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The letter and the spirit of the law

WE obviously have to be governed by the rule of law. Without the law, we can only expect disorder and chaos, and all the forms of injustice. But we need to distinguish between the letter of the law and the spirit of the law, and know how to understand and apply the law properly. Ideally, […] The post The letter and the spirit of the law appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource: thedailyguardian thedailyguardianOct 11th, 2018

New EPA head Scott Pruitt’s emails indicate close ties to oil and gas producers – ABC News

More than 7,000 pages of emails from Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt indicate a cozy relationship with oil and gas producers, fossil fuel companies, electric companies, as well as political groups tied to the Koch Brothers during his time as Oklahoma Attorney General. The emails &'8212; made public Wednesday by an Oklahoma judge in response to a lawsuit by liberal watchdog group the Center for Media and Democracy &'8212; indicate coordination between Pruitt and these Koch-backed groups with the goal of undermining the Obama administration's efforts to help curb carbon emissions and prevent climate change. Pruitt was narrowly confirmed by the U.S. Senate (52-46) to be the EPA's administrator Friday after a contentious confirmation process while facing protests from Democrats and environmental groups not only because of his ties to energy companies, but because as Oklahoma’s attorney general he sued the EPA 14 times. Some emails show that companies like Devon Energy in 2013 provided Pruitt's office with draft letters to send to government regulators in an attempt to block those regulations. Some of this was publicly known because some of the emails were previously released to the New York Times in 2014. “Please find attached a short white paper with some talking points that you might find useful to cut and paste when encouraging States to file comments on the SSM rule,” wrote a lobbyist at Hunton &'38; Williams, a law firm that represents major utility companies. The SSM rule relates to industrial emissions. Democrats attempted to hold off on Pruitt’s confirmation until these emails were released, but they were unsuccessful. “Thank you to your respective bosses and all they are doing to push back against President Obama’s EPA and its axis with liberal environmental groups to increase energy costs for Oklahomans and American families across the states,” reads another email sent to Pruitt from an executive at the Koch-backed Americans for Prosperity, a conservative political advocacy group. “You both work for true champions of freedom and liberty!” The emails also show how Pruitt’s office appeared to work with these companies to draft these letters for Pruitt to sign to try and prevent new regulations. “Any suggestions?” a deputy solicitor general in Pruitt’s office wrote in May 2013 to an executive at Devon Energy, an oil and gas production company. The email to the executive, Bill Whitsitt, included a draft Pruitt’s office appeared to be planning to send to the EPA regarding proposed emissions regulations. Whitsitt replied with what looks like proposed changes: “Please note that you could use just the red changes, or both red and blue (the latter being some further improvements from one of our experts) or none.” The deputy solicitor general replied the next day telling Whitsitt he had sent the letter, writing “Thanks for all your help on this.” In another email in January 2013, Pruitt’s chief of staff at the time gushed to Whitsitt: “You are so amazingly helpful!!! Thank you so much!!!” &'8220;Our engagement with Scott Pruitt as Attorney General of Oklahoma is consistent – and proportionate – with our commitment to engage in conversations with policymakers on a broad range of matters that promote jobs, economic growth and a robust domestic energy sector,&'8221; a spokesperson for Devon Energy told ABC News. &'8220;In some cases, we serve as a resource with useful information and expertise for decision-makers &' It would be indefensible for us to not be engaged in these important issues.&'8221; Lincoln Ferguson, the press secretary for the Oklahoma Attorney General’s office released a statement writing that their office has &'8220;complied with a Court’s order regarding a January 2015 Open Records Act request.” &'8220;In fact, the Office went above and beyond what is required under the Open Records Act and produced thousands of additional documents that, but for the Court’s order, would typically be considered records outside the scope of the Act,” Ferguson said. &'8220;This broad disclosure should provide affirmation that, despite politically motivated allegations, the Office of Attorney General remains fully committed to the letter and spirit of the Open Records Act.” Americans for Prosperity declined comment. “The newly released emails reveal a close and friendly relationship between Scott Pruitt’s office and the fossil fuel industry,” Nick Surgey, research director at the Center for Media and Democracy, wrote in an email Wednesday.( SHUSHANNAH WALSHE,RYAN STRUYK) &'160; &'160; 35&'160;total views, 35&'160;views today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 23rd, 2017

Spirit rather than the letter of the law

It looks like our country will remain divided as dissension and disunity heighten because of the recent ruling of the Supreme Court (SC) on the burial of the.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 10th, 2016

The spirit of letters

The spirit of the law vs. the letter of the law. Scarlet letter politics. FOI, NDF, EJK, LNB, ETC......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 19th, 2016

Letter: Free press at risk in Philippines

Letter: Free press at risk in Philippines Honolulu Star-Advertiser Journalists are killed in the Philippines more frequently than in most countries, but this fact seems more a function of general law.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated News4 hr. 14 min. ago

China’s leaders want more babies

BEIJING — Facing a future demographic crisis and aging society, China’s leaders are desperately seeking to persuade couples to have more children. But bureaucrats don’t seem to have gotten the message, fining a couple in a recent widely publicized case for having a third child against the strict letter of the law. The move has […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2019

Coco levy bill lacks ‘vital safeguards,’ says Duterte re veto

MANILA, Philippines -- President Rodrigo Duterte vetoed the coco levy fund bill because it lacked "vital safeguards" to avoid past mistakes and "may be violative of the Constitution."   Last week, the Palace confirmed that Duterte vetoed the measure seeking to create a P100-billion trust fund for coconut farmers.   READ: Duterte vetoes coco levy fund bill   Duterte explained his reasons for vetoing the measure in a letter addressed sent to the House Representatives last Thursday, Feb. 14.   "After much deliberation, I have come to the conclusion that the bill may be violative of the Constitution and is lacking in vital safeguards to avoid t...Keep on reading: Coco levy bill lacks ‘vital safeguards,’ says Duterte re veto.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2019

PPF condemns cyber-libel charges against Rappler journalist

PAKISTAN Press Foundation (PPF), in a letter to Rodrigo Duterte, President of Philippines has expressed concern overthe cyber-libel charges against Maria Ressa, CEO and Executive Editor of Rappler and chairperson of the Indonesian Women’s Journalists Forum (FJPI). PPF Secretary General Owais Aslam Ali has condemned the intimidation of journalists in Philippines and arrest of Maria […] The post PPF condemns cyber-libel charges against Rappler journalist appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2019

UAAP 81 Football: Four Tamaraws score as FEU drops UE, 4-1

Far Eastern University picked up a massive opening day win as they trounced University of the East, 4-1, Sunday afternoon at the FEU-FERN Football Field in Diliman, Quezon City. Coming off their worst campaign in years, finishing seventh in UAAP Season 80, FEU looked every bit like the program that once won back-to-back titles as they dominated a contender in UE. Early on however, it looked like the Red Warriors were primed to get on the board first after a foul inside the box from FEU resulted in a penalty attempt from for UE. Red Warriors striker Mar Diano flubbed the penalty attempt however, as his shot hit the cross bar and bounced out. Immediately on the other end, it was FEU who drew first blood, with rookie Jermi Darapan scoring in the 29th minute. Three minutes into the second half, former Baby Tamaraws star Chester Gio Pabualan announced his arrival into the men’s tournament with a header to give the Tamaraws a 2-0 advantage. Opening day was a good one for tournament rookies, as the Red Warriors managed to pull one back in the 51st minute courtesy of first year-wingback Champ Marin, who became the fourth rookie to score a goal in the first matchday. The Tamaraws regained momentum as they widened their advantage to 3-1, courtesy of a free kick conversion from Nicky Canonigo in the 60th minute. FEU continued to pull away in the 66th minute, with Alex Rayos blasting one from way outside the box to make it a three-goal advantage for the Tamaraws. "Winning the first game of the season is the most important," said head coach Bobae Park. "Our players, I know they're also a little bit nervous, but they just tried their best, and their spirit is together."  With the win, FEU joins UST at the top of the early leaderboard with a win and three points each. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2019

With Roma, Alfonso Cuaron reinvents how he makes films

LOS ANGELES, USA — Mexican filmmaker Alfonso Cuaron has experimented before with styles and genres, from space epic Gravity to road trip coming-of-age tale Y Tu Mama Tambien to fantasy flick Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. But with Roma, his highly acclaimed autobiographical love letter to his ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2019

Jordan s weight reaches farther than court in NC

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CHARLOTTE -- Unlike Mark Cuban and James Dolan, the host of the 2019 NBA All-Star Game was voted in 14 times to participate and played in 13. Quite different from Micky Arison and Glen Taylor, the team owner whose arena and city will be the center of All-Star 2019 averaged 20.2 points in those 13 All-Star appearances, was named MVP three times and posted the first triple-double in the game’s history (1997). And not at all like Steve Ballmer and Joe Lacob, the guy most often credited with making Charlotte All-Star worthy this weekend ignited the annual Slam Dunk Contest with his takeoff from the foul line in 1988. He also regularly irritated former NBA commissioner David Stern into a series of fines for golfing when he should have been sitting through mandatory Friday media sessions. With a level of celebrity as arguably the game’s greatest player ever, morphed now into an off-radar role as owner of the Charlotte Hornets, Michael Jordan remains as famous, as popular and as successful as any or all the active All-Star participants who’ll cavort at the Spectrum Center in the city’s Uptown business district. Ain’t no other NBA owner who can say that. “You think about all these wealthy, successful owners in our league,” said Hornets president Fred Whitfield, “no one knew who any of them were, really, until they bought their team. Everybody in the world knew who Michael Jordan was before he bought his team.” Jordan’s place in the All-Star galaxy in the coming days is reflective of his unique position among those who oversee the NBA’s 29 other franchises. His impact on the team, on its fans, on their city and on the state in returning to his native North Carolina -- he grew up in coastal Wilmington before attending college in Chapel Hill -- to anchor and lend stability to the Hornets will be on full display, even if he’s hard to spot this weekend. It’s all a reminder, too, of the old movie line from a remarkably blessed character, wondering “What do you do when your real life exceeds your dreams?” Most don’t dare to imagine playing in an All-Star Game, never mind hosting one as the owner of the local team. “No,” Jordan told some Charlotte reporters Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), coming forward for one of his few appearances of the week. “As a kid growing up here in North Carolina, the first thing [was] playing basketball. And then things evolved from there -- from the University of North Carolina to Chicago. Obviously you know the history from that. “[The] opportunity to represent North Carolina in an All-Star Game from a different seat is truly amazing. It tells the path that I have taken. It gives me great pleasure to give that back to the community. It’s been a long-traveled road.” The celebration of the league’s brightest stars, and the ubiquitous banners and signage devoted to it will make it even harder than usual to visibly spot signs of Jordan’s ownership of the Hornets. For a typical regular season game, you might spy a flag emblazoned with his well-known “Jumpman” logo. Occasionally he’ll watch part of the game, rarely all, from seats at the end of his team’s bench, though he’s as likely to retreat to his suite atop the arena’s lower bowl. An in-game, timeout scoreboard video meant to stoke the crowd includes shots of GM Mitch Kupchak (“Architect of Champions”) and coach James Borrego (“Elite Pedigree”) but ends right about the time you expect some dramatic silhouette of His Airness to appear. It’s as if Jordan is as protective of his brand in running the Hornets as he is in maintaining its exclusivity in the marketplace. Doesn’t matter, though. His fingerprints are all over the franchise, as a basketball team, as a business enterprise and as a member of the community. On court, Jordan trusts his team Jordan’s greatest notoriety as an owner in a basketball setting may have come in December, when he was courtside for a tense game against Detroit. Guard Jeremy Lamb drained a 22-foot jumper with 0.3 seconds left, sending reserves Malik Monk and Bismack Biyombo onto the floor in celebration of what would be a 108-107 home victory. Trouble was, that sliver of time on the clock. Too many men. The Hornets were whistled for a one-shot technical foul and Jordan impulsively smacked Monk lightly, twice, on the back of the head. Any other owner does that, the player’s agent might file a grievance with the players union. Jordan does it and, thanks to his in-the-trenches, in-the-fraternity credibility, it comes across as a goof. “A tap of endearment,” Jordan called it later in a statement. “It was like a big brother and little brother tap. No negative intent. Only love!" Said Monk: “Big, big, big brother. But it was nothing. He was just playing.” The arc of Jordan’s career and his reputation as a stone-cold competitor make it OK if he wants to vent -- or swipe -- when things don’t go the Hornets’ way. Doesn’t matter that Jordan, who will turn 56 on All-Star Sunday, is old enough to be any of his players' dad. He still carries himself like an athlete, and their frame of reference remains, “That’s Mike.” “I’ve seen kids come up through camps,” said Buzz Peterson, Charlotte’s assistant general manager under Kupchak. “You could say Julius Erving, you could say Larry Johnson, Karl Malone, whatever, and the kids’ eyes are like, ‘Who?’ But you say Michael Jordan, they’re gonna know. That’s the separation there.” Peterson is among Jordan’s closest friends -- he beat him out as North Carolina’s prep player of the year in 1981, won an NCAA title with him as a Tar Heels teammate and is described by those who know both as someone who can disagree with the boss while staying comfortably in the inner circle. For Borrego, Charlotte’s first-year coach, interviewing to run Jordan’s team could have been intimidating. “We’re all human beings -- there’s a presence that comes with ‘Michael Jordan’ when he’s around,” Borrego told NBA.com in January. “But it’s healthy. He comes with a competitive spirit that you feel. “Michael was straight with me from Day 1. When I interviewed, he said, ‘I’m going to give you space to do your job. Whatever you need, you come to me. I’ll give you the resources you need.’ He has not tried to interfere one time. I feel his full support. … We’re starting to speak each other’s language, which is pretty healthy for us now.” Jordan keeps the coach apprised of his interactions with players, Borrego said. Other coaches should have such a resource at the ready. Hornets guard and 2019 All-Star starter Kemba Walker probably has benefited most from Jordan’s counsel. They text frequently, a pinch-me arrangement to this day for Walker. “I grew up wearing Jordans, grew up wanting to be like Jordan,” Walker said recently. “So for me to get this opportunity to be on his team means the world to me. He’s the one who believed in me -- I had no idea where I was going to go on draft night and he traded up for me. I’ve always heard the story, he was the one who actually drafted me. So it’s unbelievable. “He’s such a good dude. He understands what it is to be good. His delivery is always good. Only in a positive way, honestly.” Said rookie wing Miles Bridges: “You think there’ll be a lot of pressure having MJ as an owner. I’d seen how he got on his teammates when he played. So I was nervous, thinking if I had a bad game, he’d go at me like, ‘What’re you doing?’ But after meeting him and bonding with him, I feel like he’s the coolest owner out there. I don’t feel any pressure, I feel like he wants the best for us.” Big man Frank Kaminsky typically sits at the end of the bench, which puts him cheek to cheek with Jordan when he’s courtside. “He’s talking about what he’s seeing out on the court. Talking to the refs,” Kaminsky said. “Things other players don’t necessarily see. He still thinks the game. “You see things on the court that he sees. One game, the roll, pocket-pass, skip to the corner was open. He was saying that. We made an adjustment in a timeout, but he saw it a couple plays before that. At the end of that game, we had a big play that was a roll, pocket-pass, into the corner that put the game away. It worked the way he’d seen it.” The Hornets’ struggles during Jordan’s tenure as owner wouldn’t suggest it -- the last time this organization won a playoff series (2002), Jordan still was a player -- but there is a prestige to playing for his team. It’s not unlike being welcomed onto the list of elite athletes who endorse Jordan Brand. “I’m one of the lucky ones who’s in both,” Kaminsky said. “You’re talking about the most iconic player in sports history -- I might be biased because I grew up in Chicago -- but when you have his approval, it means a lot. You have it in the back of your mind that he wants you here.” Head smack or no head smack. Jordan grows as owner, businessman Basketball is a zero-sum game and the NBA is full of stars, even if none shines quite as brightly as Jordan. But business has room for negotiation and compromise, and deals get struck daily that leave both sides happy. There, Jordan has been beyond clutch. Funnel down everything he’s accomplished -- six NBA championships, the league’s highest career scoring average (30.1), five MVP awards, six Finals MVP, 10 scoring titles, nine All-Defensive team nods -- and it invariably ends with clammy hands. The “wow” factor is real and the Hornets are extremely careful about leveraging it. “It gives our organization a certain cachet,” said Whitfield, another longtime friend who goes back more than 35 years with Jordan. “For him to be majority owner, for him to do it in his home state as a local hometown hero, and to be able to come back and not just lead the team and the rebranding from the Bobcats to the Hornets, but his commitment to the community in giving back, it’s something that’s so special.” That’s a lot to unpack. When Jordan initially signed on with the Hornets, he did so as head of its basketball operations in 2006, purchasing a small minority stake in the team. The team was bad, the business was worse and trending down. “Back in ’08-09, the economy was in the tank and I was mandated to ‘displace’ 42 of our executives here on the business side,” Whitfield said. “When Michael bought the team, we were losing $30 million a year.’ Brought back into the league in 2004 two years after the original Hornets (1988-2002) were moved to New Orleans by reviled owner George Shinn, the Charlotte expansion team was owned -- and nicknamed -- by Bob Johnson, a co-founder of the BET television network. The Bobcats excelled only at losing and were 122 games under .500 in their first five seasons. The front office was understaffed, Spectrum Center (then known as Time Warner Cable Arena) needed renovations almost from its inception and there was a real sense that, if a buyer with deep pockets and a commitment to the area weren’t found, the franchise could be moved. In March 2010, Jordan ponied up the cash to become majority owner. But it says something that the deal stands as one of the few, if ever, instances of an NBA franchise being sold at a discount. Johnson paid $300 million for the team; Jordan purchased it for $275 million. Forbes.com recently had Charlotte worth $1.25 billion -- which ranks 28th. And Jordan reportedly has one of the biggest stakes of all NBA owners, with his share estimated at upwards of 90 percent, possibly as high as 98 percent. That’s a lot of success in nine years, despite the basketball team’s mostly middling performance. “With MJ being with the team, you got instant credibility in the marketplace,” said Pete Guelli, the chief operating officer who started on the job about 10 months before Jordan took ownership. “There had been a lot of uncertainty previously, but with his brand and his resources and his commitment, that just dissipated immediately. It was much, much easier to walk in the door and tell people about our vision for this franchise.” Rebranding the team as “Hornets” gave the franchise an existential boost -- it suddenly had a history again, complete with records, archives and true alumni. The arena got a makeover and, per Guelli, is credited for events there that generate an alleged $1 billion in revenues for local businesses. “Fortunately, we’ve been profitable pretty much since [Jordan took over],” Whitfield said. “That’s huge, especially since we haven’t gotten where we want to be on the basketball side.” Closing a new kind of game now It’s hard to overstate Jordan’s added value, not so much as some corporate or financial whiz but as a presence who brought instant motivation and energy to the staff. He imported executives with whom he had developed relationships at Nike or in other ventures and, after taking early criticism for an uncertain level of involvement, has been more diligent in recent years. “I love seeing him sitting at the end of the bench encouraging his players when he attends a game” said Charles F. Bowman, Bank of America’s market president for Charlotte and North Carolina. “And as a business person what impresses me is that he has empowered his management team to focus not only on the court but also on building bridges with the community. “He had a vision for where he was taking the team and a clear plan to get there. He has hired good people, gives them latitude to make decisions and he expects them to perform. Michael is unique -- the best player ever who is determined to keep getting better year over year as an owner.” The NBA has gotten a taste of Jordan’s growth and transition at some pivotal times. This is the legendary voice of the players who, during rancorous negotiations in the 1998 lockout, countered Washington owner Abe Pollin’s gripes about losing money by telling Pollin to sell his team. By the lockout of 2011, Jordan had moved to the other side of the table. But several members of the National Basketball Players Association’s executive committee saw him not as an opponent or turncoat but as a role model: someone who had transformed himself from employee to employer at the game’s highest level. “The players understood, he had been in their shoes,” Whitfield said. “He’s not forgetting what it meant to be a player. He was in the process of learning what it meant to be an owner.” When the current collective bargaining agreement was negotiated with commissioner Adam Silver and union director Michele Roberts leading the talks, Jordan was an active, powerful voice. He is an influential member of the NBA’s labor relations and competition committees. One Charlotte insider spoke to Jordan’s clout with his fellow owners in getting this weekend’s showcase -- jeopardized by a political squabble in 2017 -- back onto the league’s short list. “There’s no All-Star Game here in Charlotte if it’s not for MJ,” the person said. Last summer in Las Vegas, Silver lauded Jordan for his ability to straddle the basketball and business worlds. “He brings unique credibility to the table when we're having discussions [with the players],” he said, “and even just among the owners, he's able to represent a player point of view… Michael can say, 'Well, look, this is how I looked at it when I was a player, and these are the kind of issues we need to address if we're going to convince players that something is in everyone's interest.’ ” Jordan’s powers of persuasion apparently have been even more impressive in Charlotte and North Carolina. The executives are careful about relying on him too often -- Jordan’s most precious commodity, now that his net worth is estimated to be upwards of $1.7 billion -- is his time. But when they need Mariano Rivera to walk in from the bullpen, he is lights out. “We’ve had corporate sponsors at a golf outing, and he’s been there, maybe stayed at one hole to tell off with everybody,” Whitfield said. Or they’ll invite certain corporate sponsors to one of a few games each season in which “Club 23” is up and running at the Spectrum Center, a private club built for such purposes. They get a chance to visit, talk with and pick Jordan’s brain on the Hornets and much more. “We’ve closed all those deals,” Whitfield said. Then there was the time a local CEO wanted to finalize a sizeable sponsorship deal with the team, and had his No. 2 invite Jordan over to their headquarters for the meetings. Whitfield told the tale: “This guy says, 'You have to come to our office. Our CEO is the man in our business.' But we’re like, 'Nah, typically, CEOs come and meet in Michael’s office or in ‘Club 23’ over here.' He said no, that wasn’t going to work for them. “So Pete Guelli said, 'Let’s make a deal: We’ll take your CEO and drop him off in Beijing. And we’ll drop off Michael in Beijing. Then we’ll see who more people gravitate to. Whoever gets the least people, he has to come to the other guy’s office.'” Point made. Point taken. Said Whitfield: “The guy says, ‘You know what, I got it. We’ll be over 10 o’clock Friday morning.’” A community he calls home The Michael Jordan who once seemed determined to float above cultural and political frays as the most prudent way to serve commerce has not held back in recent years from making his presence felt. He has been more philanthropist than activist and, let’s face it, in times of the most dire need, cash beats talk every time. Charity and investing in the community can be good for business, sure. Making that a priority after Guelli’s arrival and Jordan’s purchase helped the Hornets build bridges with fans and merchants that Shinn and the original franchise’s departure had torched. More than that, though, giving back for Jordan and his team at this point in his life was the right thing to do. And do, and do, and do. The list of charitable and civic efforts Jordan and the Hornets have undertaken is long, with few outside the region or state aware of most of it. Among the highlights: - Donating $2 million to relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Florence, particularly meaningful because of the damage it did in Jordan’s hometown of Wilmington. - Dedicated $7 million in partnership with Novant Health to fund two Michael Jordan Family Clinics, set to open in Charlotte in 2020. - Serving as Make-A-Wish’s Chief Wish Ambassador since 2008, while donating more than $5 million to the organization. His relationship with Make-A-Wish began more than 30 years ago. - Contributing $5 million as a founding donor of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. - Addressing the issue of police shootings and community policing in 2016 by donating $1 million each to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. After the hurricane in September devastated so many homes and businesses in and near Jordan’s roots, he wanted to do more than to stroke a fat check. In a meeting covered by The Associated Press, he met with Stephanie Parker and her family, including four young children, after they lost their apartment in two feet of flooding. A call from the director of the Cape Fear chapter of the Red Cross brought them together. The meeting took place at a Lowe’s home improvement store. “I look around the corner, and it’s Michael Jordan. ‘Oh my God!’" Parker said. “I look at my kids, ‘It’s Michael Jordan!’ I’m not going to lie, some tears came in my eyes, because the first thing that went through my mind was when I was younger, his last game when he was on the Chicago Bulls team, and that flashback just came right in my mind.” Afterward, Jordan was coaxed by the Charlotte Observer to talk about why that disaster resonated so deeply for him. “You gotta take care of home,” he said. “Wilmington truly is my home. Kept thinking about all those places I grew up going to … You don’t want to see any of that anywhere, but when it’s home, that’s tough to swallow.” There’s basketball, there’s business and then there’s real life, which sometimes intrudes in the most desperate ways. “We didn’t know how many people in our community were hungry,” Whitfield said. “There are people in dire need, and it’s special to have that hometown hero have in his heart that ‘This is where I can help.’ “It gives not only him as a person but our organization a platform to really speak out. That commitment is what has made him a special owner, and why he’s even more beloved in our community.” Winning title No. 7 drives Jordan now To date, Jordan’s greatest achievements have come elsewhere, at least since his baseline shot as a freshman propelled North Carolina to the 1982 NCAA championship. Those Bulls championships, the “Dream Team” magnificence, his partnership with that sneaker company in Beaverton, Ore., his Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction, shooting “Space Jam,” all of it -- his legacy has been crafted with others, for others, mostly far from home. (For the record, Jordan, his wife Yvette and their two daughters own a mansion outside Charlotte and an estate in south Florida). “Look, this has always been home for him,” Whitfield said. “Even though he was drafted by Chicago, WGN became a very popular station. And he just continued to elevate, so people in this state were proud to say, even though he’s a Bull, we love him. When the Bulls would come here and play at the old Coliseum, these fans who were avid Hornets fans were all pulling for Michael Jordan. “He’d score, they’d cheer loudly. The Hornets would score, they’d cheer loudly. North Carolina always felt like he was their native son who went off and achieved greatness.” Coming back first to head the franchise’s basketball operations and then as owner, Jordan’s role -- in light of the modest results on the court -- has been custodial. Yes, the club’s improved financial stability is important. But for this driven winner and NBA owner unlike all others, custodial isn’t going to cut it for long. “He did an interview with Cigar Aficionado magazine a while back,” Peterson said, “and the question was asked, ‘What would you like to do?’ And he said, ‘Win a seventh championship. Win as an owner.’ So for me, every day, I’m thinking, here’s a close friend and you want to make your friends happy, right? So each day I think, do the best you can to reach this goal for him.” Said Hornets wing Nicolas Batum: “I understand. He wants to win. He wants to compete since he was born.” It hasn’t been for lack of trying, although Jordan has made sure to keep fiscal responsibility high on every agenda. The team’s payroll for 2018-19 is approximately $122.3 million, which ranks near the middle of the NBA pack. “That Michael Jordan is one cheap dude,” said an impassioned cab driver on a recent airport run. “He’s only going to spend so much and the players they get shows it.” The Hornets never have spent into the league’s luxury-tax, and if Walker is retained when he hits free agency this summer, he’ll likely become the first Charlotte player to sign a full maximum-salary contract (though the five-year, $120 million deal Batum landed in 2016 came awfully close). Injuries and dubious moves have taken a toll, a situation that Kupchak, Borrego and their staffs have been tasked with fixing. Jordan, by all accounts, is engaged yet patient, with a playoff berth and potentially a record above .500 within reach. “I’m sure he feels like,” Whitfield said, “if he were still 30 years old and could lace ‘em up and get out there, he’d help us get over the hump. I think he would cherish it as much or more than the first six. Because I think he realizes how hard it is to get it done. “But it doesn’t bother us if the fans see his frustration sitting next to our bench. It’s important to us that they see he’s not only invested, he’s vested in what our team is trying to do. They can relate to him because they’re feeling that same frustration.” Jordan is theirs again and that’s what matters. For basketball, for business, for community and in time, just maybe, in championship. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2019

Batangueño Driver Feted for Free Rides to Elderly, PWDs

The city council has recognized a Good Samaritan here who offered free rides to the elderly. Jeepney driver Conrado Comia took center stage as his good deed reached the Sangguniang Panlungsod (City Legislative Council) which unanimously passed a resolution honoring him for his compassion and kindred spirit. The 42-year-old driver was humbled as the resolution […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2019

Mark Abelardo eager to show Filipino fighting spirit in latest ONE assignment - Inquirer Sports

Mark Abelardo eager to show Filipino fighting spirit in latest ONE assignment INQUIRER.net Thailand-based Mark Abelardo is eager to show the Filipino warrior in him against Daichi Takenaka of Japan i.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2019

Int’l press groups: Charges against Ressa ‘politically motivated’ 

MANILA, Philippines --- World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) and the World Editors Forum wrote a letter to President Rodrigo Duterte on Wednesday, saying the cyberlibel charge against Rappler chief executive Maria Ressa was "politically motivated."   "We are seriously concerned that the charges are politically motivated and form part of a systematic campaign by the government to use the law as a weapon to silence Rappler's reporting, which has often been critical of your presidency," the international press groups wrote in a joint letter to Duterte.   The letter was released after Ressa was arrested on Wednesday by agents of the Nationa...Keep on reading: Int’l press groups: Charges against Ressa ‘politically motivated’ .....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 14th, 2019

Singing letter carriers back for special V-Day delivery

For Heart's Day, why not raise the bar higher with a singing letter carrier to surprise your loved ones? Philippine Postal Corp. (PHLPost) is offering for the sixth year its "Pada-LOVE! Magpadala, Kiligin, Ma-inlove" package from Feb. 11 to 15, when hopeless and hopeful romantics could send handwritten letters to their lovers or soon-to-be partners while being serenaded by "Singing Karteros" (letter carriers) with two songs of the senders' choice. This postal service is a domestic express mail package priced at P2,500 and comes with a flower bouquet, a Valentine's Day card and a special PHLPost stamp themed "King and Queen of Hearts." The special stamps are now available at the...Keep on reading: Singing letter carriers back for special V-Day delivery.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 13th, 2019

TFK head queries NBI-6 on lady lawyer’s case

BACOLOD City – John Chiong, founder and national commander of Task Force Kasanag (TFK), called the attention of the regional director of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) to the filing of murder and frustrated murder cases in connection with the reported ambush on a lady lawyer recently. In a letter to NBI-6 Regional Director […] The post TFK head queries NBI-6 on lady lawyer’s case appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsFeb 12th, 2019

ONE Championship: Mark Fairtex Abelardo out to showcase Filipino fighting spirit in Bangkok

Mark "Tyson" Fairtex Abelardo might have been far away from the Philippines for the longest time, but he keeps his mother country close to his heart.   On Saturday, 16 February, he will have the chance to make an impression to his Filipino kababayans when he takes on undefeated bantamweight Daichi Takenaka on the undercard of ONE: CLASH OF LEGENDS, which emanates from the Impact Arena in Bangkok, Thailand.   "I feel more than ready to finally showcase my skill on the global stage,” said Abelardo, who signed a ONE Championship contract following his victory at ONE Warrior Series 3 in October.   “This is what I worked and trained hard for all my life, and I will make sure to make the most out of this moment.”   Born to Filipino parents in Auckland, New Zealand, "Tyson" is currently based in Pattaya, Thailand, where he hones his craft at the Fairtex Training Center.   While he has moved around the Asia Pacific for most of his adulthood, Abelardo noted that the Filipino warrior spirit is not lost on him, and it’s something that he vows to showcase in Bangkok.   "I am based in Thailand, but I will be out to show the fans out there that I possess the Filipino fighting spirit that Pinoys are known for,” he said. “I proudly represent the Philippines in ONE Championship."   The 27-year-old, however, will have his hands full against Takenaka, who is yet to taste defeat in his professional career. The Japanese grappler, who is a former Shooto Featherweight Champion, is known for his ability to mix his point of attack with strikes and efficient takedowns.   Despite the tall task at hand, Abelardo remains unfazed as he is excited to showcase his skills against a top opponent.   "A difficult fight is what I hoped for,” he explained.   “I feel that this is the kind of fight I needed in order to step up my level and go up the rankings in the bantamweight division. Fans will be in for a treat that evening."  said Abelardo.   "The goal is to win impressively, get my name out there, and represent the Philippine flag on a global stage."  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 12th, 2019

Longchamp’s woman takes a NY Fashion Week trip to Paris

Models Kendall Jenner and Liu Wen took a break from the catwalk to sit front row for Longchamp's second appearance at New York Fashion Week, and creative director Sophie Delafontaine couldn't have been happier. Delafontaine told The Associated Press she was moved by New York City's concrete jungle to tell the season's story of a woman traveling from the Big Apple to Paris. "It's really a mix of this Parisian attitude, effortless, natural, very elegant woman with a lot of felinity, and black and white mixed with a lot of graphic, and New York spirit --- and very colorful also," she said. And who embodies the on-the-go Paris to New York girl perfectly? Jenner, who is the face ...Keep on reading: Longchamp’s woman takes a NY Fashion Week trip to Paris.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 11th, 2019

Michael Jackson estate: New film violates channel standards

The Michael Jackson estate has sent a letter to the U.K.'s Channel 4 warning that a documentary on two men who accuse the singer of molesting them as boys violates the network's programming guidelines. The letter written by estate attorney Howard Weitzman and released Monday to The Associated Press states that "Leaving Neverland," set to air in early March, makes no attempt at getting a response to the accusers from Jackson's estate, family, friends or others who have defended his reputation as required by the channel's standards for factual programming and basic journalistic ethics. The letter cites a section of the publicly availableguidelinesthat state if a show makes "signi...Keep on reading: Michael Jackson estate: New film violates channel standards.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 11th, 2019

PBA: Kevin Alas undergoes successful surgery anew

A week after re-tearing his right knee at the Ynares Center last Feb. 2, NLEX Road Warriors guard Kevin Alas went under the knife Saturday evening and the operation was a success, said Louie Alas, Kevin's father. The older Alas also added that his son requested to stay a couple of days more in the hospital since the area still felt excruciating pain, especially after the anesthetic had worn off. "Usually kasi ano yan eh, yung procedure na yan, pagkatapos pwede ka nang lumabas. Pero naexperience na namin last year, sabi ko after six hours, sobrang sakit nung wala na yung anesthesia," shared Coach Louie. "So inanticipate ko na, sabi ko mag-ano ka na lang, pa-admit ka nalang ng one to two days para at least may mga pain reliever ditong ready." The Phoenix mentor also shared that his son is in a positive mood, though still feeling the ill effects of the surgery. "Okay naman siya. He’s in high spirit na. Ayaw lang kumain," Alas said. The former Letran guard, who just played five games into the season after tearing his ACL for the first time March 2018, will be beginning therapy once again in two weeks' time. However, due to the incident, Kevin could not be reached for comments the past days since he did not want to discuss basketball. Despite that, the older Alas thinks his son could have followed the recently-concluded game, which saw Phoenix lose their first game of the Philippine Cup against Rain or Shine in overtime, 98-94. __ Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2019

Boxing faces breakaway threat ahead of 2020 Tokyo Olympics

MOSCOW --- Amateur boxing faces a breakaway threat ahead of the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo after its international federation elected a president accused of ties to organized crime. The federation, known as AIBA, says a "rogue group" led by unnamed "Kazakhstani individuals" has asked national boxing federations to write to the International Olympic Committee offering to help run an Olympic boxing tournament without AIBA. AIBA published late Friday what it said was a sample letter organized by the breakaway group. The unsigned letter addressed to the IOC says "our group is ready to provide with the necessary technical expertise and sufficient financial conditions" to run the tournam...Keep on reading: Boxing faces breakaway threat ahead of 2020 Tokyo Olympics.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2019