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Rappler Talk: Comedy, idolatry, and social commentary in Asuang

In a world of social media hot takes, influencers, and connectivity overload, a movie like Asuang is inevitable. An official entry to the Cinema One Originals Festival 2018, Asuang documents the efforts of the titular god of Bicol to "regain his former glory and fame but to no avail."  Asuang ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerOct 16th, 2018

Rappler Talk: Future-proofing young Filipinos through innovation, social enterprise

MANILA, Philippines – A recent study of the Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS) said that half of the jobs in Southeast Asian countries will be at high risk of being affected by automation. This is echoed by the Institute for the Future, which predicted that 85% of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Rappler Talk: Dr Mahar Mangahas on Duterte s survey ratings so far

  MANILA, Philippines – Rappler talks to Social Weather Stations president Dr Mahar Mangahas about how President Rodrigo Duterte has fared in trust and approval surveys, and how Filipinos grade his administration's performance on key national issues. Watch Rappler's full interview with Mangahas at 6 pm, Friday, June 29. – Rappler.com .....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 29th, 2018

Rappler Talk: Did Duterte s campaign team work with Cambridge Analytica?

BOOKMARK THIS PAGE TO WATCH THE INTERVIEW WITH POMPEE LA VIÑA AT 4PM MANILA, Philippines – Rappler talks to Juan Gabriel "Pompee" La Viña, the person responsible for crafting President Rodrigo Duterte's social media strategy for his 2016 presidential campaign. After photos surfaced of suspended Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix with Duterte's ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 11th, 2018

Rappler Talk: Henry De Sio, Jr on The Changemaker Effect in society

Bookmark to watch the interview with Henry de Sio Jr live on Rappler at 10:30 AM MANILA, Philippines – Rappler talks to Henry De Sio Jr., Global Chair for Framework Change of Ashoka, the first and largest organization of social innovators in the world. De Sio served as the Chief Operating Officer of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Rappler Talk with 'People's' Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo

Rappler Talk with 'People's' Social Welfare Secretary Judy Taguiwalo.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 17th, 2017

Rappler Talk: Bolet Banal on reading in the social media age

Rappler Talk: Bolet Banal on reading in the social media age.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2016

'PressFreedom: Reviewing the state of media under Duterte

The hashtag “#PressFreedom” trended in social media on Thursday following the arrest of Rappler chief Maria Ressa by the National Bureau of Investigation on charges of cyberlibel. The charge came from a complaint filed by businessman Wilfredo Keng over an article by Rappler published in May 2012 that allegedly violated the Cybercrime Prevention Act of […] The post #PressFreedom: Reviewing the state of media under Duterte appeared first on Interaksyon......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsFeb 14th, 2019

Looking closely at how NBI carried out arrest warrant against Rappler’s CEO

Observations on how Rappler chief executive officer Maria Ressa was arrested by officers of the National Bureau of Investigation on charges of cyberlibel surfaced on social media. The veteran journalist was arrested on the evening of Feb. 13, 2019 with orders from Presiding Judge Rainelda Estacio-Montesa of the Manila Regional Trial Court Branch 46. Rappler […] The post Looking closely at how NBI carried out arrest warrant against Rappler’s CEO appeared first on Interaksyon......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsFeb 13th, 2019

Michelle Obama makes a Grammys cameo

It was a show of force at the 61st Grammys held on Sunday (Monday morning, Manila time). The song is a social commentary of the rampant mass shootings in the US, gun violence and racism Ricky Martin and Camilla Cabello opened the show in high fashion with spots for their hits “Havana” and “Mi Gente.” […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsFeb 11th, 2019

Rappler Talk: Abdullah Dimaporo on expectations for the BOL Plebiscite in Lanao del Norte

LANAO DEL NORTE, Philippines – On the eve of the second voting day in the Bangsamoro plebiscite, Rappler talks to Lanao del Norte 2nd District Representative Abdullah Dimaporo on the expectations he has for the historic vote in the province. The Dimaporo clan has openly opposed the inclusion of 6 municipalities ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2019

Rappler Entertainment Talk: Karen Gallman

MANILA, Philippines – Karen Gallman formally rounded out a year of competitions for the Binibining Pilipinas 2018 queens by  winning the country's first Miss Intercontinental title on January 26 at the Mall of Asia Arena. Karen's win ended the country's bridesmaid stint in the competition and continues to show that the Philippines is a power ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 3rd, 2019

DSWD backs lowering criminal liability age to 12 | Evening wRap

Today on Rappler: The Department of Social Welfare and Development or DSWD backs Congress in lowering the minimum age of criminal liability to 12 years old. Ombudsman prosecutors are now running after senatorial candidate Bong Revilla to return to the national treasury P124.5 million plundered through the pork barrel scam. Two persons of interest in the Jolo ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 30th, 2019

Angel Locsin to critics body-shaming her: ‘This is my body. This is me.’

Kapamilya actress Angel Locsin shrugged off her bashers who have been continuously criticizing her weight gain on social media in an interview on “Tonight With Boy Abunda.” The talk show host asked about her opinion on the negative comments being posted by social media users following her comeback in primetime television. Boy Abunda remarked, “Nagbalik […] The post Angel Locsin to critics body-shaming her: ‘This is my body. This is me.’ appeared first on Interaksyon......»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsJan 29th, 2019

Manila Bay cleanup kicks off

MANILA, Philippines – The rehabilitation of Manila Bay officially started on Sunday, January 27. Some 5,000 volunteers gathered at the Quirino Grandstand and participated in the solidarity walk to Manila Bay. (WATCH: Rappler Talk: Cleaning up Manila Bay ) Environment Secretary Roy Cimatu led the program. He was joined by ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 27th, 2019

More Filipino families considered themselves poor in 2018 survey

More Filipino families considered themselves poor in 2018 survey Rappler Results of a Social Weather Stations survey show that the average self-poverty rate in 2018 was at 48%, up by two percentage.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJan 27th, 2019

Jollibee is latest victim of China s copycat culture

A fast food chain in Guangxi, China became the talk on social media after two Filipinos recently stumbled upon it and discovered that it has a resemblance to the Philippine fast food giant Jollibee......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 24th, 2019

Queer Fil-Ams yearn for unconditional love, acceptance from family

  NEW YORK -- Two activists shared their personal journeys as queer Pinays and their thoughts on gender violence and the culture of silence within the Filipino American family. Riya Ortiz, lead organizer and case manager of Damayan Migrant Workers, and artist-activist Mary Ann Ubaldo --- who is known on social media as Panday Banale --- were interviewed on Makilala TV for the episode "Queer Pinays: Pride and Prejudice" slated to air on Manhattan Neighborhood Network on January 24. The TV talk show, now on its sixth year, is hosted by three women, namely public health professional Rachelle Ocampo, book author and fitness coach Jen Furer, and community journalist Cristina...Keep on reading: Queer Fil-Ams yearn for unconditional love, acceptance from family.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 23rd, 2019

Rappler Talk: MILF chief Murad on hopes, challenges for the Bangsamoro vote

COTABATO CITY, Philippines – Will a new and more powerful region rise in Muslim Mindanao? Will Cotabato City and Isabela City join this new region? As votes all over Mindanao are tallied, Rappler speaks to Moro Islamic Liberation Front chairman Al-Haj Murad Ebrahim.  At the time of the interview, the "yes to ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 22nd, 2019

MILF s Iqbal: We expect landslide victory in 4 provinces, 2 cities

COTABATO CITY, Philippines – On the eve of the Bangsamoro plebiscite, Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) officials said they have reason to hope that the Bangsamoro Organic Law (BOL) will be ratified. MILF peace panel chairman Mohagher Iqbal, in a Rappler Talk interview on Sunday, January 20, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 20th, 2019