Advertisements


Rampage takes box-office lead

LOS ANGELES — Sci-fi action flick Rampage topped North American box offices over the weekend, taking in an estimated $34.5 million to barely beat out horror film A Quiet Place, industry tracker Exhibitor Relations said Sunday. Rampage stars hard-working Dwayne (The Rock) Johnson in a plot perhaps better seen than described: He plays a primatologist […] The post Rampage takes box-office lead appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource: bworldonline bworldonlineApr 16th, 2018

Myanmar’s great hope fails to live up to expectations – The Guardian

The script called for the lead actor, a Nobel prize winner, to seize control of a country, bring peace where there was conflict and prosperity where there was poverty. A nation emerging from years of military dictatorship was to become a beacon of hope not only for its cowed population but also for much of a fractured and turbulent south-east Asia. But like many political dramas – especially over the past 12 months – the script has not been followed by Myanmar and its de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. Now, a year since one of the world’s most famous prisoners of conscience came to power in the specially created position of state counsellor, the talk is not of progress. Instead, it is of drastically escalating ethnic conflicts that have simmered and sporadically exploded for decades; a new Rohingya Muslim insurgency that has prompted an army crackdown some say may amount to crimes against humanity; a rash of online defamation cases that have fostered a panic over freedom of speech; and a repressive legal framework that allowed the generals to jail so many still being in place. And all the while, Aung San Suu Kyi is accused of remaining mostly silent, doggedly avoiding the media. Many who led the campaign [to free her] were on the liberal side. I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher. Interviews by the Guardian with more than a dozen diplomats, analysts and current and former advisers reveal frustrations with a top-down government struggling to cope with immense challenges. Aung San Suu Kyi’s questionable leadership style, her inability or unwillingness to communicate a vision, and her reluctance to speak out against the persecution of minorities have raised the question of whether the popular narrative is misplaced. And although some defend her, saying it takes time to right the wrongs of decades, others see a fundamental misunderstanding of the woman herself. “Many of the people who led the campaign [to free Aung San Suu Kyi] … were more on the liberal side of the spectrum,” one diplomat put it. “I think she’s closer to a Margaret Thatcher.” It’s a stark contrast to the Aung San Suu Kyi who, during 15 years of house arrest at her lakeside villa on University Avenue in Yangon, stood on rickety tables and delivered speeches about human rights over the gate. “And she was electric,” said David Mathieson, a longtime Myanmar researcher for Human Rights Watch who is now an independent consultant. “She was funny. She was informative. She was principled … And I think it’s lamentable that she’s not doing the equivalent of that now.” Five hours north by car from Yangon, Myanmar’s dystopian capital Naypyidaw stands surrounded by densely forested mountains. It is here, in the so-called Abode of Kings supposedly built to insulate Myanmar’s generals from attack, amid a landscape of deserted 20-lane highways and grandiose hotels, that Aung Sun Suu Kyi lives her life in power. The 71-year-old is a disciplined ruler. Her habit, established during imprisonment, is to wake before dawn and meditate in the house she shares with her pet dog and a small retinue of maids. She has breakfast with an adviser, often Kyaw Tint Swe, a former ambassador who spent decades defending the junta’s actions. An aide, Win Htein, says Aung San Suu Kyi eats very little. “The amount of food she is taking is like a kitten,” he said. “She doesn’t eat carbohydrates. Fruit and vegetables. No pork, or mutton, or beef. Only fish.” Her few indulgences include a vast wardrobe of luxurious silk longyis and evening film viewings, musicals being her favourite. Win Htein recently gave her a copy of La La Land. But mostly she works. And there is a lot of work. As well as state counsellor – a position created to get around the military-drafted constitution that bars her from the presidency – she is foreign minister, minister of the president’s office and chair of numerous committees. Widely described as a micromanager, she pores over documents after hours. A source close to the attorney general’s office says she asks to see a copy of every draft bill before it is submitted to parliament. Ministers routinely pass decisions upwards. “The problem is there are no policymakers in her cabinet,” said Burmese political analyst Myat Ko. People who know her say Aung San Suu Kyi inspires both devotion and fear. She is variously described as charming and charismatic, and sharp and authoritarian. “She feels like a real leader,” one diplomat said. “Intelligent, quick-witted, quite funny.” At the same time, he added: “I would say that she has appeared to be very keen to be the sole decision-maker to have no chance of establishing rival power centres.” Echelons above her subordinates in stature, the state counsellor is often depicted as living in a bubble, surrounded by a cabal of advisers who are too nervous to convey hard truths. A Yangon-based analyst working on the peace process said bad news often does not reach her. “In meetings, she is dismissive, dictatorial – in some cases, belittling,” said a senior aid worker who, like many others interviewed for this story, insisted on anonymity because he works with the administration. The government, he said, has become “so centralised, there is complete fear of her”. This is not the administration many hoped for when the National League for Democracy (NLD) took over the government [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 31st, 2017

JONES CUP: Ateneo gets back on track at expense of Japan

Ateneo de Manila University started strong and finished even stronger to barge back onto the win column in the 2018 William Jones Cup. Thirdy Ravena had all the answers in the endgame as the young Blue Eagles lost a 14-point lead, but dug deep to hold off the Team B of the Japanese national team, 80-74, on Wednesday at the Xinzhuang Gymnasium in Taiwan. The UAAP champions established a 48-34 lead in the third quarter before the Japanese came roaring back with a 29-14 rampage to grab a 63-62 edge in the final frame. In the ensuing possession, UAAP Season 80 Mythical selection Ravena took the ball right to the rim where he made good on the basket plus the bonus. That uncorked an 8-1 burst that took back the advantage in favor of Ateneo, 70-63. Japan yet again threatened at 70-72 inside the last two minutes only to see Gian Mamuyac nail a tough midrange jumper and Ravena register a resounding rejection that closed the door on them once and for all. Incoming fourth-year forward Ravena wound up with 14 points, nine rebounds, three steals, and one block. Ivorian reinforcement Angelo Kouame had his own 15-point, 14-rebound double-double on top of two blocks. Behind the end-to-end play of Ravena, the Blue Eagles swooped back on the right track, evening their standing at 2-2. The Philippine team will now turn its attention to Indonesian club team CLS Knights on Thursday. Takuma Sato paced Japan with 12 points. BOX SCORES ATENEO PILIPINAS 80 - Kouame 15, Ravena 14, Wong 11, Nieto Ma 10, Mamuyac 9, Mendoza 8, Nieto Mi 5, Verano 4, Black 2, Go 2, Maagdenberg 0, White 0. JAPAN 74 - Sato 12, Takahashi 11, Imamura 10, Hashimoto 9, Tamaki 8, Namizato 6, Hiraiwa 5, Toews 5, Schafer 5, Nakanishi 3, Sugiura 0, Inoue 0. QUARTER SCORES: 21-13, 37-31, 60-55, 80-74. —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News1 hr. 18 min. ago

Mexican president-elect slashes his own salary

MEXICO CITY, Mexico --- Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador says he plans to earn 40 percent of what his predecessor makes when he takes office in December as part of an austerity push in government. Lopez Obrador told reporters Sunday he will take home 108,000 pesos a month, which is $5,707 at current exchange rates, and that no public official will be able to earn more than the president during his six-year term. He reiterated campaign promises to cut back on other taxpayer funded perks for high-level government officials, such as chauffeurs, bodyguards and private medical insurance. /cbb...Keep on reading: Mexican president-elect slashes his own salary.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 15th, 2018

Duterte’s mood changes lead peace talks with Reds nowhere

[Editor's Note: President Rodrigo Duterte will deliver his third State of the Nation Address (Sona) on July 23. The Inquirer looks back at promises he made in Sona 2016 and Sona 2017, and how he and his administration performed on those promises. We will also look at major issues that marked his two years in office in our #Sona2018 series.] Like a stormy romance, peace talks between the government and communist insurgents have always careened off the path to church. Peace in the negotiations has always depended on President Rodrigo Duterte's mood, although supporters of the effort to put an end to the insurgency that's been going on for half a century have not given up on their...Keep on reading: Duterte’s mood changes lead peace talks with Reds nowhere.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 15th, 2018

PVL Finals: Creamline takes 1-0 lead, cruises past PayMaya

Creamline struck the crucial first blow, beating PayMaya in four sets, 25-21, 22-25, 25-20, 25-19, taking a 1-0 lead in the best-of-three championship series of the Premier Volleyball League Reinforced Conference Sunday at Mall of Asia Arena. The Cool Smashers relied on a three-pronged attack that Kuttika Kaewpin spearheaded with 19 points while Alyssa Valdez and Laura Schaudt had 18 and 13 points, respectively. It was still a tight contest through the midway part of the fourth set with Craemline leading 13-11, that was until Valdez started heating up. The Cool Smashers went on a 9-2 run with Valdez capping it off with a smith kill for the 22-15 lead. Even with the early ...Keep on reading: PVL Finals: Creamline takes 1-0 lead, cruises past PayMaya.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 8th, 2018

F2 Logistics pulls down Generika, takes charge

Riding on the crest of its fruitful stint in Thailand, F2 Logistics sent Generika-Ayala crashing back to earth in straight sets, 25-20, 25-16, 25-20, to steal the solo lead in Pool A of the 2018 Chooks to Go-Philippine Superliga Invitational Conference yesterday at the Filoil Flying V Center......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 5th, 2018

BanKo takes Game 1 of PVL semis, denies PayMaya

BanKo dealt the first blow in its three-game semifinals series against PayMaya, taking a four-set win, 25-19, 26-28, 25-23, 25-23, in the Premier Volleyball League Reinforced Conference Sunday at Filoil Flying V Centre. Jutarat Montripila of the Perlas Spikers and the High Flyers' Tess Rountree put on a duel putting up 31 points apiece to lead their respective teams but BanKo had a better support in Lakia Bright, who tallied 23 points. Both teams were scorching on the offensive end with BanKo having a slim 62-57 advantage in terms of spikes, and that was what head coach Dong Dela Cruz preached to his team. "I told them that we have to work, earn every point because we all kn...Keep on reading: BanKo takes Game 1 of PVL semis, denies PayMaya.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

[Right of Way] The fault in our signs: MMDA takes corrective action on Katipunan

In earlier episodes of "Right of Way," road safety advocate Vince Lazatin tackled problematic road signs and pavement markings around Metro Manila. (WATCH: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 ) The trilogy merited a response from the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) , with Traffic Management Office Director Noemie ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 28th, 2018

Why its lead stars think ‘Write Moment’ will click with viewers

Valeen Montenegro is optimistic about the box-office chances of Dominic D. Lim's "The Write Moment," her big-screen partnership with comedian Jerald Napoles. She believes the movie will find an audience because, as she explains, "moviegoers are now looking for something other than the usual rom-com fare." "A plain-looking guy gets paired with a beautiful leading lady. Clearly, this [formula], as demonstrated by 'Kita Kita' has a large following," costar Jerald Napoles enthuses. "I'm confident that the audience will like our film, not only because it has similar elements [with the Alessandra de Rossi-Empoy Marquez starrer], but also because its story is fresh. And these days, every...Keep on reading: Why its lead stars think ‘Write Moment’ will click with viewers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

Community takes lead to rebuild Marawi City after siege

MANILA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — When Tong Pacasum was allowed back into the area where his family home once stood in Marawi on the Philippine island of Mindanao, there was nothing left for him to salvage months after a bloody siege that leveled much of the city. But Pacasum considers himself lucky: his family is safe, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

LA Lakers enter 2018 offseason in unfamiliar position

NBA.com staff report The rich heritage of the Los Angeles Lakers is evident every time you walk into their sparkling practice facility in the shadow of the Pacific Ocean near the beach. All sixteen championship banners the franchise has won are on full display. And that makes the task of digesting what the Lakers' front office executives, both Magic Johnson and Rob Pelinka, are dealing with this summer. Restoring the glory for this proud franchise will not be an easy task. Even with a promising young group of players and enough cap space for potentially two max-salary contracts give them the right tools to work with. Leaning on that aforementioned championship heritage, however, is a bit trickier, according to longtime Los Angeles Times columnist Bill Plaschke. The Lakers sit in a spot in the NBA food chain that is unfamiliar to their passionate fan base, which makes the current rebuilding process a complicated affair for all involved: Yes, the Lakers franchise, dating to its days in Minneapolis, has won 16 banners. But no, the Lakers are not sitting at the top of the food chain. They’re scrambling close to the bottom. They haven’t made the playoffs in five years. They haven’t won a playoff series in six years. They haven’t made it past the second round in eight years. Their last championship acquisition was Pau Gasol in 2008. Their last championship free-agent signing was Ron Artest in 2009. Artest is no longer Artest, and the Lakers no longer are the Lakers. If they don’t approach the upcoming free-agent season with that understanding, they’re going to come up empty again. In the fight to lure LeBron James and Paul George — outcomes that are mired in uncertainty — the Lakers do not need to emphasize all those hanging banners, but rather the emptiness where there are no banners. They don’t need to expound on their greatness. They need to emphasize their need to be great again, and the legacy that awaits someone who can lead them there. Don’t talk about Kobe Bryant, talk about the void he left behind, and how this smart and savvy marketplace will embrace someone who can create his own story. Don’t sell this as being part of history, sell it as forging a new history. Make it about the basketball. Make it all about the basketball. Keep owner Jeanie Buss involved; she’s the basketball history. Make coach Luke Walton part of the pitch; he’s the basketball present. Sometimes it seems like the entire Lakers offseason strategy is the staging of the Magic and Pelinka Show, and in a room with sophisticated free agents and their reps, that’s not going to be enough......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 25th, 2018

Community takes lead to rebuild Philippine city after...

By Rina Chandran MANILA, June 23 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - When Tong Pacasum was allowed back into the area where his family home once stood in Marawi on the Philippine island of Mindanao, the.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJun 23rd, 2018

Community takes lead to rebuild Marawi after siege

Tong Pacasum, who is eager to start rebuilding his home, is hopeful that the community will lead the development of a better Marawi. Source link link: Community takes lead to rebuild Marawi after siege.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJun 23rd, 2018

Brian Harman takes 1-shot lead in Travelers

By Pat Eaton-Robb, Associated Press CROMWELL, Conn. (AP) — Brian Harman shot a 4-under 66 on Friday to move to 10-under par and watched that hold up for the second-round lead in the Travelers Championship, thanks in part to a 10-second rule. Harman finished a stroke ahead of Matt Jones and first round co-leader Zach Johnson, who lost a stroke during his round of 68 when his birdie putt hung on the lip of the cup at the third hole for longer than the maximum allowed 10 seconds before falling in, giving him a par. "After 10 seconds, the ball was moving and at that point even if the ball is moving, It's deemed to be at rest, because it's on the lip," Johnson said. "Don't ask me why, but that's just the way it is." Harman had his short game working for the second consecutive day, taking 26 putts after needing only 23 during the first round. "The putter has been really good so far, but I've been in position a lot," he said. "I've had a lot of good looks at it. I'm just able to put a little pressure on the course right now, which is nice." Jones hit 16 of 18 greens for the second consecutive day, following up his first round 65 with a 66. Bryson DeChambeau (66), Paul Casey (67) and Russell Henley (65) were two strokes back going into the weekend. But Johnson, who started on the 10th tee, had the day's most interesting round, which included just two birdies, but one amazing par save. He hit the ball into the TPC River Highland's signature lake on No. 17, dropped across the water near the 16th tee box and then put his third shot within 8 feet of the hole from 234 yards away. "You can't hit that shot and then not make that putt," he said. "It felt good to get away with that four. That's as good an up and down as I've ever witnessed or performed." Lanto Griffin and two-time Travelers champion Bubba Watson were at even par coming into Friday. But both shot a 63 to move into contention heading into the weekend, three shots behind the leader. Watson jump started his round with an eagle on his third hole, the par-5 13th. "I had some mental mistakes yesterday, and then I didn't make some putts," said Watson. "Today I started out hotter. I made a good shot on 11, our second hole, made the putt, making a solid par putt on 12, and then that freed me up a little bit. Gave me some confidence going into the next hole where I made the eagle." Rory McIlroy also is at 7 under after a 69. McIlroy, Watson and Justin Thomas (5 under) were grouped together Thursday and Friday, drawing large galleries. "I definitely helps, Thomas said. "It's fun playing with good friends. You definitely get more momentum when guys are playing well. I obviously couldn't get a whole lot of momentum out there. I was kind of hovering around 1- or 2-under. It was pretty much just Bubba today. Rory didn't play great either and both of us definitely could have had a lot lower rounds" Defending champion Jordan Spieth, tied with Johnson after an opening 63, had a 73 to drop into a tie for 25th at 4 under. His round, which started on the back nine, included a triple bogey on the par-5 13th hole and an eagle on par-5 sixth, when he put his second shot within 2 feet of the hole from 276 yards away. "I don't go to the range after 63s very often, and I was there for an hour yesterday trying to figure out the golf swing," he said. "So it's not like things are on. Sometimes it can get disguised by rounds, but it's not far off. It really is close." Masters champion Patrick Reed, coming off a fourth-place finish in the U.S. Open, shot a 67 to miss the cut by a shot at minus-1......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 23rd, 2018

Barangay officials told to lead by example

BACOLOD City – Negros Occidental Gov. Alfredo Marañon, Jr. urged newly elected barangays officials of the province to lead by example as they assume office on June 20, 2018. Marañon issued the call during the Mass Oath Taking of Newly-Elected Barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) Officials held at the Negros Occ. Multi-Purpose Activity Center (NOMPAC) […] The post Barangay officials told to lead by example appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2018

Why Donnalyn thinks she has what it takes to be a lead star

After her chirpy, rap-pop single "Kakaibabe" became a hit and the subject of memes four years ago, singer-songwriter Donnalyn Bartolome has admittedly refocused her attention, from music to acting. She continued to release singles, but she's been trying to get more and more into acting, the most recent being the horror flick, "Cry No Fear." "It's just that there has been a string of opportunities to act, so I was hoping to maximize them," the 23-year-old told the Inquirer in a recent interview. Juggling acting and music is tough for her, because she's the type of artist who prefers to focus on a specific project at a given time. "In a way, doing a film is less work for me, b...Keep on reading: Why Donnalyn thinks she has what it takes to be a lead star.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

Avena takes control by two shots

LIPA City--Abe Avena fired a two-over-par 74 on Wednesday to take a two-shot lead over Rolly Viray after the opening round of the Philippine Seniors Championship at Mount Malarayat's Lobo and.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

MPBL warns Parks: Repeat offense may lead to severe sanction

MANILA, Philippines – The Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League (MPBL) Commissioner's Office warned Mandaluyong player Ray Parks on Saturday, June 16, for his disparaging statements after his team lost to the Muntinlupa Cagers during the league opener. Parks, a two-time Asean Basketball League (ABL) Most Valuable Player, took a swipe at the officiating and even ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

Johnson takes 4-shot lead into weekend at US Open

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Dustin Johnson handled the worst of the weather and wound up as the sole survivor to par at the U.S. Open, taking a four-shot lead into the weekend at Shinnecock Hills. Johnson dropped only one shot Friday morning in wind and two hours of light rain that made the course play even longer. He made a 45-foot birdie putt on the par-3 seventh hole for a 3-under 67. In perfect scoring conditions in the afternoon, no one could catch him. Ian Poulter was one shot behind until a triple bogey on his second-to-last hole. Charley Hoffman was under par until a bogey on his final hole. Johnson was at 4-under 136, four shots ahead of Hoffman and Scott Piercy. The weekend will not include Tiger Woods, who shot 72 to miss the cut for the fifth time in his last eight majors. Jordan Spieth joined him with a bogey-bogey finish to miss the cut by one shot......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018