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Student-developed device turns rain into energy

(Impact Journalism Day) Rainergy, developed by a 15-year old student in Azerbaijan, creates sustainable energy out of pouring rain......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJun 15th, 2018

Teenage student develops ‘green’ air-conditioner

A 19-year-old student has developed an energy-efficient air-conditioner that could revolutionize the way homes are cooled and leaves virtually no carbon footprint......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 6th, 2018

Mickelson's final mission: Win a Ryder Cup in Europe

em>By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press /em> JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — Phil Mickelson hasn't had his fill, not when it comes to the Cup. Especially the next one. Mickelson saved some of his best golf in one of his worst years for when it really counted. Steve Stricker wanted to see some life from Lefty before deciding to use a captain's pick on him for the Presidents Cup, and Mickelson delivered with four rounds in the 60s at the TPC Boston to tie for sixth. The pick extended his record streak to 23 consecutive teams, and Mickelson delivered another strong performance on the course and in the team room. He went 3-0-1 at Liberty National, one of four Americans to go unbeaten. But it was a passing comment in Chicago, the week after he was chosen for the Presidents Cup, that shed some insight into his immediate future. He is starting a new season this week at the Safeway Open, which was expected because his management company runs the tournament. 'Looks like I'm probably going to go to China, too,' Mickelson said. China? Mickelson is a two-time winner at Sheshan International, but he has played the HSBC Champions only once in the last four years. Why now? One reason — perhaps the only reason — is because the World Golf Championship in Shanghai is the only tournament in the fall that offers Ryder Cup points. This is one team Mickelson doesn't want to miss. He turns 48 next year and is still trying to manage psoriatic arthritis, which affected his energy and focus this year. Mickelson realizes his time is running out as a player in the Ryder Cup. He has played on three winning teams, all in America. Next year's matches are in France. This might be Mickelson's last chance to win a Ryder Cup in Europe. 'That's the one thing I haven't done,' he said in Chicago. And the opportunity has never looked better. The Americans suddenly look a lot like Europeans when only a gold trophy, not cash, is on the line. They have developed a formula of familiarity, and they have relationships that go beyond the team room. Not even Europe had that. Jordan Spieth, Justin Thomas and Daniel Berger grew up together in junior golf and graduated high school the same year. Thomas lives down the street from Rickie Fowler. 'You look at the camaraderie of the young players and how they support each other, even outside of these team events,' Mickelson said. 'They have a support system where they love competing against each other, love beating each other, but are genuinely happy for each other's success. And that leads to a very positive, uplifting energy in the team room. 'And I think that these young guys ... really lay a solid foundation for the U.S. teams.' The performance in the Presidents Cup — a 19-11 victory, a beating so thorough the Americans were one match away from ending it on Saturday — made it tempting to look ahead one year to the Ryder Cup with the belief it will turn out the same way. If the Europeans were watching, should they be nervous? 'It's more confidence for us than anything they would be worried about,' Spieth said. That alone might be enough to worry. The Americans have figured something out, and Mickelson was behind that, too. He's the one who put his image on the line at Gleneagles after the 2014 Ryder Cup with his passive-aggressive criticism of the way Tom Watson ran the team and his incredulous tone when asking why the Americans got away from what had worked for them in Valhalla when they won in 2008. That led to the task force, in which the players lobbed for consistency and control. And it appears to be working. 'They got better at doing what Europe does than what Europe did,' said Geoff Ogilvy, an assistant captain for the International team. 'And we paid the price. Europe made America better. ... Europe plays with such spirit, and that's what it is. What you see with that U.S. team, isn't it a bit of that European spirit?' Does that translate to the Ryder Cup? Not necessarily. The Americans have been feeling good about themselves after the Presidents Cup for the last decade and they have only two Ryder Cup victories to show for it. The Ryder Cup is a different monster. Mickelson knows that better than anyone. And that's why he's so desperate to be there. 'There will be a point where I look back and I remember, cherish, talk about all the experiences and memories that have been created,' he said of his 23 appearances in the Cups. 'Right now, I'm still trying to make more. I have not been a part of a Ryder Cup victory in Europe. It's a big goal of mine. We have the players, the foundation, and the direction. I want to be part of that team next year.'   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 4th, 2017

Millennials: We know nation’s history

Rain did not dampen the fervor of millennials who participated in anti-martial law demonstration Friday at the Luneta Park in Manila.   On the 46th anniversary of martial law declaration in the country, these millennials -- students from various universities and advocacy groups -- declared their disgust over President Rodrigo Duterte, who has been vocal about his admiration to the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos and his brand of governance, even asserting they know much about the nation's history.   "Never again, never again to martial law," the students said in unison."Duterte, Marcos -- walang pinag-iba."   A Manila university student said not being phys...Keep on reading: Millennials: We know nation’s history.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 21st, 2018

Fil-Am actor Matt Mercurio stars in Halloween slasher movie

  NEW YORK -- A masked serial killer turns a horror-themed amusement park into his own personal playground, terrorizing a group of friends while the rest of the patrons believe that it is all part of the show. College student Natalie (Amy Forsyth) is visiting her childhood best friend Brooke (Reign Edwards) and her roommate Taylor (Bex Taylor-Klaus). If it were any other time of the year these three and their boyfriends might be heading to a concert or a bar, but it is Halloween, which means that like everyone else they will be bound for Hell Fest --- a sprawling labyrinth of rides, games, and mazes that travels the country and happens to be in town. Every year thousands f...Keep on reading: Fil-Am actor Matt Mercurio stars in Halloween slasher movie.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

‘Florence’ turns deadly, slams Carolinas

WILMINGTON — A woman and her baby were killed when a tree fell on their house and several more storm-related deaths were reported Friday as Hurricane Florence slammed into the Carolinas, dousing the eastern US states with torrential rain and causing rivers to burst their banks. Four deaths were confirmed by officials as US media […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

Florence turns deadly, unleashing torrential floods on Carolinas

WILMINGTON, USA (UPDATED) – A woman and her baby were killed when a tree fell on their house and several more storm-related deaths were reported on Friday, September 14, as Hurricane Florence slammed into the Carolinas , dousing the eastern United States with torrential rain. Four deaths were confirmed by officials as US media reported ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

PVL Finals: ‘Atin ‘to, atin to’ is the new UP Ikot

Last year, Paul Desiderio shouted ‘Atin ‘to!’ during University of the Philippines’ last huddle in a UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball game. After that, Desiderio sank the game-winning buzzer-beating triple to down University of Sto. Tomas. It has since been the battle cry of the Diliman-based student-athletes. On Wednesday, the Lady Maroons did their own version that morale-boosting mantra. Down 7-13 in the pivotal stretch of the fifth set, the words again echoed in UP’s huddle up until they marched back inside the court.          “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to!” Like a shot of adrenaline, the Lady Maroons charged with renewed energy. Afterwards, they made history. UP completed a sweet sweep of the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference best-of-three Finals series, 25-20, 25-18, 23-25, 20-25, 15-13, to hoist its first major title in 36 years at the FilOil Flying V Centre. “Nu’ng nagsimula pa lang ‘yung fifth set we talked na how much do we want to win and in order for us to actually get the championship title,” said veteran setter Ayel Estranero, whose ace, which landed like a dagger right at the middle of the stunned Lady Tamaraws, sealed the championship that eluded UP in almost four decades. “Kailangan namin gustuhin lahat kami,” added Estranero, whose squad won the series opener also in five sets. “‘That’s why everyone actually never gave up until the end.” Estranero and Isa Molde, who collected the conference and Finals Most Valuable Player as well as the 1st Best Outside Spiker, took matters on their own hands in that closing stretch as they scored six of the last eight points.    But the duo was quick to give credit to the collective effort of the whole team. “Kita naman e,” said Estranero. “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to,” Molde butted in during the postgame interview where the two joined head coach Godfrey Okumu. “Yeah, atin ‘to, atin ‘to. Di kami makakapalo talaga kung walang dumepensa or di ako maka-set ng walang dumepensa so until the end it was still a collective effort from everyone from the coaches and the players even those in the bench,” Estranero pointed out. “So ‘yun pero siyempre andun din yung conscious effort na gugustuhin mo talaga and you’ll do whatever it takes,” added Estranero. When the playmaker trooped behind the service line – UP at championship point – Estranero murmured a little prayer.    “When I was serving I was just actually praying and I just actually believed that the team can actually win despite na sobrang haba ng hinabol namin. Kahit ang layo ng score namin but then na-feel namin sa loob na hindi pa kami talaga susuko that everyone is still willing to fight,” she recalled.  “So ‘yun nu’ng nag-serve ako hindi ako kinakabahan as in I just really want to win for the team and for everyone,” Estranero added. When she made the connection on her serve, the ball flew in at a low arching trajectory. “Gulat ako kasi I mean like hindi ko naman totally alam ano mangyayari sa bola pag release ko,” said Estranero. It was supposed to be a sure reception from FEU's libero. But like having their feet cemented on the taraflex floor, FEU libero Buding Duremdes and the rest of the Lady Tams just froze. “But when I saw the ball dropped and touch the floor, it was just so overwhelming,” said Estranero. Estranero rolled and then sprawled on the floor face down after the final whistle, slamming her hand on the court. Her teammates were already crying, shouting, hugging and congratulating each other as they round inside the court after completing their conquest. Confetti slowly fell. History made. “Atin ‘to, atin ‘to.” UP owned the night.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

Malampaya group, Energy dep’t ask SC to review CoA decision

By Victor V. Saulon, Sub-editor SHELL Philippines Exploration BV (SPEx) and its consortium partners that developed the country’s only natural gas discovery, along with the Department of Energy (DoE), have asked the Supreme Court to review the state auditor’s finding that they owe the government billions of pesos in unpaid income tax. “We can confirm… link: Malampaya group, Energy dep’t ask SC to review CoA decision.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

Malampaya group, Energy dep’t ask SC to review CoA decision

SHELL Philippines Exploration BV (SPEx) and its consortium partners that developed the country’s only natural gas discovery, along with the Department of Energy (DoE), have asked the Supreme Court to review the state auditor’s finding that they owe the government billions of pesos in unpaid income tax. The post Malampaya group, Energy dep’t ask SC to review CoA decision appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

George T. Yang turns over three performing arts studios for De La Salle University Manila

A known supporter for youth development through employment, education and the arts, Yang was honored by the De La Salle University (DLSU) in appreciation of his generosity and support for his alma mater’s performing arts student organizations. The three new George T. Yang Performing Arts Studios will serve as dedicated venues where the University’s Chorale, […] The post George T. Yang turns over three performing arts studios for De La Salle University Manila appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

Monsoon dumps over half of August rainfall in just 1 day

MANILA, Philippines – Thinking that it rained way too much on Saturday, August 11? It turns out that more than half of the expected volume of rain for the entire month of August fell just on Saturday, as the southwest monsoon was enhanced by Tropical Storm Karding ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 12th, 2018

DOE turns to cheaper diesel to stem price hikes

The Department of Energy (DOE) has directed local oil companies to provide Euro-II compliant automotive diesel oil as its temporary solution to help reduce fuel prices......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

BROWNOUT-FREE | Police station in Catanduanes turns to solar energy

BROWNOUT-FREE | Police station in Catanduanes turns to solar energy.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bicolstandardRelated NewsAug 6th, 2018

She reminds me of EJ Laure -- Padda on rookie Genesis

Adamson University rookie Trisha Genesis drew praises from head coach Air Padda after a good debut on Sunday in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference. “I think she did OK,” said Padda after Adamson’s 25-22, 22-25, 25-22, 25-21, win over College of St. Benilde at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Genesis, a recruit from Holy Rosary College, scored seven points in just three sets of action.   The 5-foot-7 open spiker was came in as a substitute in the second frame. Genesis skipped the Lady Falcons’ first game against University of Perpetual Help as she was suffering from shingles. Padda gave Genesis the playing time with second year Chiara Permentilla struggling. “It was her first match. I don’t think she thought she was gonna play coz she just got back into training,” said Padda. “Chiara was struggling at the serve line and her defense was off.” Genesis was thankful for the chance to showcase what she can contribute to the team. “Sobrang saya po na may kaunting pressure kasi kakagaling ko lang sa sakit. So bale kakabalik ko pa lang two days pa lang ako nakakapag-training,” said the Physical Education student. “Sobrang saya kasi kahit nawala po ako ng matagal nagawa pa rin po magtiwala sa akin ni coach na maipasok kanina sa game.” The hitter may still be a raw talent in UAAP standards but Padda sees a lot of potential from the Laguna native and the mentor even compared Genesis to University of Sto. Tomas hitter EJ Laure, who was named UAAP Season 77 rookie of the year.   “Honestly when I see her she kinda reminds me of EJ Laure when she's playing,” said Padda. “That’s who she reminds me off.” “But I’m telling you that kid has so much potential. She hasn’t develop her jump yet but once she develops her jump and she gets a little bit… we’re working on her speed,” the mentor added. “She has what we call it in the States like the roundhouse arm. It could work to your benefit but it can also be a disadvantage because she doesn’t have like a whip. But she has a long arm so as soon as she’s at the right timing it’ll be hard to stop. I’m excited for her, I’m excited for all our babies.” “Ang saya po galing po kasi sa coach namin, si coach Air. Tapos yun nga po EJ Laure kilala po yan. Kilalang magaling sa volleyball,” said Genesis.   Looking at her potential, Padda has high hopes on her rookie. “Trisha, she’s a good player. She’s definitely gonna get an opportunity to get in the starting six,” said Padda. “As you can see she’s got a lot of firepower but she’s still so young. There’s a lot of aspect in the game that she hasn’t learned just yet. But I love her energy she brings a youthful vibe to the court and I’m excited for her. I’m excited to see what she’s gonna do this conference.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 29th, 2018

PBA: Balkman inspired SMB to this Finals appearance

San Miguel is yet again in the Finals, this time in the 2018 PBA Commissioner’s Cup. While the Beermen were heavily favored to do so even before the conference began, their spot in the championship round was far from a sure thing – especially after they lost three games in a row early on. “We’re very thankful dahil we were able to catch up at the right time,” head coach Leo Austria said on Sunday, just minutes after he and his boys finished off Alaska, 3-1, in the best-of-five semifinals series. “At 0-3, everybody was so scared and talagang worried about our situation.” The defending champions dropped all of their games up against Meralco, Rain or Shine, and Alaska to start the conference. As it turns out, however, they were merely missing the right reinforcement. Enter Renaldo Balkman, the franchise’s prodigal son, who took over for Troy Gillenwater, ineffective and uninspiring in the first two games. “It (just to happened) na we changed our import and the players started to become inspired because of what he showed in the first game against Alaska,” coach Leo said. In his first game, Balkman had 32 points, 13 rebounds, three assists, and three steals, but still saw San Miguel lose, 105-103. Nonetheless, that immediate impact was more than enough proof for the rest of the Beermen that they have found their missing piece. “Kahit natalo kami, the players, the locals, if they see na there’s somebody who could help the team, everybody will try to do their best to help,” their always amiable mentor said. From there, they have gone on an 11-3 tear en route to a second straight Finals appearance in the Commissioner’s Cup. The Puerto Rican reinforcement is only relishing another shot at a title – just months after winning the Asean Basketball League championship. “I’m really blessed, man. I just won one and to try to come back and win another one right now, that’s my goal,” he said. Along with that, he wants nothing more than to keep proving his worth. “Until now, I wanna show I still got it and I (can) keep playing. I got a lot left in my tank,” he shared. He then continued, “Age is nothing but a number, believe that.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2018

Death squads, Gilas suspension, Tropical Storm Inday | Evening wRap

Today on Rappler: Bishop slams ' death squads ' in 2 overnight Caloocan murders. Duterte won't have any hand in bid to scrap 2019 polls – Roque. VIRAL: UST student tweets how she was physically abused. 10 Gilas players suspended , SBP fined for FIBA brawl. More rain seen as Tropical Storm Inday ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

Street kid studying in rain finds home through crowdfunding effort

The young girl seen studying in front of a Malate condominium, and who has been subject recently of a viral video, now lives in a temporary apartment with her family, thanks to the efforts of individuals through a crowdfunding page. The third-grade student, Lorensalie Elaine "Jelen" Dolfu, made for a bright sight on a gray afternoon when Rolando Villanueva, a 36-year-old facility manager, spotted her reading textbooks while trying to find cover with a blanket in the rain. His video of her taken on July 5 now has 5.4 million views, as of this writing. WATCH: Video of street kid studying in rain goes viral Jelen is the daughter of Jerry and Ellen Dolfu, and proudly created her own nic...Keep on reading: Street kid studying in rain finds home through crowdfunding effort.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 19th, 2018

Formula E paves way for electric cars on and off racetrack

By Terrin Waack, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Unplug and go. Filling up a car is as simple as that, even if it's not gas flowing through the nozzle. Electricity is efficient. Formula E, a global electric auto racing series, steers the way — toward the future of not only its sport but also its industry. "You don't realize it," Mahindra Racing team principal Dilbagh Gill said, "but the second car from today that you're going to buy is going to be an electric car." America is one of Formula E's biggest targets. So, for the second consecutive time since the series' inception in 2014, Formula E took on the Brooklyn streets for a season-finale doubleheader of its 12-race schedule. The track length is 2.373 kilometers with Lower Manhattan in the backdrop as well as the Statue of Liberty. Techeetah's Jean-Eric Vergne became the fourth different driver to win the championship and Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler took home the overall team title. Confetti at the finish line marked the end of an era. In January, Formula E unveiled its new Gen2 car for next season. The current cars have a maximum power of 200kW, limited to 180kW during races, and they top out at 225 kph (140 mph). This model has been around since the series started and requires a mid-race car change because the battery runs out. The Gen2 car will run faster and longer. No more swaps. Performance has basically been doubled in just four years without changing the battery's fundamental chemistry. "I don't know if you remember before Formula E started, there was this whole perception that lithium batteries were a little bit dangerous — they were prohibited on airplanes, they caught fire on mobile phones," Panasonic Jaguar Racing sporting manager Gary Ekerold said. "Since we've run Formula E ... absolutely fine. Batteries are proven to be safe." But they're still monitored. A dielectric — non-conductor — fluid in the battery keeps it cool while the car runs. There's also a battery management system that constantly records data, monitoring temperature and voltage. When the car is charging, dry-ice blowers — Super Chillers — connect to the car and prevent overheating. It takes less than an hour to recharge a drained battery. "It's going to start reaching a stage where the time it takes to fill up your gas — 4 minutes and 40 seconds on average — is going to be the time it takes to charge your car," Gill said. Teams are given identical batteries. The chassis, or bodies, of the cars are also the same. Where teams can get creative are places such as the electric motor, inverter, powertrain and gearbox. Manufacturers get involved here. Everyday car names occupy pit lane. Audi and Jaguar already have teams. Nissan and BMW will next season. Mercedes-Benz and Porsche are joining for season six. "This is like a playground for them," Mahindra Racing driver Feliz Rosenqvist said. "When you get to the competitive side, you can always find new ways that maybe you wouldn't do on a normal car. You push the software and hardware." The steering wheel, which has a programmable screen, is also fair game. Things can get technical when the car gets broken down into specific parts and technology is thrown into the mix. But the basics remain: Energy is how far. Power is how fast. "It's still a racing car," Panasonic Jaguar Racing driver Mitch Evans said. "It looks like a racing car. It drives like a racing car." It just doesn't sound like the normal racing car. The roar of a combustion engine is missing. "That's normally like a sensor for your driving — how quick you're going, how you hear the revs — and now you can only hear the wind," Rosenqvist said. "It's more like riding a bike. As you increase your speed, you just start hearing wind." To spectators, the whizzing equates to an amplified toy car, go-kart or scooter. All electric, of course. It's not that disruptive to the public. Electric cars are the way of the future. They're already racing on city streets. They go rain or shine — only stop for thunder or lightning. And they're much better for the environment. "Your whole life runs on a battery," Gill said. "The time is now.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

Scientists perform first-ever color X-ray on a human

PARIS, France – New Zealand scientists have performed the first-ever 3-D, colour X-ray on a human, using a technique that promises to improve the field of medical diagnostics, said Europe's CERN physics lab which contributed imaging technology. The new device, based on the traditional black-and-white X-ray, incorporates particle-tracking technology developed ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

Coach of England wins the nation s heart by being a nice guy

By Danica Kirka, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — In an age of tattoos, tongue piercings and tensions over Brexit, a soft-spoken man in a dark blue waistcoat and striped tie is uniting England amid dreams of victory in soccer's World Cup. Coach Gareth Southgate is the buttoned-down leader of a new generation of players who speak softly and let their victories silence critics. And England supporters have found that refreshing after years of underperforming teams led by stars such as David Beckham, who became as much a celebrity as an athlete. "He's very much about a team spirit. It's more about the collective — you can see it in the way he deals with the squad," said Paul Willis, who was in the stands last Saturday in Samara, Russia, when England reached the semifinals with a 2-0 victory over Sweden. "We had superstars, but we didn't have a team." Southgate's focus on teamwork and civility has made him an unlikely icon in a country that is deeply divided by bitter arguments over plans to leave the European Union and a widening gap between rich and poor. England Captain Harry Kane may be the tournament's leading scorer, but fans are donning waistcoats and ties — even as the country enjoys an unusually hot summer — in homage to Southgate as pundits extol the 47-year-old coach's calm leadership. "He has shown us the value of courtesy, kindness, hard work and that most derided of virtues, niceness," columnist India Knight wrote in the Sunday Times. "He has redefined not just how to be a manager, but how to be a man." Southgate displayed his character after England's July 3 victory over Colombia, offering a supportive hug to Colombian player Mateus Uribe after his miss in a penalty shootout helped England advance. The England coach understood Uribe's agony, having missed a similar shot at the 1996 European championships. The moment of empathy also reminded the country how Southgate once lampooned his own failure with a Pizza Hut commercial in which he wore a bag over his head to shield his identity from angry fans. Southgate's compassion sparked a hashtag for the coach's real and imagined acts of kindness such as "#GarethSouthgateWould stop and help you put the chain back on your bike even if he was all dressed in his waistcoat and late for the game." Southgate became manager less than two years ago after the Football Association's first choice was forced out after unguarded comments to undercover reporters. Since then he has quietly ushered out the last of the old stars and brought together a group of youngsters who modestly shrug off compliments and give kudos to their teammates. Perhaps more importantly, he recognized the contribution of the fans, something that had been eroded during the superstar era. After every game, Southgate and his players walk across the field to applaud the supporters who have traveled to Russia to cheer for the team. "We had lost a bit of connection," Willis, a 57-year-old fan from Birmingham, said of past regimes. "That is now back. All the team and the back room applaud our input to the game." That has also translated into huge support back home in football-mad England. At least 20 million people, 38 percent of England's population, watched Saturday's victory over Sweden, according to figures from the BBC. Commentators say the actual number was much higher because so many people watched the game on huge screens in parks and shopping centers. London authorities are inviting 30,000 fans to the city's Hyde Park for a screening of Wednesday's semifinal against Croatia. Fearing demand will far exceed that, authorities stressed that only those with tickets should come to the park. Ticket services reported hundreds of people were trying to dump theater tickets for Wednesday because they had more pressing business elsewhere. Social media sites are urging fans to wear waistcoats — please don't call them vests — to the office ahead of the big match — a "Waistcoat Wednesday" if you will. Marks & Spencer, the official tailor to the England team, says sales of the grandfatherly garments have doubled during the World Cup. Rio Ferdinand, one of the previous "golden generation" of players who is now a commentator for the BBC, has been leading the cheers for this year's team, asking fans to post video of their beer-throwing, chest-bearing, flag-waving celebrations after the win over Sweden. On Sunday, Ferdinand tweeted his own mea culpa for past failures, while also highlighting Southgate's unique contribution. "Why weren't the golden generation... the golden generation???" he tweeted. "We as players look at ourselves first...we never performed....but sometimes you have to be allowed to perform! Gareth is allowing this current @England to do this." That's paying off. Kane, who turns 25 later this month, has scored six goals in the tournament. Dele Alli, 22, came back from injury to score the team's second goal against Sweden. Fabian Delph, 28, played the last 15 minutes of Saturday's game after missing the previous game against Colombia because Southgate allowed him to go home for the birth of his third child. Southgate himself recognizes the contributions of everyone, from the physiotherapists to the players who push their teammates in practice but rarely get into a game, even to fans back home. "Our country has been through some difficult moments recently in terms of its unity, and I think sport has the power to do that and football in particular has the power to do that," he said. "So for us, we can feel the energy and we can feel the support from home, and that's, that's a very special feeling. It's a privilege." Barring that, it does help to have a snappy waistcoat. "Quite frankly, I don't care what he wears," Willis said. "He can wear a tutu if we carry on winning.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 11th, 2018