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Sandino’s ‘high-school project’ goes big-time

  Singer-actor Sandino Martin recounts the journey of "Changing Partners" from stage to screen. Sandino, who was part of the original theater production, relates: "I remember falling in love with the script the first time I read it---even in its crudest form then." He recalls that the play had its start as a "reading project" in the Virgin Labfest in 2016. "It felt like a high-school project. We bought our own costumes, painted the set ... a teeny-tiny set ... but I could feel that we all believed in it." He admits that he and costars Agot Isidro, Jojit Lorenzo and Anna Luna had zero expectations that their "high-school project" would go this far. After winning eight aw...Keep on reading: Sandino’s ‘high-school project’ goes big-time.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJan 31st, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

Wendell Carter Jr. brings all-around package to Bulls

NBA.com staff report Wendell Carter Jr. had his plan in place from a young age, as early as the third grade. His hoop dreams always centered on fulfilling a destiny his father, a professional player overseas, never did. So when NBA Commissioner Adam Silver called his name early during Thursday's draft (Friday, PHL time), it was the culmination of a family project years in the making. Carter, who joins an up and coming young cast in Chicago, arrives with a focus and attention to detail that puts the emphasis on professional in professional ballplayer. As Malika Andrews of the Chicago Tribune points out, Carter has spent his young life preparing for the opportunity that is being presented to him now with the Bulls: At Pace Academy, Carter was also one of the highest-ranked basketball prospects in the country. He scored 30 points and grabbed 20 rebounds to lead Pace to the Georgia Class AA state championship in 2016. Pace coach Demetrius Smith made sure to tune in to the draft after a staff meeting Thursday night. “As far as a big man, he’s probably the best from Georgia since Dwight Howard,” Smith said. ”There never has been another guy like him at our school.” Carter sacrificed some of his own offense on a Duke team that also had Marvin Bagley III and Grayson Allen — two other first-round picks. Carter averaged 13.5 points and 9.1 rebounds for the Blue Devils, serving as a more physical complement to the sinewy Bagley, whom the Kings selected at No. 2. “The beautiful thing about Wendell is that he doesn’t have to be the featured guy to have an impact,” Carter’s performance coach, Sekou Walton, said. “Wendell can actually help you out defensively, he can get your rebounds. His assist ratio is pretty high as well. He can work well with someone who has to have touches. Wendell is that perfect support guy, and the NBA needs more people like Wendell.” Indeed, Carter’s potential lies not only in his physical gifts and scoring ability but also his unselfishness and commitment to team play. Kylia describes her son as “unselfish to a fault.” Sommerville called him the “quarterback that makes everybody’s life easier.” Throughout high school, Carter kept a comprehensive training program that reflects his attention to detail: He practiced, lifted weights, stuck to a healthy diet and even carried a water jug everywhere he went to ensure he was properly hydrated. One of Smith’s favorite memories took place immediately after Carter’s sensational championship game performance in 2016. After Pace beat Manchester High 65-43 in the state final, the team celebrated with burgers, fries and milkshakes from Chick-fil-A on the bus ride back from Macon to Atlanta. When the bus pulled up at the school and Carter’s teammates rushed to go celebrate, Carter stayed behind to pick up the napkins, bags and cups. “We always say, ‘Leave it better than you found it,’ ” Smith said in a phone interview from his Atlanta home. “I have seen him do it after games too — picking up Gatorade cups and stuff like that. You just don’t find too many kids that are that humble and are willing to do all the dirty work, the little stuff.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

One Rohingya’s struggle to empower women in Malaysia – Al Jazeera

Tucked away upstairs at a shopping plaza in this city’s north end is a small storefront turned classroom for dozens of Rohinyga women and children. The sound of these women reciting English phrases, laughing and the occasional cries of kids can be heard in the stairwell. Its founder, Sharifah Husain, 24, said she wanted to do something to help women and children in her community, who are not allowed to work or study in Malaysia. “I noticed we didn’t have a Rohingya women’s organisation that was standing up for women – to be the voice of women,” Husain said. Husain comes from Buthidaung village in Myanmar’s restive Rakhine state. Her father fled to Malaysia when she was five-years old, fearing for his life. Husain was left behind with her mother and two younger siblings. The village was attacked soon afterward, so Husain’s mother took them to Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar – then known as Burma. Her recollection of the traumatic moment when a local mob attacked her village is hazy. It took place almost 20 years ago. But it mirrors the accounts of Rohingya refugees now in Bangladesh, who’ve recently fled the Myanmar’s army clearance operations and local Buddhist mobs. “My mother was arrested in Yangon and sentenced to prison for not having official [identification or travel] documents,” Husain recounted. “This left me in charge.” Husain can’t remember how long she spent in Yangon, but she said she was separated from her siblings and sent north to Mandalay and forced into servitude. She spoke to her father in Malaysia, over the phone, and he agreed to pay human traffickers to bring Husain and her siblings to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia’s largest city. All three, including Husain, were smuggled by land, into Thailand and Malaysia. At that time the Southeast Asia trafficking route wasn’t as defined as it is today. Human trafficking groups in Bangladesh and Thailand now make a lot of money off of poor, desperate refugees fleeing war and violence in Myanmar. Today, the concern faced by the Malaysia government is if it recognises its refugees then that could send a signal to more to make the perilous journey, now taken by sea from Myanmar and Bangladesh to sanctuary in Malaysia, where they don’t face violent persecution. The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, states there are 152,170 registered refugees in Malaysia. The majority are Rohingya, displaced from their homes in Myanmar, like Husain. But the amount of unregistered refugees varies widely from 40,000 to 140,000, according to Asylum Access Malaysia. “The big question is – when are the boats going to come? There’s no indication they will now, but there’s definitely a high possibility that they will. And once new groups arrive, that complicates [the] situation,” said Deepa Nambiar, Asylum Access Malaysia director. UNHCR runs what it calls a “parallel school system” for refugees in Malaysia, allowing children to  access basic, primary-level education. Refugee groups and local faith-based organisations fund these schools, staffed by volunteers. One-hundred and twenty-eight informal refugee schools in Malaysia access funding from the UN. It provides education to 7,154 children, according to UNHCR. Malaysia’s Prime Minister’s Office states 16,809 Rohingya refugee children are registered with UNHCR. This means about 10,000, or more, refugee children in Malaysia are unable to access any form of education. A dozen or so more informal refugee schools exist but rely solely on donations and are understaffed, said Asylum Access. “To live in Malaysia, yes you can live, but you don’t have a future. You are in a box. You can’t go out of the box,” Husain said. Husain has received no formal education in Malaysia. This is remarkable considering her drive to educate refugee women and children. Malaysians are supporting Rohingya Women’s Development Network by volunteering as teachers and support staff. Rohinyga Women’s Development Network started officially last year. But Husain has spent the last decade educating her community’s most vulnerable women and children in their own homes. “I have built up a trust. The men especially trust me. They feel safe sending their wives to our centre because they know me,” Husain said. Word has spread and more refugee families are now attending Rohingya Women’s Development Network classes, where they receive English-language instruction, leadership training and brand new self-defence classes. “We want to stop domestic violence. We want to stop child marriages in the community. We want to build up women’s empowerment,” Husain said. “We really need the Malaysia government to recognise us.” Husain is trying to change the mentality in the Rohingya and wider refugee community in Malaysia, that women and girls can’t study, work, or earn an income. She receives some funding from UNHCR to run programmes but uses her own money to keep them going. “Of course I have support from my family. My father is my hero. My husband is my hero. Both of these men have really pushed me forward,” Husain added. The Rohingya Women’s Development Network has teamed up with Asylum Access Malaysia on a refugee theatre project. This will allow refugee women to educate the community on issues of sexual violence. “What I think is so innovative about Sharifah and the team is that when we were discussing this project they said ‘we need to get men involved’,” Nambiar said. Husain is appealing to others in the refugee community to support initiatives set up by the Malaysia government and civil society groups to help […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Tale of 2 cities: Olympics sponsors in Pyeongchang and Tokyo

em>By Youkyung Lee and Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press /em> SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Winter Olympics coming to South Korea in February offer an example of the Olympian efforts often required to meet corporate sponsorship goals. Tokyo tells a different story: The coffers are already overflowing for the 2020 Summer Games. It's a tale of two cities and two Olympics — winter and summer. Pyeongchang is a little-known destination in one of South Korea's poorest provinces. It is the 'little town that could,' bidding twice unsuccessfully for the Winter Olympics before winning on its third try. A final push enabled it to reach its sponsorship target of 940 billion won ($830 million) in September, with just five months to go. Tokyo is an established global capital, and the Summer Games usually generate more excitement — and more money. Organizers have raised 300 billion yen ($2.7 billion) in sponsorship, twice any previous Olympics. International Olympic Committee Vice President John Coates describes it as a remarkable achievement. The divergent experiences of two Asian host cities illustrate the challenges that smaller bidders face, as well as South Korea's dependence on the big family-owned companies that dominate its economy. Not that Tokyo is home-free. The cost of the 2020 Games has nearly doubled from initial projections. As with most Olympics, taxpayers will have to foot a good part of the bill. ___ strong>WHERE 'CHAEBOLS' RULE /strong> Starting with the 1988 Seoul Olympics, South Korea has used mega-events such as the soccer World Cup to raise the profile of the country and its manufacturing exporters. Pyeongchang is different. The project was initiated by local politicians in an area long alienated politically and economically in South Korea's rise to prosperity. Some feared people would confuse the city's name with Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. They couldn't count on the automatic support of the huge family-run conglomerates, known as 'chaebol,' such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG. 'When such mega-events were the nation-state's key project, the chaebol were called on and were expected to become the leading participants,' said Joo Yu-min, a professor at the National University of Singapore who co-authored a book on South Korea's use of mega-events. In the end, the national government brought the conglomerates in, first in the bid process, and then for sponsorship. That underscores both the outsized role they play in the economy and their close ties with government. They owe a debt to special treatment from the government, which in turn used them to industrialize the country after the devastating 1950-53 Korean War. After Pyeongchang's bid was rejected a second time, the government called on Samsung and others to help. The president even pardoned Lee Kun-hee, the patriarch of the Samsung founding family who had been an IOC member but voluntarily suspended his membership after being indicted for tax evasion. The IOC reinstated Lee in 2010 with a reprimand and some restrictions, allowing him to lobby heavily for what became Pyeongchang's winning bid in 2011. It took three years for the organizing committee to sign its first domestic sponsor, KT Corp., the country's second-largest mobile carrier. Again, the national government asked the conglomerates for help. All the major ones signed on, after the office of then-President Park Geun-hye made a special request and multichannel pressures for financial assistance, Joo said. Elsewhere, companies may weigh sponsorship decisions based more on the marketing benefits. 'In South Korea, companies make donations out of a sense of duty that they are being part of the national event,' said Park Dong Min, the executive director overseeing membership at the Korea Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Sponsors who signed up late weren't willing to give as much, because there was less time to enjoy the marketing benefits. A bank that signed on less than a year before the Games significantly reduced its sponsorship. To top it off, a massive sports-related political corruption scandal rocked South Korea in 2016, just when Pyeongchang was making last-ditch efforts to raise sponsorship. 'Companies showed some reluctance' to sponsor the Olympics, said Eom Chanwang, director of the Pyeongchang organizing committee marketing team. 'Nevertheless, they still joined.' The scandal brought down Park, the president. Lee Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung group, received a five-year sentence for bribery. Lee, who has appealed, had become de facto chief of the Samsung group after his father Lee Kun-hee, the IOC member pardoned in late 2009, fell ill. It was the younger Lee who signed an agreement with IOC President Thomas Bach to extend Samsung Electronics' sponsorship of the Olympics globally through 2020. Samsung declined interviews for this story. With the scandal still fresh in people's minds, major companies have held back from launching full-fledged marketing to promote the Games. 'Samsung traditionally has done consumer marketing through the Olympics, but because its chief is in jail, it cannot do as much these days,' said Kim Do-kyun, a sports professor at Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Physical Education. The Pyeongchang Games were the biggest victim of the scandal, he said. ___ strong>SUMMER OF '64 /strong> The president of Japan's biggest toilet manufacturer was seven years old when the Olympics first came to Japan. TOTO Ltd. made news in 1964 for its prefabricated toilet-and-bath units that helped speed the construction of a luxury hotel, the New Otani, in time for the Games. The company, now known for high-tech toilets that baffle some foreign visitors, is back as a sponsor of Tokyo 2020. 'I feel our company and the Olympics have been bonded by fate,' TOTO president Madoka Kitamura said at a sponsorship signing ceremony at the same hotel last year. The $2.7 billion in sponsorship for Tokyo 2020 is more than three times the original estimate. By comparison, sponsorship revenue was $848 million in Rio de Janeiro last year, and about $1.2 billion for both London 2012 and Beijing 2008. The Winter Olympics typically attract less, though Sochi, Russia, raised $1.2 billion in 2014. Analysts attribute Tokyo's success to both patriotism and a sense of nostalgia for the 1964 Summer Games. They were much more than a sports contest for Japan. They were a moment of pride, marking the country's return as an industrial power after the devastation of World War II and a seven-year U.S. occupation. 'All of Japan still recognizes the unique role that the 1964 Olympics played in Japan's stepping out onto the world stage,' said Michael Payne, a former IOC marketing director who now works as a consultant. 'Many of the CEOs of top Japanese companies would have been young kids back in '64 and are very aware of the role those Games played for the psychological recovery from the Second World War.' They grew up with the high-speed 'Shinkansen' bullet train, inaugurated in 1964; modern expressways and western-style toilets, all symbols of Japan's postwar economic growth. 'Now they have become business leaders, they want to contribute and leave something behind that can be remembered for the next 50 years,' said Masahiko Sakamaki, executive director of marketing for the Tokyo organizing committee. He said that memories of the recovery may have boosted interest in sponsorship, as Japan was still reeling from a deadly 2011 earthquake and tsunami when Tokyo won the bid in 2013. Sakamaki said the organizing committee started receiving sponsorship inquiries as soon as it was established in 2014, before the official start of sponsorship contracts in 2015. There is so much interest that the IOC is allowing Tokyo to have multiple sponsors in some categories, instead of the usual one, including in aviation, newspaper publishing, electronics and banking. TOTO officials won't say how much they are contributing, but media reports say companies in its sponsorship category give between 6 billion and 15 billion yen ($53 million to $133.5 million). Tokyo 2020 wouldn't comment on those reports. 'We believe our presence as part of an all-Japan effort toward a successful Olympics will enhance our favorable brand image,' said Mariko Shibasaki, the company's senior planner for sports communication. Thanks in part to robust sponsorship revenue, the organizing committee has increased its contribution to the cost of the games from 500 billion to 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion). The sponsorship revenue makes up half of the income in the privately-run organizing committee's operating budget. Other revenue comes from the International Olympic Committee, marketing and ticket sales. The overall cost of the Tokyo Olympics is estimated at 1.4 trillion yen (12.4 billion) with the Tokyo government shouldering 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion) and the remaining 200 billion yen (1.8 billion) paid by the national government and local governments hosting events. ___ em>Yamaguchi reported from Tokyo. Associated Press writer Stephen Wade in Rio de Janeiro contributed to this story. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Knicks overwhelm Young, Hawks 126-107 in Fizdale s debut

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 31 points, sparking the Knicks during their franchise-record, 49-point second quarter, and New York beat the Atlanta Hawks 126-107 on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) in their first game under coach David Fizdale. Hardaway had 16 points in the period, when the Knicks matched the Hawks' point total for the entire first half. New York led 72-49 at the break. Trae Young finished with 14 points, six rebounds and five assists, shooting 5-for-14 in his NBA debut. Taurean Prince scored 21 points for the Hawks, who were overwhelmed in their first game under Lloyd Pierce. Four other Knicks scored at least 15 points, while rookie Kevin Knox finished with 10 and was just 4-for-16. Hardaway and the Knicks started slowly, as he had missed his first four shots and the Knicks started 0-for-9 when they took a timeout trailing 10-2. During that break, George Holmes of Northport, New York, nailed a halfcourt shot to win $10,000, and suddenly the New Yorkers couldn't miss. Frank Ntilikina made a three-pointer out of the timeout to get the Knicks started on a 12-0 run and then they really took off in the second quarter. That was especially true of Hardaway, who made his next eight shots against his former team. He fell seven points shy of Patrick Ewing's franchise record for opening night, and perhaps could have gotten closer if he needed to play more of the fourth quarter. Young, the No. 5 pick in the draft and the first player to lead the nation in scoring and assists in the same season as a freshman at Oklahoma, said he felt butterflies Wednesday. He recalled that he shot airballs on his first shot in high school, college and Summer League, saying he wanted to avoid that again. He did, knocking down his first shot as a pro, a runner in the lane late in the first quarter. But he missed his other six shots in the first half and the Hawks were outscored by 19 points in his 17 minutes before halftime. TIP-INS Hawks: Pierce congratulated Hawks radio play-by-play voice Steve Holman for working his 2,500th game, counting playoffs, Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Holman started his career with the team in March 1989. ... Atlanta plays its first three games on the road before facing Dallas in its home opener next Wednesday (next Thursday, PHL time). Knicks: The Knicks' record for any quarter is 53 points in the fourth quarter against Seattle on Dec. 26, 1967. ... Courtney Lee didn't play after sitting out nearly all of the preseason with a strained neck. Fizdale indicated the veteran guard wouldn't play the first few games, saying that Lee was "totally on board with how I'm approaching it and we'll see how it goes." ... The Knicks opened at home for the first time since the 2014-15 season. ... OPENING-NIGHT OLD-TIMER Vince Carter began his 21st season by starting at forward and scoring 12 points. Pierce said the Hawks' research Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) found that only Robert Parish was an older opening-night NBA starter than the 41-year-old Carter. He stands out so much on a young Atlanta team that the Hawks' average NBA experience drops from 3.65 years to 2.63 if Carter is excluded. FRIENDS AND FOES Fizdale and Pierce played against each other in college, when Fizdale was a senior at San Diego during Pierce's freshman season for West Coast Conference rival Santa Clara. "Lloyd caught a lob on my head from Steve Nash once," Fizdale recalled. "I still haven't forgave him for that but we've been friends a long time and this is obviously for both of us a big moment." UP NEXT Hawks: Visit Memphis on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Knicks: Visit Brooklyn on Friday (Saturday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

LSGH dominates this week s NBTC NCAA 24

With still two games left in the elimination round, the CSB-LSGH Junior Blazers were the first to secure a twice-to-beat advantage as the Final Four draws near.  It was the first time in school history they achieved the incentive, proving that they are still the team to beat in the NCAA Juniors Division.  Led by Inand Fornilos and Joshua David, CSB-LSGH bested Lyceum, 80-75, on Thursday, to notch their 14th win in 16 games. Fornilos was a man on a mission as he poured in 12 points, 13 rebounds, and two blocks. His stellar play earned him the number one spot in the Chooks-to-Go/NBTC NCAA 24 weekly high school rankings.  David was equally superb with his 20-point production, placing him right behind Fornilos for the second spot. David also made a significant impact on the defensive end as he challenged the 3-point attempt by John Barba in the closing moments, helping his team get the win.  At third in the weekly rankings is JRU's John Amores. The versatile swingman put up 12 points, six boards, and three steals in a semis-securing win over EAC that puts them back in the Final Four for the first time since 2014. Completing the top five are standout guard Joel Cagulangan of the Junior Blazers and Jonnel Policarpio of the Mapua Red Robins.  Perpetual Help's Ezdel Galoy crashes into the sixth spot after a pair of solid outings. He first put up 19 points and 14 rebounds in a win over EAC then followed it up with another double-double of 21 points and 10 boards vs Letran.  Rounding up the top ten are Mapua's Dan Arches, Arellano's Aaron Fermin, Lyceum's Mac Guadana, and Mapua's Clint Escamis.  Here are the complete Week 14 rankings of the Chooks-to-Go/NBTC NCAA 24: 1. Inand Fornilos (CSB) (4) 2. Joshua David (CSB) (15) 3. John Amores (JRU) (3) 4. Joel Cagulangan (CSB) (2) 5. Jonnel Policarpio (MU) (7) 6. Ezdel Galoy (UPHSD) (N/A) 7. Dan Arches (MU) (13) 8. Aaron Fermin (AU) (6) 9. Mac Guadana (LPU) (1) 10. Clint Escamis (MU) (8) 11. Emman Galman (UPHSD) (11) 12. Penny Estacio (SBU) (N/A) 13. Marwin Dionisio (JRU) (N/A) 14. Rom Junsay (AU) (10) 15. John Barba (LPU) (9) 16. Tony Ynot (SBU) (N/A) 17. Milo Janao (SSC) (24) 18. Justine Sanchez (SBU) (N/A) 19. John Delos Santos (JRU) (5) 20. Ronald Bucoy (JRU) (N/A) 21. RC Calimag (CSB) (14) 22. Kean Baclaan (SSC) (12) 23. JR Ilustrisimo (EAC) (N/A) 24. Shawn Argente (CSJL) (N/A) This year, there will be three separate editions of the NBTC 24 – one for the NCAA, one for the UAAP, and one for the CESAFI – to accommodate the Juniors calendar for the whole year. After all three editions have been completed, a final list composing the top 24 players nationwide will then be chosen to participate in the annual NBTC All-Star Game in March......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 16th, 2018

UAAP: From MVP to Rookie of the Year? CJ Cansino s making a great case

Safe to say, CJ Cansino has taken the UAAP 81 Men’s Basketball Tournament by storm. With per game counts of 13.4 points and 7.8 rebounds, he has got to be one of the frontrunners for Rookie of the Year. University of Sto. Tomas’ super rookie only built on those on Saturday with a big-time 17-point, 17-rebound double-double on top of four assists. In fact, he already had a double-double late in the second quarter with 10 points and 12 rebounds. Of course, Cansino is only giving his best to prove his worth. “Siyempre, pinapatunayan ko sa lahat na belong din ako rito,” he said. He then continued, “Pinaghirapan ko ‘to, I worked hard on this simula bata ako. Kaya ginagawa ko lang yung best ko and every game, naka-focus talaga ako.” While his numbers are eye-openers for just about everybody watching the UAAP Seniors, the long-limbed swingman has actually been putting up those sort of statistics ever since his days in the UAAP Juniors. In his last season there, he averaged 24.6 points, 12.9 rebounds, and 3.0 assists. Those were more than enough to make him the runaway MVP – a runaway MVP that had an 18-point lead in terms of Statistical Points (SPs) over his closest competitor in Kai Sotto. Yes, Kai Sotto, the 7-foot-1, 16-year-old of Ateneo de Manila High School. That doesn’t mean, however, that slowly but surely, UST is becoming the Cansino’s team. Rather, according to the super rookie himself, they want nothing more than total team effort each and every game. As he put it, “Si coach [Aldin Ayo], wala siyang main man na parang, ito, CJ Cansino, ikaw lang tututukan ko. ‘Di siya ganun.” He then continued, “Lahat kami, equal opportunity. Kung sinong maglaro nang mayos this game, siya talaga maglalaro.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 6th, 2018

NCAA 94: Bolick on San Beda: 'Our school is built for championships'

Over the past decade or so, San Beda's dynasty has ruled over the NCAA. Over the course of that time, the community just doesn't accept losses. Fortunately, the Red Lions have come through time and time again. Against a CSB team that was pretty much fighting for their playoff lives, the defending champs showed no mercy and San Beda rolled to a 77-55 victory, its 8th straight win in the NCAA Seasn 94 men's basketball tournament. The Red Lions tied rival Lyceum for first place with identical 14-1 records. "Kami sa San Beda kasi, since the start, every year alam namin na kailangan... prepared kami every game," Bolick, who scored a game-high 19 points, said. "Because our school, di tumatanggap ng talo. Kahit anong game, kahit charity pa yan. Our school is built for championships," he added. With a good winnin streak going, Bolick says the champion Red Lions are peaking at the right time. Which is great for them as they target yet another playoff bonus come the Fina Four. "I think we're peaking at the right time," Bolick said. "Hopefully ma-continue pa rin. My teammates really work hard, kaya gumagaling as a team, and madali din sakin as a leader," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 4th, 2018

LSGH denies San Beda s entry into NCAA 94 Final Four

STANDINGS LSGH 13-2 (Final Four) MAPUA 11-4 SAN BEDA 10-5 JRU 9-6 LPU 8-7 ARELLANO 6-8 PERPETUAL 6-9 SAN SEBASTIAN 5-10 (eliminated) LETRAN 3-11 (eliminated) EAC 3-12 (eliminated) College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills remains the first and only team assured of a place in the next round of the NCAA 94 Men’s Basketball Tournament. San Beda High School tried its best to get that as well on Thursday at the Filoil Flying V Centre, but was instead resoundingly rejected by the Junior Blazers who registered a 91-78 come-from-behind win. Main man Joel Cagulangan topped the scoring column with 24 points to go along with six rebounds and three assists, but only made 9-of-22 shots from the field In the endgame, it was Sydney Mosqueda who came through, scoring 10 of his 19 points in the tight final frame. “We’re happy with the win because our boys showed resiliency,” head coach Marvin Bienvenida said post-game. The defending champions were down by five points inside the last four minutes until Mosqueda went on a 5-0 run to tie the tally. The Red Cubs again took the lead, 75-72, and even had a chance to increase it, but Inand Fornilos stole the ball and the possession from them. At the other end, Mosqueda then set up Fornilos for an easy look inside that proved to be the go-ahead basket. San Beda would keep coming from that point, but Cagulangan had all the answers for CSB-LSGH which strengthened its stranglehold on the top-seed. Now at 13-2, they are one win away from clinching the twice-to-beat advantage. “We are still taking it one game at a time. We are not done proving to ourselves that we are getting better each and every game,” coach Marvin said. For the now 10-5 Red Cubs, Zach Estacio showed the way with 13 points while Joshua Lazaro also had a 10-point, 12-rebound double-double. A win would have assured them of at least a playoff for a Final Four spot. Instead, they now find themselves still behind 11-4 Mapua High School and barely ahead of 9-6 Jose Rizal High School and 8-7 Lyceum of the Philippines University. In the day’s other game, University of Perpetual Help stayed alive after beating down San Sebastian College-Recoletos, 82-67. Emman Galman was on fire all game long and wound up with a career-best 30 points and was backstopped by Tony Ogunsanya who posted a 20-point, 14-rebound double-double. Just at halftime, Galman already had 17 markers to his name, almost matching the output of their opponents at 22. At 6-9, the Junior Altas still have a boxer’s chance at snatching a playoff berth. On the other hand, now at 5-10, the Staglets are no longer in contention for the Final Four. Kean Baclaan fronted their effort in this one with 24 points, six rebounds, five steals, and four assists. BOX SCORES FIRST GAME PERPETUAL 82 – Galman 30, Ogunsanya 20, Galoy 12, Kawamura 8, Orgo 3, Duka 3, Barcuma 2, Nunez 2, Defante 2, Romilla 0, Lauchengo 0, Dela Cruz 0 SAN SEBASTIAN 67 – Baclaan 24, Pinero 13, Are 10, Cortes 4, Cruz 4, Dela Cruz 4, Timbancaya 2, Janao 2, Balo 2, Perez 0, Loristo 0, Solatorio 0, Suico 0, Gomez 0, Austria 0 QUARTER SCORES: 22-10, 43-22, 60-53, 82-67 SECOND GAME CSB-LSGH 81 – Cagulangan 24, Mosqueda 19, Calimag 11, Fornilos 7, Palencia 6, David 5, Sangco 3, Lepalam 2, Morales 2, Valenzuela 2, Cortez 0, Lopez 0. SAN BEDA 78 – Estacio 13, Coyoca 12, Lazaro 10, Llarena 10, Talampas 10, Oliva 9, Sanchez 9, Ynot 2, Andrada 2, Pelipel 1, Alcantara 0. QUARTER SCORES: 23-23, 41-36, 59-57, 81-78. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 4th, 2018

LSGH leader Joel Cagulangan holds on to top spot in NBTC NCAA 24

Consistent for the majority of NCAA Season 94 Juniors Basketball Tournament, Joel Cagulangan has decided to up the ante entering the homestretch of the eliminations. The star guard has been on a stupendous tear as of late, being one of the handful of driving forces that keeps the league-leading La Salle Greenhills on top of the standings with its 12-2 card. And it's no different this past week as Cagulangan dropped 10 points, 10 rebounds, seven assists, and two steals in the Greenies' 16-point dismantling of EAC-ICA. That's why it's no surprise that for the second straight week, and fourth time overall, he claimed the top spot in the Chooks-to-Go/NBTC NCAA 24 weekly high school rankings. Chasing him for the pole position are Mapua top gun Clint Escamis, JRU revelation John Amores, LSGH two-way stud Inand Fornilos, and Lyceum super scorer John Barba who all earned spots in this week's top five. Rounding out the top 10 are Lyceum's Mac Guadana, Mapua's Dan Arches, JRU's John Delos Santos, LSGH's RC Calimag, and Mapua's Jonnel Policarpio. Calimag was this week's top mover, jumping 14 spots from last week's 23 to enter the top nine, while LSGH's Joshua David, who dropped from third to 11th, and San Sebastian's Milo Janao, who sunk from 10th to 18th, suffered the biggest drop offs going eight spots down. Here are the complete Week 11 rankings of the Chooks-to-Go/NBTC NCAA 24: 1. Joel Cagulangan (CSB) (1) 2. Clint Escamis (MU) (5) 3. John Amores (JRU) (12) 4. Inand Fornilos (CSB) (4) 5. John Barba (LPU) (11) 6. Mac Guadana (LPU) (9) 7. Dan Arches (MU) (2) 8. John Delos Santos (JRU) (N/A) 9. RC Calimag (CSB) (23) 10. Jonnel Policarpio (MU) (8) 11. Joshua David (CSB) (3) 12. Aaron Fermin (AU) (7) 13. Karl Mariano (MU) (N/A) 14. Rom Junsay (AU) (13) 15. Roseler Sarias (MU) (N/A) 16. Emman Galman (UPHSD) (19) 17. Adrian Balowa (EAC) (N/A) 18. Milo Janao (SSCR) (10) 19. Joshua Lazaro (SBU) (N/A) 20. Lars Sunga (AU) (14) 21. Yuri Kawamura (UPHSD) (18) 22. Jearelan Omandac (LPU) (N/A) 23. Winston Ynot (SBU) (N/A) 24. Kean Baclaan (SSCR) (24) This year, there will be three separate editions of the NBTC 24 – one for the NCAA, one for the UAAP, and one for the CESAFI – to accommodate the Juniors calendar for the whole year.  After all three editions have been completed, a final list composing the top 24 players nationwide will then be chosen to participate in the annual NBTC All-Star Game in March......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2018

Dominant debut for No. 1 pick Ayton in Suns exhibition game

By The Associated Press Deandre Ayton might be the NBA’s next great man in the middle. The No. 1 pick had a dominant debut Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time), finishing with 24 points, 10 rebounds and three blocked shots in the Phoenix Suns’ 106-102 loss to the Sacramento Kings. The exhibition opener for both teams featured the top two picks in the most recent draft. Marvin Bagley III of Duke came off the Sacramento bench for seven points in 25 minutes. Ayton — Bagley’s one-time high school teammate — looks a little more NBA-ready. The former Arizona star leaped high for alley-oop and showed off a nice touch with a hook, finishing 9-for-16 from the floor and 6-of-8 from the free throw line. Joel Embiid, perhaps the league’s top current big man, matched up Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) with another top-10 center from the draft, Orlando’s Mo Bamba. Embiid kept Philadelphia unbeaten with 21 points in the 76ers’ final game before they head to China for a pair of games against Dallas. KINGS 106, SUNS 102 Yogi Ferrell had 26 points on 9-of-14 shooting, including 6-of-9 from three-point range, and Willie Cauley-Stein added 14 points and 12 rebounds for Sacramento. Josh Jackson added 17 points and six assists for Phoenix, and TJ Warren scored 16 points on 6-of-7 shooting. Ayton missed his final four field-goal attempts and went 2-of-4 from the line with an offensive foul in the final minute. KINGS: Bogdan Bogdanovic (knee), Kosta Koufos (hamstring), Iman Shumpert (calf) and Nemanja Bjelica (knee) did not play. ... Harry Giles III, who missed all of last season after being selected 20th overall in the 2017 draft, scored 14 points. ... Bagley shot 2-for-7 and grabbed two rebounds. SUNS: Mikal Bridges, the 10th overall selection in June’s draft, was scoreless with one rebound in 12 minutes. ... Devin Booker, who had surgery on his right hand last month, did not play. He is expected to miss all of the preseason but expects to be ready for the start of the regular season. UP NEXT: The Kings (1-0) travel to Los Angeles to play the Lakers on Thursday (Friday, PHL time). ... Phoenix (0-1) will play host to the New Zealand Breakers on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). 76ERS 120, MAGIC 114 Joel Embiid had 21 points on 9-of-15 shooting and grabbed seven rebounds in 22 minutes. Ben Simmons added nine points, five rebounds, seven assist, two steals and a block. Furkan Korkmaz made 6-of-8 from the field, including 3-of-5 from behind the arc, and finished with 18 points in 18 minutes for the 76ers. Nikola Vucevic led Orlando with 20 points and blocked two shots. Terrence Ross hit three triples and finished with 13 points and three steals. 76ERS: Markelle Fultz, the top pick in the 2017 draft who missed 68 games last season, had 12 points on 5-of-12 shooting and grabbed six rebounds. ... Jerryd Bayless did not play after suffering a sprained knee during practice Sunday. He’ll be re-evaluated in 3-to-4 weeks. Wilson Chandler, who strained his hamstring in Friday’s preseason opener, did not play. MAGIC: D.J. Augustine and Mo Bamba, the No. 6 overall selection in June’s draft, scored 12 points apiece. Augustine hit 3-of-4 from three-point range and had six assists. ... Isaiah Briscoe had 11 points and Aaron Gordon added 10 points, seven rebounds and four assists. UP NEXT: The 76ers (2-0) play Dallas in Shanghai on Friday. ... Orlando (0-1) returns home to play Flamengo. KNICKS 124, WIZARDS 121, OT Rookie Kevin Knox had 13 points and 10 rebounds in the Knicks’ preseason opener. The No. 9 pick in the draft started and added three assists and two steals in 26 minutes. Lance Thomas scored 12 points. John Wall played just 9.5 minutes of Washington’s exhibition opener, scoring six points. Bradley Beal had 11, but shot just 3-for-12 in 22 minutes. KNICKS: Hall of Famer Patrick Ewing, now coaching Georgetown, spoke to Knicks players earlier Monday (Tuesday, PHL time). ... Damyean Dotson scored 12 of his 14 points in overtime, making all three shots, including two three-pointers. ... Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 11 points. ... Second-round pick Mitchell Robinson, who didn’t play in college last season, had six points and seven rebounds. ... Rookie Allonzo Trier, signed to a two-way contract, had 13 points. ... Courtney Lee sat out with a strained neck. WIZARDS: Dwight Howard remained out with a back injury that has sidelined him since training camp began. ... Kelly Oubre Jr. led Washington with 15 points, eight rebounds and four assists. ... Otto Porter Jr. scored 13 points. ... Markieff Morris was ejected after exchanging words with Mitchell. ... Austin Rivers had seven points off the bench in his first game with the Wizards. ... Jordan McRae was 4-for-4 for nine points in OT. UP NEXT: The Knicks visit Brooklyn on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Washington (0-1) hosts Miami on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). PELICANS 116, HAWKS 102 DeAndre’ Bembry had 20 points, five rebounds and four assists and John Collins scored 18 points for Atlanta. Rookie Trae Young had 11 points and eight assists, but was just 5-of-16 shooting. Anthony Davis led New Orleans with 16 points and grabbed seven rebounds in 17 minutes, and Jrue Holiday hit 3-of-4 from three-point range and finished with 13 points. Julius Randle had 11 points on 5-of-7 shooting and grabbed seven rebounds. PELICANS: Jahlil Okafor (ankle), Darius Miller (biceps), Nikola Mirotic (Achilles) and Alexis Ajinca (quadriceps) did not play. ... New Orleans shot just 36.5 percent (38-of-104) from the field, including 8-of-39 (20.5 percent) from behind the arc. HAWKS: Justin Anderson (leg) Dewayne Dedmon (ankle), Daniel Hamilton (rotator cuff) and Omari Spellman did not play. ... Alex Poythress had 13 points and five rebounds in 14 minutes. ... Tyler Dorsey scored 11 points. UP NEXT: The Pelicans (0-2) travel to New York to play the Knicks on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). ... Atlanta (1-0) plays the Grizzlies in Memphis on Friday (Saturday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2018

UAAP: It was time to make a change for Thirdy Ravena

Thirdy Ravena made his UAAP debut on Saturday at the Filoil Flying V Centre – a Thirdy Ravena sporting a bowl cut, that is. That change of look came from this: Asked about it post-game, the fourth-year Ateneo de Manila University forward answered that it was all pretty simple. “I just wanted something new. Sawa na ako sa buhok ko dati so naisip ko to make a change,” he said. Pressed further, Ravena said that he was getting sick and tired of the same old haircut he has had since high school. “Trip ko lang talaga. Naisip ko kasing pare-parehas lang yung buhok ko sa mga picture so naisip ko na maiba naman,” he said. Apparently, last year’s Mythical selection decided that he would like to have hair shaved at the sides and then shaped like a bowl up top. That did not go unnoticed in social media as several people have referred to it as “bunot.” Ravena has no problems whatsoever with that. “Edi mukha siyang bunot,” he said through chuckles. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 29th, 2018

UAAP: La Salle s Encho Serrano doesn t want to be the next Calvin Abueva

Encho Serrano’s first two games in the UAAP Seniors were, put frankly, forgettable. The one-time top high school player only had a total of four points in a total of 21.5 minutes as De La Salle University started the season with a loss and then a win. Of course, Serrano acknowledged that he felt rookie jitters – especially after an almost two-year layoff from the UAAP. “Medyo pressured, pero kailangan ko talaga kasing bawiin yung matagal akong hindi naglaro,” he said. He then continued, “Sobrang gigil nung una kaya naging ganun na nga siguro.” The nerves finally settled for the first-year player on Sunday as he turned in his best game thus far with 11 points and four rebounds in 13 minutes of action. Yes, he nearly tripled his scoring total in the Green Archers’ 82-72 triumph over University of the East. Still, Serrano said he knows full well he could do much more. “Masaya, pero malayo pa. Wala pa masyadong kumpyansa, pero papunta na dun,” he said. Indeed, the native of Apalit, Pampanga is confident that he is already on his way there – especially if he is to fulfill the story behind his jersey number. Serrano once wore jersey number 27 in his time as star of Adamson High School, but had number 8 on his back in preseason leagues once he joined La Salle. “Dapat talaga, 8, kasi idol ko si Calvin [Abueva],” he said. That would have made sense as, even in high school, he was already being compared to PBA superstar Calvin Abueva. Come the UAAP Season 81, however, the Green Archer was now donning number 18. “Sabi kasi ng daddy ko, gamitin mo na lang 18, gumawa ka ng sarili mong pangalan. Yun na nga yung gusto kong gawin,” he said. If he only builds on this breakout game, he may very well do just that. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

NCAA: Red Cubs, Staglets boost bids for Final Four

STANDINGS LSGH 10-2 MAPUA 9-3 SAN BEDA 9-4 JRU 7-6 PERPETUAL 5-6 ARELLANO 5-6 LPU 5-7 SAN SEBASTIAN 5-8 LETRAN 3-8 EAC 2-10 San Beda High School stayed within striking distance of the top two and San Sebastian College-Recoletos stayed alive and kicking in the NCAA 94 Juniors Basketball Tournament. The two teams made sure the Final Four remained a nine-team race following separate well-earned wins on Thursday at the Filoil Flying V Centre. The Red Cubs stood strong in the middle periods to take care of business against Emilio Aguinaldo College, 80-71. Winderlich Coyoca built on his breakout game the last time around with 18 points, four steals, two rebounds, and two assists in this one while Winston Ynot and Kent Pelipel chipped in 13 and 11 markers, respectively. Trailing by one after the opening salvo, San Beda turned it on and dominate their opponents by a score of 46-32 in the second and third quarters. That double-digit lead would be more than enough for their ninth win in the last 11 games following a 0-2 start to the season. At 9-4, the Red Cubs are breathing down the necks of top two teams 10-2 College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills and 9-3 Mapua High School. Third-running San Beda also gained separation from fourth-running Jose Rizal High School after it fell to the Staglets, 51-56. Milo Janao did the heavy lifting as always with 19 points and seven rebounds while JP Timbancaya contributed 10 markers and six boards of his own. Behind those two, the Staglets took the fight out of their opponents and charged to 5-8 – still well in contention in the tournament. John Amores paced the Light Bombers with 16 points on top of seven rebounds and three assists. He was the lone scorer in double-digits, however, and as such, saw his squad fail to build on its big-time upset of the Red Robins a week ago. Still, with a 7-6 record, JRU stayed at solo fourth all of University of Perpetual Help (5-6), Arellano High School (5-6), Lycuem of the Philippines University (5-7), Baste (3-8), and even Colegio de San Juan de Letran (3-8) right behind. Meanwhile, the loss pushed the Brigadiers to the brink now at 2-10. BOX SCORES FIRST GAME SAN SEBASTIAN 56 – Janao 19, Timbancaya 10, Are 6, Gomez 6, Loristo 4, Cortes 4, Balo 3, Perez 2, Suico 2, Baclaan 0, Cruz 0, Dela Cruz 0, Austria 0 JRU 51 – Amores 16, Vasquez 7, Bucoy 7, Ganut 6, Icban 4, Dionisio 3, Portales 3, Baluyut 2, Sy 2, Mangio 1, Delos Santos 0, Fortuna 0 QUARTER SCORES: 11-10, 29-25, 38-36, 56-51 SECOND GAME SAN BEDA 80 – Coyoca 18, Ynot 13, Pelipel 11, Llarena 9, Estacio 8, Oliva 7, Lazaro 6, Andrada 4, Talampas 2, Valencia 2, Sanchez 0, Alcantara 0, Calibo 0 EAC 71 – Ilustrisimo 16, Boado 14, Sanosa 9, Balowa 7, Murillo 7, Quebral 6, Lozano 4, Sumagaysay 4, Encila 2, Mejia 2, Pascual 0, Calara 0, Rivera 0 QUARTER SCORES: 13-14, 38-28, 59-46, 80-71 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

UAAP: Manganti wants people to take Adamson seriously after career-high

First it was Jerrick Ahanmisi. This time it was Sean Manganti who took over and flexed his muscles in Adamson University's latest conquest in the UAAP Season 81 men's basketball tournament. From playing sparse minutes in the first half due to foul trouble, a possessed Manganti emerged in the second half to lead the Falcons to a 90 - 76 victory over the University of the East with a career-high performance of 27 points on 63 percent shooting from the field. On top of that, he thrilled the Adamsonians with a fantastic slam in the third quarter.   Sean Manganti TAKES FLIGHT ✈ #UAAPSeason81 pic.twitter.com/ZHx2JMTXSu — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 19, 2018   "I was so excited because that was my first dunk since Season 79 because [during] Season 80 I was with injuries the whole season so I was excited for that one. I tried to give something to the crowd," he said. Behind his stellar performance is the desire to make up for what he describes as a "terrible" first game last September 9 versus Ateneo. He only scored four points then. "That's what I have been trying to do this whole year even during the preseason. I came out during the first game really, terrible game so I try to make up for it," Manganti explained. Aside from producing points for the team, Manganti, together with Ahanmisi, is also providing leadership in the squad. This is something that head coach Franz Pumaren has specifically asked from both of them. "Prior to this opening of the UAAP, I sat with them, I talked to them about their roles. I mentioned that the young guys will follow them if they play well," Pumaren explained. However, he has yet to see both players explode at the same time. "I guess I'm still waiting for the time that these two guys can really play like an orchestra at the same time, I think that will be a fun thing to watch, both guys playing well," added the Adamson mentor. Regardless, with both seniors' performance in Season 81 so far, Manganti seems to be embracing the role he is expected to fill. After all, he had a good precendent to emulate. "All I do is fill the spot. Last year it was Rob Manalang so I just try to fill that spot, trying to be a leader," added Manganti. With Ahanmisi and Manganti leading the pack and Pumaren directing the shots, the Falcons carved their best start in the UAAP since 2003 with a 2-0 slate. Manganti thinks that this impressive start will spark a big school-strong school mentality in the Adamson faithful. "I want everybody to look at Adamson as a big school. How many years has it been that it is looked at as a small school," Manganti shared. "Nobody takes it seriously. I just want to be taken seriously showing we are a great team.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

Baguio Boys: MMA champ Eduard Folayang reconnects with high school friend and star boxing trainer Marvin Somodio

After spending the last month or so training at the Jackson-Wink MM Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico, former ONE Championship Lightweight World Champion Eduard Folayang made a quick stopover in Los Angeles, California, before finally heading back to the Philippines, Tuesday.  While in Los Angeles, Folayang was able to reconnect with an old high school friend in former boxer-turned-coach Marvin Somodio.  Like Folayang, Somodio is a native of Baguio City.  "Sobrang saya ko na nakita ko si Marvin kanina." Folayang shared with Steve Angeles of ABS-CBN News. "Naalala ko nung nasa high school kami, naglalaro siya ng boxing and I’m playing Sepak Takraw, and you never imagine that in that long period of time, there are a lot of changes," Fun fact: before becoming an MMA star and Wushu standout, Folayang's first sport was Sepak Takraw.  Somodio did go on to become a professional boxer, but his career lasted just three fights, two wins and one loss. He eventually found his calling as a trainer and began in Baguio City. Now, Somodio is the chief assistant trainer in Freddie Roach's Wild Card Gym in Los Angeles, California.          View this post on Instagram                   Hitting some mitts with @marvinsomodio in @wildcardwest @tristeezy_mma @bviloria @jayanthony714 @the.landslide #growing #learning A post shared by Eduard Landslide Folayang (@the.landslide) on Sep 17, 2018 at 12:36pm PDT "Ang maganda dun, we follow what we love, we follow the passion that we love, and now we met each other having the same passion." said Folayang.  Both Folayang and Somodio have found success in their respective fields of combat sports, with Somodio being a trainer to world champions in boxing, while Folayang having established himself as the face of Filipino MMA.  "Yung makikita mo siya na very successful, makikita ka niya na successful din, dito pa sa America, iba yung pakiramdam." Folayang added.    H/T: Steve Angeles, ABS-CBN News.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

EYES ON YOU, KID: NCAA 94 Jrs. players to watch

The first round of the NCAA 94 Juniors Basketball Tournament is over and done with. And with the second round already underway, we’re getting even more glimpses of the future of Philippine basketball courtesy of these players: CLINT ESCAMIS – Mapua High School (yellow jersey with ball) ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 23.3 points, 46.9 percent shooting, 5.7 rebounds, 3.9 assists, 2.7 steals Clint Escamis has spent his first two seasons under the leadership of the likes of Sherwin Concepcion, Mike Enriquez, Warren Bonifacio, and Will Gozum. Now in his third and last season in Mapua, he is proving that he is no slouch as a leader himself. The league’s top scorer and second-best steal-getter has carried the Red Robins right back up there in the standings – and they are the only team to have downed all f the traditional powerhouses in College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills, Arellano High School, and San Beda High School. This version of Mapua may not be as star-studded as it was in the last four years, but they may just have the brightest star in all of the league in their 6-foot-1 swingman. INAND FORNILOS – College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills (green jersey defending white jersey with ball) ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 11.4 points, 51.8 percent shooting, 10.9 rebounds, 2.0 blocks, 1.0 assist On a team as fully loaded as CSB-LSGH, there has to be a workhorse – and Inand Fornilos has been just that and more. Just like he did in their championship campaign last season, he has been a force to reckon with on both ends of the floor for the league-leading Junior Blazers. The rebounds and defense have always been second nature for Fornilos, but this season, he has become better on offense. In fact, he already has a couple of 20-point games to his name – not bad for an undersized big man at 6-foot-2. Without a doubt, the graduating forward is doing all he can to make his former team regret ever letting him go. JOHN AMORES – Jose Rizal High School (blue jersey with ball) ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 20.1 points, 6.8 rebounds, 2.8 assists, 1.0 steal And all of that is because of John Amores, the second-best scorer in all of the league and the undisputed main man of the daring Light Bombers – the only team that will be sweeping contending Mapua in the elimination round. JRU’s rise from the bottom half of the standings to the top four is nothing short of spectacular and that improvement is best personified by Amores who went from role player a year ago to go-to-guy this season. Give the Most Improved Award to the kid already because he’s ready and raring to take much more than that. JOEL CAGULANGAN – College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills (green jersey with ball) ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 15.3 points, 7.3 assists, 4.7 rebounds, 2.1 steals For the high standards he set a year ago, this season has been a quiet one for Joel Cagulangan. With the likes of Escamis and Amores flying high and CSB-LSGH teammates Fornilos and RC Calimag grabbing more headlines than him, last year’s Finals MVP has been under the radar. Quietly, however, he is actually the Junior Blazers’ leading scorer and the NCAA’s best assistman and fourth-best steal-getter. Yes, that’s just how the 5-foot-9 do-it-all dynamo rolls, making an impact even if everybody else doesn’t feel it. Just don’t forget that he could also choose to make everybody feel his impact, okay? AARON FERMIN – Arellano High School (grey jersey, #18) ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 14.2 points, 53.5 percent shooting, 17.6 rebounds, 1.0 block If not for Arellano’s struggles last season, Aaron Fermin would have been MVP. If not for the Braves’ struggle in the ongoing season, Fermin would have been the league’s most tantalizing talent. Standing at 6-foot-5, graced with a wide frame, having timing on lock, and blessed with a non-stop motor, the graduating big man has all the tools to be a game-changer on both ends of the floor. Indeed, he had a stretch of games of posting a 15-point, 20-rebound double-double. Now, if only he could lift Arellano to much-needed wins and back onto a playoff push. DAN ARCHES – Mapua High School (yellow jersey with ball) ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 16.2 points, 3.9 rebounds, 3.9 assists, 1.8 steals Mapua has long been defined by its talented big men, but now, it’s the guys at the wings who have taken center stage. Escamis has been their main man, but he also has a more than capable running mate in Dan Arches. All Escamis could do, Arches could do as well, only without the same sort of consistency. But hey, this is the first time he has been getting time with in his two years as a Red Robins so there’s nothing that all those reps couldn’t improve. And oh, he also has one thing going for him – a fine floater that he could bust out at any time that somehow, some way, has become automatic. JOSHUA DAVID – College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills (green jersey, with ball) ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 14.3 points, 6.4 rebounds, 3.3 assists, 1.9 steals Imagine the dynamic between Escamis and Arches, and then translate that onto Cagulangan and his own partner-in-crime in Joshua David. Like Cagulangan, David could stuff the stat sheet. Like Cagulangan, David could do whatever CSB-LSGH needs for a win. The only difference is that unlike Cagulangan, David already has the size at 6-feet and a big body to make the same sort of noise in the Seniors. Of course, Cagulangan’s clutch genes are also on another level, but who knows? Maybe David is just waiting on the wings to seize those moments for himself? MILO JANAO AND KEAN BACLAAN – San Sebastian College-Recoletos JANAO’S ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 19.0 points, 5.0 rebounds, 1.0 assist (yellow jersey with ball in first photo) BACLAAN’S ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 15.1 points, 5.1 rebounds, 4.1 assists, 1.8 steals (yellow jersey with ball in second photo) It looks like San Sebastian College-Recoletos still wouldn’t be able to get over the hump this year, but the good news is that they remain on the right track. The even better news is that Milo Janao and Kean Baclaan, the two paving the way for them, are here to stay. That backcourt, by themselves, has fueled the Staglets to four wins – and still in the thick of things. While a long-awaited, much-wanted playoff berth is a long shot this year, perhaps it wouldn’t be so when both Janao and Baclaan get a year older and a year more determined to continue doing it all to win. MAC GUADANA AND JOHN BARBA – Lyceum of the Philippines University GUADANA’S ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 19.5 points, 5.0 rebounds, 1.8 assists (grey jersey with ball in first photo) BARBA’S ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 17.6 points, 6.3 rebounds, 2.7 assists, 1.7 steals (grey jersey with ball in second photo) Batang Gilas member Mac Guadana has become the NCAA’s constant – a 6-foot guard who could score at will while also doing his part in rebounding and playmaking. With him showing the way, Lyceum of the Philippines University has proven to be a far from easy out for three seasons now. They are still a ways away from legitimate contention, but the Junior Pirates have reason to believe that would be sooner than later as teaming up with Guadana is John Barba, a 6-foot-2 forward who just has a knack for willing his way to good looks inside. With those two, the boys from Cavite have two of the top six scorers in all of the league. Now, they just have to find the other pieces of the puzzle for their first-ever playoff berth. ROM JUNSAY – Arellano High School (grey jersey with ball) ROUND 1 AVERAGES: 19.4 points, 4.9 rebounds, 2.4 assists, 1.6 steals Rom Junsay was one of the biggest keys to Mapua’s first-ever championship. That was two years ago, though, and since then, the 5-foot-6 has transferred to Arellano and is now only playing his first and last season there. Nonetheless, in just his first game in blue and grey, he wasted no time in reminding everybody about his talents, dropping a career-high 34 points. He and the Braves have trailed off from there, but just as Arellano is a sleeping giant no team wants to wake, Junsay is an active volcano just waiting for the perfect time to erupt. HONORABLE MENTIONS Jonnel Policarpio – Mapua High School RC Calimag – College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Here s why Chris Webber should be in the Hall of Fame

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst C-Webb needs to be in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. My Turner colleague Chris Webber has always brought out polarizing opinions -- first as a player, and now as a broadcaster. And I’m not objective when it comes to him, either. I love the guy. He’s a true student of the game, not afraid to speak his mind on and off the court, and is someone whose love for the game knows no equal. It’s just a matter of time before he gets his chance to run a team, either in the front office or as a part-owner. But it will and should happen. And, after his impactful career as a player, he should be enshrined in Springfield. Everyone’s criteria for the Hall is different. To me, getting in the Hall as a player requires a yes answer to two questions: 1) were you among the very best at your position for a substantial period of time during your career, and 2) did your presence and/or play change the game in a meaningful way while you played? (This is why a guy like Sixers guard Andrew Toney, in my view, is HOF-worthy, even though “The Boston Strangler” played from 1980-88 and was limited significantly by injury in two of those seasons.) Webber is a “yes” to both of those questions. In the NBA, Webber was a five-time All-Star, four times with the Kings, and was Rookie of the Year in 1993. He was first- or second-team All NBA four times. His career PER of 20.9 is the highest of any non-retired and Hall of Fame eligible player that isn’t currently in the Hall. (Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett each have higher PERs than Webber, and each is an obvious HOF lock, but they aren’t Hall of Fame eligible until 2020.) Webber’s career PER is better than those of Hall of Famers including Allen Iverson, Bob McAdoo, Ed McCauley, George McGinnis, Billy Cunningham, Steve Nash, David Thompson, Connie Hawkins, Alex English, Walt Bellamy, Cliff Hagan and many others. Yet in his fifth year of eligibility, Webber was again passed over by the Hall of Fame voters this year. That needs to change. His impact on the game, from high school to being a member of the “Fab Five” at Michigan in college and during his 15 NBA seasons, is undeniable. The Hall encompasses all of a person’s basketball achievements, and Webber’s career is Hall-worthy. At Country Day High School in Michigan, he led his team to three state championships, averaging 29 points and 13 rebounds per game his senior season, when he was a consensus national player of the year. He then decided to cap an incredible recruiting class, which had three of the top 10 players in the country, among a group of freshmen that came to be known as “The Fab Five.” (Also on that Michigan team was a junior guard who averaged 2.9 points per game, who had no future as pro player, but who carved out a place for himself nonetheless in the NBA -- Rob Pelinka, who became a high-powered agent representing the likes of Kobe Bryant before becoming the Lakers’ General Manager in 2017.) “The Fab Five”, like it or not -- and, I liked it very much -- changed basketball forever. And Webber was the lynchpin of those Michigan teams that reached consecutive NCAA championship games in 1992 and ‘93. Across the board, the Fab Five had long-lasting impact. Aesthetically, they were vanguards, wearing long, loooong shorts that became all the rage throughout basketball.  And while trash talking has been at the heart of hoops for generations, Michigan raised it to a team-wide art form. It drove traditionalists crazy, while kids watching at home loved it. They were the accelerant to the “one-and-done” era, even though none of them left Michigan after their freshman season. But seeing five freshmen start games and play the lion’s share of minutes rippled throughout the college game. Going forward, teams didn’t just recruit blue-chippers, they put them on the floor immediately. What John Calipari does annually at Kentucky now is but the logical conclusion to what Michigan started, and every Power 5 team in college basketball has had to follow suit or get left behind. Of course, “The Fab Five” era wound up being star-crossed. I’m well aware of the penalties assessed to the Michigan program because of the money that Ed Martin gave to players, including Webber. The university vacated the ‘92-93 season, including all of its NCAA Tournament games that year, and took down the banners commemorating “The Fab Five” and their two Final Four runs. (Michigan also vacated all of its games from 1995-96 because of Martin’s associations with other players on teams during those seasons, and its ‘93, ‘96 and ‘98 NCAA Tournament appearances, as well as its ‘97 NIT title and ‘98 Big 10 Tournament championship.) It’s obvious to me that if not for his involvement with Martin, Webber would have been on the 2000 U.S. Olympic team, which won the gold medal in Australia, as well -- another potential feather in his cap that would bolster his Hall of Fame credentials. I will say, as delicately as I can, that there are coaches and players in the Hall that have been accused of doing some of the very things that got Michigan and Webber in so much trouble. That, in and of itself, should not be disqualifying. Webber’s NBA career also did not include a championship. But he was just as impactful on the pro game. Beginning in Golden State and Washington, C-Webb was a category all his own -- a big man with catcher’s mitts for hands who could pulverize in transition, yet was also an incredibly deft passer, both from the post or out front. As a rookie, Webber elevated Golden State from a 34-48 record in 1992-93 to 50-32 the next season. Traded to Washington after that one season with the Warriors, having conflicted mightily with Coach Don Nelson, Webber helped get the then-Bullets to the postseason for the first time in nine years. Once there, the Bullets went toe-to-toe with the defending-champion Bulls in a tough, three-game first-round series in ’97. But it wasn’t until Webber was sent to what was then the equivalent of Siberia in the NBA -- Sacramento -- that his game reached full flower. Playing with another excellent passing big man in Vlade Divac, and a flashy savant of a point guard in Jason Williams, Webber and the Kings were the vanguard of the modern NBA game, coming to fruition years before the Suns’ Seven Seconds or Less attack led by one of last week’s Hall of Fame inductees, Steve Nash. The Kings moved the ball with flair and purpose. The Warriors have changed the game forever by stretching the floor to the breaking point for opposing defenses with their 3-point proficiency, but even they didn’t have what Sacramento possessed -- two bigs who could initiate and finish from anywhere inside the 3-point line. No one could do what the Kings could do, and with Webber, Sacramento changed almost overnight from perennial joke to perennial championship contender. The Kings made the playoffs six straight seasons, reaching the Western Conference finals in 2002 before losing in controversial fashion to the Lakers in seven games. Webber’s knee injury during the Kings’ semifinal playoff series with Dallas in 2003 marked the beginning of the end for him and the Kings. If he hadn’t gotten hurt, Sacramento probably would have beaten the Mavericks and played San Antonio in the West finals. And while San Antonio would have been favored in that series, the Kings would have had a chance, with the winner facing the Nets in The Finals that year. And a championship would also have made C-Webb’s pro career look much different. But, that didn’t happen. It doesn’t matter, though. Webb’s career stands on its own merits. At all levels, he has had impact and changed the game, and he deserves to have his moment in the sun in Springfield. Sometimes it takes players of merit a little longer, for various reasons -- think Spencer Haywood, or, this year, Mo Cheeks. Chris Webber is a Hall of Famer, and it isn’t a close call. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Nash, Kidd highlight 2018 Basketball Hall of Fame class

  LOS ANGELES --The 2018 Basketball Hall of Fame class includes a sharp-shooting point guard from Canada and two NBA stars who shared both the rookie-of-the year award and the inductee podium atFriday's ceremony. Steve Nash went from being a unscouted high school phenom from the basketball backwoods of Victoria, British Columbia to an eight-time all star, while Jason Kidd and Grant Hill were co-rookies of the year in 1994-95 before going on to play a combined 37 seasons in the NBA. The trio were part of an impressive list of 13 inductees to the 2018 Naismith Memorial National Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts. "I was never supposed to be here," Na...Keep on reading: Nash, Kidd highlight 2018 Basketball Hall of Fame class.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

Gross-out humor in ‘American Vandal’s’ mind-boggling new mystery

  The Peabody-winning web series "American Vandal" returns to Netflix on Sept. 14 with a hilariously irreverent but insightful second season, featuring a cackle-and-gag-inducing mystery that isn't for the fainthearted.   After finding the perpetrator behind the costly high school prank that left 27 faculty cars vandalized with red spray-painted phallic images in Season 1, Peter Maldonado (Tyler Alvarez) and Sam Ecklund (Griffin Gluck) bring their investigative skills to a Catholic school.     New heights   This time, the catfishing whodunit involves an elusive Turd Burglar, who has been taking his poop-related pranks to new heights...Keep on reading: Gross-out humor in ‘American Vandal’s’ mind-boggling new mystery.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018