Advertisements


Saudi OFW forced by employer to drink bleach

An overseas Filipino worker in Saudi Arabia was allegedly forced by her employer to drink household bleach, the Department of Foreign Affairs said yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarApr 16th, 2018

Saudi OFW forced by employer to drink bleach

An overseas Filipino worker in Saudi Arabia was allegedly forced by her employer to drink household bleach, the Department of Foreign Affairs said yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 16th, 2018

DFA monitoring situation of OFW forced to drink bleach

By Camille A. Aguinaldo THE Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) is coordinating with Saudi Arabian authorities following the hospitalization of an Oversees Filipino Worker (OFW) who was allegedly forced to drink household bleach by her employer. In a statement issued Monday, the DFA quoted Philippine Consulate in Jeddah as saying that Agnes Mancilla remained in […] The post DFA monitoring situation of OFW forced to drink bleach appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsApr 16th, 2018

HR Body in Saudi Probes Mancilla Case: DFA

The highest human rights body in Saudi Arabia has taken “serious interest” in the case of Agnes Mancilla, the Filipina worker allegedly forced to ingest bleach in Jeddah, and is currently looking into her case, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) said Wednesday night. Consul General Edgar Badajos of the Philippine Consulate General in Jeddah […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsApr 19th, 2018

Saudi human rights body probes case of OFW made to drink bleach - Manila Bulletin

Saudi human rights body probes case of OFW made to drink bleach - Manila Bulletin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsApr 19th, 2018

OFW recalls horrifying abuse under Saudi employer

An overseas Filipino worker abused by her employer in Saudi Arabia shared her story as her condition has improved, the Department of Foreign Affairs said Tuesday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 17th, 2018

Welcome home

 President Rodrigo Duterte welcomes Pahima Algasi, returning overseas Filipino worker (OFW) and her family during a meeting at the Coco’s South Bistro Restaurant in Davao City on April 14, 2018. The President expressed his happiness over the resolution of the case of Algasi who was allegedly abused by her employer in the Kingdom of Saudi […] The post Welcome home appeared first on MindaNews......»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsApr 16th, 2018

Duterte meets OFW scalded by Saudi employer

MANILA, Philippines – President Rodrigo Duterte welcomed on Saturday, April 14, an overseas Filipino worker (OFW) who was finally able to come home 4 years after she was scalded by her employer in Saudi Arabia. Duterte and Special Assistant to the President Christopher Lawrence Go met ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 15th, 2018

Duterte meets OFW scalded by Saudi employer

Duterte met with Pahima Alagasi, who was scalded by the mother of her employer with boiling water in 2013......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 15th, 2018

OFW scalded by Saudi employer returns home

The overseas Filipino worker who suffered severe burns after her Saudi employer doused her with boiling water returned home yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 13th, 2018

OFW scalded by Saudi employer returns home

The overseas Filipino worker who suffered severe burns after her Saudi employer doused her with boiling water returned home yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 13th, 2018

OFW scalded by Saudi employer returns home

The overseas Filipino worker who suffered severe burns after her Saudi employer doused her with boiling water returned home yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 13th, 2018

Review case of OFW who was doused with boiling water, DFA urged

    A labor advocacy group urged the Department of Foreign Affairs to review the case of Pahima Alagasi, the domestic helper who was severely burned after her boss doused her with boiling water.     Alagasi finally arrived home in Manila on Friday, four years after her female employer in Saudi Arabia scalded her back with boiling water.     The Blas F. Ople Policy Center urged the DFA to review the case of the overseas Filipino worker, who filed a complaint against her boss in May 2014.     "We urge the DFA to review the case and look at gaps in legal assistance and humanitarian service delivery. It is only by l...Keep on reading: Review case of OFW who was doused with boiling water, DFA urged.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 13th, 2018

Saudi Arabian prince helps abused OFW

Thanks to the generosity of a Saudi prince and representations made by the Philippine government, the Filipino domestic helper scalded by her employer in 2014 will finally be coming home.   In a Wednesday press briefing, House Assistant Minority Leader and ACTS-OFW Rep. Aniceto Bertiz III announced that Pahima Alagasi was expected to arrive "hopefully in two weeks' time."   Alagasi got second-degree burns when her Saudi employer doused her with boiling water in 2014 after she had accidentally dropped the cap of the water heater while making coffee.   While she later managed to escape and find refuge at a center run by the Philippine Embassy in Riyadh, Ala...Keep on reading: Saudi Arabian prince helps abused OFW.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 4th, 2018

PH mulls expanding deployment ban to Saudi Arabia over ‘slave trade’

AMID reports that Filipino household workers (HSWs) or domestic helpers were being traded like slaves, the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) is considering expanding the existing deployment ban in Kuwait to Saudi Arabia and other Middle East (ME) countries. “For example, in Saudi, it is common malpractice that the employer trades or switches their worker to [...] The post PH mulls expanding deployment ban to Saudi Arabia over ‘slave trade’ appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

What the Qatar crisis means for Hamas – CNN News

When Palestinian militant group Hamas announced its new charter to the world, it wasn't from Ramallah or Gaza City, but from the Sheraton hotel's gilded Salwa Ballroom in Doha. It was no surprise that Hamas chose Qatar. It's the home of outgoing Hamas leader, Khaled Meshaal, and much of his senior leadership. &'8220;Qatar is quite important for Hamas,&'8221; said H.A. Hellyer, a senior non-resident fellow at the Atlantic Council. &'8220;Qatar provides strong financial aid to the occupied Palestinian territories and is a safe haven for a number of Hamas leaders.&'8221; The recent crisis in the Persian Gulf region is putting that relationship in jeopardy. Earlier this month, nine countries including Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt, and Bahrain cut diplomatic ties with Qatar and imposed financial embargoes of varying severity. The announcement was the culmination of a feud that had been simmering for years. The nine countries accused Doha of assisting terrorist organizations, providing support for the Muslim Brotherhood and of being far too cozy with Iran. Ironically perhaps, Qatar's relationship with Hamas had not been among the biggest issues dividing the region. Unlike the US, Britain, and Europe, all of which designate Hamas as a terrorist organization, Arab states &'8212; including Qatar &'8212; do not. This was something Qatar's Foreign Minister sought to remind people in an interview with Russia's RT, in response to a call from his Saudi counterpart that Qatar stop supporting Hamas. &'8220;The US views Hamas as a terror organization. But to the rest of the Arab nations, it is a legitimate resistance movement. We do not support Hamas, we support the Palestinian people,&'8221; Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani said. &'8220;Hamas' presence [in Doha] is coordinated with the US and the countries in the region, and it's part of our effort to mediate between the Palestinian factions to reach reconciliation.&'8221; For its part, Hamas says it is being squeezed unreasonably. &'8220;The Gulf Countries are pressuring Qatar to cut relations with resistance organizations. This is unacceptable and we refuse this pressure,&'8221; Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoom said in a statement to CNN. &'8220;We are a resistance movement and the whole world is a witness to this.&'8221; Hamas is seen as having been under a series of pressures for the last few years, reflected in some significant internal changes. Last month, a new leader was announced &'8212; Ismail Haniya taking over from long-time leader Meshaal &'8212; at the same time as the militant group issued its new charter. While Israel pointed to the fact the new document continued to espouse violent resistance, and a commitment to the &'8220;rejection of the Zionist entity,&'8221; others observers said the document's description of a Palestinian state with the borders existing on the eve of the Six Day War in 1967 provided evidence of a new moderation. As Hamas rank and file were digesting those changes, so the leadership was suddenly forced to pay careful attention to diplomatic developments. Hellyer sees two main reasons the nine regional allies are turning their attention towards Hamas. &'8220;First, Hamas has ties to the Muslim Brotherhood organization, which puts it in the firing line of Abu Dhabi and Saudi Arabia,&'8221; Hellyer says. &'8220;But I think this has more to do with a western audience. The Saudi rulers took advantage of Trump's recognition of them as a powerful actor in the region and that might have encouraged them.&'8221; Al Jazeera, based in Qatar, has been a thorn in the side of regional autocrats for years. Qatar's regional influence also comes from support for Islamists, whether it is the Muslim Brotherhood and Hamas at one end of the spectrum, or Al Qaeda at the other. Doha has used this sway to negotiate with various groups including the Taliban, as well as to help negotiate ceasefires between Israel and Hamas. In late 2010 and into 2011, Qatar saw its influence throughout the Middle East rise sharply. Al Jazeera, already a thorn in the side of Arab autocrats, reported extensively on the Arab Spring. The Al Jazeera Arabic channel grew additional roots in Egypt after the uprising and election of Mohamed Morsy who hailed from the Muslim Brotherhood. The international community praised the new Egyptian president for bringing a swift end to a war between Gaza militants and Israel that same year. In the long run, though, as it unraveled across the region, the Arab Spring proved to be disastrous for Hamas, which saw the number of countries it could call a friend whittled away. &'8220;Hamas had very strong relations with Syria, Egypt, Qatar, Turkey and Iran,&'8221; says Mustafa Barghouti, an independent Palestinian politician. &'8220;Things have changed over time so they had to diversify relations.&'8221; Before 2012, the Hamas leadership was based out of Damascus. Tensions grew between the militants and the regime of Syrian President Bashar Al Assad as revolution gripped the country. Eventually, Hamas sided with the rebels and cut ties to some extent with Syria, Hezbollah, and Iran. &'8220;Hamas lost a lot in the uprisings,&'8221; says Hellyer. &'8220;This is one of the reasons why Qatar stepped in.&'8221; Qatar, a strong supporter of both the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and Hamas, took advantage of the situation. In the fall of 2012, the head of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, visited the Gaza Strip becoming the first world leader to do so under Hamas control. The emir inaugurated projects worth hundreds of millions of dollars. In the vacuum left [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 13th, 2017

From ‘happily ever after’ to hell – CNN News

Islam and Ahmed met online, looking for their &'8220;happily ever after&'8221; through a Muslim dating site. But instead of bringing love and contentment, their marriage left Islam trapped in a living nightmare. Fast forward four years &'8212; and three husbands &'' and she and her two small children are caught in limbo in northern Syria. Islam Mitat is from Morocco; Ahmed Khalil was originally from Kabul in Afghanistan, but had moved to the UK and become a British citizen by the time they met on Muslima.com. Mitat dreamed of a career as a fashion designer, and saw a British husband as a way out of her drab existence in the Moroccan town of Oujda, near the Algerian border. Months after their first online encounter, Khalil traveled to Morocco with a woman he said was his sister. He met Mitat's family, and proposed marriage, showing them bank statements to prove his intentions were serious. &'8220;He was a normal person,&'8221; Mitat recalls, though she says he did make her swap her regular choice of clothing &'8212; tight jeans and t-shirts &'' for long dresses. After they were married, the couple traveled to Dubai, and from there to Jalalabad in Afghanistan to meet Ahmed's family. Mitat says she only stayed in Afghanistan for a month, because of the security situation there, before returning home to Morocco. Khalil went back to Dubai, but shortly afterward he called her with news. &'8220;He told me had a job in Turkey,&'8221; she says, &'8220;and we're going to go for a holiday too, me and him.&'8221; The &'8220;holiday&'8221; got off to a strange start. Instead of heading to a resort or a hotel, the couple flew to Gaziantep, on southern Turkey's border with Syria. A certified copy of Ahmed Khalil's passport shows his birthplace as Kabul in Afghanistan. A man who spoke only Turkish drove them to a house full of men, women and children. The women and children were in one room, the men in another, Mitat says. She was confused, and asked the other women where they were going. &'8220;We're going hijra,&'8221; they explained. To Syria. Hijra was the journey of the Prophet Muhammad and his followers, the fledgling Muslim community, from Mecca to Medina in 622 to escape persecution. In a modern context, it signifies escape from the tyranny of the enemies of Islam to the realm of the faithful. &'8220;When we were in Dubai he told me, 'I have for you a surprise, but I will give it to you in Turkey.' This is the surprise: to go in Syria,&'8221; she says. When she objected, Khalil's response was blunt. &'8220;You are my wife and you have to obey me,&'8221; she says he told her. Mitat says she wanted to tell Turkish border officials about her predicament, but says that as she and the others approached the Syrian border, the guards opened fire so they ran into Syria. When asked about the incident on the border, a Turkish police spokesman said he could not share information about individual cases. Once inside the country, they headed to the nearby town of Jarablus, to a guesthouse for &'8220;muhajarin&'8221; &'8212; those who were making hijra to the so-called caliphate &'' like them. Mitat says the place was packed with people from &'8220;everywhere&'8221; &'8212; the UK, Canada, France, Belgium, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria and Saudi Arabia. No sooner had they arrived, than Khalil was sent off for a month of military training, leaving Mitat, who was now pregnant, behind. Once he'd been trained, ISIS sent Khalil to fight. He was killed on his first day, in the battle of Kobani. After his death, Mitat says she was terrified and didn't know what to do; banned from talking to ordinary Syrians, she was forced to stay within the muhajirin community. She moved in with her husband's brother and his family, who had also traveled to Syria, but when her brother-in-law was killed too, ISIS moved her into a guesthouse, where she stayed until her son, Abdullah, was born. As Kurdish fighters closed in, ISIS told Mitat she had to marry again and get out of the area to safety, so she wed a friend of her first husband, a man known as Abu Talha Al-Almani (his name means &'8220;the German&'8221;). He took her to Manbij, northeast of Aleppo, before moving again, this time to Raqqa as Kurdish forces closed in. A month after they got there, Mitat says she divorced Abu Talha because he wouldn't let her leave the house. She says fear played a major role in her decision not to leave immediately. Islam says she was told that other people who tried to leave had their children taken away, or were forced into weeks of intense Islamic studies. All the while, Mitat was trying to escape with little Abdullah. ISIS did its best to keep her and other muhajarin away from local Syrians who might help them, and smugglers hesitated to help, because they faced execution if caught. Others asked exorbitant fees &'8212; as much as USD $5,000 &'8212; according to Mitat. Eventually ISIS compelled her to marry for a third time, this time to a man who Mitat describes as a gentle soul, called Abu Abdallah Al-Afghani. This name &'' given to him by ISIS &'8212; indicates he was of Afghan origin. Mitat, though, says he was Indian, and that his mother lived in Australia. She says he [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 26th, 2017

Raped OFW in Saudi dies

MANILA, Philippines - A Filipina worker in Saudi Arabia who was allegedly raped by her employer has died......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 19th, 2016

Pinay rape victim in Saudi passes away

A Filipina domestic helper in Saudi Arabia who went into a coma after she was allegedly raped by her employer has passed away. Labor and Employment Secretary Silvestre Bello 3rd said Irma Avila Edloy, 35, died at the King Salman Hospital in Riyadh because.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsAug 19th, 2016

No Pinoys among casualties in bombing of Saudi border city, no forced repatriation – DFA

No Pinoys among casualties in bombing of Saudi border city, no forced repatriation – DFA.....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsAug 19th, 2016

HSW Edloy’s family will receive aid from OWWA and KSA

The Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) said yesterday that allegedly raped Filipina household service worker (HSW), who recently died in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), will get financial help from the government and her employer. &'8220;Depende.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 19th, 2016