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ST week festivities to happen in Cagayan

MANILA, August 10 -- Following the success of the recently concluded National Science and Technology Week (NSTW) held in Manila, Region 2 will kick off its 2018 Regional Science and Technology Week (R.....»»

Category: newsSource: manilanews manilanewsAug 10th, 2018

ST week festivities to happen in Cagayan

MANILA, August 10 -- Following the success of the recently concluded National Science and Technology Week (NSTW) held in Manila, Region 2 will kick off its 2018 Regional Science and Technology Week (R.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

LOOK: Charlotte Hornets go retro with Classic Night

      CHARLOTTE, USA – The second night of 2018-2019 NBA Opening Week had one of the league’s 1988 expansion teams showing off a classic look.  As part of the night’s festivities, the Hornets wore a throwback of the first uniforms when the team debuted back in the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

AP interview: Rosberg expects F1 merger with electric series

By Rob Harris, Associated Press Highlighting fresh concerns about global warming, Nico Rosberg foresees an eventual merger between the fuel-guzzling Formula One championship and the more environmentally friendly, electric motorsport series. The German driver retired from F1 after winning his only title in 2016, and he has since invested in the four-year-old Formula E championship, which he said is now worth 750 million euros ($870 million). While F1 remains more attractive to sponsors and fans, the upstart series is showing increasing commercial appeal. Heineken, which already sponsors F1, was announced on Monday as the official beer and cider backer of the electric street racing championship under a five-year deal. That unified approach to marketing across both series points to a future where they join forces. "Maybe we will never even get to that point (where Formula E is bigger than F1) and we will just see a merger between Formula One and Formula E before that," Rosberg said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press on Monday. "When the moment comes that Formula One needs to go electric, which will happen, maybe you will just see a merger then." They already share ownership through American entertainment and broadcasting magnate John Malone's companies. Liberty Global was already the biggest shareholder in Formula E when Liberty Media bought F1 in 2017. "The step for Formula One to go electric will be a big and difficult one," Rosberg said. "If that ever happens." It might become inevitable, with a fast-warming planet to be protected, and sports conscious of its role. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued a gloomy report last week which said the difference between life and death for multitudes of people around the world could be whether world leaders find a way to reduce future warming caused by humans by less than a single degree Fahrenheit. "It's a real problem out there in the world and we need to do what we can as fast as possible to help all together," Rosberg said. "If the whole world is selling and driving electric cars," he added, "it doesn't make sense for Formula One to be combustion engines, so that moment will come. The advantage is that Formula One and Formula E have the same owner." Although the cars are quieter compared to the ear-splitting, fuel-guzzling engines in F1, the new Gen 2 models which run faster and longer have been introduced. Nissan and BMW will be debuting on the grid when the fifth Formula E championship begins in Saudi Arabia in December. There has also been a high-profile signing for the series: Former F1 driver Felipe Massa racing for Venturi, the Monaco-based team co-owned by actor Leonardo Di Caprio. Stoffel Vandoorne announced on Monday he is also making the switch from F1, joining the Mercedes-linked HWA Racelab Formula E team after leaving McLaren at the end of this season. Rosberg is already looking forward to the following season when Mercedes-Benz and Porsche appear on the grid. "That will be a spectacle everyone will want to watch," Rosberg said. "They need to showcase their electric technology in Formula E. None of them can afford to lose.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 16th, 2018

Mid-term project

The announced state visit to the Philippines of China’s President Xi Jinping will likely happen this November. In his message on the occasion of the 149th National Day of China last week, President Rodrigo Duterte stated he is looking forward to the forthcoming reciprocal visit of the Chinese leader in Manila......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 8th, 2018

Rockets hope Paul can escape bad luck and help team to title

By KRISTIE RIEKEN,  AP Sports Writer LAKE CHARLES, La. (AP) — Houston Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta said this week that his team was a "hamstring" away from the Western Conference title last season. The hamstring he was referring to was Chris Paul's, with the injury the latest setback for the point guard whose illustrious career at times has seemed cursed. After signing Paul to a four-year, $160 million extension in the offseason, the Rockets hope the bad luck ends this year and he'll help them to their first title since 1995. "Chris deserves a championship," Fertitta said. "It is time. But luck is luck and it just takes a little luck in sports. You have to set yourself up to be one of the best and then you need a few things to fall into place." The Rockets led the Warriors 3-2 in the conference finals last season before Paul's season ended with a hamstring injury in Game 5. Golden State won the next two games to advance to the Finals and go on to win the title. Paul scoffed at the notion that his ill-timed hamstring injury was the worst thing that's happened to him. "If that's the toughest thing, then I'm living a real good life," he said. "But it's definitely up there as far as basketball goes, as far as not being able to influence the outcome. If that doesn't do something to you then you're in the wrong profession." But that disappointing end to Paul's first season in Houston was far from the first time things have gone awry at the worst times for the nine-time All-Star. He was dogged for years about his inability to escape the second round of the playoffs after making nine trips to the postseason without ever reaching the conference finals before finally breaking through with the Rockets last season. Paul looked sure to advance in 2015 when he and the Clippers were up 3-1 over the Rockets in the conference semifinals. But they were routed in Game 5 before squandering a 19-point second-half lead in a loss at home in Game 6 and being eliminated in Houston in Game 7. No one with the Rockets would go as far as to say that Paul might be cursed, but everyone agreed that he's had more than his share of bad luck. Coach Mike D'Antoni feels for Paul. But this isn't the first time he's worked with a superstar point guard with problems such as these. D'Antoni coached Steve Nash for four seasons on those great teams in Phoenix that were never able to win a title. Nash was named MVP twice, but finished an 18-year career without a ring. "(Paul's) had a remarkable career, so I don't know how bad of luck it is," D'Antoni said. "Just sometimes at the end of a season it doesn't quite work out. Steve Nash was that way where he had just weird stuff happen. It happens." "But you keep knocking on the door and eventually it will (open)," D'Antoni continued. So, does Paul spend a lot of time sitting around thinking about what might have been if he'd been healthy for those last two games last season? "It sounds crazy but unfortunately I've had a lot of different adversities and challenges and whatnot," he said. "And I know it sounds cliche, but it only made me stronger mentally and everything like that. So for me ... I don't even think about it now." As the owner of Golden Nugget casinos across the country, Fertitta knows a thing or two about luck. He also knows about heartbreak as a sports fan after cheering on the Houston Oilers for years only to see them fall short of winning a title again and again before leaving for Tennessee. "The Oilers kept trying to kick the door down and it never happened," he said wistfully. That doesn't mean he isn't optimistic that it's time for the tide to turn for Paul, who is entering his 14th NBA season. But Paul doesn't think of it that way. Of course, his goal is to win a title and put his years of coming up short behind him. He just doesn't see it as him being due for some good fortune. "Whatever's going to happen is going to happen and if that's the bad luck that I've had there's some people who have had a lot worse luck than I've had," he said. "So, for me ... whatever happens you move on and you go to the next thing.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 29th, 2018

Still no power in Cagayan, Kalinga due to Typhoon Ompong

Power has yet to be fully restored in Cagayan and Kalinga after Typhoon Ompong hit Northern Luzon last week......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 27th, 2018

They re past their prime, but good luck! - Top Rank s Bob Arum to Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr

On the sidelines of the official press conference of the Jerwin Ancjas vs. Alejandro Santiago press conference in San Francisco, Top Rank Chief Bob Arum gamely elaborated on his comments on the possibility of a second Pacquiao versus Mayweather Jr. fight. The 86-year old executive admitted to how he reacted the first time he heard the news of Floyd and Manny trying to put together a second fight.  “Here we go again! The last time it took them five years to make it happen, maybe this time it will take them four?” Arum said.  Sarcasm aside, Arum wished both fighters luck and explained why Top Ranked will not be involved whatsoever this time around. “Well you know good luck to them," Arum added. "I really sort of have my doubts whether it will happen, but if it happens, at least though you know they make considerable money, and this is boxing, this is a business."  "You know as far as Top Rank is concerned, the reason I said we would not be involved is that we're doing almost three events a month here. Every weekend, where we're off with our next show, is two weeks from now in Omaha and then a week later in Las Vegas with the Japanese middleweight champion.” he continued.  Arum himself did not pull his punches in calling both fighters out as clearly beyond their best years.  “So we really don't have time for fighters who you know, are really past that peak. Whatever you say about them, will it be an entertaining fight? I don't know, I think so because, I mean that those two were great, they were great fighters in their time and I think there'll be a lot of nostalgia, so you know, I'm not saying, I'm not criticizing the fight, We just don't have time to get involved” The last time the media heard from either Pacquiao or Mayweather Jr.’s camp was rumours of a formal announcement possibly happening in Manila, with both fighters present. But to this day nothing has materialised......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2018

Familiar issues, but no panic for Patriots after 1-2 start

By KYLE HIGHTOWER,  AP Sports Writer BOSTON (AP) — Two weeks, two head-shaking losses by the New England Patriots. In Week 2, the Patriots' defense was deficient in a 31-20 loss to Jacksonville in which the Patriots were victimized on third down. There were problems all over the field in Sunday's stunning 26-10 loss at Detroit, though it was Tom Brady and the Patriots offense that struggled the most against a defense coached by former Patriots defensive coordinator and new Lions head coach Matt Patricia. It's left New England at 1-2 for the first time since 2012. Things won't get any easier as the Patriots prepare to open their division schedule against 3-0 Miami. Patriots coach Bill Belichick said he sees problems everywhere on the field right now. "We're not making enough plays in any phase of the game, so we've just got to perform better," he said. "I think the energy and the effort and all of that — we're trying. Everybody's trying hard. We're just not getting it done, which is all that matters." One of the most surprising things in Sunday's loss to the Lions was how ineffective Detroit managed to render quarterback Tom Brady. The reigning regular-season MVP completed just 14 of 26 passes for 133 yards with one touchdown. He also had a costly interception midway through the fourth quarter that helped the Lions seal the victory. The 133 passing yards for Brady were his fewest in a game since he went 8 of 16 for 80 yards against Buffalo on Dec. 28, 2014. What's more troubling, though, is an offense that over the past two weeks has gone 6 of 21 on third down. "We're not scoring enough points. We're not executing well enough on a down-by-down basis. Certainly, at a high level, we should have our expectations set in," Brady said. "The process has been the same, there's been a lot of talk about it in practice, and we're going through it and watching the film and correcting stuff, it's just not getting done on the field. And we have to get it corrected soon." One common theme in the way the Jaguars and Lions succeeded in limiting the Patriots offensively, was keying on tight end Rob Gronkowski. One of Brady's favorite options, Gronk has just 13 catches for 189 yards and a touchdown this season. He hasn't scored in either of the two losses, hauling in only six total receptions. But Gronkowski said no one inside the Patriots' locker room is panicking about starting 1-2. "I mean, it's early, it's football and it's the NFL," he said. "Some crazy things happen every single week and we've just got to bounce back. We can't put our heads down, we have to keep them up. We've got to keep on fighting and there's another week next week." "We've got a big division game next week versus Miami. We've just got to keep on fighting. It's a long season, I know we're 1-2 right now, but we've got to keep on fighting and keep on going. There's no other way to do it.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018

NFA: Pile of rice at port not hoard

CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY---The National Food Authority (NFA) in Northern Mindanao belied reports of rice hoarding at the Mindanao Container Terminal (MCT) in Tagoloan, Misamis Oriental. "If you see piles of rice bags inside the warehouse, that doesn't automatically mean they're hoarding," said Hazel Belacho, the NFA regional office's information officer. Floro Calixihan, Bureau of Customs regional collector, said people might have suspected that piles of rice sacks at the port last week were hoarded goods. He said the pileup was caused by a "slight delay" in X-ray scanning and inspection of the shipment at the customs examination area "because there was only one X-ray scanning unit a...Keep on reading: NFA: Pile of rice at port not hoard.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

No way the Pacquiao-Mayweather 2 will happen this year

Manny Pacquao-Floyd Mayweather 2 this year? Forget it. A few days following their chance meeting in Tokyo where both announced their agreement to face each other anew this coming December in a repeat of their 2015 showdown, the Filipino legend and his American undefeated counterpart appeared to have changed their minds. Pacquiao, early this week, [...] The post No way the Pacquiao-Mayweather 2 will happen this year appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2018

DILG asks 16 Cagayan, Cordillera mayors to explain absence

The Department of the Interior and Local Government has issued show cause orders to 16 mayors from Cagayan Valley and the Cordillera Administrative Region, seeking explanation for their absence in their respective jurisdictions at the height of the onslaught of Typhoon Ompong last week......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

Tom Brady loses for 1st time in 9 games vs Jaguars, 31-20

By Mark Long, Associated Press JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Tom Brady trudged off the field with his helmet in one hand, grass stains on his jersey and a look of frustration on his face. This was a different feeling for the New England Patriots quarterback — at least against Jacksonville. Brady lost for the first time in nine starts against the Jaguars, a 31-20 setback Sunday in which Blake Bortles outshined the three-time league MVP and five-time Super Bowl champion. Jacksonville had been the only remaining AFC team to never beat Brady. The Jags (2-0) finally got it done in a rematch of last season's AFC championship game. It shouldn't take long for Brady and the Patriots (1-1) to bounce back. They play winless Detroit next week. "It's a long year," Brady said. "I think you have a bad day against a good team, it's a recipe for losing." Brady completed 24 of 35 passes for 234 yards, with two touchdowns and a turnover. He was sacked twice, including once by Dante Fowler in the fourth quarter that caused a fumble. He said New England's offensive execution has room for improvement. "I don't think it's anywhere near where we're capable of or what we've done at different points through a season," Brady said. "We've got to make improvements, and I think September and October, that's what they're for. I think there's a lot of practices we need and a lot of time that we need to figure out what we do well and what we don't do so well. But you have to try to win in the meantime. And today obviously wasn't enough." The Jaguars, who can get to 3-0 for the first time since 2004 next week against Tennessee, did just about everything right. They held tight end Rob Gronkowski to two catches for 15 yards. They slowed New England's running game to 3.4 yards a carry. They allowed just two plays longer than 25 yards. And Bortles delivered the best game of his five-year career. Bortles threw for 377 yards and four touchdowns. He tossed perfect passes in the end zone to Donte Moncrief, Keelan Cole and Austin Seferian-Jenkins in the first half, and then connected with Dede Westbrook on a short crossing route in the fourth quarter that Westbrook turned into a 61-yard score . "We go against Blake in practice," Jaguars defensive end Calais Campbell said. "He has some days where he is just lights out and gets us. If he can get us, he can get anybody because we feel pretty good about ourselves. I know what's going to happen. If he keeps getting opportunities, he's going to be a big-time player. "I was just grabbing popcorn every time the ball was in Bortles' hands. I say, 'He's going to do something great', and then he's running and spinning and, man, it was impressive." Here are some other things we learned from the game: COLE STEPS UP Cole had the key block on Westbrook's big play that sealed the victory and is proving to be the team's go-to receiver. He finished with seven catches for 116 yards and a score. He made a spectacular, one-handed catch on Jacksonville's second drive and beat Eric Rowe for a 24-yard touchdown three plays later that got Rowe benched. "Keelan made an unbelievable play on the sideline," coach Doug Marrone said. "Everybody saw that. He's a guy that has been really steady for us, really worked his butt off. ... The first year is tough. You're trying to find your way. That second year you kind of get set in a way, and he's been good right from the beginning, very focused and has done a nice job for us." HOME STREAKING The Jaguars can set a franchise record next week by winning their eighth consecutive game at home. They host Tennessee next Sunday. Jacksonville hasn't lost at home since falling to the Los Angeles Rams in Week 6 of last season. RECORD HEAT The teams played in the hottest game in Jaguars history. Temperature at kickoff was 97 degrees, with a heat index of 107 degrees. According to the NFL, it was the warmest game since Green Bay played at Arizona in 2003. KEY INJURIES The Patriots lost two of their best defenders to concussions. Defensive end Trey Flowers left the game in the first quarter, and safety Patrick Chung was hurt injured in the second half. Jaguars left tackle Cam Robinson injured his left knee in the first quarter and was helped off the field. UP NEXT The Patriots play at Detroit, where former New England defensive coordinator Matt Patricia is now the head coach. The Jaguars host AFC South rival Tennessee in the second of three straight home games......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Rams defense living up to early expectations after shutout

By Joe Reedy, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — Only two games have been played, yet the Rams defense is living up to its lofty expectations. Los Angeles put on a dominating display in Sunday's 34-0 victory over Arizona as it gave up only five first downs and didn't allow the Cardinals to cross midfield until the final minute of the game. "If we can play elite defense like that and put up zeroes across the board and let our offense just run up and down the field, so be it," defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh said. The Rams ended up making the Cardinals a one-dimensional team. Arizona averaged only 2.6 yards on first-down plays and often found itself getting behind schedule on second and third down. David Johnson also was never able to find any consistency as he was held to 48 yards on 13 carries. While the Rams had 10 plays in which they gained 17 yards or more, Arizona's longest play went for 15 and it had only three of 10 yards or more. "I can't remember the time I've seen a defense play that complete from whistle to whistle," Rams coach Sean McVay said. "We're playing good situationally, stopping the run on early downs and getting ourselves into situations where you can really dictate things." The Rams haven't allowed a point in their last six quarters and have only given up one touchdown, but they face a larger challenge next week against the Chargers and Philip Rivers. Even though things are clicking right now, defensive tackle Aaron Donald thinks there still is a lot ahead of them. "I think we can even get better. That's the scary thing," he said. LONG TIME COMING The Rams are 2-0 for the first time since 2001, when they made their third Super Bowl appearance. What made McVay even more pleased was how his team responded on a short week following last Monday's 33-13 win at Oakland. The Rams had only one day of a regular game week practice, using Wednesday as more of a walkthrough instead of what is normally one of the toughest practice days of the week. "When you've got mature players that know how to take care of themselves, but also get them ready physically and mentally you can take those types of approaches," he said. "Really for the players to be able to handle this week the way that they did says a lot about our team and hopefully we'll continue to take steps." BACKUP PLAN Greg Zuerlein's status is questionable after he strained his groin during pregame warmups and was unable to play. Punter Johnny Hekker handled kickoff duties and was good on a 20-yard field goal and extra point. Hekker is normally the holder on field goals and extra points, but wide receiver Cooper Kupp handled that on Sunday. "I can't imagine thinking you're going to punt the whole game and then like, 'Hey, Johnny (Hekker) you're going to kick field goals, too.' I don't think anyone flinched," quarterback Jared Goff said. "We love Greg and we need him out there and we want to have him back as soon as possible, but stuff like that may happen." If Zuerlein has to miss any more games, the Rams are likely to give Sam Ficken a call. Ficken was with the team during training camp before being released and was with the team for three games last season, including the playoffs, when Zuerlein suffered a season ending back injury. He was 4 of 5 on field goals and 5 of 6 on extra points. STUCK IN NEUTRAL The Cardinals have scored only one touchdown in their first two games and have just two plays of 20 yards or more, which came in their Week 1 loss to Washington. Coach Steve Wilks said he didn't consider replacing quarterback Sam Bradford with first-round pick Josh Rosen during the game and ran down a long list of problems that he has to solve before next week's game against Chicago. "I don't even know where to start right now. We've got to do a much better job running the football. We've got to do a much better job protecting. Receivers got to get off the jam at the line of scrimmage," Wilks said. "I think you have to find ways, number one, you have to find a way to generate positive plays on first and second down, so we don't find ourselves in a third-and-long type situation." INJURIES Cardinals: WR Larry Fitzgerald injured his hamstring during the fourth quarter and did not return. Fitzgerald said after the game that he could have continued to play but that he didn't know how effective he would have been. Rams: RB Todd Gurley did not play during the fourth quarter due to cramping but was fine in the locker room after the game......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Floyd Mayweather Jr. rematch is unfinished business, says Manny Pacquiao

Over the weekend, social media went into a frenzy as Floyd “Money” Mayweather Jr. announced on his Instagram account that he would be coming out of retirement for a rematch with Manny Pacquiao. It was easy to shrug the news off, but then Pacquiao responded on his Instagram with a post of his own and fueling the talks of a potential rematch. As it turns out, the little Instagram back-and-forth could actually turn out to be a legitimate fight announcement.  According to Senior Ring Magazine writer Mike Coppinger, the rematch is already in the advanced stage of negotiations, with the fight being planned for Las Vegas and December 1 or December 8 as target dates. Breaking: Talks for #MayweatherPacquiao2 are in the advanced stages and it’s expected there will be contracts out this week, according to industry sources. Once finalized, the fight will likely land in Las Vegas and two target dates are Dec. 1 and Dec. 8 — Mike Coppinger (@MikeCoppinger) September 17, 2018  In his first interview since the interaction with Mayweather, Pacquiao basically confirmed that the fight is happening.   "Well, he’s announcing his comeback from retirement, so he wants to fight, he challenged me, he wants get my belt." Mayweather has mostly been retired since late-2015, returning to action last year for a big money super-fight with UFC star Conor McGregor. Pacquiao on the other hand, has remained active, save for a brief eight-month retirement perioid in 2016. Last July, Pacquiao captured his eleventh-world championship by defeating Lucas Matthysse for the WBA (Regular) Welterweight World Championship in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Pacquiao himself confirmed that he and Mayweather are indeed in negotiation-mode, without giving away too much information.  "Right now we’re in the middle of negotiations, hoping to finalize that." Pacquiao shared with Dyan Castillejo of ABS-CBN News. "Sa ngayon, pag-uusapan pa yung negotiations, we’re in the middle of negotiations, so hindi pa natin masabi kung kailan or kung ano yung exact date." "I’m always available. I’m always available for him." Pacquiao added.  @mannypacquiao says @FloydMayweather wants his belt and they will continue to discuss details of planned superfight #MP #TMT pic.twitter.com/nZCOW4sByN — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 17, 2018 I’m always available for him . @mannypacquiao to @FloydMayweather #MP #TMT pic.twitter.com/5nf01HrZz3 — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 17, 2018 If the fight does push through, it will be a highly-anticipated rematch of their 2015 bout, which saw Mayweather emerge victorious via Unanimous Decision after twelve rounds.  For Pacquiao, he feels that he has some unfinished business with the unbeaten fighter, which is why he's pushing for the rematch to happen.  "Ang importante ay matuloy na para makita, para hindi unfinished business yung kaming dalawa. Para bang nanakawan tayo ng panalo and matagal na panahon ang hinintay natin." The eight-division boxing world champion is confident that he can come out with the win this time around.  "Right now, alam ko na yung gagawin ko." As far as his training is concerned, Pacquiao has yet to reveal where he'll be holding camp. For his bout against Matthysse, Pacquiao held camp in his gym in General Santos, with close friend Buboy Fernandez overseeing matters.  "Kung saan man ako mag-training, basta I’ll put myself through strict and disciplined training." the 39-year old boxer-turned-statesman said.      @mannypacquiao on @FloydMayweather as unfinished business pic.twitter.com/YiUU3gdAhI — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 17, 2018.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Forum seeks answers to rise in CEPALCO power rates

A forum on the Mindanao Power Situation has been scheduled this week to shed light on the unprecedented rise in the prices of electricity in Northern Mindanao, especially in the franchise area of the Cagayan Electric Power and Light Co. (CEPALCO) which covers Cagayan de Oro City and the municipalities of Tagoloan, Villanueva and Jasaan, Misamis Oriental......»»

Category: newsSource:  kagay_anRelated NewsSep 14th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Here s why Chris Webber should be in the Hall of Fame

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst C-Webb needs to be in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. My Turner colleague Chris Webber has always brought out polarizing opinions -- first as a player, and now as a broadcaster. And I’m not objective when it comes to him, either. I love the guy. He’s a true student of the game, not afraid to speak his mind on and off the court, and is someone whose love for the game knows no equal. It’s just a matter of time before he gets his chance to run a team, either in the front office or as a part-owner. But it will and should happen. And, after his impactful career as a player, he should be enshrined in Springfield. Everyone’s criteria for the Hall is different. To me, getting in the Hall as a player requires a yes answer to two questions: 1) were you among the very best at your position for a substantial period of time during your career, and 2) did your presence and/or play change the game in a meaningful way while you played? (This is why a guy like Sixers guard Andrew Toney, in my view, is HOF-worthy, even though “The Boston Strangler” played from 1980-88 and was limited significantly by injury in two of those seasons.) Webber is a “yes” to both of those questions. In the NBA, Webber was a five-time All-Star, four times with the Kings, and was Rookie of the Year in 1993. He was first- or second-team All NBA four times. His career PER of 20.9 is the highest of any non-retired and Hall of Fame eligible player that isn’t currently in the Hall. (Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett each have higher PERs than Webber, and each is an obvious HOF lock, but they aren’t Hall of Fame eligible until 2020.) Webber’s career PER is better than those of Hall of Famers including Allen Iverson, Bob McAdoo, Ed McCauley, George McGinnis, Billy Cunningham, Steve Nash, David Thompson, Connie Hawkins, Alex English, Walt Bellamy, Cliff Hagan and many others. Yet in his fifth year of eligibility, Webber was again passed over by the Hall of Fame voters this year. That needs to change. His impact on the game, from high school to being a member of the “Fab Five” at Michigan in college and during his 15 NBA seasons, is undeniable. The Hall encompasses all of a person’s basketball achievements, and Webber’s career is Hall-worthy. At Country Day High School in Michigan, he led his team to three state championships, averaging 29 points and 13 rebounds per game his senior season, when he was a consensus national player of the year. He then decided to cap an incredible recruiting class, which had three of the top 10 players in the country, among a group of freshmen that came to be known as “The Fab Five.” (Also on that Michigan team was a junior guard who averaged 2.9 points per game, who had no future as pro player, but who carved out a place for himself nonetheless in the NBA -- Rob Pelinka, who became a high-powered agent representing the likes of Kobe Bryant before becoming the Lakers’ General Manager in 2017.) “The Fab Five”, like it or not -- and, I liked it very much -- changed basketball forever. And Webber was the lynchpin of those Michigan teams that reached consecutive NCAA championship games in 1992 and ‘93. Across the board, the Fab Five had long-lasting impact. Aesthetically, they were vanguards, wearing long, loooong shorts that became all the rage throughout basketball.  And while trash talking has been at the heart of hoops for generations, Michigan raised it to a team-wide art form. It drove traditionalists crazy, while kids watching at home loved it. They were the accelerant to the “one-and-done” era, even though none of them left Michigan after their freshman season. But seeing five freshmen start games and play the lion’s share of minutes rippled throughout the college game. Going forward, teams didn’t just recruit blue-chippers, they put them on the floor immediately. What John Calipari does annually at Kentucky now is but the logical conclusion to what Michigan started, and every Power 5 team in college basketball has had to follow suit or get left behind. Of course, “The Fab Five” era wound up being star-crossed. I’m well aware of the penalties assessed to the Michigan program because of the money that Ed Martin gave to players, including Webber. The university vacated the ‘92-93 season, including all of its NCAA Tournament games that year, and took down the banners commemorating “The Fab Five” and their two Final Four runs. (Michigan also vacated all of its games from 1995-96 because of Martin’s associations with other players on teams during those seasons, and its ‘93, ‘96 and ‘98 NCAA Tournament appearances, as well as its ‘97 NIT title and ‘98 Big 10 Tournament championship.) It’s obvious to me that if not for his involvement with Martin, Webber would have been on the 2000 U.S. Olympic team, which won the gold medal in Australia, as well -- another potential feather in his cap that would bolster his Hall of Fame credentials. I will say, as delicately as I can, that there are coaches and players in the Hall that have been accused of doing some of the very things that got Michigan and Webber in so much trouble. That, in and of itself, should not be disqualifying. Webber’s NBA career also did not include a championship. But he was just as impactful on the pro game. Beginning in Golden State and Washington, C-Webb was a category all his own -- a big man with catcher’s mitts for hands who could pulverize in transition, yet was also an incredibly deft passer, both from the post or out front. As a rookie, Webber elevated Golden State from a 34-48 record in 1992-93 to 50-32 the next season. Traded to Washington after that one season with the Warriors, having conflicted mightily with Coach Don Nelson, Webber helped get the then-Bullets to the postseason for the first time in nine years. Once there, the Bullets went toe-to-toe with the defending-champion Bulls in a tough, three-game first-round series in ’97. But it wasn’t until Webber was sent to what was then the equivalent of Siberia in the NBA -- Sacramento -- that his game reached full flower. Playing with another excellent passing big man in Vlade Divac, and a flashy savant of a point guard in Jason Williams, Webber and the Kings were the vanguard of the modern NBA game, coming to fruition years before the Suns’ Seven Seconds or Less attack led by one of last week’s Hall of Fame inductees, Steve Nash. The Kings moved the ball with flair and purpose. The Warriors have changed the game forever by stretching the floor to the breaking point for opposing defenses with their 3-point proficiency, but even they didn’t have what Sacramento possessed -- two bigs who could initiate and finish from anywhere inside the 3-point line. No one could do what the Kings could do, and with Webber, Sacramento changed almost overnight from perennial joke to perennial championship contender. The Kings made the playoffs six straight seasons, reaching the Western Conference finals in 2002 before losing in controversial fashion to the Lakers in seven games. Webber’s knee injury during the Kings’ semifinal playoff series with Dallas in 2003 marked the beginning of the end for him and the Kings. If he hadn’t gotten hurt, Sacramento probably would have beaten the Mavericks and played San Antonio in the West finals. And while San Antonio would have been favored in that series, the Kings would have had a chance, with the winner facing the Nets in The Finals that year. And a championship would also have made C-Webb’s pro career look much different. But, that didn’t happen. It doesn’t matter, though. Webb’s career stands on its own merits. At all levels, he has had impact and changed the game, and he deserves to have his moment in the sun in Springfield. Sometimes it takes players of merit a little longer, for various reasons -- think Spencer Haywood, or, this year, Mo Cheeks. Chris Webber is a Hall of Famer, and it isn’t a close call. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Tom Ford kicks off festivities amid heat

NEW YORK Fashion Week opened with a bang with a master class from Tom Ford, A-list models oozing subdued sophistication in neutral palettes with Tom Hanks and breakout rom-com star Henry Golding front row. The post Tom Ford kicks off festivities amid heat appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsSep 9th, 2018

PVL: Tigresses keep eyes focused on Finals seat

Already on the cusp of its breakthrough championship stint, University of Sto. Tomas is keen on sustaining its momentum and not give Far Eastern University a chance to recover. The Tigresses are now a win away from advancing to the best-of-three Finals of the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference after drawing first blood, 16-25, 26-24, 25-18, 25-23, in their semis showdown against old UAAP rival Lady Tamaraws. UST can seal the series on Saturday. To keep their focus on their ultimate goal, assistant coach Yani Fernandez, who is taking over coaching duties with head mentor Kungfu Reyes joining the national women’s volleyball team’s campaign in the Jakarta Palembang Asian Games, reminded his wards that there is still much work to be done.   “We’ll take it as parang 0-0 pa rin para yung hunger at kagustuhan ng mga bata nandoon pa rin,” said Fernandez, who is looking to steer UST to its first Finals appearance in a Sports Vision organized tournament since 2012. The then Maika Ortiz, Maru Banaticla and Rhea Dimaculangan-led Tigresses fell short against Ateneo de Manila University in the championship of the defunct V-League Season 9 1st Conference. UST also repeated over FEU after the Tigresses outlasted the Lady Tams in five sets at the end of the elimination round last week in Cagayan de Oro. Fernandez is hoping to ride the crest of their mastery over FEU in their last two meetings to finish off the Lady Tams. “At least ‘yung good momentum na sinasabi ko nga sa mga bata kahit papaano nasa amin. Yun lang ang advantage, ang sinasabing good momentum. But the game itself hindi pa naman,” he said. Game 3, if necessary, is on Sunday.   ---   Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 30th, 2018

1, done: Halep 1st No. 1 to lose 1st Open match; Serena wins

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Some players, like top-ranked Simona Halep, freely acknowledge they don't deal well with the hustle-and-bustle of the U.S. Open and all it entails. Others, like 44th-ranked Kaia Kanepi, take to the Big Apple and its Grand Slam tournament. Put those two types at opposite ends of a court at Flushing Meadows and watch what can happen: Halep made a quick-as-can-be exit Monday, overwhelmed by the power-based game of Kanepi 6-2, 6-4 to become the first No. 1-seeded woman to lose her opening match at the U.S. Open in the half-century of the professional era. On a Day 1 that featured the major tournament debut of 25-second serve clocks, Halep blamed opening-round jitters, a recurring theme throughout her career. The reigning French Open champion has now lost her first match at 12 of 34 career major appearances, a stunningly high rate for such an accomplished player. "It's always about the nerves," said Halep, who was beaten in the first round in New York by five-time major champion Maria Sharapova in 2017. "Even when you are there in the top, you feel the same nerves. You are human." She also offered up an explanation tied to this particular site. "Maybe the noise in the crowd. The city is busy. So everything together," said Halep, who was coming off consecutive runs to the final at hard-court tuneup tournaments at Cincinnati and Montreal. "I'm a quiet person, so maybe I like the smaller places." Her departure means she can't stand in the way of Serena Williams, who could have faced Halep in the fourth round. Williams, the 23-time major champion who missed last year's U.S. Open because she gave birth on Sept. 1, returned with a flourish, following singer Kelly Clarkson's opening night performance in Arthur Ashe Stadium with a 6-4, 6-0 victory over Magda Linette under the lights. "The first set was tight. It was my first back here in New York, so that wasn't the easiest," Williams told the crowd. "Once I got settled, I started doing what I'm trying to do in practice." Williams, a six-time winner at Flushing Meadows, moved a step closer to a possible third-round matchup against her older sister, two-time winner Venus, who defeated 2004 champion Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-3, 5-7, 6-3. Others making the second round included defending champion and No. 3 seed Sloane Stephens, two-time finalist Victoria Azarenka, and two-time major champ Garbine Muguruza. Four seeded men lost, including No. 8 Grigor Dimitrov against three-time major champion Stan Wawrinka, who also beat him in the first round of Wimbledon, No. 16 Kyle Edmund and No. 19 Roberto Bautista Agut. Andy Murray, whose three major titles include the 2012 U.S. Open, played his first Grand Slam match in more than a year and won, eliminating James Duckworth 6-7 (5), 6-3, 7-5, 6-3. At night, defending champion Rafael Nadal advanced when the man he beat in the 2013 French Open final, David Ferrer, stopped in the second set because of an injury, while 2009 champ Juan Martin del Potro had no trouble dismissing Donald Young 6-0, 6-3, 6-4. Halep's loss was the first match at the rebuilt Louis Armstrong Stadium, which now has about 14,000 seats and a retractable roof, and what a way to get things started. That cover was not needed to protect from rain on Day 1 at the year's last major tournament — although some protection from the bright sun and its 90-degree (33-degree Celsius) heat might have been in order. "The courts suit my game, and I love being in New York. I like the city," said Kanepi, who is from Estonia and is sharing a coach this week with another player, Andrea Petkovic. "I like the weather: humid and hot." But several players had trouble in the heat, struggling with cramping or simply breathing. Since professionals first were allowed to enter Grand Slam tournaments in 1968, only five times before Monday did women seeded No. 1 lose their opening match at a major — and never at the U.S. Open. It happened twice to Martina Hingis and once to Steffi Graf at Wimbledon, once to Angelique Kerber at the French Open and once to Virginia Ruzici at the Australian Open. Halep got off to a slow start at Roland Garros this year, too, dropping her opening set, also by a 6-2 score, but ended up pulling out the victory there and adding six more to lift the trophy. There would be no such turnaround for her against Kanepi, a big hitter who dictated the points to claim her second career win against a top-ranked player — but first top-20 victory since 2015. Kanepi has shown the occasional ability to grab significant results, including a run to the quarterfinals at Flushing Meadows a year ago. On this day, Kanepi took charge of baseline exchanges, compiling a 26-9 edge in winners, 14 on her favored forehand side alone. Wearing two strips of athletic tape on her left shoulder, the right-handed Kanepi also had far more unforced errors, 28-9, but that high-risk, high-reward style ultimately paid off. "I thought, 'I just have to be aggressive and try to stay calm,'" Kanepi said. Early in the second set, on the way to falling behind by two breaks at 3-0, Halep slammed her racket twice, drawing a warning for a code violation from the chair umpire. Eventually, Halep got going a bit, taking advantage of Kanepi's mistakes to break back twice and get to 4-all in that set, getting a lot of support from fans who repeatedly chanted her first name. "I was thinking about that: Why (did) they cheer so much for her? Because normally, they cheer for the underdog," Kanepi said with a smile. "It was a bit annoying for some time, but I got over it." Sure did. She ended a 14-stroke exchange with a cross-court forehand volley winner to break right back for a 5-4 lead, then served out the victory......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2018