Review: Citizen Jake is every Filipino

MANILA, Philippines — No one would dare say "Citizen Jake" was coward and passive; not with its unflinching observations of the current political climate; no.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: philstar philstarMar 14th, 2018

Citizen Jake: Of fathers and sons

By Menchu Aquino Sarmiento Movie Review Citizen Jake Directed by Mike de Leon FILIPINO FILM auteur Mike de Leon’s varied oeuvre spans musical screwball comedy (Kakabakaba Ka Ba, 1980), dark twisted psychodrama (Kisapmata, 1981), the inspiring politicization of once complacent religious during Marcos martial law (Sister Stella L., 1984), and the harrowing indictment of the […] The post Citizen Jake: Of fathers and sons appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

The anger of Jake Herrera

Film review: Citizen Jake.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 16th, 2018

Filing of application for fire, jail exams until April 17 -- CSC

THE Civil Service Commission (CSC) reminds the public that acceptance of applications for the June 17 examination for fire and penology officers, and basic competency on local treasury is until April 27 only. All three exams are open to individuals who are Filipino citizen, of good moral character and has….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsMar 17th, 2018

WATCH: Atom Araullo shares experience as first-time actor in Citizen Jake

MANILA, Philippines — Real life journalist Atom Araullo's first foray into film is to play an angrier version of himself, as "Citizen Jake." .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 14th, 2018

Beyond the Filipiniaña and terno: the Bb Pilipinas 2018 National Costume review

Exhilarating! Impressive! Awe-inspiring! That’s the extraordinary result of the synergy of the country’s unrivalled beauty pageant, the Filipino designers’ artistry and the beauty of the Filipina. The 2018 Binibining Pilipinas National Costume  held last March 3 at the Kia Theatre was nothing short of spectacular. Even longtime pageant afficionados were surprised at the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 7th, 2018

De Leon’s ‘Citizen Jake’ as metaphor of an unchanging country

Award-winning filmmaker Mike de Leon's comeback movie, "Citizen Jake," finally premieres with two screenings this month at the UP Cine Adarna, University of the Philippines in Diliman, Quezon City. Broadcast journalist Atom Araullo, who makes his acting debut as the movie's titular reporter, told the Inquirer that he's "excited" about the UP screenings. "As the first public screening of 'Citizen Jake' draws near, we the filmmakers, are filled with anticipation and a great sense of relief that we have managed to bring this collaborative film to completion," De Leon told the Inquirer. The incessant buzz surrounding the film is quite understandable, considering that De Leon's l...Keep on reading: De Leon’s ‘Citizen Jake’ as metaphor of an unchanging country.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

DOLE team to review labor pact with Israel

THE Philippine government, through the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), is sending a top level team to Israel to review the terms of a proposed bilateral labor agreement (BLA) that is expected to provide greater protection and ease the entry of overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) to the Holy Land. In an administrative order, Labor [...] The post DOLE team to review labor pact with Israel appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2018

‘Citizen Pinoy’ wins media award for serving overseas Filipinos

DALY CITY, California --- "Citizen Pinoy," a weekly program dubbed as TFC's "passport to immigration information," won the Television Journalism Award -- Best Regular TV Program Category in the 2017 Migration Advocacy and Media (MAM) Awards last month. Attorney Michael J. Gurfinkel, a U.S. immigration attorney and host of "Citizen Pinoy," received the award at a ceremony held at the Philippine International Convention Center in Manila during International Migrants Day, December 18. Gurfinkel said that he was "really humbled and honored about the award because it represents the recognition of the Filipino Overseas Worker and the sacrifices they have made, especially those in Ame...Keep on reading: ‘Citizen Pinoy’ wins media award for serving overseas Filipinos.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 17th, 2018

Hard work, family, and tocino the key ingredients to Fil-Am cyclist’s success

Coryn Rivera, said to be the only cyclist with Filipino roots to be taking part in the European circuit, is back at where it all began for her. “It’s good to be back,” she said with a small smile during her welcome lunch on Monday at the Shang at the Fort in Taguig. The name Rivera resonated with Filipinos when she won the Prudential RideLondon Classique a year ago. Then, her origins were unknown until ABS-CBN’s Gretchen Ho, who was part of the country’s delegation in London, inquired about them. While now an American citizen, the 25-year-old’s parents are full-blooded Filipinos who remain proud of their roots. Their eldest of two children only shares the same sentiment. “It’s cool to be a person with an ethnic background. I think I’m the only one with Filipino blood to be there (European circuit),” Coryn said. Rivera is now part of professional cycling team Sunweb which is very much active in the European circuit. In all of her races, a big part of her preparation remains Filipino to the core. “I still love tocino and tapa for breakfast with banana ketchup. I’m still very much into Filipino culture even though I was born in the (US),” she said. Of course, it has been parents Wally and Lina who have made sure that such is the case. “Breakfast is very important so I would make sure she always had her rice and tocino,” the latter shared. With that simple yet loving act, the elder Riveras have made it clear that they are fully behind their big-time source of pride who only stands at 5-foot-3. And clearly, that has made all the difference in the world. “We always support Coryn. I think that’s why she succeeds – because we support her 110 percent,” Lina said. That all-out support has impacted Coryn in more ways than one. “She saw us work hard to get to where we are. We also don’t spoil our kids – we make them work hard to get to where they are,” her mother said. She then continued, “We do everything on our own and she’s just the same way.” Indeed, it has been the example set by her hardworking parents that Rivera follows to this day wherever she is – be that in the Tour of Flanders in Belgium or in the hills of Tagaytay. “My parents are role models. They are hardworking and that’s what I want to be,” she said. And so, the American citizen cyclist remains Filipino at heart – even though she is yet to string together a Tagalog sentence. Asked about the native language of her parents, she answered, “I understand it really well, but as far as speaking it, I’m still practicing.” Good thing then that she will have some time to practice as Rivera will participate in the upcoming PRUride PH 2018 from January 11 to 14 in Subic, Zambales. Backed by British life insurer Pru Like UK, PRUride PH 2018 is expected to be one of the biggest cycling events in the country as it will be spread over two areas and span two weekends. In Subic, veteran pedal-pushers such as George Oconer and Marella Salamat will join Rivera in taking part in the 160 km PRUride Professional Road Race. The event continues a week later in McKinley West in Taguig where next iterations of the Criterium races first held a year ago will ensue. PRUride PH 2018 has been sanctioned by PhilCycling, the national governing body for the sport of cycling. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 8th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

700 extras, the real La Naval—how ‘Ang Larawan’ was painstakingly put together

  Much has been written about "Ang Larawan," the musical film based on the play "A Portrait of the Artist as Filipino" by National Artist for Literature Nick Joaquin. The lyrical libretto written by National Artist for Theater Rolando Tinio. The rousing musical score composed by maestro Ryan Cayabyab. The film's inclusion in the 2017 Metro Manila Film Festival (it won Best Picture at the festival's Gabi ng Parangal). Its successful world premiere at the 30th Tokyo International Film Festival. The glowing review that it received from Variety. The excellent performances by the ensemble cast led by Joanna Ampil, Rachel Alejandro and Paulo Avelino. The long and challenging ...Keep on reading: 700 extras, the real La Naval—how ‘Ang Larawan’ was painstakingly put together.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 30th, 2017

Book review | Carlos Bulosan—Revolutionary Filipino Writer in the United States: A Critical Appraisal

By JEFFREY ARELLANO CABUSAO Department of English and Cultural Studies Bryant University, Smithfield, Rhode Island Carlos Bulosan, one of our most significant Filipino writers of the twentieth century, is the focus of a new book by one of our most significant and prolific Filipino literary/cultural theorists and public intellectuals today—E. San Juan, Jr. According to… The post Book review | Carlos Bulosan—Revolutionary Filipino Writer in the United States: A Critical Appraisal appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsDec 29th, 2017

Ang Larawan: The way we are

By Menchu Aquino Sarmiento Movie review Ang Larawan Directed by Loy Arcenas ANG LARAWAN, directed by Loy Arcenas, is the musical film adaptation of Nick Joaquin’s 65-year-old play Portrait of the Artist as Filipino. It is more accurately a portrait of Filipino society itself, warts and all, than of any artist and his idiosyncrasies, and […] The post Ang Larawan: The way we are appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsDec 27th, 2017

‘Ang Larawan’ review: Admirable feat

If there is one word to describe the screen adaptation of Ang Larawan, a musical restaging of Nick Joaquin’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Filipino, it is antiquated. The film, directed by Loy Arcenas, opens with a montage of black-and-white footage of old Manila over a ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 26th, 2017

Filipino among two charged in NY for force labor, visa fraud

  NEW YORK -- A federal judge ordered the detention of two men, one a Filipino, while they face federal forced labor and visa fraud charges in Eastern District of U.S. District Court in Central Islip, New York. Ralph Colamussi, 61, former owner of the shuttered Thatched Cottage and Roberto Villanueva, 60, the restaurant's former manager, are charged with six counts, including forced labor, fraud in foreign labor contracting, visa fraud and conspiracies to commit forced labor. Both men have pleaded not guilty. Colamussi may have a bail hearing in the future. Villanueva, a citizen of the of the Philippines who lived in Glen Head, New York, had been ordered permanently det...Keep on reading: Filipino among two charged in NY for force labor, visa fraud.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 21st, 2017

PBA Season 43 preview: The Pack

Forget the PBA impasse for a second. Seriously, forget it. Why? There are basketball games to be played. That's right, the PBA will push through with the opening of the 43rd season as originally scheduled and before we start what appears to be another long, exciting, stressful (for the good reasons, of course), and eventful year of basketball, let's look at all 12 teams first. We start with "The Pack" in this preview. Special thanks to Alaska's coach Alex Compton for this idea. Okay here we go.   Rain or Shine Elasto Painters PBA Season 42 results: Philippine Cup - Quarterfinals Commissioner's Cup - Quarterfinals Governors' Cup - Quarterfinals PBA Season 43 opening day line up: Gabe Norwood Ed Daquioag Jericho Cruz Dexter Maiquez Maverick Ahanmisi Jewel Ponferrada Mark Borboran Chris Tiu James Yap Don Trollano Raymond Almazan Rey Nambatac Beau Belga Ronnie Matias Jeremy King Injured/Reserve: Jay Washington Head coach: Caloy Garcia The Elasto Painters, after losing so many key peices from their championship team in the previous offseason, didn't exactly have a bad year in 2017. ROS made it to the playoffs in each of the three conferences. However, the Painters failed to advance to the semifinals in all three as well. Rain or Shine is a champion team but the transition period for this franchise might be extended unless they can actually sustain their strong starts to conferences.   NLEX Road Warriors PBA Season 42 results: Philippine Cup - Missed playoffs Commissioner's Cup - Missed playoffs Governors' Cup - Quarterfinals PBA Season 43 opening day line up: Emman Monfort Michael Miranda Juami Tiongson Jansen Rios Kevin Alas Cyrus Baguio Alex Mallari Larry Fonacier Kiefer Ravena Raul Soyud Kenneth Ighalo Rabeh Al-Hussaini Alfonso Gotladera JR Quinahan Asi Taulava Injured/Reserve: Ronjay Buenafe Head coach: Yeng Guiao It took them a while but the Road Warriors finally figured things out under coach Yeng Guiao. And now with a new star at poing guard plus a another offseason of playing together, this season feels like the actual start of the Yeng Guiao era in NLEX. The Road Warriors have a nice mix of young and veteran talent and they have a champion coach at the helm. The potential is there to make noise in the playoffs.   Phoenix Fuel Masters PBA Season 42 results: Philippine Cup - Quarterfinals Commissioner's Cup - Quarterfinals Governors' Cup - Missed playoffs PBA Season 43 opening day line up: LA Revilla Jason Perkins Gelo Alolino JC Intal Joseph Eriobu Justin Chua Marvin Hayes Jeff Chan Doug Kramer Jam Cortez Karl Dehesa Rey Guevarra William Wilson RJ Jazul Matthew Wright Head coach: Louie Alas Phoenix is in it to win it. The Fuel Masters missed the playoffs once for the first time in four conferences and the team literally changed almost their entire coaching staff. Coach Louie Alas will have an interesting squad to work with in his debut season with the team. If Phoenix can avoid a major slide similar to what happened in the 2017 Governors' Cup, expect the Fuel Masters to be featured in the playoff race.   KIA Picanto PBA Season 42 results: Philippine Cup - Missed playoffs Commissioner's Cup - Missed playoffs Governors' Cup - Missed playoffs PBA Season 43 opening day line up: Reden Celda Jackson Corpuz JR Reyes Jon Gabriel Philip Paniamogan Rashawn McCarthy Prince Caperal Eric Camson Jan Jamon Pedrito Galanza Roldan Sara Glenn Khobuntin Mark Yee Dylan Ababou Ronald Tubid Head coach: Chris Gavina Kia's unconventional ways will be tested this season. After basically trading away Christian Standhardinger, people will most certainly watch the Picanto to lose. But you never know with this team, they have a brilliant coach and maybe Kia manages to pull off an upset or two this season. Maybe it's not so bad after all. We'll see.   Meralco Bolts PBA Season 42 results: Philippine Cup - Missed playoffs Commissioner's Cup - Quarterfinals Governors' Cup - Finals PBA Season 43 opening day line up: Bryan Faundo Mike Tolomia Cliff Hodge Nico Salva Baser Amer Chris Newsome KG Canaleta Garvo Lanete Joseph Sedurifa Anjo Caram Jason Ballesteros Jared Dillinger Reynel Hugnatan Ranidel De Ocampo Mac Baracael Injured/Reserve: Ken Bono Head coach: Norman Black For the past two seasons, Meralco has not performed well in the Philippine Cup. Without an import, the Bolts just shut down for some reason. However, the team can build on a more mature set of locals this time around to make some noise in the All-Filipino. And you already know coach Norman Black is not allowing another All-Filipino collapse from his team.   Blackwater Elite PBA Season 42 results: Philippine Cup - Missed playoffs Commissioner's Cup - Missed playoffs Governors' Cup - Quarterfinals PBA Season 43 opening day line up: Mike Cortez Mike Digregorio Ael Banal Roi Sumang JP Erram Mark Cruz John Pinto Mac Belo James Sena Renz Palma Chris Javier Allein Maliksi Dave Marcelo Raymar Jose Kyle Neypes Head coach: Leo Isaac Blackwater has an interesting team. Just looking at their line up from top to bottom, the Elite have all the tools to make a playoff runs this season. Starting with the All-Filipino, Blackwater can finish the job that they failed to do last season. People forget that the Elite, despite missing the playoffs, had a pretty good Philippine Cup last year.   Globalport Batang Pier PBA Season 42 results: Philippine Cup - Quarterfinals Commissioner's Cup - Quarterfinals Governors' Cup - Missed playoffs PBA Season 43 opening day line up: Yousef Taha Julian Sargent Stanley Pringle Terrence Romeo Nico Elorde Sean Anthony Micahel Juico Jonathan Gray Ryan Arana Kelly Nabong Lervin Flores Joseph Gabayni Bradwyn Guinto Injured/Reserve: Arnold Van Opstal Head coach: Pido Jarencio Regardless if its Pido Jarencio or Franz Pumaren coaching this team, things will be hard for Globalport if Terrence Romeo continues to miss time. But looking at it from another angle, maybe Stanley Pringle shows us another level to his game and takes the Batang Pier to new heights. However, Globalport fans would feel more comfortable if the Bro recovers according to schedule and makes his debut sooner rather than later.   Alaska Aces PBA Season 42 results: Philippine Cup - Quarterfinals Commissioner's Cup - Missed playoffs Governors' Cup - Missed playoffs PBA Season 43 opening day line up: Simon Enciso Chris Banchero Sonny Thoss Calvin Abueva Marion Magat Jake Pascual Jeron Teng Chris Exciminiano Carl Bryan Cruz Abel Galiguez Davon Potts Jvee Casio Kevin Racal Vic Manuel Injured/Reserve: Noy Baclao Head coach: Alex Compton It possibly can't get any worse for Alaska this season. After a down year, the Aces are poised for a bounce back season. If Alaska can re-learn how to finish games, the team can absolutely regain its lofty standing on top of the league. The pieces are there, it's amazing how the Aces lost so many games last season. It cannot get any worse.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017

Customs tasked to reconcile wide trade gap with China

MANILA, Philippines — Filipino customs officials are set to meet with their Chinese counterparts to review the declining but still significant gap between th.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 6th, 2017
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Sereno lawyers demand fair treatment from lawmakers

    Two lawyers representing Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno in the impeachment complaint being discussed before the House committee on justice said they remain "somehow optimistic" that she would receive fair treatment among senators, if and once her case is brought to the Senate.   Lawyers Joshua Santiago and Aldwin Salumbides, who also serve as the high magistrate's spokespersons, expressed hope in a press briefingon Saturdaythat justice will be evident before the Senate.   "Do we expect fair treatment in the Senate? We do not expect fair treatment. We demand fair treatment---not just for the Chief Justice, but for any Filipino citizen who ...Keep on reading: Sereno lawyers demand fair treatment from lawmakers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 25th, 2017

Re-visiting Carlos Bulosan

Review by PAULINO LIM, JR. E. San Juan, Jr., Carlos Bulosan: Revolutionary Filipino Writer in the United States A Critical Appraisal New York: Peter Lang, 2017 Carlos Bulosan: Revolutionary Writer in the United States is part of a project destined for the world’s libraries of the 21st Century. With its colorful cover and solid binding,… The post Re-visiting Carlos Bulosan appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsNov 21st, 2017