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Stars of Philippine cycling join national championships

The stars of Philippine cycling vie in the PhilCycling National Championships for Road which will kick off with the massed start race on an out-and-back course in Subic and Bataan on Friday. Led by Marella Vania Salamat, Marc Galedo and the ageless Alfie Catalan—all former Southeast Asian Games gold medalists—the races in the men and women elite, under 23 and men junior will flag off from the Subic Bay Exhibition and Convention Center. The men’s race will cover 138.27 kms marked by a treacherous 7-km climb on an average 7 percent gradient atop the Dambana Ng Kagitingan giant cross on Mount Samat. The women’s race, on the other hand, will be staged simultaneously with the men and will cover 96.55 kms of circuit racing inside Subic. “We are expecting a tough race considering that the courses for both events are technical,” Race Director Ian Alacar said. The races are highlights of the PRU Ride PH 2018, a cycling festival staged annually by Pru Life UK. Pru Life UK Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer Allan Tumbaga led the ribbon-cutting ceremony yesterday at the SBECC with top-ranked Filipino-American female cyclist Coryn Rivera gracing the occasion. The event is sanctioned by the PhilCycling headed by its president, Tagaytay City Rep. Abraham “Bambol” Tolentino and Chairman Alberto Lina and will award the winner’s the coveted national champions’ jerseys. The individual time trial on Saturday, on the other hand, will test the men on a 30.12-km route and the women on a 21.94-km distance. The national championships will conclude with the Criterium races on January 21 at McKinley West in Taguig City. Also joining the fray is Ariana Domingo, a two-time Southeast Asian mountain bike champion who is testing her strength in the road discipline and former Tour champion Santy Barnachea, George Oconer, Ronnel Hualda and Junrey Navarra. Adding spice to the men’s race will be the presence of Filipino-American Coryn Rivera, who will ride behind the race column as part of her training for 45 races she is set to take part in this season. Rivera is one of the world’s foremost women elite rider, having won the Tour of Flanders in Belgium last year and leading the US team in the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnJan 11th, 2018

Veteran cyclists in action

THE stars of Philippine cycling descended in Subic as they vie in the PhilCycling National Championships for Road which fires off today with the massed start race on an out-and-back course in Subic and Bataan. Led by Marella Vania Salamat, Marc Galedo and the ageless Alfie Catalan -- all former….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJan 11th, 2018

Superteams and superpowers: Basketball in 2017

The common theme in basketball as of late is rather simple: build yourself a superteam and see where it goes. 2017 saw a bunch of superteams take the court in all levels. Some panned out and some did not. Nevertheless, we live in a world of superteams. Either your favorite basketball team is one or it's not.   Warriors World For the 2016-2017 NBA Season, the 73-win Golden State Warriors, a superteam in their own right, added former Most Valuable Player Kevin Durant. Oh my goodness. The Dubs then proceeded to decimate the NBA, winning 67 games in the regular season. Golden State was even better in the playoffs, making a serious play for a postseason sweep before finishing with a 16-1 record and a second title in three seasons.   Seriously, it's a Warriors World that we live in Golden State's success has prompted other teams to try and create their own superteam. Houston snatched Chris Paul away from the Los Angeles Clippers and now the Rockets have a potent backcourt combo that also feature MVP contender James Harden. Oklahoma City completed two incredible trades that made Paul George and Carmelo Anthony members of the Thunder. Oh, OKC also has MVP winner Russell Westbrook running point. The Timberwolves also have something going on in Minnesota as Jimmy Butler joined Karl-Anthony Towns and Andrew Wiggins for a young and intriguing Big 3. The Eastern Conference landscape changed when Cleveland traded Kyrie Irving to Boston. The Celtics previously signed Gordon Hayward and all of a sudden, the winningest NBA franchise is in position to take over the East now and the forseeable future. Speaking of Cleveland, LeBron James is still with the Cavs and they've added Dwyane Wade of all people to join an aging but still scary superteam. The King started this whole superteam craze. Golden State just happened to perfect. We all live in a Warriors World.   Feer the Beer Over in the PBA, the Philippines' premier superteam is still pretty effective despite its stars each playing almost 40 minutes per game. A year removed from the "Beeracle Run," San Miguel made history by being only the second team to capture the Perpetual Trophy following three straight Philippine Cup titles. Then the Beermen, with the top-3 MVP candidates in June Mar Fajardo, Alex Cabagnot, and Chris Ross, plus Arwind Santos and Marcio Lassiter, ended the franchise's 16-year championship drought in the Commissioner's Cup. With the help of import Charles Rhodes of course. San Miguel had legitimate chances to win the Grand Slam of course, but the team ultimately fell short in the Governors' Cup. However, the Beermen did add 6'8" Fil-German Christian Standhardinger to the fold. Superteam.   Return of the Kings It was the perfect set up. Meralco earned the number 1 seed and was rolling all the way to the Finals. Meanwhile, the Gink Kings had to go through yet another emotional and heated series against rival TNT in the semifinals in order to have a chance to properly defend their title. The series before that? The Gin Kings had to end San Miguel's Grand Slam dreams. In the 2017 Governors' Cup Finals, Meralco was in perfect position to take The Rematch and allow the birth of a new PBA rivalry. After seven games, none of that happened and Ginebra won back-to-back titles by virtue of their quote unquote superteam. Greg Slaughter, Japeth Aguilar, Joe Devance, Justin Brownlee, LA Tenorio, Sol Mercado, and Scottie Thompson. How is that not a superteam? The Kangkong jokes sure died a slow death.   Systematic Mayhem Even in college hoops, superteams are the way to go. However, in the amatuers, you just have to recruit your way into building one. La Salle has perfected this method and the Green Archers are certainly the biggest --- and loudest and most aggressive ---- recruiters. The Taft superteam featuring Ben Mbala and co. got the Green Archers to two UAAP Finals and one championship. Only one championship because another superteam, quietly built in Katipunan with surgical, perhaps even robotic, precision, beat them this year. That's right, Big Bad Blue is once again on top of the UAAP as the Ateneo Blue Eagles scored a sensational, near-sweep of UAAP Season 80. Coach Tab Baldwin has a collection of incredible players that may not look like it on first glance but they do certainly qualify for superteam status. Dom't believe it? Maybe you will after they complete a five-peat. It could happen.   Sweep In the other collegiate league, two superteams dominated the NCAA for two separate periods in one season. First, Lyceum, the surprise superteam, made history by completing an 18-game sweep of the elimination round. However, the Pirates ran into the league's decade-old superteam in San Beda and the Red Lions ended up sweeping the Finals for yet another title. Most of the major characters from both squads will return for a new season and if a San Beda-Lyceum rematch does not happen, well, that's just disappointing isn't it?   OVERTIME 2017 also saw the rise and fall and rise of the Gilas Pilipinas program. Well sort of. The Philippines got off to a great star this year by absolutely dominating the SEABA Championships. Then, disaster struck in the 2017 FIBA Asia Cup when Gilas was embarassed by an old foe in South Korea. To end the year, the Philippine national team recovered, albeit in an ugly fashion, to take an early lead in the 2019 World Cup Asian Qualifiers. Gilas is more than capable of forming a Pinoy superteam that could compete, and even beat, the best of Asia. Let's hope we get that in 2018. Finally, 2017 also saw the Civil War PBA edition. It wasn't funny and it wasn't good. Fortunately, it seems that bright and peacuful days are ahead of our beloved league. Let's hope that's the case and let's just leave the bad memories behind this year. Time to move on and forget about that stuff. There are basketball games to be played.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 28th, 2017

Morales, Gorospe shine

PAUL MORALES won a sprint finish against Ronald Oranza and Jermyn Prado won pulling away to rule the Philippine National Cycling Championships for Road over a technical and treacherous route yesterday in Subic and Bataan. A total of 96 riders answered the gun for the men’s elite race of the….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Morales, Prado, Gorospe victorious in national championships

Jan Paul Morales completed a sprint finish to top Ronald Oranza and the treacherous Subic-to-Bataan route of the Philippine National Cycling Championships for Road Friday afternoon. Jermyn Prado blew right past the competition to dominate the women's race. A total of 96 riders answered the PRUride PH 2018 gun for the men’s elite race, but it was Morales, a longtime national team member who won the coveted national champions’ jersey. “I really went for the win but I had to work hard for this one,” said Morales moments after his victory that earned him not only P50,000 in cash from organizer Pru Life UK but also an all-expense paid trip to the Prudential Ride London in July. Morales clocked three hours, 42 minutes and 55 seconds—same time as Oranza—over the 137-km course that included a treacherous climb to the Dambana ng Mga Bayani at Mt. Samat in Mariveles, Bataan. Felipe Marcelo and Jonel Carcueva shared third place after figuring in a close finish. Oranza brought home P25,000 while Marcelo and Carcueva shared the third and fourth place prizes of P15,000 and P12,500, respectively. Also earning tickets to London and P50,000 each were Prado and Men's Under-23 winner Ismael Gorospe. Prado clocked 3:26:00 to win gold in the 96.55-km women elite race, beating Chinese Taipei's Chang Ting Ting by more than two minutes, and Arianne Dormitorio by over five minutes. Two-time Asean mountain bike champion Dormitorio was almost successful in her first foray with the road discipline but crashed against the strong cross winds inside Subic. Chang also banked P25,000 and P12,500, respectively. Gorospe won the Men's Under-23 jewel after completing a 3:45:40 finish over the same course at the elite race. Danielver Carinon and Ronilla Quita completed the podium......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Meet 2017 s ten most powerful people in sports in Asia

In Asia, sports equals passion, and these ten big names in the sporting world today have led their respective organizations to amazing heights this year. Let’s take a look at 2017’s Top 10 People Behind the Biggest Sports Media Properties in Asia.   #1 Gianni Infantino, President of the FIFA World Cup Gianni Infantino is a football administrator and the current President of the FIFA World Cup. The FIFA World Cup is an international football association and tournament held every four years. Men’s football is arguably the most popular sport in the entire world and the same is true for Asia. The sport retains large numbers in viewership and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Countries like Singapore, Korea and Australia all follow football religiously.   #2 Aleksander Ceferin, President of UEFA Champions League Aleksander Ceferin heads the UEFA Champions League, an annual football competition, unlike FIFA which is only held every four years. The Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) is one of the most prestigious football tournaments in the world and is participated by top-division European football clubs. Although it does not consist of Asian teams, UEFA remains popular among the Asian people due to the popularity of football as a sport.   #3 Chatri Sityodtong, Chairman and CEO of ONE Championship When billionaire Chatri Sityodtong conjured up the idea for ONE Championship, he envisioned the entire Asia united under a single sport. ONE Championship has achieved tremendous success since its establishment in 2011. Martial arts is considered a Pan-Asian sport and for the first time in Asian history, it is a sport that has transcended regional and cultural boundaries. Currently the largest global sports media property in Asian history. Today, ONE Championship is broadcast to over one billion viewers in over 128 countries across the globe.   #4 Horacio Muratore, President of FIBA Having been president of FIBA since 2014, Horacio Muratore has continued to develop the sport of basketball, not just in Asia, but in the entire world. The FIBA Basketball World Cup was established in 1950 and is an international basketball competition held every four years since its inaugural year. It also has popular variations in the FIBA Asia Championships and FIBA EuroBasket. The next tournament is scheduled for Beijing, China in 2019. Basketball’s popularity in Asia remains concentrated in the Philippines, Taiwan and China where the sport enjoys a very strong and faithful following.   #5 John Malone, Owner of Formula One Although Bernie Ecclestone, Formula One’s colorful chief executive remains at the helm of business operations, new owner American billionaire John Malone purchased the company in early 2017 and has since continued to deliver fans heart-pumping auto-racing action. Formula One, also known as Formula 1 or simply as F1, is the highest class of single-seater international auto-racing tournament in the world. Held in different variations depending on the region, the races are held regularly on an annual basis on purpose-built F1 circuits or public roads. The most popular variation in Asia is the Singapore Grand Prix which normally takes place on the Marina Bay Street Circuit. The Singapore Grand Prix was first held in 1966. It is the first of its kind in Asia.   #6 Rob Manfred, Commissioner of Major League Baseball Rob Manfred was named the 10th Commissioner in the history of Major League Baseball a wildly popular sport not just in the United States, but also in Japan, Taiwan, and China. Major League Baseball or the MLB is the most recognizable professional baseball organization in the world. It is immensely popular especially in Japan where baseball is almost considered a national sport. Since 1986, an all-star team from the MLB is sent to a biennial end-of-season tour of Japan. It is called MLB Japan All-Star Series wherein exhibition games are held in a best-of format against all-stars from the Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) league. Aside from MLB Japan Serie, there also exists an MLB China Series and an MLB Taiwan Series.   #7 Hemang Amin, Chief Operating Officer of Vivo Indian Premier League Heman Amin has been a part of the BCCI, which governs the Vivo Indian Premier League, for the past seven years. The IPL is a professional Twenty20 cricket league established in India which is held every April and May of every year. Cricket is by far the most popular sport in India. Although a relatively new organization, having been established as recently as 2008, the IPL is one of the fastest growing sports media properties in Asia. It is currently valued at US$1.6 billion which is a monumental achievement for such a young property.   #8 Chito Narvasa, Former Commissioner of the Philippine Basketball Association Former basketball player and coach, Chito Narvasa is the ninth Commissioner of the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA). Basketball is a wildly popular sport in the Philippines, and perhaps the most widely played in the entire country. The premiere proving ground of men’s professional basketball in the Philippines is the PBA, which owns the distinction of being the first professional basketball league in Asia, and the second-oldest continuously existing league in the world apart from the National Basketball Association (NBA). The PBA played its first game in 1975, and today fuels a hoop-crazy nation that loves its basketball.   #9 Cai Zhenhua, President of the Chinese Football Association China has a burgeoning football obsession, with support from Chinese President Xi Jinping himself who is helping to develop the sport. Cai Zhenhua is the current President of the Chinese Football Association, which governs the sport in China.China’s passion for football is manifest in the Chinese Super League (CSL), which is the highest tier of professional football in the country. With a season that starts in March and ends mid-November, the CSL features 16 football clubs in its current season. The league, the largest in China, now operates under the management of the Chinese Football Association. The current champions are the Guangzhou Evergrande.   #10 Mitsuri Murai, Chairman of Japan Professional Football League Inaugurated in 2014, Mitsuri Murai is the Chairman of the Japan Professional Football League, or more popularly known as the J.League. Japanese professional football league, J.League is one of the most successful football leagues in all of Asia. It is the top level of Japan’s professional football scene, which is one of the most popular sports in all the region. With an annual revenue of over $560-million, the J.League features three football levels: J1, J2, and J3. The league is also governed by FIFA on the global level......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 19th, 2017

No rogues in new ‘Tokhang’ — ‘Bato’

THERE will be a much stricter vetting of Drug Enforcement Officers in the Philippine National Police this year with PNP chief Director General Ronald ‘Bato’ M. dela Rosa vowing not to allow policemen who have been previously linked to illegal drugs to join their reinvigorated Oplan: Tokhang operations across the….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJan 20th, 2018

Up close with The Art of Eight Limbs : My first experience of watching Muay Thai live

I’ve been a combat sports fan for nearly a decade now. I began watching MMA back in 2009, around the time that stars like Georges St-Pierre and BJ Penn were at their peak, and immediately got hooked, and it’s actually that fandom that got me to where I am now today…a sportswriter. It’s also that appreciation for the sport that got me to try and get into combat sports, and I’ve been practicing on a regular basis since then. The first time I ever set foot inside a boxing gym and put on a pair of 16-ounce gloves was for my first ever Muay Thai class. I saw these fighters on TV throwing these beautiful kicks, knocking the bejeezus out of their opponents. I wanted to be able to do that too, I decided to try it out. That first session was really fun, but real tiring…and painful. I was sore for days after that, but I enjoyed it and decided to make it a regular part of my life. It wasn’t necessarily to be a pro-level practicioner, rather a way to keep fit and stay healthy. My first session was around eight years ago, and I’ve been going as regularly as I can ever since. Of course, my appreciation for the widely popular martial art grew, I started doing some research and watched some Muay Thai fights online, and eventually being able to try and train Muay Thai in Thailand and getting to watch a legit fight became parts of my ‘Bucket List’ so to say. Fortunately, I got to tick one of those things off my list late last year.   The Lumpinee Stadium in Bangkok, Thailand. Home of some of the world's best Muay Thai fighters. pic.twitter.com/yKCRvLqtDf — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 When I was sent to Bangkok (to cover ONE Championship MMA, fittingly enough), I was able to catch a big Muay Thai card at the most popular Muay Thai arena in Thailand, the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium. A quick look at the Lumpinee Stadium schedule on their website shows that there’s usually a fight card thrice a week, every Tuesday, Friday, and Saturday, which gives you an idea of how popular it is to patrons, and how many competitors there are. It’s a 5,000 seater arena, no bigger than the San Juan Arena, but boy, the place was buzzing on that Friday night.   A look inside the Lumpinee Stadium. It's fight night Friday here in BKK. pic.twitter.com/Tagws4qZCC — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 Unlike here in the Philippines, where boxing or MMA shows don’t get filled up until about midway through the card, the Lumpinee Stadium had a decent number of people after the first fight of the night, and amazingly, the fans were already into it, a testament of just how big Muay Thai is in the country. It is, after all, their national sport.   But before I go on any further, here’s a quick backgrounder on what Muay Thai is. A striking-based form of self-defense and combat sport that rose to prominence in Thailand during the 1900s, Muay Thai makes use of one’s hands and elbows, knees, and feet to inflict damage. It’s commonly known as “The Art of Eight Limbs” because practicioners can punch, kick, knee, and elbow their opponents. Names like Samart Payakaroon, Buakaw Banchamek, and Saenchai have made names for themselves in Muay Thai. In MMA, former champions such as Anderson Silva, Jose Aldo, and Dejdamrong Sor Amnuaysirichoke are known for their high-level Muay Thai.   So, going back… The card I went to that night was apparently a big one, with three championships up for grabs. The ticket cost me 1000 Baht, which is around 1500 PHP. A small price to pay, I believe, to get to see some honest-to-goodness Muay Thai action in the country’s most popular stadium. (I did, however, get into an argument with the ticket lady because I tried haggling for a lower price, to the point that she let out an exasperated 'OH MY GOD!' in the thickest Thai accent I've ever heard.) There was no reserved seating, at least for the ticket I paid for, so I had to find a spot that gave me a good view. Being that the stadium itself was small, my spot wasn’t too far away from the ring. Think lower box seats. It was close enough for me to see the action.   Also known as 'The Art of Eight Limbs" Muay Thai utilizes punching and kicking techniques, as well as knee strikes, elbow strikes and clinching. pic.twitter.com/lN8z8LbPO5 — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 When I said that Thai fans were immediately in to the action, I meant it. When I got in, it was towards the end of the first fight of the night, but it felt like it was already the main event, as the fans were as rowdy as they could get.   While the 5000-seater stadium isn't particularly packed, the active crowd makes it feel as though it is. pic.twitter.com/kQ1NC5QpOU — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 With every kick and with every punch, the people would go “EYYYYYY!!!” whether or not it connected or it missed, and with every knee, they’d yell out “KNEEEEEE!!!” Every fight had that ‘big fight feel.” The fights lasted for up to five three-minute rounds, and while much shorter than boxing bouts, there was definitely no shortage of action. Again, with the small stadium, you could hear every time that flesh hit flesh, which was both entertaining and at the same time unnerving.   All the fights have this "big fight feel" because the crowd roars with every hit. pic.twitter.com/XYl72AUL4Z — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 One thing that you’ll notice in Muay Thai fights is that the competitors do a little dance before the fight commences.   Before each fight, the fighters perform a ceremonial dance known as the Wai Khru. This is to give honor and pay respects to their teachers. pic.twitter.com/ZJLCCUHRFZ — Santino Honasan🎈 (@honasantino) December 8, 2017 This ritual is called the “Wai Khru” and it’s done to pay their teachers respect and show their gratitude. Interesting note: the Wai Khru isn’t just limited to Muay Thai. Students in schools in Thailand participate in this ritual as well. I asked my trainer about this years ago, and he said that usually, the actions and gestures in the Wai Khru are thought of on the spot. The thing that struck me the most about this experience was that bets were being placed inside the arena as the fights were going on. After every round, a few people in the crowd, would yell out and call for bets, much like the ‘Cristo’ that you see in cockfighting arenas. I really hate the comparison, but it looked a lot like human cockfighting. Be that as it may, when you look past the gambling aspect of it, (which in reality, is prevalent anywhere anyway, just not as blatant), you’ll see that the martial art is very much a part of Thai culture. If you can fill up a 5,000 seater arena three times a week, I’d say that you’re doing something right. The experience was really something worth going through, especially if you enjoy combat sports in it’s purest form. I’ve gotten to watch boxing and mixed martial arts in bigger, sold out stadiums, but getting to watch Muay Thai in a tiny arena such as the Lumpinee Stadium was very different experience. The action and the atmosphere was unlike any I’ve ever seen before, and it’s something that I highly recommend to anyone who gets to visit Bangkok, whether or not you’re a fight fan. If you are a fight fan, it’s definitely something to experience. I’m really happy that I did. Now to check that other thing on the bucket list off........»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 19th, 2018

Police to allow media in revived ‘Tokhang’

MEMBERS of the media, human rights groups, and other entities will be invited to observe the Philippine National Police’s (PNP) revived “Tokhang” anti-drug operations for transparency, said its spokesman, Chief Supt. Dionardo Carlos. “You’re welcome to join. We won’t let you be in harm’s way if the police know there’s a likelihood that you would [...] The post Police to allow media in revived ‘Tokhang’ appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsJan 18th, 2018

Morales, Prado share elite race honors

MANILA, Philippines — Jan Paul Morales won a sprint finish against Ronald Oranza and Jermyn Prado won pulling away to rule the Philippine National Cycling Ch.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Hard work, family, and tocino the key ingredients to Fil-Am cyclist’s success

Coryn Rivera, said to be the only cyclist with Filipino roots to be taking part in the European circuit, is back at where it all began for her. “It’s good to be back,” she said with a small smile during her welcome lunch on Monday at the Shang at the Fort in Taguig. The name Rivera resonated with Filipinos when she won the Prudential RideLondon Classique a year ago. Then, her origins were unknown until ABS-CBN’s Gretchen Ho, who was part of the country’s delegation in London, inquired about them. While now an American citizen, the 25-year-old’s parents are full-blooded Filipinos who remain proud of their roots. Their eldest of two children only shares the same sentiment. “It’s cool to be a person with an ethnic background. I think I’m the only one with Filipino blood to be there (European circuit),” Coryn said. Rivera is now part of professional cycling team Sunweb which is very much active in the European circuit. In all of her races, a big part of her preparation remains Filipino to the core. “I still love tocino and tapa for breakfast with banana ketchup. I’m still very much into Filipino culture even though I was born in the (US),” she said. Of course, it has been parents Wally and Lina who have made sure that such is the case. “Breakfast is very important so I would make sure she always had her rice and tocino,” the latter shared. With that simple yet loving act, the elder Riveras have made it clear that they are fully behind their big-time source of pride who only stands at 5-foot-3. And clearly, that has made all the difference in the world. “We always support Coryn. I think that’s why she succeeds – because we support her 110 percent,” Lina said. That all-out support has impacted Coryn in more ways than one. “She saw us work hard to get to where we are. We also don’t spoil our kids – we make them work hard to get to where they are,” her mother said. She then continued, “We do everything on our own and she’s just the same way.” Indeed, it has been the example set by her hardworking parents that Rivera follows to this day wherever she is – be that in the Tour of Flanders in Belgium or in the hills of Tagaytay. “My parents are role models. They are hardworking and that’s what I want to be,” she said. And so, the American citizen cyclist remains Filipino at heart – even though she is yet to string together a Tagalog sentence. Asked about the native language of her parents, she answered, “I understand it really well, but as far as speaking it, I’m still practicing.” Good thing then that she will have some time to practice as Rivera will participate in the upcoming PRUride PH 2018 from January 11 to 14 in Subic, Zambales. Backed by British life insurer Pru Like UK, PRUride PH 2018 is expected to be one of the biggest cycling events in the country as it will be spread over two areas and span two weekends. In Subic, veteran pedal-pushers such as George Oconer and Marella Salamat will join Rivera in taking part in the 160 km PRUride Professional Road Race. The event continues a week later in McKinley West in Taguig where next iterations of the Criterium races first held a year ago will ensue. PRUride PH 2018 has been sanctioned by PhilCycling, the national governing body for the sport of cycling. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 8th, 2018

IN PHOTOS: Thousands join procession of Nazareno replicas

MANILA, Philippines – Thousands joined the procession of replicas of the Black Nazarene image outside Quiapo Church on Sunday, January 7. The procession began at around 2 pm on Sunday, and is ongoing as of posting time. The Philippine National Police said up to 70,000 devotees joined the procession as of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 7th, 2018

PANOORIN: Prusisyon ng mga Nazareno replica, piyestang piyesta

MAYNILA, Pilipinas – Taimtim man dahil may kasamang dasal, piyestang piyesta rin ang prusisyon ng mga Nazareno replica ngayong Linggo, ika-7 ng Enero. Ayon sa Philippine National Police, umabot ng 100,000 na deboto ang sumama sa prusisyon na ito. (LOOK: IN PHOTOS: Thousands join procession of Nazareno replicas ) Panoorin ang ilang eksena ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 7th, 2018

Creamline brings in Gumabao, Gohing

Creamline is building up a powerhouse team months before the start of the 2018 Premier Volleyball League. After securing the services of volleyball stars Alyssa Valdez and Risa Sato, who played for BaliPure last year, the Rebisco franchise in its Facebook page announced the addition of former De La Salle University teammates Michele Gumabao and Melissa Gohing. In a ‘Guess Who?’ post by Creamline Thursday and Friday, there were clues about the two new players that the Cool Smashers tapped to beef up their roster – all were pointing at Gohing and Gumabao. Gohing won the UAAP Season 71 Rookie of the Year award and collected four titles with DLSU. Gumabao is a three-time UAAP champion, two-time Best Blocker winner and Finals Most Valuable Player back in Season 75 before foregoing her last playing year the following season.   This will mark the return of Gumabao to the Sports Vision-organized volleyball league after bolting out of Pocari Sweat last year. She transferred to Cocolife in the Philippine Superliga. Gohing, on the other hand, left the Lady Warriors after three years with the Federated Distributors, Inc. franchise. The multi-awarded libero played with Gumabao in the PSL back in 2015 when they left the DLSU core-led Generika Lifesavers to transfer to FDI’s club Philips Gold Lady Slammers. The two gave the Lady Slammers a couple of bronze medal finishes that year in the All-Filipino and Grand Prix before the club bolted out the following year to join the V-League.   With Gumabao, Gohing and Myla Pablo at the helm, the Pocari Sweat dominated the tournament winning the Open Conference and Reinforced Conference titles at the expense of Air Force and the Valdez-led Bureau of Customs, respectively. Creamline despite having collegiate aces Valdez and top setter Jia Morado settled for a third place finish in the PVL’s inaugural Reinforced and Open conferences. The PVL is tentatively scheduled to open April......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 6th, 2018

‘Bato’ promises less bloody war on drugs

VOWING transparency by using body cameras and even allowing the public including the media to join their anti-narcotics operations, the Philippine National Police headed by Director General Ronald ‘Bato’ M. dela Rosa promises a ‘less bloody’ war on drugs this year. But anti-narcotics police will fire their guns when necessary….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJan 1st, 2018

BEST OF 5 PART 2: In 2006, the reign of the Red Lion began

Read Part 1 of ABS-CBN Sports’ Best of 5 series on the San Beda Red Lions here. --- San Beda College is the winningest team in all of NCAA basketball. With 21 championships in the Seniors division, they have four more than second-running archrival Colegio de San Juan de Letran. Almost half of that total comes from the last 12 years where the Red Lions have claimed 10 titles. A dozen years ago, Mendiola having the rightful claim as the winningest all but seemed to be a far- fetched idea. Back in 2005, the red and white only had 11 championships in the Seniors division – way behind what the Knights had. THIS ISN’T WHAT YOU KNOW Then, San Beda was not the dynasty that it is now – and not even one of the top contenders as that recognition belonged to Letran and Philippine Christian University. More than that, they were also right smack in the middle of a 28-year title drought, with their last title coming in the late ‘70s. That 1978 championship was under the guidance of famed mentor Bonnie Carbonell. After him, a number of coaches tried to take home the championship for the Red Lions only to come up short time and again. THEN AND NOW Enter Koy Banal in 2005 and continuing into 2006. And just to give him a good start, he brought along the very same Carbonell who was the school’s last vestige of a championship. “I brought in Freddie Abuda sa coaching staff to add to Chito Victolero and JB Sison who were already there. More important was I also got coach Bonnie Carbonell who was my hero,” he shared. He then continued, “He’s the one who inspired me to coach and he was the last coach who gave San Beda a championship.” As it turns out, Carbonell’s arrival was some sort of premonition as that year was the magical season they had long been waiting for. Even Banal, 11 years since and numerous stints in the PBA and PBA D-League after, could not forget that magical season. As he put it, “That year was really special. That is still in my heart, that is still in my memory. You won’t forget those experiences.” THE EARLY BIRD GETS THE WORM So much so that the now 56-year-old head coach could still narrate what had happened then like it was yesterday. The story of San Beda’s modern-day dynasty starts at the end of Season 81 – following another finish outside of the playoff picture. “Right after our last game in Season 81, I just gave the players one week off,” Banal recalled. “I told them Season 82 is already starting for us.” And so, from October of 2005 onto 2006, they were already gearing up for another shot at ending an almost three-decade long title drought. KINGS OF THE QUEEN CITY OF THE SOUTH That gearing up took them as Cebu where, in Banal’s eyes, all came together for them. “Ang key rito is yung aming preparation. I wanted to create adversity kasi nga I wanted to buil their character kaya we went to Cebu,” he said. He then continued, “’Di lang kami sa isang gym naglaro. Nagpunta kami mismo sa campuses – sa UV (University of Visayas), sa UC (University of Cebu), sa USC (University of San Carlos), USJ-R (University of San Jose-Recoletos. Yun talaga yung key kasi araw-araw na laro tapos may practice pa.” He also added, “Dun talaga kami nag-bond kasi biro mo, magkakasama kami ng one week. Dun talaga nabuo ang San Beda.” Still, all those preparations would have been all for naught without game-changing players. CATALYST FOR CHANGE Fortunately for Mendiola, that time also saw them with perhaps the biggest game-changer in the history of the NCAA. Banal’s very first order of business when he took the job was to bring in a big man – and not just a big man, but a dominant big man. “The primary plan was to recruit a dominant big man because that was the problem of San Beda in the previous seasons. The solution to the problem? A six-foot eight-inch powerhouse hailing from Nigeria. “We brought in Sam Ekwe. I believe his arrival turned the tides for us kasi Rookie (of the Year)-MVP, ano pa bang pwedeng ibigay sa kanya nun,” the mentor said. Indeed, from the get-go, Ekwe proved to be a force the league had not seen before and averaged 10.6 points, 16.5 rebounds, and three blocks. While he has always had the tools, Banal said what made him special was that he was more than willing to know more about how to make good use of those tools. “Very dominant, but willing to learn and listen and follow. Kaya I would like to give the credit to Freddie Abuda kasi siya ang tumutok talaga,” he said. BREAKTHROUGH With Ekwe wowing just about everybody all the way to both the MVP and RoY awards, the Red Lions followed his lead all the way to the championship round. There, they bested the Dolphins – then with future PBA stars such as Beau Belga, Jayson Castro, Gabby Espinas – in an epic three-game series. And it wasn’t even until the very last seconds when Belga’s would-be game-winner clanged off the rim and into the hands of Yousif Aljamal that the decision was definite – Mendiola’s title drought has come to an end. For the head coach who ended it all, even at that moment, he knew full well that it wasn’t about him. “Yung iniisip ko talaga, para sa mga players e. Yung sakripisyo nila, nagbunga kaya kung makikita mo yung video nun, bawat isa, umakap sa akin e,” he said. He then continued, “Special talaga yun, nasa puso ko yun at ‘di makakalimutan. Nothing compares to the championship we all won in San Beda.” FULL CIRCLE As if the good ending needed to be even better, that 28-year wait was tied up neatly by the presence of one Bonnie Carbonell – the head coach of the last title before the drought and a consultant of the first title after the drought. “After winning the championship, kami ni coach Bonnie, may maganda kaming kuha na nag-akapan kaming dalawa. ‘Di ko rin makakalimutan yun,” Banal said. Until now, it’s not just Banal who hasn’t forgotten. Nobody at all will be forgetting about San Beda, winners of 10 of the last 12 championships, anytime soon. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 29th, 2017

Finding Christ in the Philippine National Police

MANILA, Philippines – Call time was earlier than usual in Camp Crame. At 4:30 am, its towering, bleached gates were already giving way to cars that flooded its wide roads in yellow. Strings of light hung over the decades-old trees, mimicking a thousand shooting stars......»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 24th, 2017

Grieving for a brave Pasig cop

Crame files MY family and I join the entire Philippine National Police in mourning the death of Police Officer 3 Wilfredo Gueta, a brave Pasig City policeman who was killed in a bloody encounter with a group of armed drug traffickers on Monday noon. I also commiserate with PO3 Gueta’s….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsDec 19th, 2017

Champs league sets comeback

MANILA, Philippines — The National Collegiate Championships (NCC) will make a comeback after a two-year hiatus as the organizing Philippine Collegiate Champi.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 19th, 2017

Coach E, Danny I, TDLC are Alaska’s aces up the sleeve

A season ago, Alaska was booted out of the quarterfinals in the Philippine Cup and failed to make the playoffs of both the reinforced conference. That was the first season in recent memory that the Aces were not contending as just in 2015 to 2016, they made four Finals appearances. Hoping to recapture some of that magic, they drafted Jeron Teng fifth overall and added Davon Potts in the second round of the 2017 PBA Draft. Teng is a two-time UAAP champion, two-time Finals MVP, four-time Mythical selection, and former Rookie of the Year while Potts is a back-to-back champion. Those two polished products are nothing but ready and raring to contribute to a battle-hardened core of Calvin Abueva, Chris Banchero, Jvee Casio, Vic Manuel, and Sonny Thoss. That’s not the only place Alaska got busy with retooling, however. With longtime coaches Louie Alas and Topex Robinson departing for Phoenix, head coach Alex Compton struck gold with their replacements. “I am really excited about the new coaches we have added to our coaching staff,” he said. Now serving as Compton’s first lieutenant is Eric Altamirano who won two championships in the PBA as well as a historic title for National University in the UAAP. “He is a proven winner, a veteran coach, and a man of excellence,” the former said. Tasked to oversee the big men including Manuel, Thoss, Noy Baclao, and Jake Pascual will be Danny Ildefonso who will be making a return to the PBA after retiring as a player in 2016. “He has always had a tremendous work ethic and now, he is already having a tremendous impact on the development of our big men,” Compton said of his new assistant who won eight championships and two MVPs. Finally, 18-year veteran Tony Dela Cruz is now part of the staff and will be relied upon to relay the Aces’ trapping system to the likes of Teng and Potts. “He knows the ins and out of our system. He has already made a very smooth transition into coaching,” the head coach said of his player turned peer. With all that, Alaska is nothing but confident that it will have a much-improved campaign all around this season. “We will get better,” Compton promised. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 18th, 2017

Classmates to join Bato in Munti

Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre II has endorsed the appointment of three retired police generals as deputy directors of the Bureau of Corrections (BuCor).   Aguirre identified the three as former Calabarzon regional police chief Valfrie Tabian, who is the current BuCor officer in charge, former Bicol police chief Melvin Ramon Buenafe and former major crimes investigator Heriberto Olitoquit.   The three are all former Philippine Military Academy classmates of Philippine National Police Director General Ronald dela Rosa, whom President Duterte said would also assume the BuCor helm in March or April next year, Aguirre said....Keep on reading: Classmates to join Bato in Munti.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017