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The Six Fix: Teen Flicks That Will Help You Brave The Coming School Year

There's more beyond the pressure of getting good grades!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnJun 13th, 2018

BLOGTABLE: Where do Spurs rank in the West with DeRozan?

NBA.com blogtable Where do you see the Spurs right now -- as currently constructed -- in the Western Conference hierarchy? Steve Aschburner: I think they’re about where they were last season, maybe a bit better because they’ll be swapping in a full season of DeMar DeRozan for just nine games of Kawhi Leonard. So something in the 45-50 victory range seems reasonable. Now, given the arms race out West, that might not be enough to get the Spurs into the postseason (it took 47 this spring to qualify). At least in adding DeMar DeRozan to LaMarcus Aldridge, their status as Monsters of the Mid-Range is secure. Tas Melas: The Spurs are the third best team in the West behind Golden State and Houston. There was a gap between those two teams and the rest and the Spurs just filled it. Two All-Stars plus Gregg Popovich looks like a 50-plus win squad to me. There is a lot of faith in the green Dejounte Murray and in the greying rest of the roster, but the old school mid-range shootin’, high post passin’, draining all that shot clockin’ will be fun to watch. Shaun Powell: The Spurs are in the middle class, which is where teams usually don't want to be. They're not title contenders and at best are title spoilers for someone else. But I'm not sure things would be different had they kept Leonard. John Schuhmann: If you look at it one way, they've replaced Danny Green with DeMar DeRozan on a team that won 47 games last season. They've finished in the top five defensively in each of the last six seasons (and in 17 of the last 21), but have lost something on that end of the floor with the departures of Green and Kyle Anderson. Offensively, they should take a step forward with DeRozan, but spacing will be an issue and the DeRozan-LaMarcus Aldridge dynamic could be more of a my-turn-your-turn situation than a cohesive duo. With the amount of isolations that they'll run and mid-range shots that they'll attempt, it's hard to see them ranking in the top 10 on that end of the floor. And of course, the Western Conference is so strong from 1-10 that there's a chance of the Spurs' 21-year playoff run coming to an end. Sekou Smith: The Spurs are in much the same space they were last season when Kawhi Leonard played in just nine games and knew they weren't a serious challenger to the Rockets or the Warriors in the Western Conference. I really like some of the young pieces, especially Dejounte Murray and Lonnie Walker, and what they could become down the road. But the Spurs front office understands where they fit in the bigger picture right now and are taking a very pragmatic approach......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 19th, 2018

Comm. Silver, NBPA say competitive imbalance not a problem

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com LAS VEGAS -- First came the backlash. Next, backlash to the backlash. By Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), much of the whipsawing over competitive balance -- or more accurately, imbalance -- as an NBA problem rising to the level of crisis had calmed down. Yet powerful voices from the league’s summer nerve center could not dismiss it entirely as an issue meriting closer inspection. “I'm not here to say we have a problem,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said Tuesday after the Board of Governors meeting. “And I love where the league is right now. [But] I think we can create a better system.” Neither Silver nor Michele Roberts, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association, sounded an alarm in their separate news conferences about what many see as a widening gap between the league’s haves and have-nots. Roberts, in fact, seemed to feel that all is well and that talent inequality is in the eye of the beholder. “Competitive balance, it almost depends on what your favorite team is,” said Roberts, who was rehired as head of the players union in another four-year contract announced Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “I don’t hear anybody in the Bay Area worrying about competitive balance. I also don’t hear the people in Philadelphia worrying about competitive balance, or Houston. “We’ve got great teams. And it’s never been the case, as far as I’m concerned, where I was not able most of the time to predict what teams were going to be in the Finals.” The topic came up in precisely that context before the Finals last month when Silver was asked about Golden State and Cleveland meeting in the championship series for the fourth consecutive year, a first in any of the major professional sports leagues. It reared its head again this month soon after free agency opened on July 1, with events conspiring to make insiders wonder about a growing disparity among teams. LeBron James’ signing with the Los Angeles Lakers was the biggest move in what appeared to be a continuing shift of strength into the league’s Western Conference. That was followed by the news that DeMarcus Cousins, New Orleans’ All-Star center, had joined the champion Warriors. That signing sparked the initial backlash, a rich-getting-richer cry that pointed not to Cousins’ one-year deal for $5.3 million in 2018-19 salary but the fact that the Warriors will spend in excess of $20 million for it when luxury taxes are counted. Golden State had the NBA’s fattest payroll in 2017-18 of $137.5 million, despite a $99 million salary cap, thanks to various exceptions in the prevailing “soft cap” system. “I don't necessarily think it's per se bad that the Warriors are so dominant,” Silver told reporters, not long after discussing the “competitive landscape” with the owners. “As I've said before, we're not trying to create some sort of forced parity. What we really focus on is parity of opportunity. And a fair point could be made in the tax system, when certain teams are spending significantly more than others, that that's not parity of opportunity.” The counter-backlash came from folks who rushed to the Warriors’ and Cousins’ defense, correctly noting that neither did anything wrong, conducting their business within the rules as specified by the collective bargaining agreement between the owners and the players. That CBA is the object of endless study and imagined revision, with amendments possible if negotiated prior to the end of the current deal after the 2023-24 season. Shooting for a “hard cap” likely would be a tough sell to players accustomed to the freedom of movement they currently enjoy. “It's not necessarily [Roberts’] issue,” Silver said in response to the union director’s characterization. “I think it's on me and our Labor Relations Committee, ultimately, to sit with the players and their committee and convince them that there may be a better way of doing things.” Silver mentioned Charlotte owner and legendary NBA superstar Michael Jordan, chairman of that Labor Relations Committee, as a valuable resource in addressing owners’ and players’ competition concerns. Both sides have valid arguments. Interest in the NBA never has been higher by almost any metric chosen, from selected TV ratings and licensing revenues to the game’s growth globally. Attendance at the MGM Resorts Las Vegas Summer League keeps pushing higher, with fans eager to see top rookies, second-year players and relative free-agent unknowns chasing their pro hoops’ dreams. The valuations of the 30 NBA franchises, of course, all have soared beyond $1 billion, according to Forbes.com, with the Knicks, the Lakers and the Warriors all estimated to be worth more than $3 billion. Longtime NBA observers such as TNT’s David Aldridge wrote a column this week that argued on behalf of dominant teams, anyway, saying that they actually drive rather than depress fan interest. As for any inability to win games or titles, he laid the blame for that on poor franchise management. The Knicks and the Clippers have all sorts of big-market advantages but haven’t won any championships lately (or at all in the Clippers' case). For Roberts, whose players reap 51 percent of NBA basketball-related income that tops $7 billion annually, business is good, period. “I’m excited about this new season,” she said Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “This free agency, there’s been a lot to write about so we’re all, I think, looking forward to what’s going to happen come October. “To the extent that people are predicting the end of the game, I just don’t think so. I would be surprised if Adam called me to say, ‘What the hell are we going to do?’ I think he’s as happy as I am. ... I think we’re in good shape.” Critics note Golden State’s on-court dominance in winning the last two championships. It only took nine NBA Finals games --one over the minimum -- while facing arguably the league’s best player in LeBron James. But those same critics seem to foget that the Warriors were pushed to the full seven games in the conference finals, and actually faced elimination twice before beating the Rockets. “I recognize what Michele's saying,” Silver said. “But at the same time, if you talk to players in the league, and I've talked to plenty of individual players as well, they want to be in the most competitive league possible too.” For every player on the Warriors' roster -- or the Rockets, the Thunder, the Celtics or the Sixers -- there are five or six on teams that realistically have no chance of chasing a ring or the Larry O’Brien Trophy. Cleveland went to four straight Finals thanks to James; no one envisions the Cavaliers getting back any time soon. “Maybe there are some players who think they’re on a second-class team,” said Sacramento wing Garrett Temple, one of the NBPA vice presidents. “But most players I’ve played with or been around, their thought process is, ‘We’re gonna get our team to become one of those first-class teams.’ It’s more of a challenge. More so than, ‘We need them to disband so we can make everybody equal.’ Because we’re competitors.” That really is the crux of the issue. Silver and some franchises want most of the competition to come on the floor, in games, in full view of fans who believe their teams can sufficiently compete. The league’s current title contenders are fine with a system that allows them to compete all the way to the top, with an owner stroking gargantuan checks to crowd out rivals. “Let me make clear that under the current system we want teams to compete like crazy,” Silver said. “So I think the Warriors within the framework of this deal should be doing everything they can to increase their dominance. That's what you want to see in a league. “You want teams to compete in every way they can within the rules.” Silver addressed a variety of topics that were came from the BOG agenda, including: -- Change is coming on multiple fronts, most notably in the league’s age limit. That seems likely to be re-set back to 18 years old from 19, permitting players to enter the league from high school. It’s a move that the NBA should be better equipped to handle with a near 30-for-30 farm-system affiliation with its G League. It also fits with the findings of an NCAA task force that cites dissatisfaction with “one-and-done” college players. Said Silver: “My personal view is that we’re ready to make that change.” -- The start of free agency, annually triggered at midnight ET on July 1 (12:00pm, July 1, PHL time), will be moved to a daytime or prime time opening bell. It’s one of those traditions that no one thought to change, Silver said. -- The league’s investigation into the Dallas Mavericks’ sexual harassment issues should be completed by the end of the month. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

Morning Tip Q& A: Mohamed Bamba

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst They have come seemingly all at once -- new, freakish size in the NBA with the ability to put the ball on the floor, shoot from deep and block everything that moves. Kristaps Porzingis begat Joel Embiid, who begat this year’s group of young big men who have grown up facing the basket rather than with their backs to it. Among the most intriguing of the 2018 Draft class is Mo Bamba, the 20-year-old from Texas via Harlem, where he grew up -- fast, as city kids tend to do, learning the game on the hardtops around New York City, while his parents, natives of Ivory Coast, wondered what the increasing fuss was around their son. He, on the other hand, has tended to handle the attention with aplomb and a smile. In a group full of long, tall people, Bamba still stands out, with an insane wingspan of 7'10" that allows for court coverage the likes of which hasn’t been seen. Bamba has been in the spotlight for a while -- the Westtown (Penn.) High School team on which he played featured teammates like Cam Reddish, a blue-chip guard who’ll play for Duke next season -- and played against the likes of the No. 1 pick in 2018, Deandre Ayton. At Texas, he starred for Coach Shaka Smart, himself among the biggest names in the sport. After one season in Austin, where he shattered the school record for blocked shots in a season, Bamba declared for the Draft, assured he’d be a high Lottery pick. But Bamba has also shown a willingness to work on what he doesn’t -- or, at least, didn’t -- do that well. He went to California for weeks with noted player development coach Drew Hanlen, who deconstructed Bamba’s jumper from the ground up. Hanlen lowered Bamba’s shot pocket, adjusted his fingers on the ball and eliminated a hitch Bamba had before shooting. Bamba displayed much improved form before the Draft, but even if he couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn, he was going high -- and, he did, to the Orlando Magic with the sixth pick overall. Desperate to regain relevance in the East, the Magic hired Steve Clifford after he was fired by Charlotte to try and improve their awful defense. At the least, Clifford inherited ridiculous size on his roster, with Bamba joining 6'10" second-year forward Jonathan Isaac and newly re-signed 6'9" forward Aaron Gordon. Bamba must show he can be a killer on the floor like Embiid, and will work to make that happen. The only significant question about him coming into the Draft was the consistency of his motor at Texas. In Las Vegas this week for Summer League with his new team, Bamba is getting his feet wet while keeping them firmly planted to the ground. David Aldridge: I know you’ve spent a lot of time with Drew on the shot. What feels better now? Mo Bamba: Everything. The mechanics are so much cleaner now than they were in college. I think the difference between college and now is just a matter of just repetition, being able to change my jump shot dramatically because of how much I’ve gone in and worked on it. DA: So with time, you can basically improve anything? MB: Yeah, my jump shot is night and day. DA: He also told me that one thing he wanted to keep working with you on after the Draft was, you have a little jump to your left when you shoot? MB: Yeah, that’s a bad tendency that I have. That’s something Drew didn’t want to change. He changed a lot of things, and that’s one of the best things about working with Drew -- he knows boundaries, and he knows how much is too much. That’s one of the things he didn’t want to change right off the bat. But that’s something I’ve been conscious of and something I’ve been working on since he pointed it out. DA: Given where you played high school, was there more pressure on you playing for Westtown or playing for Texas? MB: I’d say there was more pressure playing -- well, actually, it was both, equal. My sophomore year at Westtown, there was a lot of pressure, because I was at a program that had never won a state championship, and had gotten to the finals three or four years in a row. At Texas, I was coming to a team that hadn’t made the NCAA Tournament the year before. So I’d say it was pretty equal. DA: I would imagine playing on a team like that in high school, with Cam and all the others, maybe prepared you not only for college, but playing in the pros. MB: Yeah, Cam can go. He’s a really good basketball player. And I know for a fact I’ll see him here next year. DA: What was Harlem like to grow up in, day by day? MB: It was, when people ask that, I pretty much tell them that you just grow up fast. You’re making decisions at a very young age that most kids don’t even come close to making. I credit a lot of my success to being from Harlem, growing up there. DA: Harlem’s changed a little the last few years. MB: Yeah, gentrification is real. It’s real. DA: What was it like seeing that demographic shift? MB: Well, I was kind of there before gentrification kind of really hit. Obviously there was a bunch of condos that went up and it was pretty cool to see. It was every time I came back home -- I’d see a new development going up. DA: Best advice your parents ever gave you? MB: I wouldn’t say it was direct advice or a quote. I’d say the best thing my parents passed on to me was to let me make my own mistakes and figure out on my age how to kind of see the world on my own. Growing up as the youngest child, one or two years after your siblings, obviously that’s great. You’re learning without truly making the mistakes on your own. But at some point in your life, you’re gonna have to learn on your own. You’re gonna have to fall to rise. DA: Conversely, then, what’s the biggest mistake you’ve made so far? MB: I’d say that the biggest mistake I’ve made so far was not committing to Texas earlier. I think waiting was awesome. I was very methodical about waiting, very strategic about what I wanted in a university. But at the same time, if I could go back, I probably would have committed my junior year, so I could hit the ground running and build the relationships, get to know people. DA: How much freedom did Shaka give you when you were there to try things on the floor that might not necessarily be good for the team, but could be good for you individually down the road? MB: Coach Smart, he’s given me so much freedom to sort of grow into who I was. That’s been a big thing in my life -- my parents and all of my coaches. Coach Smart did a great job of just letting me come to terms with myself, as a basketball player and a person. DA: I saw in one of your interviews before the Draft that you don’t think people really understand you when you say you’re a unicorn. So define that for me as you see it. MB: Well, I mean, people kind of have a concept of what it means. To me, it’s just someone who makes plays that have never been seen before -- a seven-foot big guard, those are all unicorns to me. DA: You played against Ayton and guys like Jarrett Allen (the Nets’ first-round pick in 2017) in high school, and I know how much you’ve looked at Joel Embiid on tape. Are you guys the new normal when it comes to the next generation of bigs? MB: Yeah, I think this is becoming a theme, and you’ll see it more and more with guys coming out of high school. One of the guys you’ll see coming up is James Wiseman (the 6'11" rising senior center currently playing at East High School in Memphis, and who is considered by many to be the top college prospect in the Class of 2019). He’s younger, but he does a lot of the things that I do, that Deandre does, that Jarrett does. It’s refreshing to see so many people that can do what I do. DA: If you were six-feet tall instead of seven, what would you be doing? MB: I’d have to be around the game, like a scout or a GM, something around the game. DA: How did the basketball bug bite you so hard growing up? MB: Honestly, it’s just my competitive nature. It bleeds over into other aspects of my life. But basketball is just something that I really excelled at, and whenever I hit kind of adversity, or whenever I do something that makes me vulnerable enough to get better and to ask for help, I just took this and ran with it. DA: Since you’re a kid, I have to ask you how good you are at Fortnight? MB: I play recreationally. One of my best friends is really good at it, and whenever I play him I get Ws. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 9th, 2018

‘13 Reasons Why’—Does it promote mental health awareness or glorify suicide and depression?

Visit us on Instagram To be You; Facebook: To be You; e-mail inq.tobeyou@gmail.com For the unfamiliar, "13 Reasons Why" is a teen television drama on Netflix, based on the 2007 novel by Jay Asher of the same title. Its executive producer is pop star Selena Gomez. The first season revolves around the story of Clay Jensen, a 17-year-old high school student who receives a box of cassette tapes made by his friend, Hannah Baker, before she committed suicide. Clay goes through the tapes one by one and finds out the 13 reasons Hannah decided to take her own life. It's revealed that Hannah was backstabbed by her friends, became a victim of false gossips, stalked, molested and rap...Keep on reading: ‘13 Reasons Why’—Does it promote mental health awareness or glorify suicide and depression?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 8th, 2018

Teen mauled to death by schoolmate in Oriental Mindoro town

CITY OF CALAPAN - A 15-year-old Grade 7 pupil died allegedly from mauling by a Grade 10 student at a high school in Victoria town in Oriental Mindoro province, police said Friday. Supt. Imelda Tole.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJul 7th, 2018

Gilas cadet Troy Rike to go one and done for fully loaded NU

National University is piling on one more piece to its already stacked roster for looming UAAP Season 81. Manning the Bulldogs’ frontcourt alongside Issa Gaye, Matt Aquino, and Jonas Tibayan will be Gilas cadet Troy Rike. Rike himself reported the news in a tweet posted on Thursday evening. Season 81 🦅🏹🐯🦅🐶🐃🗡 ? pic.twitter.com/lOww5Aremq — Troy Rike (@troyrike) Hulyo 5, 2018 The Filipino-American big man played for four years for Wake Forest University in the US NCAA before coming back home to the Philippines to suit up for the Gilas cadets in the recently concluded 2018 Filoil Flying V Preseason Cup. Rike already holds a bachelor’s degree from Wake Forest, but has enrolled for a master’s degree in NU. As per UAAP rules, a student-athlete from a non-member school who is pursuing graduate studies in a member school shall not be subject to residency. As a post-graduate student, however, the 22-year-old will only have one year of eligibility for the Bulldogs. Nonetheless, Rike said he plans to make the most out of the opportunity. “The most important thing for me is to get as many game reps as I can over here (so I can) get accustomed to the Filipino style of play,” he said. Just a day ago, the Gilas cadet turned NU Bulldog also grabbed headlines by continuing to extend a helping hand to Australia. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 5th, 2018

JRU’s coach Vergel admits: ‘Now, we’re rebuilding’

HOW’D THEY DO LAST SEASON? 11-8 overall, third-seed after eliminations, lost in stepladder playoffs to San Sebastian YES, THEY’RE STILL HERE: MJ Dela Virgen, Darius Estrella, Jed Mendoza WELCOME TO THE FAMILY: Ry Dela Rosa, Andrei Dulalia, Agem Miranda GOOD LUCK ON FUTURE ENDEAVORS: Abdul Wahab Abdul Razak, Ervin Grospe, Gio Lasquety, Abdel Poutouochi, Teytey Teodoro WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM JRU? Truth be told, nobody knows anything at all about JRU. “Now, we’re rebuilding. Parang ang naiwan sa aking players, aapat lang from past season. I’m not expecting too much kasi bago nga yung team namin.” – head coach Vergel Meneses Longtime veterans Ervin Grospe and Gio Lasquety have graduated and NCAA 94 was supposed to be the Teytey Teodoro show. Only, Teodoro departed from Shaw Boulevard due to circumstances yet to be disclosed. Now, Jed Mendoza is the only known commodity for head coach Vergel Meneses and it’s high time for him to take the next step into becoming a go-to-guy. “Ang sabi ko sa kanya, let your teammates get involved. I’m not asking you to shoot every time or score 30 points. You need your teammates para ma-open yung floor for you.” – head coach Vergel Meneses But fear not, Heavy Bombers faithful, a ray hope may very well be found in Darius Estrella, a former NCAA Juniors MVP who was having flashes of brilliance before tearing his ACL a year ago. WHO IS/ARE THE PLAYER/S TO WATCH OUT FOR FROM JRU? Clearly, JRU’s one and only answer to this question is Mendoza who won the Most Improved Player last year and only looks to improve even more. Much also rests on the shoulders of Estrella who has no time to waste in getting back to his old self. Coach Vergel also has promising pieces coming in in the form of former University of the East do-it-all player Agem Miranda and double-double machine Andrei Dulalia as well as ex-San Beda HS’ solid contributor Ry Dela Rosa. For the first time in years, the Heavy Bombers won’t have a foreign student-athlete so expect the locals to go all-out and all-heart. “Ang sinasabi ko sa mga players ko, just keep working hard, just keep fighting. I’m not asking you for a win, na every game, kailangan tayong manalo. Ang hinahanap ko lang sa kanila at magtatrabaho sila every game.” – head coach Vergel Meneses WHY SHOULD WE ROOT FOR JRU? Coach Vergel Meneses is the longest-tenured head coach in the NCAA and he has made the Final Four in all but three of his eight years on the coaching chair. “We’ll be there every game, fighting. Yun lang ang masasabi ko. Sa nakikita ko, yung puso ng mga bata compared to last time, maganda.” – head coach Vergel Meneses If, somehow, some way, he gets the Heavy Bombers to the playoffs once more, could anybody even question his coaching credentials? WHERE WOULD JRU BE AT THE END OF NCAA SEASON 94? Unfortunately, as much as everybody loves them some Vergel Meneses, he and his boys would be watching the Final Four at home or at school. As always, JRU could pull off upsets, but those would be few and far between. WHEN IS JRU’S FIRST GAME IN NCAA SEASON 94? JRU’s first game in the season is a home game in their Shaw Boulevard campus. Visiting them there on July 12 will be Mapua. As always, all of the #GalingNCAA will be on S+A, S+A HD, LIGA, LIGA HD, and livestream. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018

Mets GM Sandy Alderson steps down after cancer returns

By Mike Fitzpatrick, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson is taking a leave of absence because his cancer has returned, and he does not expect to return to the job. With the team in a massive tailspin, Mets chief operating officer Jeff Wilpon and the 70-year-old Alderson made the announcement before Tuesday night's game against Pittsburgh. "With respect to the future, I would say two things: One is, notwithstanding the good prognosis, my health is an uncertainty going forward," said Alderson, who agreed to a contract extension in December. "And secondly, if I were to look at it on the merits, I'm not sure coming back is warranted." Asked whether he would like Alderson to resume his GM duties if his health eventually allowed that, Wilpon avoided expressing an opinion and answered the same way twice: "I think his health and his family are first and foremost." Assistant general manager John Ricco and special assistants J.P. Ricciardi and Omar Minaya will run the team's baseball operations in Alderson's absence. Minaya preceded Alderson as Mets general manager, and Ricciardi was GM of the Toronto Blue Jays from 2001-09. Alderson was hired by the Mets after the 2010 season. He was diagnosed with cancer at the end of the 2015 season and had surgery but stayed on the job. He reduced his work schedule at times but remained in a full-time role while undergoing chemotherapy treatments. "One difference between then and now is that that took place in the offseason," Alderson said. "I had a surgery in the offseason, I had some chemo in the offseason. Much easier to manage that with offseason activity. I had the decision-making authority basically at that time. I will not have the decision-making authority going forward. If people want to call me, they're welcome to do so. But at the same time, I don't expect to be involved in day-to-day activity." Ricciardi, Minaya and first-year manager Mickey Callaway were all in the news conference room at Citi Field when Alderson and Wilpon made the announcement. Wilpon said Alderson approached him Sunday about the idea. Alderson informed players in the clubhouse Tuesday before addressing the media. "It is paramount to all of us that care greatly for Sandy that he makes this a priority for him and his family," Wilpon said. Alderson said a recurrence of his cancer was detected around late April or early May and he's been receiving treatment since. "I expect that the treatment will continue so I can have surgery later this summer. My prognosis is actually good. But in the meantime, the chemotherapy, the surgery, all take their toll," Alderson said, choking back tears. He said the treatment affects his energy level and leads to other side effects, explaining why he hasn't been traveling on road trips lately. "Which makes it difficult to stay up with sort of the pace, the tempo of the every day," Alderson said. "Operations continue, the game continues, we have a season to play. So I think in the best interests of the Mets and for my health, this is the right result. "I feel badly that we've had the season that we have had to date. I feel personally responsible for the results that we've had," he added. "At the same time, I have confidence in our manager, our coaching staff, our players, that this will change. John, Omar, J.P., I'm sure will take a hard look at where we are, maybe take a fresh look at where we are and I have every confidence that they will serve the franchise well over the next few months through the end of the season." New York reached the 2015 World Series after rebuilding under Alderson and made it back to the playoffs the following year, but injuries and underperformance have decimated the team since. The Mets started this season 11-1, but a 6-24 slide left them at 31-45 going into Tuesday night's game, fourth in the NL East. Alderson, a Marine Infantry Officer who served in Vietnam, is a Harvard Law School graduate. Before joining the Mets, he worked in the commissioner's office and had success running the Oakland Athletics and San Diego Padres. "Difficult day for me, but I appreciate everybody being here, appreciate the support that everyone has provided me over the course of a long period of time but certainly recently as well," he said. "And I'm looking forward to the Mets getting back on track.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Every teacher’s dilemma in this day and age

The school year has started in the public schools and in some private schools nationwide. As teachers prepare for the coming of the students, many are perplexed with the existing laws that make “disciplining” the students in school a challenge......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

Fil-Am teen shot dead in Seattle park

SEATTLE---A 17-year-old Filipino American student, who was planning to join the U.S. Marines, was shot and killed by an unknown assailant at Martha Washington Park on June 2.   Ryan Dela Cruz was a senior at Franklin High School just weeks away from graduation, was fatally shot shortly after. midnight on Saturday morning   Police believe that Dela Cruz was with a group of teenagers to hunt for ghosts at the reportedly haunted park when a brawl took place with another group of youths.   The second group opened fire, and Dela Cruz was hit three times, according to accounts by police and family members. He was taken to Harborview Medical Center where he ...Keep on reading: Fil-Am teen shot dead in Seattle park.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 6th, 2018

Tigers draft Auburn right-hander Casey Mize with No. 1 pick

By Dennis Waszak Jr., Associated Press SECAUCUS, N.J. (AP) — Casey Mize went from undrafted three years ago all the way to No. 1. The Detroit Tigers selected the Auburn right-hander with the top pick in the Major League Baseball draft Monday night. The announcement at MLB Network studios marked the second time the Tigers led off the draft, and first since they took Rice pitcher Matt Anderson in 1997. The 6-foot-3, 220-pound Mize had long been linked to the Tigers, and he pitched his way this season to the top spot on Detroit's list. Mize went undrafted out of high school three years ago, but developed into a potential big league ace while in college. "It means a ton," Mize said in an interview on MLB Network's broadcast. "I'm very thankful that the Tigers thought of me enough to take me with their first selection. I can't describe this feeling right now." Mize is 10-5 with a 2.95 ERA and 151 strikeouts with just 12 walks in 109 2/3 innings while helping the Tigers to the NCAA Tournament super regionals. Mize has solid command of four pitches, including a fastball that hovers in the mid-90s (mph). His outstanding command and wicked split changeup whip up lots of swings and misses. Mize became only the seventh player in draft history to go from undrafted in high school to the No. 1 pick since Stephen Strasburg went to the Washington Nationals in 2009. "All of us in the Tigers organization are thrilled to select Casey with this pick, and are confident that he will become a pillar in our player development system that's going to bring winning baseball to Detroit for seasons to come," Detroit general manager Al Avila said. "Being a college pitcher — especially coming from the Southeastern Conference — we know Casey has seen elite competition before." With the second selection, San Francisco took slugging Georgia Tech catcher Joey Bart, the Atlantic Coast Conference player of the year. Perhaps Buster Posey's replacement someday, Bart follows in the footsteps of big league backstops Matt Wieters and Jason Varitek, who also came out of Georgia Tech. Bart led the conference in hitting with a .359 average and topped the Yellow Jackets with a .632 slugging percentage, 79 hits, 16 home runs, 55 runs and a .471 on-base percentage. He's also one of the country's best defensive catchers, with a .992 fielding percentage on the season while throwing out 12 of 33 would-be base stealers. Wichita State third baseman Alec Bohm was the first of six players attending the draft to be selected, going third overall to Philadelphia. He had some trouble buttoning his white Phillies jersey before heading to the podium to shake hands with Commissioner Rob Manfred. "The holes are pretty tight. It was pretty tough," said the 6-foot-5 Bohm, later adding that his biggest strength is probably his maturity at the plate. "I'm just ready to go play ball." Bohm is one of the top offensive players in the draft, hitting .339 with 16 homers — the most by a Wichita State player since 2004 — and 55 RBIs with 14 doubles and 39 walks. He also showed a knack for hitting in the clutch by setting a school record with three grand slams this year, and led the team with 10 go-ahead RBIs. "Alec Bohm is a tremendous offensive player," Phillies director of amateur scouting Johnny Almaraz said in a statement. "He is a middle of the order bat, a big power-hitting third baseman who could be a .300 hitter and drive in 100-plus runs." Oregon State second baseman Nick Madrigal went fourth to the Chicago White Sox. Despite his short stature — 5-foot-7, 160 pounds — Madrigal is considered by many to be the best overall hitter in the draft. He rebounded nicely for the Beavers after missing half the season with a broken left wrist. He was hitting .406 with three homers, 32 RBIs and just five strikeouts in 133 at-bats while helping lead Oregon State to the NCAA Tournament super regionals. Rounding out the top five was Cincinnati, which took Florida third baseman Jonathan India. The Southeastern Conference player of the year has been an offensive force for the defending College World Series champions. He's the 12th player in school history to post 20 or more homers, 100 or more RBIs and 30 or more stolen bases in his career......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 5th, 2018

Advisory for college students

CLASSES in the tertiary level for this coming academic year (AY) 2018-2019 will start on June 4, 2018 or not later than June 25, 2018. Around 200,000 college students in the region are expected to be back to school during this opening of classes. Generally, no enrolment in the second year and third year levels […] The post Advisory for college students appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

LeBron James reigns supreme over Eastern Conference yet again

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com BOSTON – For nearly a decade, the general managers of the NBA’s Eastern Conference have had, essentially, one job: Arm, equip and overhaul their teams specifically to get past LeBron James and whatever squad with which he happened to be rolling. They have failed. Miserably and spectacularly. And that’s even spotting them the first couple of summers to get their bearings after the whole “Super Team” genesis in Miami back in 2010-11. James’ domination of the conference continued Sunday (Monday, PHL time) when he and the Cleveland Cavaliers persevered in Game 7 against the Boston Celtics at TD Garden. Clawing back from 2-0 and 3-2 deficits in the series, and playing the final seven quarters without their second All-Star, forward Kevin Love (concussion protocol), the Cavaliers hung around in an ugly game. They took advantage of a Boston team on training wheels – 7-of-39 on three-pointers, oh my! – and snagged a ticket to their fourth consecutive NBA Finals. For James, it’s eight in a row and nine overall, these Cleveland four added to the four he reached with the Heat from 2011-14. It’s a run unprecedented since Bill Russell’s Celtics were winning 11 championships in 13 years, a stranglehold on half of all Finals opportunities this decade. He has a 6-2 record in Game 7 situations, with nothing but triumphs after dropping his first two. “I mean, the bigger the stage, the bigger the player, and he's been doing it for us since we've been here,” Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said. “The great quote from the great [Clippers coach] Doc Rivers is, ‘You always want to go into the Game 7 with the best player,’ and we have the best player on our team going into a Game 7. I like our chances. And he delivered again.” Next year at this point, maybe by league proxy, James will have one hand tied behind his back. That’s the next logical step in handicapping him against the field. He has made it to The Finals without his most talented sidekicks. He has taken or dragged along an ever-changing cast of teammates. This time, he did with arguably the Cavaliers’ barest cupboard since first dipping their collective toes in The Finals water back in 2007. Two All-Star point guards, Kyrie Irving (with whom James won a ring in 2016) and Isaiah Thomas (from whom James won his freedom after five awkward weeks), already were long gone when Love went down. And now he was facing elimination with a shaky crew and a huge, inflated question mark hovering over his and Cleveland’s offseason, whenever it comes. Then again, the Celtics were facing him. Like the Raptors, the Pacers, the Bulls, the Hawks and several others before them, Boston well understood the player through whom its playoff ambitions had to go. “I think we’ve played now until May 25th and May 27th the last two years and we started on September 25th. That’s every day,” Boston coach Brad Stevens said about his team’s 2017 and 2018 tangles with Cleveland in the East finals. “Every day you’re totally focused on this, and he’s gone past that eight straight times. “It’s ridiculous. And he does it at this level and with the pressure, with the scrutiny – doesn’t matter.” Plenty of the foes chasing James when his Finals streak began have headed into retirement ringless and unfulfilled. Others were in high school or grade school. Celtics forward Jayson Tatum, for instance, was 13 years old when James began his streak against Dallas in 2011. There are so many others like Horford, with tire tracks on their backs, no mercy coming their way from James and very little hope on the horizon. At age 33, James played all 82 games in the regular season for the first time in his 15-year career. He made it an even 100 with Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) appearance and he did it with aplomb, staying on the floor for all 48 minutes. “Our goal going into the series was to make him exert as much energy as humanly possible, and try to be as good as we can on everybody else,” Stevens said. “For the most part, I thought we were pretty good at that. Multiple games now in TD Garden, held them under 100, three games in the 80s – but he still scored 35. It’s a joke.” James’ stats line – 35 points, 15 rebounds, nine assists – was enough this time because he got a reasonable amount of help. Three other Cavaliers scored in double figures, including Jeff Green, the journeyman forward who started in Love’s spot. Being one of James’ teammates requires a thick skin for when things don’t go well. It also carries a sense of obligation, to occasionally come through the way Green did in Game 7 (19 points, eight rebounds) given the debt they all owe their resident superstar. “You want to be there for him,” Green said. “You want to be in the trenches, in the battle, helping him achieve the ultimate goal. For me, it’s a no-brainer to go out there and give it all I have.” Green was a part of James’ most tumultuous campaign yet, with so many twists and turns – the shotgun Irving trade, Thomas’ bad fit, a rash of injuries, a desperate reset at the trade deadline and a bumpy learning curve once the new guys arrived – that James and Lue casually referred to it as “five seasons” crammed into one. “It's now six seasons in one,” James said after midnight. “I guess this is the last chapter for our team in this season. It's been a whirlwind. I mean, it's been [a rollercoaster]. It's been good, it's been bad, it's been roses. There have been thorns in the roses. There's been everything that you can ask for.” For eight years, a conference full of rivals has targeted one player, who happens to be the league’s best, the first among alleged equals with the Heat and clearly the leader when he headed back home to Ohio. In that time, the players have worked, the coaches have schemed and the GMs have plotted. No one has found the answer. None have stopped him. Fact is, nobody’s really laid a glove on him. It’s his conference, seemingly for as long as he wants it. “It's been a satisfaction in the fact that I like to be successful,” James said. “But more importantly, just the work that I put into it. I mean, it's an every-single-day work ethic that I have while I'm playing this game, while I have the ability to play this game at this level. I love the competition. “I think about the teams that I've played over this run and the players that I've played over this run, slightly. But more importantly, me just being healthy. I've been healthy throughout this run. I put a lot of work into my body, into my craft. Being available to my teammates and being available to my franchise, the two franchises I've been with, and throughout this run is what's been more important to me than anything. Always being available.” It was late. James was weary. Another Game 7 in less than 24 hours would determine his and the Cavaliers’ next playoff challenge. “I'll be available for at least four more games,” he said. “And we'll see what happens.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 28th, 2018

La Salle’s Dyke rejuvenated as he returns to action

Mark Dyke began his collegiate career in the UAAP as one of the highly touted big men of his batch coming out of Nazareth School of National University. Having earned a couple of Mythical Team selections, Dyke, who was already enrolled at NU, made the jump to La Salle to join a talented crop that included Andrei Caracut and Jolo Go. That transfer, however, proved to be the start of Dyke's limbo as he served a one-year residency while Caracut, who won the 2016 Rookie of the Year plum, and Go were able to contribute for the Green Archers. Dyke, who skipped the last season, said he lost confidence in himself after he was stuck in a state of nothingness. And it took almost tw...Keep on reading: La Salle’s Dyke rejuvenated as he returns to action.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 26th, 2018

170 private schools in Metro raising tuition

The Department of Education (DepEd) has granted the request of 170 private elementary and high schools in the National Capital Region to increase tuition in the coming school year......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2018

1.3% of schools still needing support for coming school year – DepEd

MANILA, Philippines – About 1.3% of schools are still in need of support before the opening of classes on June 4, announced Department of Education (DepEd) Undersecretary Jesus Mateo on Monday, May 21. Mateo explained the readiness of schools were evaluated based on 6 variables: (availability of) teachers, classrooms, toilets, seats, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 21st, 2018

Coming-of-age rom-com gets a coming-out twist

  Times are a-changing, indeed. After all, it isn't every day that we get to watch a film about "gender-fluid" young men who share a reluctant smooch, while the SRO crowd watching their story being played out on the big screen cheers them on. That was the pervasive mood that greeted us when we watched a recent screening of Greg Berlanti's fresh, funny and feel-good coming-out tale "Love, Simon," which will have sneak previews tomorrow and on May 1 before its nationwide release on May 9. The aforementioned kiss is the main protagonist's bold act of you-and-me-against-the-world defiance that stems from a life shrouded in secrecy. Hunky 17-year-old high school student S...Keep on reading: Coming-of-age rom-com gets a coming-out twist.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 28th, 2018

Getting champion coach Joe Silva just the first step in rebuild of UE basketball

After a number of false starts, University of the East finally has a new head coach all ready and all set to go. According to several sources, the Red Warriors will be announcing the appointment of two-time UAAP Juniors champion Joe Silva as new head coach next week. This, confirming the report first broken by Matthew Li of Tiebreaker Times. Silva’s hiring will, at long last, put an end to the Recto-based squad’s long, long search for a replacement for former mentor Derrick Pumaren who resigned late last year. He registered a record of 21-35 in his four years at the helm for his alma mater. Asked for comment, Silva responded, “We’re in talks, but nothing is sure yet.” As per sources, though, UE is already certain to go all-in on a young coach coming off a UAAP Juniors championship with Ateneo de Manila High School in Season 80. Following that championship, he stepped down from his position in late March. In all, Silva won two championships for the Blue Eaglets, both near-season sweeps, and had a 77-20 overall record. During all that, he had a hand in the development of the likes of Thirdy Ravena, Nieto twins Matt and Mike, SJ Belangel, Dave Ildefonso, and Kai Sotto. Now, Silva takes the next step in his career as tactician in college basketball. The good news for him is that both Alvin Pasaol and Philip Manalang will still be wearing red and white for at least one more season. Both are also already back in training after stints in the PBA D-League. Still, sources said that Silva, along with team patron Bong Tan and team manager Lawrence Chongson, remain on the lookout for more talent – possibly even taking in a foreign student-athlete. Along with being UE Seniors head coach, sources also said that Silva will be a consultant for the Junior Warriors who have been languishing at the bottom of the standings for almost a decade now. Apparently, both the school and its newly-hired mentor are nothing eager for a culture change for UE’s Seniors and Juniors basketball programs. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 28th, 2018

DepEd to replace SHS textbooks with tablets

THE Department of Education (DepEd) announced that some Senior High School (SHS) students will be using tablet computers as alternative to textbooks this coming school year. The DepEd earlier said the new set of computer packages will be distributed to public schools nationwide starting this year. According to Education Undersecretary….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsApr 28th, 2018

UAAP VOLLEYBALL: NU sweeps way back into the Finals for the sixth straight year

National University stormed to a 25-13, 25-13, 31-29, demolition of hapless University of Sto. Tomas in the 80th UAAP men’s volleyball Final Four to advance in the championship round for the sixth straight year Sunday at the MOA Arena. Bryan Bagunas and Madzlan Gampong starred in the Bulldogs’ fourth win in a row heading into the best-of-three Finals starting on April 28.    NU will await its championship opponent on Wednesday when the three-time reigning titlists Ateneo de Manila University and Far Eastern University clash in a winner take all duel for the last Finals berth. “Gawa rin naman sa ginagawa namin sa suporta ng school namin at managers. ‘Yung sixth straight appearance namin sa Finals ay bunga sa suporta ng school, ng mga magulang ng players. Masaya kami,” said NU coach Dante Alinsunurin. Bagunas finished with a career-high 29 points coming off 24 attacks, three aces and a couple of blocks including the match-clinching denial over Arnold Bautista to seal the 73-minute victory. Gampong had eight markers while James Natividad           After dominating the first two frames, the Bulldogs found themselves trailing, 16-19, in the third. Gampong and Bagunas led NU’s comeback as the Bulldogs pushed at match point, 24-22. The Tigers saved two match points after an error by Gampong and a kill block by Tyrone Carodan before Joshua Umandal’s kill pushed UST at set point, 25-24. Bagunas’ back-to-back hit brought NU back at match point, 26-25. UST regained the set point advantage before saving two more match points to tie the frame at 29.           The fourth year hitter Bagunas pounded a through the block kill to break the deadlock before scoring a kill block on Bautista. Jayvee Sumagaysay scored 10 points while Umandal had nine for the Espana-based squad.           --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 22nd, 2018