Advertisements


Ramco, LBC Express renew digital ties

Ramco, LBC Express renew digital ties.....»»

Category: techSource: thestandard thestandardNov 27th, 2017

Finding a new home in the digital age

"Adulting" is fast becoming an overused term. Paying one's own bills is a form of adulting; grocery shopping, too. Moving out---and living independently---is arguably the most daunting form of adulting there is, marriage and kids aside. While strong family ties in Filipino culture allow us to live with our parents as long as possible, moving out is something that is bound to happen to some, if not all of us.   When I first moved out of my parents' home many years ago, I had neither the time nor the liberty to consider too many options. I had to find a place immediately, and it had to be within my meager budget and close enough to my office. I had to pester people to take d...Keep on reading: Finding a new home in the digital age.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 24th, 2018

PSA to honor SMC, other backers in rites

MANILA, Philippines — The Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) and long-time backers of sports renew their ties for the staging of the SMC-PSA Annual A.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2018

PSA Awards set Feb. 27

THE Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) and well-known supporters of sports renew their ties for the staging of the SMC-PSA Annual Awards Night on Feb. 27 at the Maynila Hall of the Manila Hotel. First on the list is giant conglomerate San Miguel Corp. which, for the nth time, serves as….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2018

DTI TIES-UP WITH GOOGLE AND IPGMB TO DIGITIZE MSMES

DTI TIES-UP WITH GOOGLE AND IPGMB TO DIGITIZE MSMES. Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) Secretary Ramon Lopez recently met with Google Philippines Country Manager Kenneth Lingan and IPG Mediabrands (IPGMB) Philippines, Inc. Chief Executive Officer Venus Navalta to discuss a possible cooperation on increasing the digital presence of businesses in the Philippines, especially Micro, Small, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

Wishes for 2018 and beyond

ABOUT this time, many of us try to recollect personal and family experiences during the year just ended. It is also now that we renew resolutions and express hope and wishes for the coming year. As has been our tradition, our family -- consisting of Mga Apo ni Terio at….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsDec 31st, 2017

DFA opens passport appointments for January 2018

Filipinos who wish to apply for or renew their passports may now secure their appointments online.   Starting January 2018, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) will be issuing Philippine passports with 10-year validity pursuant to Republic Act 10928 signed by President Rodrigo Duterte.   DFA's passport appointment system is now operated by state-owned Apo Production Unit, Inc. but the interface has not changed.   The passport fees remain the same: P 950.00 for regular processing (20 working days) and P 1,200.00 for express processing (10 working days).   The following are exempted from securing prior appointment and may enjoy priority l...Keep on reading: DFA opens passport appointments for January 2018.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 10th, 2017

Carmudi, CAGI Renew Ties for Upcoming Car, Truck, Motorcycle of the Year Awards

Carmudi, CAGI Renew Ties for Upcoming Car, Truck, Motorcycle of the Year Awards.....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2017

RCMP reveals use of secretive cellphone surveillance technology for the first time – CBC News

The RCMP for the first time is publicly confirming it uses cellphone surveillance devices in investigations across Canada — but at the same time says the potential of unauthorized snooping in Ottawa, as reported by CBC News, poses a threat to national security. &'8220;Absolutely,&'8221; RCMP Chief Supt. Jeff Adam, who is in charge of technical investigations services, said in an unprecedented technical briefing Wednesday with reporters from CBC News, the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail. The RCMP held the briefing in the wake of a CBC News investigation that found evidence that devices known as IMSI catchers may be in use near government buildings in Ottawa for the purpose of illegal spying. &'8220;Not everyone uses the equipment in the way the RCMP does,&'8221; Adam said. &'8220;It is publicly known there is equipment out there that is not limited in its capturing of communications between devices. And so it's a security risk when it is used in proximity to government and/or any other commercial enterprises.&'8221; Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said Tuesday the devices detected did not belong to any Canadian police or intelligence agency. Adam told reporters that while he isn't &'8220;personally aware&'8221; of foreign agencies using the technology in Canada, &'8220;I can't rule that out.&'8221; But on Wednesday, after shrouding their own use of the technology in secrecy for years, the RCMP took the unprecedented step of speaking publicly about the devices — also known as Stingrays or Mobile Device Identifiers (MDIs) — to address public concern amidst mounting questions about their use The RCMP says that MDIs — of which it owns 10 — have become &'8220;vital tools&'8221; deployed scores of times to identify and track mobile devices in 19 criminal investigations last year and another 24 in 2015. He says in all cases but one in 2016, police got warrants. The one exception was an exigent circumstance — in other words, an emergency scenario &'8220;such as a kidnapping,&'8221; said Adam, whose office tracks every instance where an MDI has been used by the RCMP. &'8220;This technology is a vital tool in providing valuable assistance to criminal investigations,&'8221; Adam said, adding some recent media reporting has misstated how police use MDIs and what the technology can actually do. He says using an MDI requires senior police approval as well as getting a judge's order. And he says the technology provides only a first step in an investigation allowing officers to identify a device. He says only then can police apply for additional warrants to obtain a user's &'8220;basic subscriber information&'8221; such as name and address connected to the phone. Then, he says, only if the phone and suspect are targets of the investigation can police seek additional warrants to track the device or conduct a wiretap to capture communications. Adam says the RCMP currently has 24 technicians trained and authorized to deploy the devices across Canada. He knows other police forces own and use them too, but declined to name them. He said the RCMP's devices are restricted in their use, with software that only allows them to identify a mobile device and to potentially track the location of that phone. &'8220;What the RCMP technology does not do is collect private communication,&'8221; Adam said. &'8220;In other words, it does not collect voice and audio communications, email messages, text messages, contact lists, images, encryption keys or basic subscriber information.&'8221; There do exist interception tools that allow eavesdropping on phone calls and direct interception of digital messages but Adam said the RCMP does not own them or use them. He said anyone operating in Canada without a proper licence or judge's authorization would be breaking section 191.1 of the Criminal Code that prohibits possession of these kinds of interception devices. He also said it would be a violation of the Radiocommunications Act. Adam conceded that until two months ago the RCMP itself failed to get express approval to use MDIs from Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED, formerly Industry Canada), the government body responsible for regulating technology that might interfere with wireless communications. He said the RCMP believed at one point that an exemption introduced in early 2015 to the Radiocommunications Act allowing the use of cellular &'8220;jammers&'8221; might also exempt the use of MDIs — but ISED ultimately disagreed. Otherwise, he said police have almost always sought a warrant, though he noted a few exceptions. He said in recent years the law has changed to catch up with emerging technologies. Police used to apply for a general warrant to use the technology. In 2015, Adam said there was a period of at least six months — between March and October — when the RCMP didn't seek a warrant at all, acting on advice from the Department of Justice and government prosecutors. RCMP say that in the past five years — including this period — police used the devices without a warrant in 11 investigations. IMSI catchers have been highly controversial for fear that hundreds of innocent device users can be swept up in the collection of cellular data. Adam said all data collected is strictly protected, isolated and reported to judges, preserved until it is no longer needed and then destroyed. &'8220;The data, once it is seized lawfully to the judge, will be secured and locked up for criminal court purposes. It will not be accessed other than the target information,&'8221; Adam said. He said the RCMP has been fully co-operating with the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner, which has been investigating police use of cellphone-tracking equipment in Canada. He also said police are very aware that cell MDIs can potentially [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 6th, 2017

Philippines, Thailand renew tourism ties - Philippine Star

Philippines, Thailand renew tourism ties - Philippine Star.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsMar 22nd, 2017

Philippines, Thailand renew tourism ties

MANILA, Philippines  — The Philippine and Thailand governments revived the tourism cooperation agreement during the official visit of President Rodrigo Duter.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 22nd, 2017

Sexual assault in Japan: ‘Every girl was a victim’ – Al Jazeera

Tamaka Ogawa was about 10 years old when she was sexually assaulted for the first time. It was a public holiday and she was on the subway. A man standing behind her pulled down the band of her culottes and underwear, touched her bare bottom, then pressed himself against her. She recalls feeling shocked and physically sickened. When she reached home, she repeatedly washed the spot where he had pressed himself against her, although she was conscious of not spending too long in the toilet, in case her family noticed that something was wrong. Some years later, on her first day of senior high school, she was groped on the commute home. After that, the groping and sexual assaults &'' men would often stick their hands inside her underwear &'' became a regular occurrence as she made her way to or from school in her uniform. Each time, she would run away, unsure of what to do. &'8220;I thought of myself as a child,&'8221; she reflects. &'8220;I could not understand that adults were excited by touching me.&'8221; It would be improper to express anger towards an adult, she thought, and she worried about attracting attention. Besides, her parents had never spoken to her about such things and how she ought to handle them. She recalls one incident particularly clearly. She was about 15 and on her way to school. A man began to touch her, putting his hand inside her underwear. He was aggressive and it hurt, she remembers. When the train stopped, she got off. But he grabbed her hand and told her: &'8220;Follow me.&'8221; Ogawa ran away. She believes that people saw what was going on, but nobody helped. She felt ashamed and complicit, she says. &'8220;He seems to have thought that I was pleased with his act,&'8221; the now 36-year-old reflects. &'8220;When I was in high school, every [girl] was a victim,&'8221; says Ogawa. &'8220;[We] didn't think we could do anything about it.&'8221; Today, Ogawa, a writer and cofounder of Press Labo, a small digital content production company in Shimokitazawa, an inner-city Tokyo neighbourhood, often writes about Japan's gender inequality and sexual violence issues. In 2015, she began writing about the country's long-standing problem with groping &'' or chikan, in Japanese &'' often experienced by schoolgirls on public transportation. Many victims stay silent, unable to talk about their experiences in a society which, by many accounts, trivialises this phenomenon. But, in the past two years, that has begun to change as more people speak up against it. Yayoi Matsunaga is one of those people. One morning in late January, the 51-year-old arrived at a coffee shop in the bustling neighbourhood of Shibuya with a suitcase of badges. The round badges, designed to deter gropers, feature illustrations such as a schoolgirl peering angrily from between her legs, or a crowd of stern-looking rabbits and include the messages, &'8220;Groping is a crime&'8221; and &'8220;Don't do it&'8221;. Each comes with a leaflet instructing the wearer to clearly display the badges on their bags, to stand confidently and to be vigilant. Matsunaga began her Osaka-based organisation, Groping Prevention Activities Centre, in 2015 after her friend's daughter was regularly molested while taking the train to school. Takako Tonooka, the pseudonym she has used in interviews with the Japan Times, confided in her mother, and the two tried various solutions to stop the attacks. They bought a stuffed toy which says &'8220;Don't do it&'8221; when pulled. They spoke to the police and the railway authorities, who said they would act if it was the same perpetrator &'' but it never was. Tonooka even wore her school skirt shorter and found that she was harassed less. Matsunaga says trains display posters telling groping victims to be brave and to speak up. Tonooka started practising saying &'8220;Stop it&'8221; and &'8220;No&'8221; at home. She began to confront offenders, who would then angrily deny touching her. Onlookers did not help. Eventually, she and her mother created a label to attach to her bag, which says, &'8220;Groping is a crime. I'm not going to give up&'8221; and features a picture of policemen catching perpetrators. It worked. But the label made Tonooka self-conscious, and Matsunaga says boys teased her. Matsunaga decided that Tonooka should not have to fight on her own, so she came up with an idea to involve others by crowdsourcing ideas for anti-groping badges. &'8220;High school girls are really into this 'kawaii' culture so they had to be cute,&'8221; she says. In November 2015 she launched a crowdfunding campaign that attracted 334 donors and raised 2.12 million yen (about $19,000). Then, she ran a badge design crowdsourcing contest. High school pupils, art school students, and freelance designers &'' many telling her it was the first time they'd thought about the issue &'' submitted 441 designs from which Matsunaga selected five. Her organisation gave away about 500 and three police stations handed out more. She now sells them online, for 410 yen ($3.70) each. From March, 11 department stores will stock them and she's aiming to secure more distributors near train stations. Apart from making the badges more widely available, Matsunaga also wants offenders to see them and think: &'8220;The world is changing, some people have started talking about it.&'8221; By involving students, Matsunaga believes she's encouraging them to talk about this issue from a young age. The badges have had a direct effect. Data collected from 70 students [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 9th, 2017

Glaiza de Castro and Kristoffer Martin renew ties with GMA Network

Glaiza de Castro and Kristoffer Martin renew ties with GMA Network.....»»

Category: newsSource:  voxbikolRelated NewsFeb 27th, 2017

Taguig, US renew English tutor ties

Taguig, US renew English tutor ties.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2017

PhilHealth, DOH, DSWD Renew Ties for Social Protection

PhilHealth, DOH, DSWD Renew Ties for Social Protection.....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsDec 28th, 2016

Philippines & UK renew bilateral ties

The Philippines recently had the privilege of hosting two high-level visits from the United Kingdom in celebration of the two countries’ auspicious friendly.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 7th, 2016

POC, PSC officials renew ties

MANILA, Philippines – Top officials of the Philippine Olympic Committee and Philippine Sport Commission sat down the other day and vowed to strengthen their.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 9th, 2016

Team FVR sets out to renew China ties

Team FVR sets out to renew China ties.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 8th, 2016

PayMaya ties up with Bayad Center

MANILA, Philippines - PayMaya Philippines Inc., the digital financial unit of PLDT Inc., has tied up with Bayad Center to allow the use of digital payments a.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 6th, 2016

Home Credit and Sun Life Grepa Financial Renew Ties; Enhance Product Offer for Credit Borrowers

Through a renewed partnership made official in May 2016, Home Credit Philippines, a global consumer financing company, and Sun Life Grepa Financial Inc. (Sun Life Grepa), the fastest-growing insurer in the top 10 life insurance...The post Home Credit and .....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJul 25th, 2016

PLDT ties up with Intel to bring digital solutions to MSME owners

MANILA, Philippines PLDT SME nation, the small business arm of PLDT Incorporated has announced a partnership with hardware tech giant Intel that is aimed at serving the huge micro-, small- and medium-enterprise or MSME market in the country. The i.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 19th, 2016