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Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnMay 15th, 2018

Asian Games: Christian Standhardinger excited to play under Yeng Guiao

Returning Gilas player Christian Standhardinger is very excited for another tour of duty donning the Pilipinas jersey, this time at the 2018 Asian Games. The Fil-German forward, who was among the 14 included in the lineup announced by the PBA, exclaimed that he is very much excited playing for long-time coach Yeng Guiao. "I’m excited to see what’s the playing style of coach (Yeng), what system he’s gonna bring to hopefully be successful. I have to see and check who we play against. I think it’s without Australia and without New Zealand exactly. And the only team to beat is China and South Korea. I hope that we can go all out and obviously make the country proud." Even though nursing a left knee injury, Standhardinger is willing to sacrifice when country calls him.  "I want to represent the country. I want to make my fellow Filipinos proud, our countrymen proud and I hope that we can do that." The number one pick of the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft even managed to tweet a message of thanks just before the introduction of the starting lineup in Game 5 of the PBA Commissioner's Cup Finals. Now trying to juggle training between the Beermen and the national squad, Standhardinger sets his priorities straight, and that is the conference crown. "So yeah, for me obviously, the first priority is to try to win the finals here. That’s very important for me. That’s very important for San Miguel. And then I can completely focus on hopefully getting some victories in the Asian Games." __   Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 5th, 2018

Style Inspo: 5 Celebs Who Make Streetwear Look Easily Steal-Worthy

Their easy swag always comes through......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 4th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 30th, 2018

Never Say Die: Paul Zamar’s PBA Dream lives on

It was August 19, 2012. Former University of the East gunner Paul Zamar seemingly fulfilled his life’s dream when his name was announced as the 35th overall pick in the 2012 PBA Draft. Selecting him was the league’s most popular team, Barangay Ginebra San Miguel. But, soon after, that same team that picked him, would let him go, unsigned. This is the predicament that many basketball players in the Philippines face as there are only so many roster spots available in the country’s first professional basketball league. Competition is extremely stiff and the careers of those players who get drafted but are unable to crack the roster usually suffers an early death. But, this has not been the case for Zamar, whose love for the game is deeply rooted. Zamar was born on October 20, 1987 in Mandaluyong. As a youngster, he was immediately exposed to the game because of his father, Boycie, an accomplished coach and basketball great. “I watched my father play in the PBL for Burger Machine where he shot the championship winning free-throws. I thought basketball was the greatest thing to do and that’s where it all began,” recalled the younger Zamar. He made his first varsity team as a freshman in San Beda High School, playing behind the likes of JVee Casio and James Martinez. Zamar would later transfer to the University of the East, where he played in the UAAP Jrs. Basketball tournament from 2003 to 2005 before moving up to the college ranks to play for the Red Warriors, the team of his father’s alma mater. It was in UE where Zamar made a name for himself as one of the league’s deadliest snipers. He also showed his versatility by being able to play point guard and taking on the challenge of defending the opposing team’s primary ball handler. Upon graduating from UE, Zamar would play in the PBA D-League for Blackwater Elite before that fateful day he was drafted. Being left out the roster did not discourage Zamar, as he went on to play an additional four years in the PBA-D-League for Cebuana Lhullier and Café France before deciding to take his talents overseas in 2017. Nowadays, the 5’11” Zamar, who is now 30 years old, has established himself as the starting shooting guard of the Mono Vampire Basketball Club in the ASEAN Basketball League. He is currently averaging 16.1 PPG and is shooting 39% from beyond the arc as the team’s Heritage Import. Although he’s been living in Thailand for over 18 months now, Zamar says it’s all part of being a professional in the world of basketball. “It’s a humbling experience (life in Thailand). First time living and doing everything by myself. Loneliness is always your enemy. I’m far away from my wife and my family. Sometimes, I wake up in the middle of the night thinking about my family in the Philippines,” shared Zamar. For any Filipino, making an impact in a foreign setting is a huge accomplishment. But, somewhere deep inside his heart, Zamar still feels that burning desire to return home and play the game at the place where he first fell in love with it. “I still have in me my PBA dream and it motivates me to just keep on playing. I believe na may purpose si Lord bakit dito niya ako nilagay. And wherever I am, I make sure I always give my best and keep improving myself,” said Zamar. Tonight, at the Sta. Rosa Multi-Purpose Complex in Sta. Rosa, Laguna, Zamar will have another opportunity to show the entire country his worth as his Mono Vampire Basketball Team takes on San Miguel Alab Pilipinas in Game 1 of the best-of-five Finals series in the 2017-18 ABL season. “We will play hard for 40 minutes. We know that we are the underdogs given the fact that we’re playing against ex-PBA and National Team Players and top caliber PBA Imports. But, we will leave everything on the basketball court and give the fans a great series,” promised Zamar. Six years ago, Zamar could’ve just easily given up and kissed basketball goodbye. But, ironically, he lives by the exact same mantra of the PBA team that drafted him: Never Say Die. There’s no telling how much longer Zamar will play professionally. Or if he will ever make it to the PBA. But, right now, his basketball career is very much alive with Mono Vampire.    .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 22nd, 2018

Style Inspo: Mrs. Coleen Garcia-Crawford Says I Do In This Sexy Galia Lahav Stunner!

We also learned which shoes she wore and the flowers that made up her bridal bouquet!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 21st, 2018

Cross Court: Basketball-volleyball power couples

Aside from titles won, awards garnered and lessons learned this year, a handful of Filipino athletes have found, and nurtured love between another fellow sports star. One could just imagine how two hearts meet in the harsh battlefield of sports especially coming from different fronts. Fate led some of the stars from the country’s top two sports – basketball and volleyball – to cross paths and develop a blooming romance. Here are some of the power couples coming from the said sports.   Bong and Mozzy Ravena The perfect example in this list. Bong was a successful basketball star during his UAAP days with University of the East, the PBA and MBA while Mozzy donned the University of Sto. Tomas jersey as a volleyball varsity player. The union produced three kids who followed their footsteps. Kiefer and Thirdy are making their own mark as basketball standouts while their sister Dani has a budding career as a rookie setter for Ateneo de Manila University.         Kiefer Ravena and Alyssa Valdez What is a King Phenom without a Queen Phenom? Arguably, the most popular sports couple of this generation, former Ateneo de Manila University King Eagle Kiefer Ravena and ex-Queen Eagle Alyssa Valdez are the equivalent of the country’s best teleserye loveteams.       LA Revilla and Denden Lazaro   I love you past the moon and beyond the stars, baby ❤️ Happy Valentine's Day! ❤️ . @larevilla A post shared by Dennise Lazaro (@denniselazaro) on Feb 14, 2017 at 4:05am PST Whoever said that blue and green won’t mix has been living under a rock. Say that to this sweet couple of ex-De La Salle University and current Kia guard LA Revilla and former Ateneo de Manila University and current Cocolife libero Denden Lazaro.   Philip Manalang and Cesca Racraquin   Walo ❤️ A post shared by Cesca Racraquin (@cescarac) on Aug 25, 2017 at 11:17pm PDT Red is the color of love. Well, at least for this couple Cesca Racraquin of San Beda College Lady Red Spikers and University of the East Red Warrior Philip Manalang.   Alfren Gayosa and Grethcel Soltones Home 🏡 bound with this one ❤🌹👑💏💍👣 @ladybeast05 💪🏻 pic.twitter.com/Kq0un7HjkM — Alfren Gayosa (@eeeeerjordan15) June 24, 2017 Fun, bubbly, sweet and chill. San Sebastian College cager Alfren Gayosa and former Lady Stags spiker and three-time NCAA MVP Grethcel Soltones’ relationship is simply described that way.   Myla Pablo and Patrick Aquino As the old saying goes, in love ‘age doesn’t matter.’ National University women’s basketball team coach Patrick Aquino and former Lady Bulldogs spiker Myla Pablo proved that. Some say that it is a May-December love affair but hey who are we to judge? Oh by the way, we’ll be hearing wedding bells soon.   Aby Marano and Robert Bolick The last time Aby Marano visited ABS-CBN Sports’ Down the Line, the former De La Salle University middle readily answered that if her boyfriend Robert Bolick of San Beda College asks her hand right that very moment, without second thought, she’ll say ‘yes’.   Kib Montalbo and Desiree Cheng   ❤️ A post shared by Kib Montalbo (@kibmontalbo) on Aug 20, 2017 at 6:12am PDT KibRee is definitely real. The De La Salle University Green Archers’ ‘man of steal’ has captured the heart of Lady Spiker and UAAP Season 79 Finals MVP Desiree Cheng, and they have been seen cheering and supporting each other through wins and losses.   Arvin Tolentino and Brandy Kramer   There's no place I'd rather be A post shared by Arvin Tolentino (@arvintolentino5) on Jul 5, 2017 at 3:43am PDT Three years and counting. Judging from this picture, there’s no letting go between Far Eastern University cager Arvin Tolentino and former San Beda College Lady Red Spiker Brandy Kramer, who is the younger sister of cager Doug.   Chico Manabat and Dindin Santiago - Manabat   First!🤗🤣 A post shared by Dindin Santiago Manabat (@dindinquickermanabat) on Aug 14, 2017 at 8:41am PDT Two years of marriage and an adorable daughter, National University Bullpups assistant coach Chico Manabat and Foton middle Dindin are a picture of a happy family.     Junemar Fajardo and Aeriael Patnongon Saturdate ❤️ pic.twitter.com/pniFpWnEC2 — Aerieal Patnongon (@iamaeriealituh) April 8, 2017 San Miguel Beer center Junemar Fajaro is one big, tall and tough man. Only Creamline middle Aerieal Patnongon can make this big, tall and tough man’s heart skip a beat.   Jan-Jan Jaboneta and Isa Molde Maroon pride runs deep for Isko and Iska power couple Jan-Jan Jaboneta and Isa Molde. Jaboneta, a sparkplug off the bench for the rising UP Fighting Maroons and Molde, one of the Lady Fighting Maroons' go-to scorers have hit it off, and are probably each others' biggest fans when gametime comes......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 14th, 2018

Cross Court: Basketball-volleyball power couples

Aside from titles won, awards garnered and lessons learned this year, a handful of Filipino athletes have found, and nurtured love between another fellow sports star. One could just imagine how two hearts meet in the harsh battlefield of sports especially coming from different fronts. Fate led some of the stars from the country’s top two sports – basketball and volleyball – to cross paths and develop a blooming romance. Here are some of the power couples coming from the said sports.   Bong and Mozzy Ravena The perfect example in this list. Bong was a successful basketball star during his UAAP days with University of the East, the PBA and MBA while Mozzy donned the University of Sto. Tomas jersey as a volleyball varsity player. The union produced three kids who followed their footsteps. Kiefer and Thirdy are making their own mark as basketball standouts while their sister Dani has a budding career as a rookie setter for Ateneo de Manila University.         Kiefer Ravena and Alyssa Valdez What is a King Phenom without a Queen Phenom? Arguably, the most popular sports couple of this generation, former Ateneo de Manila University King Eagle Kiefer Ravena and ex-Queen Eagle Alyssa Valdez are the equivalent of the country’s best teleserye loveteams.       LA Revilla and Denden Lazaro   I love you past the moon and beyond the stars, baby ❤️ Happy Valentine's Day! ❤️ . @larevilla A post shared by Dennise Lazaro (@denniselazaro) on Feb 14, 2017 at 4:05am PST Whoever said that blue and green won’t mix has been living under a rock. Say that to this sweet couple of ex-De La Salle University and current Kia guard LA Revilla and former Ateneo de Manila University and current Cocolife libero Denden Lazaro.   Philip Manalang and Cesca Racraquin   Walo ❤️ A post shared by Cesca Racraquin (@cescarac) on Aug 25, 2017 at 11:17pm PDT Red is the color of love. Well, at least for this couple Cesca Racraquin of San Beda College Lady Red Spikers and University of the East Red Warrior Philip Manalang.   Alfren Gayosa and Grethcel Soltones Home 🏡 bound with this one ❤🌹👑💏💍👣 @ladybeast05 💪🏻 pic.twitter.com/Kq0un7HjkM — Alfren Gayosa (@eeeeerjordan15) June 24, 2017 Fun, bubbly, sweet and chill. San Sebastian College cager Alfren Gayosa and former Lady Stags spiker and three-time NCAA MVP Grethcel Soltones’ relationship is simply described that way.   Myla Pablo and Patrick Aquino As the old saying goes, in love ‘age doesn’t matter.’ National University women’s basketball team coach Patrick Aquino and former Lady Bulldogs spiker Myla Pablo proved that. Some say that it is a May-December love affair but hey who are we to judge? Oh by the way, we’ll be hearing wedding bells soon.   Aby Marano and Robert Bolick The last time Aby Marano visited ABS-CBN Sports’ Down the Line, the former De La Salle University middle readily answered that if her boyfriend Robert Bolick of San Beda College asks her hand right that very moment, without second thought, she’ll say ‘yes’.   Kib Montalbo and Desiree Cheng   ❤️ A post shared by Kib Montalbo (@kibmontalbo) on Aug 20, 2017 at 6:12am PDT Is KibRee for real? Let’s just hope that the De La Salle University Green Archers’ ‘man of steal’ will capture the heart of Lady Spiker and UAAP Season 79 Finals MVP Desiree Cheng to officially put that question to rest.   Arvin Tolentino and Brandy Kramer   There's no place I'd rather be A post shared by Arvin Tolentino (@arvintolentino5) on Jul 5, 2017 at 3:43am PDT Three years and counting. Judging from this picture, there’s no letting go between Far Eastern University cager Arvin Tolentino and former San Beda College Lady Red Spiker Brandy Kramer, who is the younger sister of cager Doug.   Chico Manabat and Dindin Santiago - Manabat   First!🤗🤣 A post shared by Dindin Santiago Manabat (@dindinquickermanabat) on Aug 14, 2017 at 8:41am PDT Two years of marriage and an adorable daughter, National University Bullpups assistant coach Chico Manabat and Foton middle Dindin are a picture of a happy family.     Junemar Fajardo and Aeriael Patnongon Saturdate ❤️ pic.twitter.com/pniFpWnEC2 — Aerieal Patnongon (@iamaeriealituh) April 8, 2017 San Miguel Beer center Junemar Fajaro is one big, tall and tough man. Only Creamline middle Aerieal Patnongon can make this big, tall and tough man’s heart skip a beat.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 26th, 2017

The five types of fashionable head coaches you ll meet in the Philippines

It has been quite a year for fashion in Philippine basketball. With guys like Terrence Romeo in the PBA and Thirdy Ravena in the amateur ranks, players are making statements both on and off the court. However, player fashion is nothing new and the biggest surprise most definetely is the way coaches are getting in on this trend of making sure their respective #OOTDs are on point. While not all coaches have embraced this movement --- at least not yet --- and some still prefer the rather safe team polo shirt and pants combo, some are starting to push it. Here, we introduce to you the five types of fashion coaches you see in Philippine basketball.   The Cool Tito The term "tito" has turned into a joke nowadays. Mostly bad jokes. But come on, what's wrong with being a tito anyway? One can be a cool tito. A cool tito like Franz Pumaren of the Adamson Falcons and the Globalport Batang Pier (okay, no Batang Pier since he took a leave of absence there). Coach Franz has been sporting the cool tito look for years now. A genius head coach that goes to games in sharp patterned polos, a nice fitted pair of pants, and a pair of sneakers if he's feeling it, Pumaren is definitely not your ordinary tito. He's a cool tito, one that even makes Korean finger hearts if you're brave enough to ask him.   The Swaggy One Whatever happened to Manong Derrick Pumaren? You know what, let's not answer that question because it doesn't matter. What matters is coach Pumaren's seemingly overnight transformation into a streetwear style icon. In a UE season that was full of disappointment, Manong Derrick was one shining star for the Red Warriors. Seriously, just look at him. He's barking instructions from the sidelines and drawing plays on the bench while wearing sweaters, red hoodies, denim jackets, red cuffed pants, white cuffed pants, and sneakers. If Manong Derrick can show some ankles, you can too. This must be what Kim Bok-Joo meant when she said "Swaaaaag!"   The Action Star Take a look at La Salle coach Aldin Ayo and you'll immediately see that he can pass as an action star from the 1990s or something. Not to say that Ayo is a terrible person, no, no, and another no. He just has that look. From his bulging biceps that routinely punish his La Salle polo shirts to his sly smirk that is kontrabida-esque, Aldin Ayo just has that look of an action star. And then he's added black and red Ralph Lauren shirt to the mix to go along with his matching Gucci belt and shoes. Somebody cast coach Ayo to a movie or something because we'll watch that for sure.   The Trendsetter When you think about fashionable basketball coaches in the Philippines, who immediately comes to mind? That's right, it's Vincent "Chot" Reyes. You can't talk about fashion among basketball coaches without mentioning about Chot Reyes. Sure, coach Chot's colorful outfits from his PBA days are long gone but he's still a sharp dresser as the chief mentor for Gilas Pilipinas. From the appropriate Comme Des Garcons polos (hashtag Puso) from around 2013 to a more simple, but custom, Nike polos in 2017, coach Chot is still setting trends on the sidelines.   The Best Dressed Right now, the best dressed head coach in the Philippines is Alab's Jimmy Alapag and it only took him one game to claim that title. Clad in a full suit in his coaching debut, Alapag not only made a personal statement but he made a team one as well. He is, after all, a professional head coach for a professional basketball team. Sometimes, looking good is half the battle. And while coach Jimmy (still sounds a little weird, right?) ditched the full suit for his second pro game, he still looked pretty sharp to be honest. Everyone should take notes from coach Jimmy in terms of sideline fashion really. Something about a well-fitted suit just looks amazing. Or, you can always go a different route like the other four coaches here. Fashion is subjective anyway, you just have to be confident enough.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 12th, 2017

Five years after first shot, Pinoy boxer Mercito Gesta gets another chance at world championship gold

Five years after his first crack at a world championship, Filipino boxer Mercito ‘No Mercy’ Gesta gets another chance at world championship gold to kick off 2018 as he challenges Venezuelan Jorge Linares on January 27th. On the line will be Linares’  WBA, WBC Diamond, and Ring Magazine lightweight titles. “I miss that feeling of being there fighting, knowing I’m going to fight for a title.” Gesta told ABS-CBN’s Steve Angeles. “That’s every fighter’s dream and I just feel like I need to do a lot more work to get that. This is my second chance for a title, and I just want to give my all for that fight. It was back in 2012 when Gesta first challenged for a world title, taking on Miguel Vasquez for the IBF lightweight strap. While it resulted in Gesta’s lone professional loss, the Mandaue-born boxer says that it was a learning experience for him. “I learned a lot after that loss, that title fight, sa experience at tsaka sa boxing style.” said Gesta. “Dahil dun nagkaroon kami paraan kung paano lalabanan, kung some day yung kalaban kagaya ng style niya, so pinag-aralan namin yun at tsaka I think natuto talaga ako.” Gesta added that the loss to Vasquez bore lessons for him, even outside the boxing ring. “Siguro kung hindi dahil dun, hindi ako mag-aadvance, dahil dun marami kaming pinag-aralan, sa buhay din, learning to accept defeat.” A lot of time has passed since then, and a lot of things have changed as well. His shoulder is at 100 percent, and he’s made the switch from Top Rank to Golden Boy Promotions. Arguably the biggest change however, is that he’s now working with hall-of-fame boxing coach Freddie Roach. “I like his personality and he’s a good trainer.” Gesta said of Roach. “Marami siyang naitulong, marami siyang na-enchance sa boxing skills ko, kaya I’m glad we chose Freddie for this fight.” Gesta is coming off a unanimous decision win over Gilberto Gonzales and a KO win over Martin Honorio in 2017. Gesta challenges Linares for the title at the Forum in Inglewood, California on January 27th, 2018.   H/T: Steve Angeles, ABS-CBN News.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 12th, 2017
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 4th, 2017

Green Spikers in high spirits after shocking Bulldogs

Needing to bounce back from two consecutive defeats, the Green Spikers did it in grand style. They slew one of the two title favorites, the much taller National University Bulldogs, in a heart-stopping marathon match for only their second victory in four outings in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference, a trailblazing event organized by Sports Vision with Asics as its official league partner and Mikasa providing the official game ball. They ripped what otherwise was a tight contest wide open in the deciding set, winning 31-29, 25-23, 20-25, 19-25, 15-6 behind the combined 64-point production of Arjay Onia (21), Raymark Woo (15), Cris Dumago (15), and Joshua Jose (13). New coach Norman Miguel, who inherited the position from his mentor, Nes Pamilar, could not have asked for more from his men, particularly from Woo. He viewed their taming of the Bulldogs, back-to-back UAAP champions before the now triple titlists Ateneo Blue Eagles dislodged them, as indicative of the Green Spikers’ finally jelling under his reins as well as of Woo’s full recovery from an MCL operation. Woo, who had had an ACL surgery before getting injured again midway in last season’s UAAP, piled up 16 points in La Salle’s opening four-set win over College of St. Benilde, managed only six in a straight-sets setback to University of Santo Tomas, and 12 when the Far Eastern U Tamaraws dealt the Green Spikers their second straight loss, 25-23, 25-19, 23-25, 25-18. “With Woo fully on the mend, we will be in a good position when the next UAAP volleyball season comes around,” said Miguel. “I can only hope that Onia and Dumago will maintain their consistency and Joshua (Jose) to continue to level up.” Jose, a middle attacker, is a grandson of boxing legend Flash Elorde. The Green Spikers are in a strong position as well to clinch one of the four semifinal births in the season-ending tournament of the PVL. They are presently locked in third place in the eight-team standings with the Growling Tigers at 2-2 behind the unbeaten Blue Eagles (4-0) and the Tamaraws (3-1). Norman said he’s continuing practically the same volleyball program begun by Pamilar on the Green Spikers, one anchored on quick plays. “Fast plays are now the norm in world volleyball, coach Nes used to tell us. Then and now I have always believed in my mentor’s system.” The De La Salle lineup: Rafael Macaspac, Geraint Bacon, Raymark Woo, Randy Hendriyanto, John delos Reyes, Jopet Movido, Cris Dumago, Arjay Onia, Wayne Marco, Joshua Jose, Reuel Asia, Keiffer Reyes, Zim Maravilla, and Levin Dimayuga. Norman Miguel, head coach; Christian Antiporda, assistant coach. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 16th, 2017

FIBA WORLD CUP: Cabagnot after first Gilas win: 'Our journey has begun'

MANILA, Philippines --- Alex Cabagnot finally got his win with Team Pilipinas and it feels oh so good. Cabagnot scored a team-high 16 points for Gilas Pilipinas Monday, helping the national team beat Qatar in a closed-door game in the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers. [Related: FIBA WORLD CUP: Gilas gets home win behind closed-doors] Part of the new-look national team, Cabagnot is glad he finally got that first win, a win that symbolizes his own journey with the national team. Scratch that, the start of a new journey for the new national team. "It felt good," Cabagnot said on the win, which pushed Gilas to 5-3 in Group F, still enough for third place and a spot in the World Cup if the Asian Qualifiers ended today. "I’m not really into the destination, but our journey has begun. That’s not the only game. And hopefully I could be there for the next window. You know how it is naman, pero, I can’t control that. I could only control what happened and I’m glad. and I’m fortunate to be with these guys and to be under coach Yeng Guiao," he added. The next FIBA window is about two months away and Cabagnot is hopeful Team Pilipinas can build on this win. Whether or not he makes it back, the veteran guard for San Miguel Beer has the national team's best interest in mind. "I’m glad we won. Masarap ‘yung panalo namin," Cabagnot said. "And hopefully we could build this in the next window --— if I’m still here, if I’m still invited by coach Yeng, the SBP community, and the federation," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Fitness Inspo: Meet Hardcore Triathlete And Proud Masculada Bubbles Paraiso!

The model shows us how strong is the new sexy!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 14th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

PBA: Marqus Blakely finally practices with TNT

In order to save its season, TNT has turned to an old rival for help. The KaTropa, down 2-4 in the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup, have signed their third import this conference. That import is former longtime Purefoods reinforcement Marqus Blakely. In multiple stints with the Purefoods franchise, Blakely won Best Import and two PBA championships. The two titles came during San Mig Coffee's magical Grand Slam run in 2014. Now, two years after his disappointing exit with the Hotshots, Blakely is back in the PBA, serving as TNT's third import in the Governors' Cup. Blakely, who has PBA career averages of 22.6 points and 14.9 rebounds, practiced with the team Tuesday. He will debut for the KaTropa on Sept. 22 against Rain or Shine in Passi City, Iloilo. After a respectable bounce back season last year where they made three semifinals and one Finals, the KaTropa have struggled in 2018. On top of their 2-4 start in the Governors' Cup, TNT has never made it past the first round in the playoffs, losing to San Miguel Beer in the quarterfinals of both the Philippine Cup and Commissioner's Cup. [Related: PBA: TNT will move on without Nash Racela for now] Head coach Nash Racela is also "on leave" this conference following the team's poor start.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Top women s college players practicing with Team USA

By PETE IACOBELLI, AP Sports Writer   COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Dawn Staley told the U.S. national team players, many returning to college soon, to keep working and improving no matter who is on the court.   Staley, the women's national team coach, held a three-day training camp as players began preparations for the FIBA World Cup in the Canary Islands this month. Many of America's best players are tied up with the WNBA playoffs and Staley brought in several of country's top college players to beef up practice and gain valuable experience before vying for a spot on the Olympic roster.   "We just have to keep moving forward. We can't worry about who we have, who we don't have," Staley said this week. "We have to implement the style of play we want on both sides of the ball and just fill players in."   Some of those fill-ins won't start playing for another two months when the college season tips off. The young camp roster includes guard Sabrina Ionescu and forward Ruthy Hebard of Oregon, Final Four hero guard Arike Ogunbowale and forward Jessica Shepard of Notre Dame and guard Tyasha Harris of Staley's South Carolina Gamecocks.   New York Liberty center Tina Charles is the most accomplished veteran in camp — and the only one with Olympic gold from 2012 and 2016.   Charles, 29, said part of her mission this week is to make the younger players feel as welcome by the veterans as fellow UConn alums Diana Taurasi and Sue Bird did when Charles first played with the national team in 2009.   "I'm trying to do the same thing here, make them feel comfortable, allow them to play their game, talk to them," Charles said. The WNBA playoffs have kept veterans like Elena Delle Donne, Taurasi, Brittney Griner, Breanna Stewart and Jewell Loyd, among others, tied up. Staley said some of those players may join when their pro teams get eliminated.   For Staley, its full speed ahead, no matter how young and wide-eyed some of the faces.   Ionescu was winded after her first practice Monday, trying to pick up the increased pace of the game.   "I think at every level, it just gets harder and harder," said Ionescu, reigning Pac 12 women's player of the year. "They were just definitely a lot stronger, quicker and had a better understanding of the game and adjustments."   Ionescu believes this experience will help when she's older and competing for a national team spot.   Ogunbowale, who hit back-to-back game winners against Connecticut in the national semifinals and Mississippi State in the title game, spent her offseason as somewhat of a celebrity. She was a guest on Ellen DeGeneres' show and on "Dancing With The Stars." At camp, she's simply a rookie trying to soak up lessons.   Los Angeles Sparks forward Nneka Ogwumike spoke to the team before the first practice, urging them to ramp it up early and don't be afraid to compete. "We're all here for the same reason," Ogunbowale said. "We're all here to get better."   Camp ends with a split-squad scrimmage at South Carolina's Colonial Life Arena before they head north for a game with Canada in Bridgeport, Connecticut, on Saturday and another with Japan at in Washington, D.C., on Monday.   The first practice overseas is in France on Sept. 13. The Americans will play three exhibitions in France and head to Tenerife, Canary Islands. World Cup pool play starts on Sept. 22 against Senegal.   Staley's not certain who'll be on the bench when that game starts, but isn't worried about it.   "We have to move forward to the ones that are committed," Staley said. "And that are going to help us compete for another World Cup gold medal."  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

LeBron James says in Kaepernick reference: I stand with Nike

By JOCELYN NOVECK, AP National Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Clutching his young daughter in his arms, LeBron James said he stands with Nike, a clear reference to the company's Colin Kaepernick ad campaign. The basketball superstar — and new Los Angeles Laker — made the remarks as he received an award Tuesday for both his style and his philanthropy from Harlem's Fashion Row. The fashion collective partnered with Nike for the New York event, both a fashion show and an awards ceremony that focused on diversity in the fashion world. The evening culminated in the reveal of the latest LeBron James Nike basketball shoe: a women's sneaker designed by three female African-American designers and inspired by strong African-American women. In emotional remarks, James paid tribute to the three women in his life — his mother, wife and 3-year-old daughter, Zhuri. He noted how his mother had raised him alone, and given him "a sense of pride, a sense of strength, a sense of no worry." "Because of you, Gloria James, I'm able to be in a position today where I can give back and showcase why I believe African-American women are the most powerful women in the world." The NBA star, who was wearing one of his favored shrunken-fit shorts suits by designer Thom Browne, called his daughter "my rock." "People always told me if you ever have a girl, she'll change you," said James, who also has two sons. "I was like, nobody's changing me, I'm a man." But she did, he said. "Not only did she change me, she's made me a better person," James said. "A more dedicated person, a stronger person, I guess a more sensitive person." Closing his remarks, he said he stood "for anybody who believes in change." He added: "I stand with Nike, all day, every day." Kaepernick, the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback, unveiled his first ad of the new campaign Monday. "Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything," it said. The new endorsement deal has sparked vigorous debate, with some fans expressing displeasure over the apparel giant's support of a player known for starting a wave of protests among NFL players against police brutality, racial inequality and other social issues. Some angry fans were even burning and cutting out the signature swoosh logos on their gear — and posting the results on social media. But Kaepernick and his Nike campaign, which marks the 30th anniversary of Nike's "Just Do It," received plenty of support from the fashion world in attendance Tuesday. Bethann Hardison, an activist for diversity in fashion and a former supermodel who was also honored by Harlem's Row, said she was happy with Nike's move. "It's such a divided situation in our world right now," she said of the negative reaction by some fans. "But I'm such a huge, huge, wholehearted supporter of Colin that I'm very proud that someone understands what he's done and (is giving) him some kudos." Prominent African-American designer Tracy Reese said she loved the new Nike campaign. "It was tastefully done," she said. "And really, this is the time to stand up for what you believe in. Colin Kaepernick has done that and I think that we need to follow his example and really go where the heart leads, instead of where everybody expects you to go." Also honored at the ceremony were Harlem streetwear designer Dapper Dan and stylist Jason Rembert. A fashion show highlighted the work of designers Kimberly Goldson, Undra Duncan and Fe Noel, who together helped create the new shoe......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

FIBA WORLD CUP: SMC stars finally show up for Gilas practice

Gilas Pilipinas officially turns its attention to the fourth window of the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifers. After a 5th-place finish in the 2018 Asian Games, the national team resumed practice Monday and several notable SMC stars finally showed up. Ginebra's Scottie Thompson and Greg Slaughter, San Miguel's Marcio Lassiter and Alex Cabagnot, and Magnolia's Ian Sangalang are the new names for Gilas in practice. Joining them are mainstays Gabe Norwood, Asi Taulava, Poy Erram, Paul Lee, Raymond Almazan, Beau Belga, Allein Maliksi, Matthew Wright, Japeth Aguilar, Stanley Pringle, and Christian Standhardinger. National team head coach Yeng Guiao is set to finalize his lineup Monday after practice with Gilas leaving for Iran on September 10. The Philippines will start the second round of the Asian Qualifiers on the road against the Iranians on September 13 before hosting Qatar four days later. Gilas currently holds a 4-2 record in its new merged group.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2018

Aces stake unbeaten slate vs Gin Kings

Alaska guns for an early 4-0 start when it meets back-to-back defending champion Barangay Ginebra San Miguel tonight in the Philippine Basketball Association Season 43 Governors’ Cup at the Araneta Coliseum. The Aces test the reigning champions at 6:45 p.m. Alaska coach Alex Compton, whose team is coming from a 107-98 win over Phoenix recently, [...] The post Aces stake unbeaten slate vs Gin Kings appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers: Alex Cabagnot ready to go for Gilas practice

At 35 years old, Alex Cabagnot is being called to the national team for the very first time.  Even so, the San Miguel sniper lit up like a young professional as he got the call from Commissioner Willie Marcial, officially including him in the pool that will be considered for the Philippine national men's basketball team that will play in the second window of the FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers, Sept. 13 in Iran, and on the 17th here at home against Qatar. Even though he did not get a call from coach Yeng Guiao or the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas, Cabagnot is ready and very primed to go to practice on Monday. "Of course I'm going to practice. I'm so excited. I wish it were Monday already,"  Cabagnot, who had an all-around game of 23 points, six boards and nine asssists in their 125-112 win against Guiao's NLEX Road Warriors. Cabagnot also thanked Guiao for considering him to be in the pool, and was speechless when he heard the official word. "I'm excited and humbled at the same time. Just to have opportunity to be in the pool and serve my country and to help it any way possible." With no issues regarding his FIBA eligibility, it's a go for the sharpshooter.  __   Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 1st, 2018