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The Beauty of a Liberal Education

This, to me, is what the brand of liberal education at University of Asia and the Pacific aims to do give to the university’s students. It aims to help everyone realize the truth that we are meant to be good and the way it goes about making this a reality is by helping us enrich… link: The Beauty of a Liberal Education.....»»

Category: newsSource: manilainformer manilainformerMay 30th, 2018

How singers find empowerment in adversity, diversity

In the upcoming benefit concert "Limitless," Angeline Quinto, Kyla, Radha Cuadrado, Liezel Garcia and Jayda Avanzado will celebrate female empowerment and pay tribute to women who have made an impact on society.   Mounted by Outbox Media, the show---to be held on Sept. 7 at Metrotent Convention Center---will pay tribute to the teachers of Antipolo City Special Education Center, which tends to over 250 children with varying medical conditions such as visual and hearing impairment, autism and intellectual disability.   In this forum, Radha, Kyla, Jayda, Angeline and Liezel talk about self-acceptance and the immense pressure on female singers to fit certain beauty ...Keep on reading: How singers find empowerment in adversity, diversity.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

Bhutan: No medals yet in the Asian Games, but still happy

By STEPHEN WADE,  AP Sports Writer JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan has never won a medal of any kind at the Asian Games, much less the Olympics. The country's fame, instead, comes from its billing as one of the happiest places on earth. In fact, the government promotes a concept it terms "Gross National Happiness" as a way to measure success. "People at home are not unhappy we have not won," Younten Tshedup, a reporter for the national newspaper Kuensel, told the Associated Press at the Asian Games. "Everyone is happy, even with no medals. But medals this time would be icing on the cake." By comparison, Bhutan's giant neighbor China has won more than 3,000 medals — about 1,500 gold — in Asian Games competitions. "We are hoping to change it this time," Younten added. Bhutan, with a population of only 750,000, has 24 athletes entered in sports including archery, taekwondo, boxing and — believe it or not — golf. Karma Karma, who competed two years ago at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, could break through in archery, which is Bhutan's national sport. She was also the flagbearer in Saturday's opening ceremony in Jakarta. Soccer and cricket are also popular in Bhutan, but competition is amateur. Archery has many participants, but the disciplines practiced at home are different than those on the Asian Games and Olympic sports programs. "We'd be happy with any medal," Nim Dorji, the head of the delegation, told The AP. Several athletes in taekwondo could break through. They talked up their chances — but were realistic, too — on Monday while seated around a table eating lunch and decked out in their distinctive red and yellow uniforms with the dragon crest on the chest. "Bhutan is a very small country," taekwondo athlete Tenzin Dorji explained. "We don't have the facilities. Maybe that's why we are not winning. In Bhutan we (athletes) are all students and we only practice for four hours. In other countries they are almost practicing for a whole day." Part of the challenge has been Bhutan's isolation, trapped between China and India in the Himalayas. It has just recently begun to open up with television and social media pushing quick change, and the natural beauty also is a lure that attracts outsiders. Nim, the head of the delegation, said the Bhutan government was getting more involved and offering incentives. "We are a small country known for our culture and traditions," taekwondo athlete Kinzang Choden said. "But sports are not our careers. Education is given more importance than sports by the government." Bhutan has sent athletes to every Asian Games since 1990, according the country's profile on the Asian Games website. The closest it has come to winning a medal was in 1998 in Bangkok, when its men's archery team lost a bronze-medal match against China. Bhutan is not alone in Asia in its medal struggles. East Timor, Indonesia's neighbor on the eastern border, is also yet to win a medal at the Asian Games, a quadrennial event that has attracted more than 11,000 athletes from 45 countries and territories competing in 40 sports. The website for the Olympic Council of Asia — the governing body of regional sports — shows six other nations that have won medals, but never a gold medal: Afghanistan, Brunei, Laos, Nepal, Palestine, and Yemen. "Everyone here is expecting a medal," Younten, the Bhutanese reporter said. "We are expecting a few, but we're not very sure about which disciplines."    .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 20th, 2018

‘Sunday Beauty Queen’ director wins British Council’s Social Impact award

Baby Ruth Villarama received the first-ever Global Alumni Award for Social Impact organized by international education organization British Council. The Alumni Awards, now on its fourth year, honors United Kingdom university graduates who have made achievements in their home country in three categories: Professional Achievement, Entrepreneurialism and Social Impact. For the first time this year, it was expanded to recognize alumni beyond their nations and regions through the Global Alumni Awards. Villarama received the Social Impact Award for work which "has positively changed their society or community," according to a British Council statement. She was among seven regional...Keep on reading: ‘Sunday Beauty Queen’ director wins British Council’s Social Impact award.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

House panel OKs bill making Baybayin the national writing system

Baybayin, an ancient script of the Philippines used before the Spanish colonial period, is now on its way to becoming the official national writing system of the Philippines with the approval of the proposed National Writing System Act (House Bill No. 1022) by the House Committee on Basic Education and Culture. The bill, which was authored by Pangasinan Rep. Leopoldo Bataoil, will be scheduled for plenary debates and then for approval on second and final reading. The measure seeks to declare Baybayin as the national writing system, in a bid to generate greater awareness on the plight of Baybayin and to foster wider appreciation on its importance and beauty. "The importance o...Keep on reading: House panel OKs bill making Baybayin the national writing system.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 23rd, 2018

Kings support protesters marching over man shot by police

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The struggling Sacramento Kings find themselves in the national spotlight and it has nothing to do with another disappointing NBA season in their sparkling new two-year-old arena. Instead of looking ahead to the draft lottery as they wind down their 12th consecutive losing season, the Kings — like many nationwide — have turned their attention to demonstrators who have joined hand-in-hand on game nights to block entrances to the building. The wave of protests stem from the March 18 fatal shooting by police of Stephon Clark, a 22-year-old unarmed black man. Kings are at the center of the demonstrations but they have embraced their role in the situation and have been supportive of both the Clark family and the protesters. “This organization has really stepped to the forefront and I wanted to use my voice as much as I could to say to try to say what I believed was right and true,” Kings player Garrett Temple said. “There are a lot of different perspectives and a lot of different things to take into account but it’s been a pretty hectic week.” The demonstrations at Kings’ games have brought heightened attention to the protests and could grow in numbers this weekend. Sacramento police shot Clark eight times — seven from behind, according to autopsy results paid for by the family that were released Friday. The Kings play host to the Golden State Warriors on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time). The protests have resonated around the country as large crowds have held demonstrations and marches throughout the city, at one point blocking nearby freeways and surrounding streets in their call for action. Owner Vivek Ranadive made an impassioned pledge of support for the protesters and the community at large following the first round of demonstrations on March 22 after first consulting with his players. The NBA team has partnered with Black Lives Matter Sacramento and the Build. Black. Coalition to create a multiyear partnership that supports the education of young people and to help workforce preparation and economic development efforts in the community. “To see the Kings step up as an organization and start backing other local organizations, that means a great deal,” Temple said. “It shows you that what Vivek said after the game wasn’t just talk, that we really want to step in and help the community with this problem.” Temple, Vince Carter and former Kings player Doug Christie will also join community activists as part of an open forum at a church in south Sacramento on Friday night to discuss the situation and possible solutions. “That’s what it’s all about, raising awareness,” Carter said after a recent game. “Regardless of this being a professional basketball game, the bigger picture and what really matters is what was going on outside and the reason they were out there.” Temple has been one of the most outspoken Kings players since the protests began. “When I was kid being able to listen to an NBA player or see an NBA player, your eyes light up and your ears open,” Temple said. “We have to use that influence that we have in a positive manner.” The protests have been mostly non-violent. Beyond blocking traffic, the demonstrators have created a few problems for businesses in downtown Sacramento. They’ve come at a financial cost for the Kings, too. Protesters have twice blocked entrances to Golden1 Center, forcing the arena into a lockdown mode. Only 2,400 fans made it inside for the March 22 (Mar. 23, PHL time) game against the Atlanta Hawks. Three days later the demonstrators stayed away as the Kings hosted the Boston Celtics but they returned on March 27 (Mar. 28, PHL time) when they took on the Dallas Mavericks and forced another lockdown of the arena and prevented all but 4,000 fans from entering. For a team that has drawn an average crowd of 17,500 this season, the lost revenue from ticket sales alone is more than $1 million by conservative estimates after refunds were offered to those fans who didn’t get in. That doesn’t include lost income from concession stands and merchandise sales. But Ranadive, the first person of Indian descent to own an NBA franchise, said after the Hawks game, “We stand here before you, old, young, black, white, brown, and we are all united in our commitment.” Warriors coach Steve Kerr watched Ranadive’s speech on television in awe. He said, “I was very proud of the way the Kings handled it and the way the NBA handled it.” Other players around the league who have played in Sacramento since the protests began expressed their concerns over the situation while praising the Kings for getting involved, including Harrison Barnes and Dirk Nowitzki of the Mavericks and Terry Rozier of the Celtics. Former Kings players DeMarcus Cousins and Matt Barnes offered to pay for Clark’s funeral. Barnes, a Sacramento native who spent part of last season with the Kings, was also a pallbearer at the funeral and has organized a march prior to Saturday’s (Sunday, PHL time) game against the Warriors. “The beauty of the game is that we have this platform to be able to speak about these things and to be able to speak about police brutality, citizen-police relationships, disproportionate amount of African-Americans getting killed,” said Barnes, who spent his first four seasons playing in Oakland about 90 minutes south of Sacramento. “It’s important that we use that platform to talk about these things “Our hearts and condolences go out to the families of those of both sides that have been affected.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 31st, 2018

Year of the young: They made good news in 2017

Visit us on Instagram To be You; Facebook: To be You; e-mail inq.tobeyou@gmail.com Despite the controversies that divided the country in 2017, several youths managed to stand out---and unite the nation---and serve as huge inspiration to their generation, if not the nation. In the fields of sports, fashion, beauty, activism and education, these newsmakers and achievers proved that no one is too young (or too old) to reach for their dreams and make a difference. Maureen Wroblewitz is the 19-year-old Filipino-German who became the first Filipino to win the popular reality TV search "Asia's Next Top Model" Cycle 5. Tiny by model standards, she bested strong contenders from around t...Keep on reading: Year of the young: They made good news in 2017.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 14th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Bam, Kiko condemn killing of university president

Two Liberal Party senators "strongly condemned" on Sunday the "senseless killing" of Cagayan de Oro state university president Ricardo Rotoras. "We strongly condemn the senseless killing of university president Dr. Ricardo Rotoras," Sen. Bam Aquino and Sen. Francis "Kiko" Pangilinan said in a joint statement. Aquino, assistant minority leader, and Pangilinan said they both worked closely with Rotoras for the passage of the Universal Access to Quality Tertiary Education Act as president of Philippine Association of State Universities and Colleges. The act, which was signed into law by President Rodrigo Duterte on August 3, 2017, gives access to "quality tertiary education by providing ...Keep on reading: Bam, Kiko condemn killing of university president.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2017

Expand your horizons, pursue post-grad studies in EU

MANILA, Philippines — The beauty of mobility, amazing sights, historical places, rich culture and arts, prestigious schools, high quality education, the list.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2017

Explosive device found at New York home of billionaire Soros

NEW YORK, USA – The FBI on Tuesday, October 23, was investigating an explosive device found in the mailbox at the New York home of US billionaire and liberal donor George Soros, a target of right-wing groups, officials confirmed. An employee of the residence in Bedford, north of Manhattan, found the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated News3 hr. 47 min. ago

Lakers Walton sounds off on officiating after loss

NBA.com staff report Los Angeles Lakers coach Luke Walton was obviously unhappy after his team's 143-142 overtime loss to the San Antonio Spurs on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time). Part of the frustration came in seeing his team fight back to force overtime and build -- and then lose -- a 142-136 lead in the extra frame. Another part of his frustration came from his view of the officiating in last night's game, and, it seems, the season at large. Before the start of this season, the Points of Education disseminated to all teams promised to focus on three key areas: freedom of movement on the perimeter and in the post, respect for the game and traveling. The Lakers and Walton were frustrated during and after night's game over what they thought were a lack of calls in some of those regards. Once the game was over, Walton opened his news conference with a lengthy comment about the officiating. In last night's loss, the Spurs attempted 38 free throws (making 28) to the Lakers 26 free-throw attempts (and 18 makes). 🎥 Luke Walton talks about the team's fight to come back and force overtime, and the impact of Johnathan Williams in his NBA debut pic.twitter.com/sWBR3fbbe6 — Los Angeles Lakers (@Lakers) October 23, 2018 "Let me start here. ... I wasn't going to say anything. I was going to save my money, but I just can't anymore," Walton said. "It's [74] points in the paint [by the Lakers] to 50, [and yet] again they outshoot us from the free-throw line -- 38 free throws. Watch the play where I got a technical foul. Watch what happened to LeBron James' arm. It's the same thing that James Harden and Chris Paul [drew fouls on and] shot 30 free throws on us the night before. ... We are scoring 70 points a night. In the paint. "Watch how Josh Hart plays this game. He played 40 minutes tonight. All he does is attack the rim. Zero free throws tonight. Zero. So to me, it doesn't matter. I know they're young, I get that. But if we are going to play a certain way, let's not reward people for flopping 30 feet from the hole on plays that have nothing to do with that possession. They're just flopping just to see if they get a foul call. And then not reward players that are physically going to the basket and getting hit. It's not right." The Lakers are the No. 2 team in the league scoring in the paint, averaging 71.3 ppg (trailing only the New Orleans Pelicans' mark of 76 ppg). After last night's loss, the Lakers rank 20th in free throw attempts (71) and 21st in free throws made (53). Additionally, the Lakers are 24th in total drives this season (110) and 23rd in free throw attempts (six) and free throws made (six) off drives. In 2017-18, the Lakers finished eighth in total free throw attempts and 16th in free throws made while ranking in the top 20 in total drives, free throw attempts and free throws made off drives. Lakers star LeBron James sparked the L.A. comeback and early OT lead with 32 points, 14 assists and eight rebounds. He said he knows there is an adjustment period ahead for the Lakers -- both in learning the new points of education and in getting in L.A. its first win of 2018-19. 🎥 LeBron James details the back-and-forth game against the Spurs. pic.twitter.com/YC1Pft1tsu — Los Angeles Lakers (@Lakers) October 23, 2018 "It's just hard with the new rule changes. You literally can't touch anybody -- well, you can, you can touch somebody defensively," James said. "You just can't. There's nothing [you can do]. We don't know. We're trying to figure it out. But every time we're on the defensive end, especially in the third quarter, we just kept putting them to the free throw line. But we got to try to figure that out because it's just giving teams too many easy opportunities to just go up there and knock down free throws." As for the Lakers' winless start to the season, James is taking a long view with his first season in Los Angeles. “I know what I got myself into,” James said. “It’s a process. I get it. We’ll be fine. I didn’t come here thinking we were going to be blazing storms right out the gate. It’s a process and I understand that. It’s frustrating not to get the win, but I’ve showered and I’m good now. "We're going to continue to get better. We're going to continue to get better. I like the direction we're going in. Obviously, it's not resulting in the wins right now but it's such a long process.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News9 hr. 21 min. ago

The addiction and downside of watching “drama” channels

You might already know about YouTube channels that cater to vlogs, skits, and beauty. But some of you might not be aware about the "drama" category, which feature videos where YouTubers report various news, mostly entertainment-related. The popular kind of drama channels though are the ones that aim to "spill tea" on issues between certain individuals. If you look up these videos, a lot of them focus on fellow YouTubers. As of recent, these are centered on members of the beauty community who, for whatever reason, are going after each other via subtweets and Snapchat videos. I'm personally not a fan of content like this but when sh*t hit the fan after the Jeffree Star documentar...Keep on reading: The addiction and downside of watching “drama” channels.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News17 hr. 47 min. ago

Acne-prone skin? It might be the alcohol in your routine

If you're still suffering from acne and dry skin past your early twenties, consider getting rid of all your skincare products that contain denatured alcohol, especially your toner. It's the one skincare trick that I stand by. Since I eliminated denatured alcohol from my routine years ago, my other products work better on my skin. Denatured alcohol is quite common in drugstore toners, if not the main ingredient. It's also in some acne spot treatments. A few micellar water formulations also contain a bit of it too. That's why it's hard to defeat acne with these products. It's also hard to believe that something so common in the beauty industry is creating more problems. But that's t...Keep on reading: Acne-prone skin? It might be the alcohol in your routine.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News17 hr. 47 min. ago

Beauty Inspo: 4 Makeup Tips To Turn Your 'Blah' Day Around

In case you pulled another all-nighter........»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated News18 hr. 47 min. ago

Maureen Wroblewitz fulfills grandmother’s wish to join Eat Bulaga

AFTER her successful foray in the modeling world, Maureen Wroblewitz, the first Filipina to win “Asia’s Next Top Model (ASNTM),” sashays her way into the local television scene as the newest addition to the Eat Bulaga family. The half-Filipina, half-German beauty surprised many when she made her noontime television debut in the program’s hit segment […] The post Maureen Wroblewitz fulfills grandmother’s wish to join Eat Bulaga appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2018

How Miss World PH has become show biz beauties’ pageant of choice

It appears that the Miss World Philippines pageant has become the beauty contest of choice for show biz denizens after the impressive showing of celebrity scions Winwyn Marquez and Zara Carbonell last year, as well as several familiar faces in this year's edition.   Winwyn, daughter of Joey Marquez and Alma Moreno, received the Reina Hispanoamericana Filipinas crown in last year's pageant, and eventually became the first Asian to win the Reina Hispanoamericana title.   For her part, Zara, daughter of Cris Villanueva, was proclaimed second runner-up last year, then went on to win in the inaugural Miss Tourism Worldwide contest in Indonesia last month.   ...Keep on reading: How Miss World PH has become show biz beauties’ pageant of choice.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2018

Studes swarm state universities – CHEd

The Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) yesterday said it is looking for ways to accommodate the huge influx of students seeking to avail themselves of the government’s free tertiary education program. In a TV interview, CHEd chairman Prospero de Vera said more students are seeking enrolment in public universities and colleges after the law on […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2018

Grab launches ‘tech roadmap’ to boost commuter safety

GRAB Philippines launched on Monday a technical “roadmap” that focuses on commuters’ welfare by eliminating and reducing the frequency of accidents through education of its drivers. The “Safer Everyday Tech...READ MORE The post Grab launches ‘tech roadmap’ to boost commuter safety appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2018

Education, Beyond Borders: Little Me Academy Launches ACADEME Philippine Online High School

On October 23rd, Little Me Academy will launch the Academe Philippine Online High School (APOHS), the first online open high school designed especially for Filipino students in grades 7 through 10. The Grand Launch is slated for 5PM at the Centrio Mall Activity Center with Singer-Songwriter and Education Advocate T.J. Monterde as Guest of Honor and Performer. However, the ACADEME exhibit will be open to all guests from 10AM to 9PM......»»

Category: newsSource:  kagay_anRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2018

Ateneo, MediXserve launch 1st university-based blockchain research center

MANILA, Philippines – The Ateneo de Manila University and health-tech startup MediXServe launched AMBERLab, the first university-based blockchain education and research laboratory in the Philippines, Monday, October 22.  AMBERLab, which stands for “Ateneo-MediXserve Blockchain Education and Research Laboratory,” seeks to serve as a think tank that ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2018