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Sandino’s ‘high-school project’ goes big-time

  Singer-actor Sandino Martin recounts the journey of "Changing Partners" from stage to screen. Sandino, who was part of the original theater production, relates: "I remember falling in love with the script the first time I read it---even in its crudest form then." He recalls that the play had its start as a "reading project" in the Virgin Labfest in 2016. "It felt like a high-school project. We bought our own costumes, painted the set ... a teeny-tiny set ... but I could feel that we all believed in it." He admits that he and costars Agot Isidro, Jojit Lorenzo and Anna Luna had zero expectations that their "high-school project" would go this far. After winning eight aw...Keep on reading: Sandino’s ‘high-school project’ goes big-time.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJan 31st, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Wendell Carter Jr. brings all-around package to Bulls

NBA.com staff report Wendell Carter Jr. had his plan in place from a young age, as early as the third grade. His hoop dreams always centered on fulfilling a destiny his father, a professional player overseas, never did. So when NBA Commissioner Adam Silver called his name early during Thursday's draft (Friday, PHL time), it was the culmination of a family project years in the making. Carter, who joins an up and coming young cast in Chicago, arrives with a focus and attention to detail that puts the emphasis on professional in professional ballplayer. As Malika Andrews of the Chicago Tribune points out, Carter has spent his young life preparing for the opportunity that is being presented to him now with the Bulls: At Pace Academy, Carter was also one of the highest-ranked basketball prospects in the country. He scored 30 points and grabbed 20 rebounds to lead Pace to the Georgia Class AA state championship in 2016. Pace coach Demetrius Smith made sure to tune in to the draft after a staff meeting Thursday night. “As far as a big man, he’s probably the best from Georgia since Dwight Howard,” Smith said. ”There never has been another guy like him at our school.” Carter sacrificed some of his own offense on a Duke team that also had Marvin Bagley III and Grayson Allen — two other first-round picks. Carter averaged 13.5 points and 9.1 rebounds for the Blue Devils, serving as a more physical complement to the sinewy Bagley, whom the Kings selected at No. 2. “The beautiful thing about Wendell is that he doesn’t have to be the featured guy to have an impact,” Carter’s performance coach, Sekou Walton, said. “Wendell can actually help you out defensively, he can get your rebounds. His assist ratio is pretty high as well. He can work well with someone who has to have touches. Wendell is that perfect support guy, and the NBA needs more people like Wendell.” Indeed, Carter’s potential lies not only in his physical gifts and scoring ability but also his unselfishness and commitment to team play. Kylia describes her son as “unselfish to a fault.” Sommerville called him the “quarterback that makes everybody’s life easier.” Throughout high school, Carter kept a comprehensive training program that reflects his attention to detail: He practiced, lifted weights, stuck to a healthy diet and even carried a water jug everywhere he went to ensure he was properly hydrated. One of Smith’s favorite memories took place immediately after Carter’s sensational championship game performance in 2016. After Pace beat Manchester High 65-43 in the state final, the team celebrated with burgers, fries and milkshakes from Chick-fil-A on the bus ride back from Macon to Atlanta. When the bus pulled up at the school and Carter’s teammates rushed to go celebrate, Carter stayed behind to pick up the napkins, bags and cups. “We always say, ‘Leave it better than you found it,’ ” Smith said in a phone interview from his Atlanta home. “I have seen him do it after games too — picking up Gatorade cups and stuff like that. You just don’t find too many kids that are that humble and are willing to do all the dirty work, the little stuff.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

One Rohingya’s struggle to empower women in Malaysia – Al Jazeera

Tucked away upstairs at a shopping plaza in this city’s north end is a small storefront turned classroom for dozens of Rohinyga women and children. The sound of these women reciting English phrases, laughing and the occasional cries of kids can be heard in the stairwell. Its founder, Sharifah Husain, 24, said she wanted to do something to help women and children in her community, who are not allowed to work or study in Malaysia. “I noticed we didn’t have a Rohingya women’s organisation that was standing up for women – to be the voice of women,” Husain said. Husain comes from Buthidaung village in Myanmar’s restive Rakhine state. Her father fled to Malaysia when she was five-years old, fearing for his life. Husain was left behind with her mother and two younger siblings. The village was attacked soon afterward, so Husain’s mother took them to Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar – then known as Burma. Her recollection of the traumatic moment when a local mob attacked her village is hazy. It took place almost 20 years ago. But it mirrors the accounts of Rohingya refugees now in Bangladesh, who’ve recently fled the Myanmar’s army clearance operations and local Buddhist mobs. “My mother was arrested in Yangon and sentenced to prison for not having official [identification or travel] documents,” Husain recounted. “This left me in charge.” Husain can’t remember how long she spent in Yangon, but she said she was separated from her siblings and sent north to Mandalay and forced into servitude. She spoke to her father in Malaysia, over the phone, and he agreed to pay human traffickers to bring Husain and her siblings to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia’s largest city. All three, including Husain, were smuggled by land, into Thailand and Malaysia. At that time the Southeast Asia trafficking route wasn’t as defined as it is today. Human trafficking groups in Bangladesh and Thailand now make a lot of money off of poor, desperate refugees fleeing war and violence in Myanmar. Today, the concern faced by the Malaysia government is if it recognises its refugees then that could send a signal to more to make the perilous journey, now taken by sea from Myanmar and Bangladesh to sanctuary in Malaysia, where they don’t face violent persecution. The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, states there are 152,170 registered refugees in Malaysia. The majority are Rohingya, displaced from their homes in Myanmar, like Husain. But the amount of unregistered refugees varies widely from 40,000 to 140,000, according to Asylum Access Malaysia. “The big question is – when are the boats going to come? There’s no indication they will now, but there’s definitely a high possibility that they will. And once new groups arrive, that complicates [the] situation,” said Deepa Nambiar, Asylum Access Malaysia director. UNHCR runs what it calls a “parallel school system” for refugees in Malaysia, allowing children to  access basic, primary-level education. Refugee groups and local faith-based organisations fund these schools, staffed by volunteers. One-hundred and twenty-eight informal refugee schools in Malaysia access funding from the UN. It provides education to 7,154 children, according to UNHCR. Malaysia’s Prime Minister’s Office states 16,809 Rohingya refugee children are registered with UNHCR. This means about 10,000, or more, refugee children in Malaysia are unable to access any form of education. A dozen or so more informal refugee schools exist but rely solely on donations and are understaffed, said Asylum Access. “To live in Malaysia, yes you can live, but you don’t have a future. You are in a box. You can’t go out of the box,” Husain said. Husain has received no formal education in Malaysia. This is remarkable considering her drive to educate refugee women and children. Malaysians are supporting Rohingya Women’s Development Network by volunteering as teachers and support staff. Rohinyga Women’s Development Network started officially last year. But Husain has spent the last decade educating her community’s most vulnerable women and children in their own homes. “I have built up a trust. The men especially trust me. They feel safe sending their wives to our centre because they know me,” Husain said. Word has spread and more refugee families are now attending Rohingya Women’s Development Network classes, where they receive English-language instruction, leadership training and brand new self-defence classes. “We want to stop domestic violence. We want to stop child marriages in the community. We want to build up women’s empowerment,” Husain said. “We really need the Malaysia government to recognise us.” Husain is trying to change the mentality in the Rohingya and wider refugee community in Malaysia, that women and girls can’t study, work, or earn an income. She receives some funding from UNHCR to run programmes but uses her own money to keep them going. “Of course I have support from my family. My father is my hero. My husband is my hero. Both of these men have really pushed me forward,” Husain added. The Rohingya Women’s Development Network has teamed up with Asylum Access Malaysia on a refugee theatre project. This will allow refugee women to educate the community on issues of sexual violence. “What I think is so innovative about Sharifah and the team is that when we were discussing this project they said ‘we need to get men involved’,” Nambiar said. Husain is appealing to others in the refugee community to support initiatives set up by the Malaysia government and civil society groups to help […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Tale of 2 cities: Olympics sponsors in Pyeongchang and Tokyo

em>By Youkyung Lee and Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press /em> SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Winter Olympics coming to South Korea in February offer an example of the Olympian efforts often required to meet corporate sponsorship goals. Tokyo tells a different story: The coffers are already overflowing for the 2020 Summer Games. It's a tale of two cities and two Olympics — winter and summer. Pyeongchang is a little-known destination in one of South Korea's poorest provinces. It is the 'little town that could,' bidding twice unsuccessfully for the Winter Olympics before winning on its third try. A final push enabled it to reach its sponsorship target of 940 billion won ($830 million) in September, with just five months to go. Tokyo is an established global capital, and the Summer Games usually generate more excitement — and more money. Organizers have raised 300 billion yen ($2.7 billion) in sponsorship, twice any previous Olympics. International Olympic Committee Vice President John Coates describes it as a remarkable achievement. The divergent experiences of two Asian host cities illustrate the challenges that smaller bidders face, as well as South Korea's dependence on the big family-owned companies that dominate its economy. Not that Tokyo is home-free. The cost of the 2020 Games has nearly doubled from initial projections. As with most Olympics, taxpayers will have to foot a good part of the bill. ___ strong>WHERE 'CHAEBOLS' RULE /strong> Starting with the 1988 Seoul Olympics, South Korea has used mega-events such as the soccer World Cup to raise the profile of the country and its manufacturing exporters. Pyeongchang is different. The project was initiated by local politicians in an area long alienated politically and economically in South Korea's rise to prosperity. Some feared people would confuse the city's name with Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. They couldn't count on the automatic support of the huge family-run conglomerates, known as 'chaebol,' such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG. 'When such mega-events were the nation-state's key project, the chaebol were called on and were expected to become the leading participants,' said Joo Yu-min, a professor at the National University of Singapore who co-authored a book on South Korea's use of mega-events. In the end, the national government brought the conglomerates in, first in the bid process, and then for sponsorship. That underscores both the outsized role they play in the economy and their close ties with government. They owe a debt to special treatment from the government, which in turn used them to industrialize the country after the devastating 1950-53 Korean War. After Pyeongchang's bid was rejected a second time, the government called on Samsung and others to help. The president even pardoned Lee Kun-hee, the patriarch of the Samsung founding family who had been an IOC member but voluntarily suspended his membership after being indicted for tax evasion. The IOC reinstated Lee in 2010 with a reprimand and some restrictions, allowing him to lobby heavily for what became Pyeongchang's winning bid in 2011. It took three years for the organizing committee to sign its first domestic sponsor, KT Corp., the country's second-largest mobile carrier. Again, the national government asked the conglomerates for help. All the major ones signed on, after the office of then-President Park Geun-hye made a special request and multichannel pressures for financial assistance, Joo said. Elsewhere, companies may weigh sponsorship decisions based more on the marketing benefits. 'In South Korea, companies make donations out of a sense of duty that they are being part of the national event,' said Park Dong Min, the executive director overseeing membership at the Korea Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Sponsors who signed up late weren't willing to give as much, because there was less time to enjoy the marketing benefits. A bank that signed on less than a year before the Games significantly reduced its sponsorship. To top it off, a massive sports-related political corruption scandal rocked South Korea in 2016, just when Pyeongchang was making last-ditch efforts to raise sponsorship. 'Companies showed some reluctance' to sponsor the Olympics, said Eom Chanwang, director of the Pyeongchang organizing committee marketing team. 'Nevertheless, they still joined.' The scandal brought down Park, the president. Lee Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung group, received a five-year sentence for bribery. Lee, who has appealed, had become de facto chief of the Samsung group after his father Lee Kun-hee, the IOC member pardoned in late 2009, fell ill. It was the younger Lee who signed an agreement with IOC President Thomas Bach to extend Samsung Electronics' sponsorship of the Olympics globally through 2020. Samsung declined interviews for this story. With the scandal still fresh in people's minds, major companies have held back from launching full-fledged marketing to promote the Games. 'Samsung traditionally has done consumer marketing through the Olympics, but because its chief is in jail, it cannot do as much these days,' said Kim Do-kyun, a sports professor at Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Physical Education. The Pyeongchang Games were the biggest victim of the scandal, he said. ___ strong>SUMMER OF '64 /strong> The president of Japan's biggest toilet manufacturer was seven years old when the Olympics first came to Japan. TOTO Ltd. made news in 1964 for its prefabricated toilet-and-bath units that helped speed the construction of a luxury hotel, the New Otani, in time for the Games. The company, now known for high-tech toilets that baffle some foreign visitors, is back as a sponsor of Tokyo 2020. 'I feel our company and the Olympics have been bonded by fate,' TOTO president Madoka Kitamura said at a sponsorship signing ceremony at the same hotel last year. The $2.7 billion in sponsorship for Tokyo 2020 is more than three times the original estimate. By comparison, sponsorship revenue was $848 million in Rio de Janeiro last year, and about $1.2 billion for both London 2012 and Beijing 2008. The Winter Olympics typically attract less, though Sochi, Russia, raised $1.2 billion in 2014. Analysts attribute Tokyo's success to both patriotism and a sense of nostalgia for the 1964 Summer Games. They were much more than a sports contest for Japan. They were a moment of pride, marking the country's return as an industrial power after the devastation of World War II and a seven-year U.S. occupation. 'All of Japan still recognizes the unique role that the 1964 Olympics played in Japan's stepping out onto the world stage,' said Michael Payne, a former IOC marketing director who now works as a consultant. 'Many of the CEOs of top Japanese companies would have been young kids back in '64 and are very aware of the role those Games played for the psychological recovery from the Second World War.' They grew up with the high-speed 'Shinkansen' bullet train, inaugurated in 1964; modern expressways and western-style toilets, all symbols of Japan's postwar economic growth. 'Now they have become business leaders, they want to contribute and leave something behind that can be remembered for the next 50 years,' said Masahiko Sakamaki, executive director of marketing for the Tokyo organizing committee. He said that memories of the recovery may have boosted interest in sponsorship, as Japan was still reeling from a deadly 2011 earthquake and tsunami when Tokyo won the bid in 2013. Sakamaki said the organizing committee started receiving sponsorship inquiries as soon as it was established in 2014, before the official start of sponsorship contracts in 2015. There is so much interest that the IOC is allowing Tokyo to have multiple sponsors in some categories, instead of the usual one, including in aviation, newspaper publishing, electronics and banking. TOTO officials won't say how much they are contributing, but media reports say companies in its sponsorship category give between 6 billion and 15 billion yen ($53 million to $133.5 million). Tokyo 2020 wouldn't comment on those reports. 'We believe our presence as part of an all-Japan effort toward a successful Olympics will enhance our favorable brand image,' said Mariko Shibasaki, the company's senior planner for sports communication. Thanks in part to robust sponsorship revenue, the organizing committee has increased its contribution to the cost of the games from 500 billion to 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion). The sponsorship revenue makes up half of the income in the privately-run organizing committee's operating budget. Other revenue comes from the International Olympic Committee, marketing and ticket sales. The overall cost of the Tokyo Olympics is estimated at 1.4 trillion yen (12.4 billion) with the Tokyo government shouldering 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion) and the remaining 200 billion yen (1.8 billion) paid by the national government and local governments hosting events. ___ em>Yamaguchi reported from Tokyo. Associated Press writer Stephen Wade in Rio de Janeiro contributed to this story. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

UAAP: Adamson scores local blue-chip recruit in 6-5 Aaron Fermin

Aaron Fermin missed out on back-to-back MVPs as his team failed to make the Final Four in his last two years in the NCAA Juniors. Now, the 6-foot-5 big man will be joining an Adamson University side that is locked into contention for the playoffs for the foreseeable future. “Sa Adamson na po ako,” he said. Fermin is the Soaring Falcons’ first big get from the local high school ranks as the likes of Jerrick Ahanmisi and Sean Manganti were recruits from the US. In the 18-year-old’s final season for Arellano High School, he averaged 15.6 points, 16.2 rebounds, and 1.2 blocks. He topped the MVP leaderboard, but did not win the award because they did not advance to the Final Four. That was also the same story in 2017 as he was, head and shoulders, the top individual player in the tournament, showcasing both the physical and mental tools to make an impact on either end. Because the Braves did not make the playoffs, however, he also did not take home the trophy. Now, Fermin will be getting together with sniper Ahanmisi, versatile Simon Camacho, heady Jerom Lastimosa, and steady Koko Pingoy for an Adamson side coming off its best finish in the Franz Pumaren era. Alongside all that young talent, the Nueva Ecija native said learning under coach Franz was the clincher for his commitment to the blue and white. “Siyempre po, pinili ko rito kasi marami akong matututunan kay coach Franz,” he said. Securing the services of Fermin is a big-time beginning to the fresh two-year contract extension Pumaren had just signed last Friday. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News9 hr. 36 min. ago

Filipino orphans portraits drawn in Memory Project | Inquirer Lifestyle

Filipino orphans portraits drawn by US students as gifts in Memory Project INQUIRER.net 15 high school students in Wisconsin, United States gifted Filipino orphans with portraits they personally drew.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJan 21st, 2019

Netflix’s Sex Education — a Contemporary British Love Letter to American High School TV Shows

Netflix presents a funny, heartwarming and cringeworthy look at the universally awkward coming-of-age experience full of good times, wild times, tough times, and the time of your life. Sex Education launches globally on January 11th telling the story of Otis, a teenage boy being raised by his sex-therapist mother Jean played by Gillian Anderson. The […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJan 19th, 2019

UAAP Season 81: Board approves shift in volleyball individual awards

The UAAP Board has approved the use of the FIVB individual awards format for Season 81. Board member Rod Roque of University of the East confirmed the development in a text message to ABS-CBN Sports Thursday. “We will be following the FIVB on the giving of individual awards, by position already no longer by skills,” said Roque, who added that the decision was unanimous. The UAAP Board held a two-day meeting to tackle about the rules and regulations of second semester sports including volleyball. For the longest time, the UAAP has been feting players by skills: scorer, attacker, blocker, server, setter, digger, receiver and Most Valuable Player. Other local leagues like the NCAA, Philippine Superliga and Premier Volleyball League and UAAP high school have already adapted the FIVB’s by positon individual awards of best two outside hitters, two middle blockers, an opposite hitter, setter, libero and MVP. Schools have until January 28 to submit their team rosters. The Eligibility Committee will conduct screening on February 4 while the final approval of team rosters is set on Feb. 11.          --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019

Israeli surveillance firm to build PH cybersecurity platform

MANILA, Philippines -- The government is stepping up its fight against online criminals as the Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT) rolls out its first-ever cybersecurity platform.   High on the agenda of the project --- formally known as the Cybersecurity Management System --- is to identify purveyors of misinformation and election-related threats on social media, counter-terrorism surveillance and intercepting online drug traffickers, said Allan Cabanlong, DICT assistant secretary for cybersecurity and enabling technologies.   The monitoring of cyberthreats will also be "near real-time" and will cover an initial 10 priority government...Keep on reading: Israeli surveillance firm to build PH cybersecurity platform.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019

UAAP: League-leading Bullpups get challenged by Nonoy s Tiger Cubs

Games on Wednesday at the Filoil Flying V Centre 9:00 AM – Adamson vs UPIS 11:00 AM – FEU-Diliman vs DLSZ 1:00 PM – UST vs NU 3:00 PM – Ateneo vs UE Nazareth School of National University has set the standard thus far in the UAAP 81 Juniors Basketball Tournament. Coming for them on Wednesday at the Filoil Flying V Centre, however, is a University of Sto. Tomas side led by a triple-doubling talent. The Bullpups are on the hunt for their seventh win in as many games, but will first have to get through the challenge certain to be put up by the 4-4 Tiger Cubs led by super rookie Mark Nonoy starting at 1:00 PM. At the same time, Ateneo de Manila High School (5-3) is on the hunt for a bounce back win up against lowly University of the East (1-7) at 3:00 PM. These two games will be LIVE and EXLUSIVE on S+A, S+A HD, LIGA and LIGA HD There will also be matchups between Far Eastern University-Diliman (6-2) and De La Salle Zobel (3-5) at 11:00 AM as well as between Adamson High School (5-3) and the University of the Philippines Integrated School (1-7) at 9:00 AM. All matchups will also be LIVE on streaming over at sports.abs-cbn.com/livestream/uaap and iWant.ph --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 15th, 2019

UAAP Season 81: UAAP Board looking to switch to FIVB individual awards format

The UAAP Board is highly considering changing its volleyball individual awards format into the FIVB standards in Season 81. Board member Rod Roque revealed that the change in the awarding format will be one of the main topics that the Board will tackle when they convene on Tuesday and Wednesday. Roque is optimistic that the change will be implemented this season. “Well, isa ‘yan sa napag-usapan naming innovations sa volleyball. Sabi namin susundan namin ‘yung international (standard) kasi by position ang international e,” said the UE athletic director. “So we might do it this year. So depende tomorrow kung ma-approve namin ‘yun then we will implement right away kasi mas marami kang mabibigyan kung position e. Pabor sa players mas maganda,” added Roque, who is also the representative of the UAAP in the Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. For the longest time, the UAAP has been feting players by skills: scorer, attacker, blocker, server, setter, digger and receiver as well as the Most Valuable Player. Other local leagues like the NCAA, Philippine Superliga and Premier Volleyball League and UAAP high school have already adapted the FIVB’s by positon individual awards of best two outside hitters, two middle blockers, an opposite hitter, setter, libero and the MVP. “Kami sa eligibility kasi kami ‘yung naga-update ng rules and regulations,” he said. “Sabi namin we follow the international kasi we’re using the international (rules and format) in all sporting events. We might as well do also for the awarding di ba?” Roque is optimistic that the change will be approved as other schools also showed positive response during their previous meetings. “Favorable naman yung response ng walong schools kasi mas maraming mabibigyan ng award e so I think ma-approve ‘yun,” he said. Roque said that it has been on the table years. “Alam mo na ‘yung tradition, tradition we keep on following the tradition, tradition,” sad Roque. “Well hi-tech dapat sumusunod tayo sa panahon, sa trend and that is the trend now we might as well do what is right.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 14th, 2019

Balanced Bullpups sweep Sotto-led Eaglets in UAAP Jrs. eliminations

STANDINGS NU 7-1 FEU-Diliman 6-2 Ateneo 5-3 Adamson 5-3 UST 4-4 DLSZ 3-5 UE 1-7 UPIS 1-7 Yet again, Carl Tamayo came up big for Nazareth School of National University in its heavyweight bout against Ateneo de Manila High School in the UAAP 81 Juniors Basketball Tournament. Tamayo’s basket and bonus quelled the Blue Eaglets’ late uprising and carried the Bullpups to a hard fought 78-71 decision on Sunday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. The versatile big man only had seven points to go along with nine rebounds, but it was his offensive board and ensuing short stab that re-increased his team’s slim one-point margin into a 73-69 lead. “Good thing he converted it kasi he was in and out kanina,” head coach Goldwin Monteverde said post-game. Still, the defending champions had 46.3 ticks to go and Forthsky Padrigao’s scoop shot was able to pull them within two points. It was at that point, however, that Ernest Felicilda’s steady hands from the line joined forces with a stout defense to put the game away for NU. Felicilda wound up with 14 points, four coming from the free throw line in the last 27 seconds, on top of six assists, five rebounds, and four steals. Gerry Abadiano and Terrence Fortea also added 16 points apiece as the Bullpups started the second round by downing Ateneo – the same story from how they finished the first round. Now at 7-1, they have also widened the distance between them and now second-running Far Eastern University-Diliman. Nonetheless, coach Gold said they haven’t won anything just yet. “It’s just part of the war. We still have six games to go in the eliminations and ang importante ngayon, our next game,” he said. Sotto paced the Blue Eaglets with 24 points, 18 rebounds, five assists, and three blocks. He was well-defended in the endgame, however, and saw his side fall to their rivals for the second straight time. In the day’s other game, the University of the Philippines Integrated School finally got a taste of victory after downing De La Salle Zobel, 64-56. Rookie Allen Torres scored 22 points, including a pair of booming threes inside the last five minutes, while graduating guard Polo Labao did it all with 18 markers, nine rebounds, six assists, and five steals to make sure the Junior Maroons improved to 1-7. On the other hand, the Junior Archers dropped to 3-5 following the shock loss. BOX SCORES THIRD GAME UPIS 64 – Torres 22, Labao 18, Tuazon 12, Estrera 4, Vergeire 4, Gomez de Liano 4, Galotera 0, Cordero 0, Lopez 0 DLSZ 56 – Macasaet 18, Jomalesa 15, Pingol 5, Subido 4, Sevilla 4, Milan 3, Villarin 3, Cudiamat 2, Buncayo 2, Luna 0, Unisa 0 QUARTER SCORES: 15-12, 23-24, 50-41, 64-56 FOURTH GAME NU 78 – Abadiano 16, Fortea 16, Felicida 14, Quiambao 10, Gonzales 8, Tamayo 7, Torres 5, Javilonar 2, Dayrit 0, Mailim 0, Alarcon 0, Enriquez 0. ATENEO 71 – Sotto 24, Chiu 12, Padrigao 12, Espinosa 8, David 6, Jaymalin 3, Diaz 2, Fetalvero 2, Salandanan 2, Coo 0, Zyrus 0. QUARTER SCORES: 11-13, 36-35, 57-52, 78-71. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 13th, 2019

Terrence gonna Terrence? NU s Fortea believes his shot will drop sooner than later

Terrence Fortea shares the same name with Terrence Romeo. At the same time, Terrence Fortea shares the same game with Terrence Romeo. A scintillating scorer who gets many of his points after dances he does with his opponents, the Nazareth School of National University Bullpup very much deserves to have his name said in the same breath as that of the San Miguel Beerman. After all, super scorer Terrence Fortea was a key cog in the Bullpups last championship in 2016 and continues to be a key cog as well in their continued contention after. In the ongoing UAAP 81 Juniors, though, the shots have not been falling for the 5-foot-10 guard – not the way they usually do, at the very least. Fortea has been averaging a team-best 14.4 points per game, but is only shooting 28 percent from the field. More pointedly, he has been struggling both from outside the arc (22-of-82) and inside the arc (13-of-43). Nonetheless, the Bullpups’ coaches only want him to keep playing his game. “Sabi sa akin nila coach na wag mawawala kumpyansa ko. ‘Di porket ‘di sumu-shoot, wala na. Dapat kada game, next play lang parati,” he said. Indeed, he did just that as in their most recent outing, a triumph over defending champion Ateneo de Manila High School, the 18-year-old sprinkled 15 shots throughout the game and made good on five. No doubt, there’s much room for his shot to improve, but in the meantime, Fortea knows full well there’s much more he can do for his team. “Lagi akong nire-remind nila coach na yung mga kalaban, ‘di lang isa gagawin sa akin. Kailangan, i-counter ko lang mga ginagawa nila mapa-score man yun o mapapasa,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 13th, 2019

UAAP: Bullpups wary of revenge-minded Blue Eaglets

Games on Sunday at the Filoil Flying V Centre 9:00 AM – UE vs UST 11:00 AM – FEU-Diliman vs Adamson 1:00 PM – DLSZ vs UPIS 3:00 PM – NU vs Ateneo We won’t have to wait long for Round 2 of the heavyweight bout between Nazareth School of National University and Ateneo de Manila High School in the UAAP 81 Juniors Basketball Tournament. The Bullpups and the Blue Eaglets wage war once more to start the second round of the season on Sunday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. At the end of the first round, NU (7-0) bested Ateneo (5-2) to stand alone atop the leaderboard. Now, the defending champions want nothing more than to get back at last year’s runners-up in the much anticipated matchup tipping off at 3:00 PM. Earlier in the day, Far Eastern University-Diliman and Adamson High School also figure in a big-time battle at 11:00 AM. The Baby Tamaraws and the Baby Falcons hold similar slates of 5-2 and are in a three-way logjam together with the Blue Eaglets for the second-seed. Meanwhile, University of Sto. Tomas (3-4) and De La Salle Zobel (3-4) are also out for boosts to their playoff pushes up against the University of the Philippines Integrated School (0-7) at 1:00 PM and University of the East (1-6), respectively. For the first time ever, the UAAP Juniors will have its elimination games broadcast on S+A and S+A HD and via livestream. The NU-Ateneo matchup will air on S+A and S+A HD at 7:00 PM while the DLSZ-UPIS matchup will air at 5:00 PM. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 12th, 2019

Patrick Beverley s trademark defense getting new test

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com There was a foul, followed by a stoppage in play, a scene replayed dozens of times in NBA arenas. Except in this case, the victim was former two-time Kia MVP Stephen Curry and the punisher was the notorious Patrick Beverley. And so the situation (of course) turned snippy. Beverley has fought against better players his entire basketball life and carries an underdog gene that tends to flare in these situations. That explains why he tried to slap the ball from the Warriors guard after the whistle. Curry wasn’t having it, and so there was a gentle shove. And then a shove was returned. Then a staredown with noses just inches from each other. Then a separation of bodies. This was Beverley doing what he does by reputation: namely, irritate and push his defensive aggression and agenda to the very limit … and then some. His “crime” was restricting Curry’s movement with a forearm. Sometimes Beverley gets away with it, but in today’s NBA, no longer with any regularity. Such is the new normal. He’s a defensive-minded player with the LA Clippers and works in a league that suddenly favors scoring and shooters. He’s quite possibly, in his estimation and that of others, someone who’s forced to evolve or perish. For him, there’s no other option. “It would be very hard,” Beverley said, “to come into the league today and try to play defense like we did years ago.” Before this season, the NBA's Points of Emphasis centered in part on freedom of movement. The goal is to help players move without barriers, which creates high-scoring games, which makes games more entertaining for fans. Halfway through the season, the evidence is convincing: Scores are up, stops are down. To date, 11 teams have an offensive rating greater than 110 and 18 teams are scoring more than 110 points per game. Last season, those numbers were six and six, respectively. For players born with height, wingspan and leaping ability, these defensive rules don’t handcuff them much. But Beverley buys his clothes off the rack, so to speak. He’s a shade over six feet and is therefore a normal man trying to make a living in a big man’s world. At 30, Beverley deals with players who are often taller and even quicker. It’s his job to make their life tougher -- but here in the new age of barely-contested shots and 120-point games, the opposite is ringing true. He’s averaging a career-high 3.6 fouls per game and can’t get away with much. As Draymond Green, a defensive demon himself and teammate of Curry’s said recently: “Defense is not allowed. You can’t really play defense in this league. I guess that’s not what they want.” ‘We’re forced to adjust’ Green's words are perhaps an extreme assessment and a touch of exaggeration. Fifteen teams averaged at least 106 ppg last season; now it’s 26. Calls are less forgiving, as only 13 teams are averaging 24 free throw attempts per game (it was five last season). The ball moves and there’s less restriction, which was the intention. And there appears to be little blowback in the basketball universe from those who observe and play. It’s just … accepted. For the most part. Even Beverley offers a shoulder shrug. “Guys who make a living off defense, we’re forced to adjust,” he said. This evolution of shifting away from certain defensive tactics is decades in the making. The NBA once allowed defenders to shove a forearm into the back of a post-up player, and subtle jersey grabs were often excused. And there was the hand-check, too. All have been outlawed. The game is far less physical, which means the “Bad Boys”-era Detroit Pistons would have little chance of winning one championship today (let alone two). The NBA has sought to distance itself from that brand of ball, from Pat Riley’s New York Knicks (and their “no free layups” mentality) and from the 85-80 scores that often stifled the creativity of the game. The result is a game that sees open lanes and quicker whistles, and less of what helped players like Beverley overcome tremendous odds to reach the NBA. “There is where we’re at,” he said. “They want to see more scoring, more up-and-down, more points and all that, which is understandable. Of course, it makes it hard for me.” Relishing his ‘instigator’ role This is Beverley’s sixth year in the NBA, but his 10th in professional basketball. His journey curved through various stops overseas before he became rooted with the Houston Rockets, his first true NBA home. It speaks to Beverley’s doggedness and his value, at least initially, as a defensive specialist assigned to the grunt work. With the rise in scoring point guards across the NBA landscape, Beverley’s role became more important, and difficult as well. In a typical week, Beverley could guard Curry, Russell Westbrook, Damian Lillard and opposing shooting guards, too. He brings an edge to the job that he learned from growing up on the West Side of Chicago to a single mother as well as a grandmother who adopted a dozen kids. Daily life was a chore. He was one of the main characters in the documentary “Hoop Reality,” the sequel to the acclaimed “Hoop Dreams.” Beverley was friendly rivals with former Kia MVP winner Derrick Rose since grade school and was actually a scorer in high school, averaging a state-best 37 points as a senior. After getting kicked out of Arkansas in 2008 after two years for academic issues -- a tutor wrote a paper for him -- he played three years in Russia and Greece before filling the point guard void on the 2012-13 Rockets caused by Kyle Lowry’s trade to Toronto the summer before. “I wouldn’t change one thing about how I got here,” he said. “Sometimes you don’t get in through the front door. Sometimes you don’t get in through the back. Sometimes you got to climb through the window. That doesn’t mean the opportunity wasn’t there. There’s a way; you’ve just got to find it.” He immediately became singled out for eyeball-to-eyeball defense that teetered on the edge. The moment that earned him a name was in the first round of the 2013 playoffs against Oklahoma City. He went for a steal on Westbrook in Game 2 while Westbrook signaled for a timeout, causing his knee injury five years ago. He still answers for that, even to this day; not that the play on the ball was reckless, but was it necessary? “I don’t go out there to hurt people, I don’t even know how to attempt to hurt somebody,” Beverley said. “I play hard, bring the edge. I’m an instigator. That gets me going. I like to bump people, to feel me getting into somebody’s jersey. I’m just different. I like contact, like physical play, like pushing and holding. But I’m not dirty.” Beverley hasn’t spoken with Westbrook -- their on-court relationship is clearly frosty -- and with the exception of Rose, he doesn’t encourage any friendships beyond his teammates. “I don’t talk to anybody,” he said. “I don’t want personal battles that take away from the team. I’m trying to win games. When I come to San Francisco or Oklahoma City or Portland, I know I’m going straight to my room because there’s people I got to be ready to play the next day. And I know they do the same. There’s respect that’s not being said. When it comes to Steph, Dame, Westbrook, I make sure I get my rest. But they get their rest, too. They know what I bring to the table.” A game that won’t change Beverley was an All-Defensive first teamer two seasons ago, both a career highlight and confirmation of his devotion to studying film and learning opponents’ tendencies. He has also overcome microfracture knee injury in 2017-18 that limited him to 11 games in his debut season with the Clippers. “I worked my ass off and I’m still working,” he said. “If it’s not one thing it’s another. Me getting hurt, coming back faster and stronger. Got kicked out of school, had to go overseas, knew I was going to the NBA anyway. I didn’t know how. But I knew. “This is bigger than me. It’s for my mom, grandmom, seeing how hard the women in my life worked to raise me. It’s not easy being a single mother raising a kid in the inner city but she made it happen. She taught me to stand on my own two feet and get the best out of hard work, which becomes part of your mindset, especially when you see two women doing it every day.” And now comes another challenge for Beverley and those like him. How do you thrive in a league that’s suddenly married to offense? “Maybe after the All-Star break they’ll stop calling ticky-tack fouls,” he said. “The better defender you are, the more you’re singled out. But I’m going to go out there and be Pat. Don’t care. Won’t change.” Beverley estimates that “70 percent” of the players he guards are rattled by him, to different degrees. He said “only a few don’t,” which he refused to name (for strategic reasons). The game may not be designed to help the underdog, average-sized player who brings intensity and defense. But there’s no sense waiting for Beverley to make excuses. He’s come too far for that. “When you’re done with this game, you don’t want to go around saying, ‘Man I wish I could’ve done this, put more time into that.’” Beverley said. “Every year I go out like a person fighting for my spot, fighting for my contract. That’s the way I train. That’s how I prepare. That’s why I’m still in the league.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2019

PBSP, DepEd launch Year 2 of educational assistance to Olango SHS scholars

PBSP, Olango Challenge corporate donors, and DepEd officially launched a one-year educational assistance project that will support 100 junior and senior high school scholars of Sta. Rosa National High School......»»

Category: newsSource:  samarnewsRelated NewsJan 7th, 2019

Living the beard life

I first started shaving in my last year of high school. My facial hair started growing a few years before and I paid it no mind until one of my teachers made an innocuous remark about.   "Going for the John Lennon look?"   It took me an embarrassingly long while to realize that she was not talking about the early, boyish, Beatlemania John, but the gruff, unkempt, post-Maharishi, Abbey Road John.   It was a brief yet brutal affair, shaving for the first time. I had already made up my mind that everything below the ears had to go and I was exceedingly eager to be done with it. I picked up the first shaving implement within sight from the bathroom sink, ...Keep on reading: Living the beard life.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 6th, 2019

UAAP: An Ateneo three-peat next year will mean much more for Nieto twins

For the seventh time in the last 11 years, Ateneo de Manila University is the king of the UAAP Seniors. And in the same light, for the third time in the last four years, Nieto twins Mike and Matt are champions. “It’s a very fulfilling experience for me together with my twin brother. Grade school pa lang, pinangarap na namin ni Mike yun,” Matt said in the school’s annual bonfire of champions late last year. “Actually, mag-champion lang, okay na, pero ngayon, winning a back-to-back, it’s ever more special for us." With that, the Nietos can now boast of 2017 and 2018 titles in the UAAP Seniors as well as a 2015 title in the UAAP Juniors. At this point in time, what’s up next for them has just become personal. “We have one more year and pwede na namin lampasan si daddy. We don’t want to end our (collegiate) career na natalo kami so extra motivation na mas galingan namin next year,” Matt said. He then continued through chuckles, “Pero si daddy, feeling ko, ninenerbyos na si daddy.” Yes, alongside keeping the crown in Katipunan and extending Ateneo’s dominance to what would be a dozen years, Mike and Matt want nothing more than to be the winningest Nietos. “Grade school pa lang kami, napag-usapan na namin yan e. Nung ‘di pa kami nananalo sa UAAP Juniors, sabi ni daddy na nanalo siya ng isa so dun na nagsimula,” Mike shared. “So si daddy, dinadala kami sa Blue Eagle Gym kasi nga, nandun yung banners and pinagmamalaki niya yung Seniors niya na 1987 and 1988.” Jet, the patriarch of the Nietos, won one championship in his time as a Blue Eaglet before winning back-to-back as a Blue Eagle. Now, his twin sons now have one last shot at overtaking him in the title tally – and they are not shy in saying that is their personal motivation. As Mike put it, “Gusto talaga namin siyang talunin e. Tie lang kasi namin siya sa high school.” He then continued through chuckles, “Ngayon, tie na namin siya sa college so wala na siyang ipagyayabang. Hopefully, ang gusto talaga namin is talunin siya ang mag-three-peat next year.” Of course, the two made it clear that they know full well that’s easier said than done. “We’ll just keep working hard and keep doing what coach Tab says,” Mike said. That’s exactly why they’re not making any guarantees just yet. “Finals muna and then we’ll see what happens,” Matt said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 4th, 2019

NCAA: 6-3 lefty forward Rhayyan Amsali staying in San Beda through college

Rhayyan Amsali is yet to play a single game for San Beda High School since he transferred there from Nazareth School of National University. That hasn’t stopped him, however, from declaring his intention to play out his first and final year for the Red Cubs and then immediately moving on up to the school’s Seniors squad. “I have decided, along with my parents, na mag-aaaral po ako ng college sa San Beda and, if god wills, maglalaro para sa Red Lions,” he said. Early last year, Amsali, a 6-foot-3 versatile forward, was playing for the Bullpups and then, months later, relocated to Taytay to play for the Red Cubs. Due to unforeseen circumstances, though, his supposed debut was put on hold as he was unable to meet academic requirements back in NU. That has left him with one season of eligibility in the NCAA Juniors which he only plans on using up in the looming NCAA 95. Whatever happens there, the Zamboanga native said he will continue to wear the red and white for the next years. “My motivation is to get batter as a student-athlete and San Beda exceeds excellent standards. Best school po ito para sa akin for my future,” he shared. He then continued, “At siyempre, pagdating sa basketball, back-to-back champion nga po ang Red Lions so kung pagbibigyan ako ng time to play for coach Boyet [Fernandez], maglalaro po ako para makatulong ang ma-maintain yung championship culture nila.” All in all, Amsali said San Beda’s winning tradition was the clincher for him to commit even though he still has one season to play in the NCAA Juniors. “San Beda has an extra exemplary record sa lahat po kaya I chose to be a Red Lion,” he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 4th, 2019

KAI-vals Series: NU s counter Carl Tamayo

It has become some sort of a cliché now that Kai Sotto is not yet done growing. Indeed, Ateneo de Manila High School’s 7-foot-1, 16-year-old still has three more years, including this one, to tower over the competition in high school. That doesn’t mean, however, that the rest of the competition will just take that lying down. Here, we take a look at the players who are more than capable of challenging Sotto’s dominance – now and even onto the future. --- Carl Tamayo has only played four games in his first year for Nazareth School of National University no thanks to a nagging right ankle sprain. There was one game he wasn’t going to miss no matter what, however – the Bullpups rematch with Ateneo de Manila High School which bested them for last year’s championship. “Yung pagmamahal ko sa team, siyempre, kailangan nila ako so I played through the pain,” he said. Not only did he play through the pain, he actually lived up to the hype of being a match for Kai Sotto, the Blue Eaglets’ 7-foot-1, 16-year-old. Sotto had 23 points, 12 rebounds, four assists, and two steals in their head-to-head matchup, but it was Tamayo who came away with the win on top of a 13-point, 10-rebound double-double. For NU’s own towering teen, though, it wasn’t the prospect of facing off with the Philippines’ biggest hope in basketball that motivated him. Rather, it was being on the floor and doing battle alongside his teammates. “Naging motivation ko, yung teammates ko kasi kailangan nila ako,” he shared afterward. “Kasi nga, malaki si Kai so pag nandun ako, alam kong magiging malaki rin contributions ko.” Indeed, for two years, Sotto is yet to find his match in the UAAP Juniors where only Raven Cortez comes close to his talent and potential. Most of the country’s young prospects have risen over in the NCAA Juniors in the likes of Warren Bonifacio, Aaron Fermin, and Will Gozum. Enter Tamayo, the UAAP Juniors’ Rookie of the Year right before Sotto was hailed as the top newcomer. Tamayo won Rookie of the Year while displaying an inside-outside game that was still quite rare for a big man. Now, he is only continuing to develop the all-around game he already has. This continued development is made even more impressive by the fact that the now 17-year-old has only been playing basketball for around five years. Yes, back in his hometown of Cebu, he was a tall kid, but nobody will find him in basketball courts and instead, he was most often playing billiards. “Hindi pa talaga ako naglalaro (ng basketball) nun. Bilyar talaga ako,” he said, recalling his time as a 12-year-old who already stood 5-foot-10. That was until coach Goldwin Monteverde came over to Cebu and ultimately convinced him to put his height to good use. “Meron kasi kaming kapitbahay, player nina coach Gold dati, tapos kinausap niya yung ball boy na may malaki nga raw siyang kapitbahay. Yung ball boy naman, kinausap si coach Gold tapos timing, pumunta sila sa Cebu, ayun, kinuha nila ako,” he shared. Of course, a little encouragement in the form of a ticket to watch San Miguel and idol June Mar Fajardo played a part in convincing Tamayo to move to Manila. From there, not only did the now 6-foot-8 versatile big man prove to be a prized prospect, he would also turn out to be a big piece for the Bullpups as they try to put a stop to Ateneo’s dynasty in the UAAP Juniors. “Nung una, ‘di ko alam paano maglaro so ensayo lang nang ensayo,” he shared. He then continued, “Kahit papaano, nag-improve naman nang nag-improve.” And now, Tamayo only vows to keep doing what he had always done – get better and better. In particular, he wants nothing more than to weaponize his outside shot to that Sotto and other opposing big men will be forced to go with him to the perimeter, leaving the paint open for slashers such as Gerry Abadiano and Cyril Gonzales to attack. As he put it, “Ang tine-train namin ngayon, to play outside. Magiging malaking tulong sa teammates ko yun kung na-develop ko yun.” --- Tamayo and Sotto will go head-to-head for three seasons, including this one, in the UAAP Juniors. They go at it once more just as NU and Ateneo will go at it once more as the second round of the UAAP 81 Juniors Basketball Tournament begins on January 13 at the Filoil Flying V Centre. And for the first time ever, that matchup will be LIVE and EXCLUSIVE on S+A, S+A HD, LIGA, LIGA HD and via livestream. Tip-off is at 3:00 PM. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 4th, 2019