 200 assigned right now.&'8221; By &'8220;assigned,&'8221; he meant that there were 200 who had existed, physically at the base. But even that was optimistic, as another hundred had never shown up while the Marines were there. In fact, of the hundred they had seen, some were on operations or on patrol. So really there were fifty to a hundred Afghan soldiers at the base, almost enabling one-to-one Marine mentoring sessions. As we sat in the Helmand runway bomb shelter, waiting for the &'8220;all clear&'8221; after the rocket attack, I overheard two young Marines chatter about 9/11 as though it was a moment of historical import rather than something they had seen live on TV. That's because for them, it is something their parents mourned when they were probably five or six. Fifteen years of war sounds exhausting until you remember that for Afghans, [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJul 24th, 2017

The week in photos: July 15-21, 2017

The week in photos: July 15-21, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2017

The week in photos: July 8-14, 2017

The week in photos: July 8-14, 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 16th, 2017