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Still no plan to fix PH runway in West PH Sea - Rappler

Still no plan to fix PH runway in West PH Sea - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource: googlenews googlenewsJan 12th, 2017

Duterte adviser bares plan to fix PH runway in West PH Sea

Duterte adviser bares plan to fix PH runway in West PH Sea.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 1st, 2017

Still no plan to fix PH runway in West PH Sea

Still no plan to fix PH runway in West PH Sea.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2017

Atlanta Hawks name Travis Schlenk as new GM

em>Atlanta Hawks press release /em> ATLANTA -– The Atlanta Hawks today announced the hiring of Travis Schlenk as General Manager and Head of Basketball Operations. He will start leading Hawks basketball operations on June 1 (June 2, PHL time). Schlenk, a veteran of more than 16 years in the NBA, joins the Hawks after 12 seasons with the Golden State Warriors, including the last five as Assistant General Manager, where he assisted 2015 NBA Executive of the Year Bob Myers in the management of all day-to-day basketball operations activities. He was previously the Warriors’ Director of Player Personnel for two years after five seasons as an assistant coach and video scout. During Schlenk’s time as part of Golden State’s basketball leadership, the Warriors hired 2016 NBA Coach of the Year Steve Kerr as head coach, drafted two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Stephen Curry, two-time All-NBA selection Klay Thompson, two-time All-Defensive First Team pick Draymond Green and Harrison Barnes; acquired 2015 Finals MVP Andre Iguodala and Andrew Bogut via trade; and signed 2014 MVP Kevin Durant and Shaun Livingston. “After meeting with Travis, our search committee and I knew that he was the right choice to become the new general manager and head of basketball operations for the Atlanta Hawks. In addition to his significant experience with two organizations that have built championship cultures, he is ready to lead our basketball operations at a critical time for making big decisions as we prepare for the 2017-2018 season and beyond. We conducted a very thorough search process and believe Travis shares our vision for the team and the ability to implement it as we continue working hard to reach our commitment to bring a championship to Atlanta,” said Principal Owner Tony Ressler. “We appreciate the willingness of Joe Lacob and Bob Myers of Golden State for allowing Travis and his family to join the Hawks.” “I am humbled by the opportunity to join the Hawks and thankful to Tony Ressler and his ownership team for trusting me with this responsibility,” Schlenk said. “The passion of the ownership team was evident throughout the process, and the team’s high standard aligns with organizations I’ve been part of and plan to emulate in Atlanta. I am excited to get started and look forward to collaborating with the team to build a first-class, championship-level franchise with a goal of sustained success. I would also like to thank Joe Lacob, Bob Myers, Steve Kerr, Larry Riley and Jerry West for being great mentors, strong advocates and friends during my time with Golden State, and for helping me prepare to serve in this role.” The Warriors have reached the last three NBA Finals and won the championship in 2015, the franchise’s first since 1975. Over the last three regular seasons, Golden State has compiled a record of 207-39 (.841), the best three-year run in NBA history, also becoming the first club to win 65-or-more games in three consecutive seasons. “While it's hard to see Travis leave our organization, this is a terrific opportunity for him,” said Warriors President of Basketball Operations and General Manager Bob Myers.  “He’s one of the bright, young executives in the league and someone who has played a major role in our success over the last several years.  His attention to detail, leadership ability and work ethic are traits that will serve him well in his new role with the Hawks.  They are fortunate to have him and will benefit greatly from his presence in the organization.”  He was a video coordinator for the Miami Heat from 2000-04 (where he worked alongside Hall-of-Famer Pat Riley, Stan Van Gundy and Erik Spoelstra), an assistant coach at the University of Georgia in 1998-99 and part of the Orlando Magic’s basketball operations staff in 1997-98, where he worked under Hall-of-Famer Chuck Daly. The Hawks conducted the search with the assistance of Len Perna of Turnkey Sports & Entertainment, the leading search firm in college and pro sports and entertainment. Schlenk earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Management & Human Ecology from Bethel College in North Newton, Kansas, where he also played basketball. He owns a Masters of Education with an emphasis in Sports Administration from Wichita State University. A native of Selden, Kansas, Schlenk and his wife, Sarah, have two daughters, Morgan and Charlotte, and a son, Will. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 25th, 2017

Top PH security officials visit disputed island in West PH Sea - Rappler

Top PH security officials visit disputed island in West PH Sea - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsApr 21st, 2017

PH security officials visit disputed island in West PH Sea - Rappler

PH security officials visit disputed island in West PH Sea - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsApr 21st, 2017

ASEAN Summit in Manila to tackle West PH Sea - Rappler

ASEAN Summit in Manila to tackle West PH Sea - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsApr 19th, 2017

Duterte administration details 'ambitious' infra plan - Rappler

Duterte administration details 'ambitious' infra plan - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsApr 18th, 2017

Duterte administration details 'ambitious' infra plan - Rappler

Duterte administration details 'ambitious' infra plan - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsApr 18th, 2017

Ex-DFA chief hits Duterte over 'selling' West PH Sea islands - Rappler

Ex-DFA chief hits Duterte over 'selling' West PH Sea islands - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsApr 11th, 2017

Barbers defends 'realistic' plan to appoint barangay officials - Rappler

Barbers defends 'realistic' plan to appoint barangay officials - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsApr 3rd, 2017

Alejano wants Duterte impeached over Benham Rise, West PH Sea row - Rappler

Alejano wants Duterte impeached over Benham Rise, West PH Sea row - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsMar 30th, 2017

EastWest prepares succession plan

MANILA, Philippines - ¬†Gotianun-led East West Banking Corp......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 29th, 2017

Why Duterte's plan to appoint barangay officials violates the Constitution - Rappler

Why Duterte's plan to appoint barangay officials violates the Constitution - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsMar 29th, 2017

Aldridge's heart in rhythm, and so is his jumper

em>By Jon Krawczynski, Associated Press /em> When LaMarcus Aldridge felt the familiar flutter with his heart, an issue that has sidelined him twice before in his NBA career, there was no telling how long the San Antonio Spurs star would be out and how big of an impact it would have on Aldridge's health and the Western Conference playoff race. Less than two weeks later, Aldridge has quickly regained the form that made him a five-time All-Star and has the Spurs positioned as a serious challenger to Golden State out West. 'Just trying to get better every night, trying to be dominant down there,' Aldridge said after scoring 26 points to beat the Minnesota Timberwolves last week, 'and trying to be the player that I have to be for us to win.' The Spurs announced that Aldridge would be out indefinitely after a heart arrhythmia surfaced again. Aldridge was diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome — an abnormality that can cause a rapid heartbeat — in 2007. He missed time at the end of his rookie season to get treated and also sat out for 10 days in training camp in 2011 after the symptoms returned. Aldridge consulted several specialists after the arrhythmia came back during a game earlier in March. But he missed only two games over less than a week before being able to return to the Spurs, who are chasing the Golden State Warriors for the No. 1 seed in the Western Conference. In the six games since he has returned, Aldridge is averaging 21.0 points and 7.8 rebounds in more than 33 minutes per game, giving the Spurs the inside scoring threat they need to complement MVP candidate Kawhi Leonard. 'The attention that he draws and the ability he has allows us to keep going and have enough offense so that if we maintain our defense we can be in the hunt,' coach Gregg Popovich said. Aldridge is finding his rhythm at the perfect time for the Spurs, who host Cleveland on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) and Golden State on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), play at Oklahoma City on Friday (Saturday, PHL time) and come back home for games against Utah and Memphis in a particularly grueling, though home-heavy, stretch. If Aldridge is concerned about his health, he sure isn't showing it. 'God is good. I'm a man of faith and I believe what's meant to be will be,' Aldridge said. 'I have faith in the plan. I'm just happy to be back and playing.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 27th, 2017

Q&A: NBA pioneer Wayne Embry

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Wayne Embry is closing in on 60 years in the NBA in one capacity or another. And if you hear him tell it, he’s been half-a-Forrest Gump, working without a plan and landing wherever the basketball winds have taken him. But that does not do the man or his career justice. “You can say Wayne’s been persistent,” Oscar Robertson said about his friend, fellow Hall of Famer and former roommate with the Cincinnati Royals. “A lot of things were not that easy for him on his way to where he is today. There was not a plan for a lot of African-Americans in those days, to be honest. People think because they see him now, ‘Everything was so wonderful.’ But he persevered. And I’m happy for him for that.” Wayne Richard Embry, who turns 80 on Sunday (Monday, PHL time), has been a player, a scout, a team executive and a pebble-grained consigliere for so long, Bill Russell only had one ring when he arrived. Embry reached the NBA in 1958, the 22nd pick in the same draft that yielded Elgin Baylor, Hal Greer and Guy Rodgers. A native of Springfield, Ohio, and the only black student at his Tecumseh High in New Carlisle, Embry played at Miami (Ohio) before becoming a five-time NBA All-Star. He averaged 14.1 points and 10.4 rebounds for Cincinnati and, at 6’8” and 240 pounds, earned his memorable nickname (“The Wall”) with bone-jarring picks and box-outs. Embry was traded in 1966 to Boston, where he spent two seasons as a backup to Russell, earning a championship ring in 1968. Then it was on to Milwaukee via the expansion draft, with the Bucks jacking the 31-year-old Embry’s minutes from 13.9 to 30.2 in the season before they landed Lew Alcindor, a.k.a. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Soon after Embry retired as a player, Bucks owner Wes Pavalon sought him out to be “assistant to the president,” Ray Patterson. When Patterson moved on to Houston in 1972, Pavalon promoted Embry, making him the first black general manager in major American professional sports. Embry helped convince Robertson to accept his trade to Milwaukee for the 1970-71 season, the trigger of the Bucks’ NBA championship that season. He helped rebuild the team, after Abdul-Jabbar demanded his exit from the gritty Midwestern city, into an under-appreciated contender into the 1980s. Then it was on to Cleveland, where Embry became the NBA’s first black team president. The Cavaliers thrived on his watch, only to be blocked by Detroit and Chicago much as Boston and Philadelphia had been the Bucks’ obstacles. At age 67, Embry accepted a role as senior basketball adviser with the Toronto Raptors, a job at which he continues to work nearly 13 years later. Toronto has averaged 50 victories over the past four seasons, with Embry helicoptering in six or seven times each season and otherwise catching their games on League Pass from his Scottsdale, Ariz., home, where he lives with Terri, his wife of 57 years. Robertson, by comparison, was only Embry’s roommate for six seasons during their travels with the Royals. “He was all right,” Robertson recalled Friday. “He slept a lot and I didn’t.” A politics junkie and a history buff, Embry exercises daily and mostly battles some sinus issues after shedding considerable weight recently. Soft-spoken but sharp as ever, he spoke at length with NBA.com on the same day that, coincidentally, former Chicago Bulls GM Jerry Krause died at age 77. Here is an edited version of that conversation: strong>NBA.com: /strong> What do you remember about Jerry Krause? strong>Wayne Embry: /strong>He was a hard worker. Whether it be his work in the NBA or his work in baseball. Very much attended to detail, too. He was, I would think for his time, innovative in his approach, looking for things other people may not have thought to look for. Players’ extended family, that sort of thing. He was really dedicated to what he did. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Was it possible to have a good working relationship with him as a rival? strong>WE: /strong> He didn’t want to reveal any information to anybody. If there was a group of guys out on the road scouting, he would seem aloof sometimes. He didn’t want to give up any secrets or anything that he assumed the other guy didn’t know. He’d be very non-communicative. [chuckles] strong>NBA.com: /strong>Even Jerry West, “The Logo,” doesn’t have 60 years in the NBA. You got here a couple seasons before him or Oscar. strong>WE: /strong> I’ve been blessed to be involved in something like this that I have a great passion for. It’s been good for me, and to be able to still be involved at my age ... I just feel blessed. strong>NBA.com: /strong> You have to feel proud not only to be the first black GM in pro sports but to have achieved that way back in 1972. Did you have a sense of being a pioneer back then? strong>WE: /strong>At the time, it was a complete shock. I thought I’d be lucky to be assistant to Ray Patterson, who had done a tremendous job building the championship team. I came there in late ’70 and in August of ’72 I get a call from Wes Pavalon. He and two of his board members were in his office. He just looked at me and said, “You’re the new general manager of the Milwaukee Bucks.” It didn’t register. I was, what, 34, 35 at the time? There never had been any [black GMs]. I just told them I’d do the best I could in whatever capacity I was in. But to be named the man in charge came as a complete shock. strong>NBA.com: /strong> Pavalon was a pretty progressive guy, whose friends included tennis great Arthur Ashe and “Roots” author Alex Haley. Did he tell you later why he chose you for such a barrier-breaking role? strong>WE: /strong> No, not really. But I think that it had a lot to do with the fact I was with the inaugural team and was captain of that team. They drafted me at my age because they wanted leadership. And [coach] Larry Costello, whom I had gotten to know, respected my approach to the game and thought I’d be good for their young team. strong>NBA.com: /strong>You played only one season with the Bucks, retiring at 31. Couldn’t you have come back for another season as a mentor to Kareem? strong>WE: /strong> I probably could have. But my knees already were aching and my back got worse. It got very difficult to get up in the morning to go to practice. I only knew how to play the game one way, and that was all out. I said, “No, I can’t do it anymore.” strong>NBA.com: /strong> When Pavalon brought you back to Milwaukee – you briefly were a city recreation director in the Boston area – he was hoping to swing a deal for Oscar, right? strong>WE: /strong> Wes said “What d’ya think?” I said, “That would be an instant championship, if you got him with Kareem.” I think Oscar had a no-trade contract or approval, and [Pavalon] asked me if I’d pick up the phone and give him a call, and kind of push him our way. I told Oscar I was going back and it’d be great for him to win a championship after all these years. And of course I was interested in pushing it along, if I was going to go back there too. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Oscar understood the value of playing alongside Kareem. strong>WE: /strong> Well, yeah. All those great years he had in Cincinnati but he could never beat Russell and the Celtics. So for him to play with a center who was dominant – I wasn’t quite as dominant a center [laughs] – was a big step toward winning a championship. And it all worked out. strong>NBA.com: /strong> It worked out for you a year later, when Patterson left and Pavalon made you GM. strong>WE: /strong> At that point, I was trying to not screw it up. And I was always afraid that trading Greg Smith screwed it up because we were trying to get bigger at the power forward position. That’s when we brought Curtis Perry in. There were a couple years there where we got beat in the playoffs [by the Lakers and the Warriors], and then we got back to the Finals in ’74. We lost the final game in Milwaukee, which was a heartbreaker. strong>NBA.com: /strong> How cooperative were the league’s other GMs back then? Whether it was due to your race or the fact you were a recently retired player breaking into their ranks, was there any resistance to working with you? strong>WE: /strong> Not at all. They were very receptive and accommodating to me, as far as being a peer. A lot of great friendships evolved out of it. With Pete Newell and Bob Feerick, who was with Golden State at the time. Stu Inman and Jerry Colangelo. I think there was a lot of mutual respect. They helped me grow in the job. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Going about your job day to day, did you feel more eyes on you because you were breaking new ground? strong>WE: /strong>Actually, it didn’t dawn on me right away. I was asked at the time if it was significant, and I said only if it was significant to others. I just felt I had a job to do. I put pressure on myself to do the best I could, prepare myself for it and work harder than everybody else. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Did you like the job right off? strong>WE: /strong>I didn’t really know what it all entailed. It was difficult at first, because I had played with some of the guys I now was managing. As teammates, we had a different type of relationship. Then you had to change that. Instead of hanging out with you, there had to be separation. That was difficult. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Did you have to let Oscar know when he was nearing the end? strong>WE: /strong> That was one of the toughest assignments I had. It was the year of the [New Orleans] expansion draft, but he told us he wasn’t ready to make a decision. The organization certainly didn’t want to put him out in the expansion draft, just out of respect to him. We ended up protecting him. But time passed and ownership decided we had to move on. I had the responsibility of telling Oscar we were moving on, which was tough. strong>NBA.com: /strong> Did it impact your relationship with Oscar, at least temporarily? strong>WE: /strong>It may have. But we worked our way through it. We’re best friends now. strong>NBA.com: /strong>You also had the, er, fun job of dealing with Kareem when he wanted out of Milwaukee. strong>WE: /strong>I think it was the fall of ’74, I got a call that Sam Gilbert – representing Kareem – wanted a meeting. We had no idea what it was for. So Wes and I and Kareem and Sam met at the Sheraton out in Brookfield [western suburb of Milwaukee] and weren’t in the room five minutes when Sam said, “Kareem wants to be traded.” We didn’t want to trade Kareem, obviously, but we knew we were in for a long evening as we tried to hammer this thing out. The reason Kareem gave was, he wanted to go to New York or L.A., larger markets. Actually, Washington was his first choice. But there was that event at his house there...  strong>NBA.com: /strong>That’s right. In January 1973, a house that Abdul-Jabbar owned in D.C. was targeted in a home invasion. [Terrorists murdered several people in an attack on the player’s spiritual teacher Hamaas Abdul Khaalis, a rival of Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad. Abdul-Jabbar was not present at the time.] strong>WE: /strong>That took Washington out, so it got down to the Lakers or the Knicks. We did everything we could do to talk him out of wanting to be traded. But he said, “Nope. If you don’t, I’ll become a free agent or I’ll sign with the ABA.” Of course we didn’t want that to happen. So we decided to keep it quiet. “Let’s not go public until we have a deal.” strong>NBA.com: /strong> You wound up keeping it quiet for most of that ’74-75 season. strong>WE: /strong>New York made their pitch but there was nothing [acceptable] they could do – they wanted to give us aging players and money. Then I got a call from Pete Newell [of the Lakers] who said, “Can we meet in Denver?” We met in Denver and hammered out a trade. strong>NBA.com: /strong> Considering your hand was forced, were you satisfied with the return on that deal? strong>WE: /strong>Yeah, we felt we got a good nucleus. And I told the board that, once it was clear Kareem wanted to be traded, I said, “This may be good for the franchise. We’re going to hold out to get young players who can be part of a solid future.” We got [David] Meyers and Junior Bridgeman as draft picks, and Brian Winters and Elmore Smith as players. Of course there was cash involved – that wasn’t my area – but that was a pretty solid foundation. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Where did your satisfaction come from as a GM, compared to winning games and chasing titles as a player? strong>WE: /strong>Pretty much the same. Our jobs in the front office are to create an environment for the players to succeed. My philosophy was, let the coaches coach and the players play. I always felt it was a players’ game. So let’s do the best we can there. Very seldom did I interfere with a coach coaching. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Well, there was that one time in Cleveland when Lenny Wilkens noticed you coaching up Brad Daugherty... strong>WE: /strong>He said, “I’d appreciate if you’d let us coach the team. I saw you over there talking to Brad and giving him some instructions.” I said, “Well, Lenny, I played the position. I just thought I’d give him a little tip.” He said, “Just pass that on to us and we’ll do it.” I thought about that, and I said, “You know what? You’re absolutely right.” You have to hold your coaches accountable, and if you’re going to do their jobs, you can’t hold them accountable. strong>NBA.com: /strong> With those Milwaukee teams of Marques Johnson, Sidney Moncrief, Bridgeman, Winters and eventually Bob Lanier, do you ever second-guess any moves you made or didn’t make? strong>WE: /strong>No, I think we were the best we could be. I thought Don Nelson did a tremendous job in developing those teams to where we were contenders. I had a great deal of pleasure in watching those teams grow, because it came after I had to tell Larry Costello he no longer would be our coach. And when I told Don Nelson – my roommate in Boston – that he was going to take over, he said “I’m not ready to coach.” I told him, “Nellie, you’re the coach. So let’s go for it.” He grew with the team and became obviously a Hall of Fame coach. That’s the reward, when you make decisions like that and they turn out well. That’s the pleasure I get now in an advisory capacity with Toronto. I tell the team when I speak to them before the season, my greatest joy is seeing others succeed. strong>NBA.com: /strong> How much better prepared were you when, after a year consulting with Indiana, you went to Cleveland as vice president and GM in 1986? strong>WE: /strong> I had learned a lot by then, a lot of valuable experiences. Managing in the ‘70s wasn’t easy for any of us. That was an era of the post-civil rights, Vietnam War protests, and it affected the sports and the country in general. We had the drug culture in the NBA. It was all part of the post-Sixties era. We were confronted with situations we never thought we’d face. It was trying, to say the least. Young people were protesting a lot of issues. We all respected others’ First Amendment rights. But we also had to be protective of the brand. So it was more a matter of how we did it. We had to protect the image of the franchise, but at the same time, we realized, “This is the time we’re living in. How can we affect change?” We had to think about how we expressed ourselves, and dealt with adversity and the various attitudes that prevailed. And still prevail. Quite frankly, I a little concerned about today. strong>NBA.com: /strong> What’s your take now on the social and political issues that have crept – or been invited – into sports. strong>WE: /strong> We’ve got to count on the 80 percent. I use the 80/20 philosophy, and if 80 percent is good and 20 percent is bad, the 80 percent has got to influence what happens with the other 20 percent. I think we still do a lot of good in sports. We can’t let the 20 percent rule. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Was the NBA of its times or ahead of its time in race relations in the ‘60s and ‘70s? strong> WE: /strong> We come from different backgrounds, different points of views. But I think once you’re in the locker room, the whole concept of winning is built on respect. You built a mutual respect in the locker room, you work toward a common goal, and that’s to win. You saw how the Celtics got along internally. Now we’ve got a lot more African-American players ... and that’s a different challenge. Plus the NBA has become global, putting us at the forefront of bringing together different cultures, different ethnic backgrounds to work toward that common goal of winning championships. It’s great to see how we’ve been able to integrate Europeans, Asians, Africans all into the NBA. We’re a model for how it can bring about change and mutual respect, which I think we need more of in the world. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Your teams in Cleveland had players and coaches who had the misfortune of being born into the era of Jordan. strong>WE: /strong>Obviously, you want to win championships. But if you can get to the final four, you’re a real contender. We were able to do that on one occasion. But we had to play against greatness in those other years. We consistently won 50 games or more, but we couldn’t overcome Michael Jordan. I talked to somebody yesterday who brought up “The Shot” again. [Laughs.] I wish they’d let that go. They keep playing that damn thing on television. strong>NBA.com: /strong> How do you feel about one man serving both as chief basketball boss and head coach, like Stan Van Gundy in Detroit or Gregg Popovich in San Antonio? strong>WE: /strong> My philosophy is having two people. But I can’t take issue with what Pop does, because he relies heavily on R.C. [Buford]. As long as someone has a person to rely on, as a check-and-balance, it can work. But I’m really an advocate of [splitting the duties]. strong>NBA.com: /strong>Did you ever want to coach? strong>WE: /strong>No. I wanted to be as far away from the action as possible because I was too fierce a competitor. One of the most regrettable things in my career was when I came on the court in a game in Detroit – I was sitting about 10 rows up – and the Pistons were having their way with our players. That was the late ‘80s or early ‘90s when the Bad Boys were at their best – or worst. The referees weren’t calling it the way I saw it, there was something happening underneath the basket and suddenly I found myself out on the court. I got the call from Rod [Thorn, NBA VP] the next day, saying “We’ve got to fine you $10,000.” I said, “Fine me more.” strong>NBA.com: /strong>I want to ask about your thoughts on the league today, about the way the game is played and the current hot topic of resting players. strong>WE: /strong> I am fearful that the big men are becoming an endangered species because of the emphasis on 3-point shooting. And I was in the room when we adopted the 3-point shot. I voted for it, I agree with it. But I am concerned about the use of these 6-11, 7-footers who we’ve seen over the years – centers don’t dominate anymore. You don’t see the development of the bigs as we once did. They’re used primarily in high pick-and-roll situations and very little in low-post play. I think there’s very much a need for a big, but the push now is for stretch-fours and stretch-fives. I can understand the analytics of it all, because we all can do arithmetic. But playing the game, you take what the defense gives you. There’s got to be a place for bigs – they want to play the game too. strong>NBA.com: /strong>And as far as resting players? strong>WE: /strong> I think that’s contrary to what the game should be about. [Commissioner] Adam Silver and the owners are going to address it, which I commend them for, because they have to address it. strong>NBA.com: /strong> The broadcast partners have wound up with some lousy games because of it. And we’ve heard fans complain when they’ve spent hundreds of dollars, months in advance, and maybe driven for hours to see the stars around whom the NBA markets itself. Do you share those concerns? strong>WE: /strong>Just as important is the whole competitive notion of why we play the game. We can’t compromise competition. If your team is vying for playoff position to get homecourt advantage, you look at the schedule and you think “Cleveland should beat that team” or “Toronto should beat that team.” But when they go in there and their three best players don’t play, that compromises competition. You can talk about being tired, but part of competition is about fatigue. You have to manage off days and manage lifestyle, manage all the things that contribute to fatigue. Physically and mentally. There are a lot of ways they can address it. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 26th, 2017

US stopped China's plan to build on Scarborough - Rappler

US stopped China's plan to build on Scarborough - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsMar 9th, 2017

Duterte to meet with jeepney groups on PUV phaseout plan - Rappler

Duterte to meet with jeepney groups on PUV phaseout plan - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsMar 1st, 2017

Duterte to meet with jeepney groups on phaseout plan - Rappler

Duterte to meet with jeepney groups on phaseout plan - Rappler.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsMar 1st, 2017

Kings cut ties with Cousins, giving Pelicans dominant duo

em>By Josh Dubow, Associated Press /em> Sacramento general manager Vlade Divac headed into All-Star weekend convinced it was finally time to part ways with ultra-talented center DeMarcus Cousins. Befitting a franchise that appears headed to a 11th straight season without a playoff berth, the Kings even seemed to botch that. Sacramento dealt Cousins and forward Omri Casspi to New Orleans in exchange for Tyreke Evans, 2016 first-round draft pick Buddy Hield, Langston Galloway and first- and second-round draft picks this summer. When asked Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) why he didn't wait for a better offer closer to Thursday's (Friday, PHL time) trade deadline, Divac gave a curious response that raised more questions than it answered. 'Most likely we would get less because I had a better deal two days ago,' Divac said. 'I don't want to go into details. I don't want to discuss the process.' Cousins will now team with another former Kentucky big man who has developed into an NBA All-Star in New Orleans' Anthony Davis. Cousins is averaging 27.8 points and 10.6 rebounds this season and can become a free agent in 2018 unless the Pelicans can sign him to an All-Star caliber extension. The Kings have not won more than 33 games in a season since drafting Cousins fifth overall in 2010 and grew tired of his antics that included frequent run-ins with coaches, media members and officials. He leads the NBA with 17 technical fouls this season, leading to a one-game suspension earlier this month. He will be suspended again after his next technical foul and every two beyond that for the rest of the regular season. Divac frequently mentioned culture and character when explaining the thought behind the deal, saying the franchise needed a change despite being only 1.5 games behind Denver for the final playoff spot in the Western Conference. 'I really love DeMarcus,' Divac said. 'I think he's a great kid. It just wasn't a fit right now with what we're trying to do. I wish him all the best. I hope this will have a positive effect on his career.' The deal to pair Cousins with Davis sends a message that the Pelicans are more concerned with making a 25-game push for the playoffs this spring then where they'll be drafting next offseason. Pelicans general manager Dell Demps previous' attempts to provide Davis a requisite supporting cast has been under increasing scrutiny as losses have mounted — New Orleans is 23-34, 2.5 games out of the final playoff spot in the West with 25 games left. When the deal was made official Monday (Tuesday, PHL time), Demps thanked Pelicans owner Tom Benson and top executives Mickey Loomis and Dennis Lauscha for their 'continued support and providing the resources for us to be successful.' 'This is an exciting time for Pelicans fans as we continue our quest for long-term success,' Demps said. The Kings, who are a game ahead of the Pelicans in the standings, will now enter rebuilding mode without Cousins. They could deal other veterans for prospects or picks before Thursday's deadline but even the rebuilding plan has issues. The Kings could be forced to swap first-round picks with Philadelphia this year and also owe the 76ers an unprotected 2019 pick as part of a trade in July 15 made to create salary cap room to sign Rajon Rondo, Kosta Koufos and Marco Belinelli. Only Koufos is still in Sacramento. This trade does increase Sacramento's chances at two first-round picks this year because they only have to give up their top pick to Chicago if it falls outside the top 10. The pick from New Orleans is top-three protected. 'We feel very strong about this draft this year,' Divac said. 'It's very strong, stronger than the past few years. It's time to start fresh.' The Kings also get the 23-year-old Hield, who won the Wooden Award at Oklahoma last year before being drafted sixth overall by the Pelicans. Hield has struggled as a rookie, averaging 8.6 points per game in 20.4 minutes per contest, while shooting 39.2 percent from the field and 36.9 percent from three-point range. 'He's talented guy,' Divac said. 'His work ethic is exactly what we want here.' Evans, who can play point guard, shooting guard or small forward, will be entering a second stint in Sacramento, where he was drafted in 2009 and went on to be Rookie of the Year. Galloway has been a solid reserve, providing scoring punch from the perimeter. Casspi has been playing about 19 minutes a game for the Kings this season, averaging 5.9 points and 4.1 rebounds. ___ em>AP Sports Writer Brett Martel in New Orleans and freelancer Antonio Harvey in Sacramento, California, contributed to this report /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 21st, 2017

Pelicans star Anthony Davis stays committed to New Orleans

Don’t expect “The Brow” to bow out from New Orleans anytime soon.  Anthony Davis reaffirmed his commitment to the Pelicans earlier this week in an interview session with international media, saying, “I don’t plan on leaving [New Orleans], so forget that. Make sure you write that down.”  Davis is signed to the Pelicans for four more seasons after the current one, but his team’s struggles have created fertile ground for trade rumors. The team has made the Playoffs just once in his previous four seasons, back in 2015, where they were swept by eventual champions Golden State Warriors.  This past offseason, the team underwent a mini-revamp of sorts, letting go of veterans Eric Gordon and Ryan Anderson, and adding in their place guys like Solomon Hill, Tim Frazier, and Langston Galloway. Lingering injuries though to Tyreke Evans, Dante Cunningham and Quincy Pondexter, and Jrue Holiday taking a leave of absence, resulted in a 0-8 start to the 2016-17 campaign.  The return of Holiday and Evans to the roster has given the team a much-needed boost however. Ahead of All-Star Weekend, the team is 23-34, but just 2.5 spots out of the eighth seed in the West. “I like our team [that] we have now. We’re always just kind of injured, and so it’s tough to win games when a lot of your top guys are out…[But] we have a team that’s able to compete for the Playoffs. We showed that a couple of times this year, where we can matchup with anybody,” Davis said.  “We just need to get healthy. That’s really it. Getting healthy and making sure that we stay consistent….If we keep all our guys on the floor, stay healthy, and be more consistent, then we’ll be fine.” Davis this season is averaging a career-high 27.7 points and 11.9 rebounds, to go with 2.2 assists, 2.5 blocks, and 1.3 steals.  With New Orleans hosting All-Star Weekend, Davis, voted in as a Western Conference starter, said that one of his goals is to win All-Star Game MVP. “It’s in New Orleans, so I’m going to try to go out there and play to the best of my ability,” he said. “That’s definitely one of the goals, to go out there and try to win MVP.”  One thing though that he won’t be doing is pitching his fellow All-Stars, in the hopes that they’ll consider moving to the Big Easy. “If guys want to come here, they can come. It’s not my job to go sell,” Davis pointed out. “I let the front office handle that. That’s their job, to bring guys in. I’m out here to play basketball.”  Of course, this isn’t the first time Davis will be playing as an All-Star in front of his home fans. But the fact that he’s more of an established star this time out, means more opportunity to do something special.  “The last time I played [in an All-Star Game in New Orleans], I didn’t get that much playing time, but the fans definitely appreciated I was there,” Davis recalls. “I’m pretty sure this time it’s going to be crazier than 2014.  “Getting an opportunity to play in front of the home crowd and family and friends is going to be something special for me.” .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2017