Advertisements


Premonition of Danger: Suspicious Objects Turn Out to be Malicious in Almost Three-quarters of Cases

Kaspersky experts have analyzed the anonymized and aggregated statistics from requests to the Kaspersky Threat Intelligence Portal, an always-on web service with access to several petabytes of global security intelligence data that is updated almost in real-time. The analysis showed that when security researchers requested additional details of a suspicious object, 72% of cases turned […].....»»

Category: newsSource: metrocebu metrocebuDec 3rd, 2019

Bill filed to protect teachers from malicious accusations of child abuse

The bill also seeks to compel the Department of Education to provide support to teachers when such cases arise......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 27th, 2019

UAAP 82 By the Numbers: Closing in on history

The Ateneo juggernaut is still going strong. Thanks to another masterful performance, the Blue Eagles are closing in on a UAAP Season 82 sweep and a three-peat. The Growling Tigers ran out of magic in Game 1 and before the UAAP Finals go to Game 2, a By the Numbers breakdown on how the Big Bad Blue imposed its will on UST.   32 Total points for Thirdy Ravena in Game 1 of the Finals. Thirdy picked up right where he left off from last year’s Finals, torching the Growling Tigers for most points by a Blue Eagle this season. Ravena has a combined 70 points in his last two Finals games.   26 Total points for Rookie of the Year Mark Nonoy. The young speedster went off in his first UAAP Finals game, keeping UST in the game after the Blue Eagles started the series with a haymaker. However, Nonoy’s effort was not enough as Thirdy took over in the second half, leading Ateneo’s final breakaway for a Game 1 win.   76 Total points for the Blue Eagles after three quarters in Game 1, they finished with 91 in a 14-point win. Ateneo averaged 76.9 points per game in the elimination round.   58 Total points in the paint for the Blue Eagles. Ateneo doubled UST’s production from the shaded area, outscoring the Growling Tigers, 58-29. That’s game right there.   7 UAAP Finals games losses for UST in this decade, three to Ateneo. The Growling Tigers have made the UAAP Finals four times since 2012. Unless they can turn things around and somehow take down the Blue Eagles, UST is losing a fourth Finals in this decade.   11 Total championships for the Blue Eagles if they can complete this season sweep. 11 titles adds to Ateneo’s lead over La Salle in the all-time race. The Blue Eagles need a lot more titles to move up the all-time ranks though FEU leads the league with 20 titles while UST and UE are tied for second with 18 each. The Green Archers are fourth with nine championships.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 18th, 2019

Pasaol-led Media sets date with Stats in Goodwill Games Finals

Former UE star Alvin Pasaol made sure he wasn’t going to let his teammates down in his UAAP return as the Chooks-to-Go Collegiate Press Corps rallied past Ateneo, 102-94, to progress in the 2019 UAAP Goodwill Games Finals on Wednesday at Smart Araneta Coliseum. The super scorer paired up with ex-Adamson stalwart Ryan Monteclaro as the mediamen fought from a 12-point second quarter deficit, 50-38, and staged a killer third quarter storm to wrest control of the tiff. Game changing was the impact of Inquirer.net's Bong Lozada, whose inspired play keyed the Media's 7-0 run late in the said frame to turn a two-point deficit to a 71-66 lead. NBTC’s Anton Altamirano and NCAA Season 95 leading scorer Allyn Bulanadi then hustled up with short stabs to open the fourth period and extend the lead to 11, 86-75 with seven minutes left. Although Chibueze Ikeh flexed great offensive dominance inside and out in the clutch for Ateneo, the Media's defense was just on-point down the stretch to book its return trip to the championship. Monteclaro led the Press with 28 points built on eight triples. Pasaol added 26 markers and 12 rebounds, while fellow Davaoeno Bulanadi chipped in 20 points, nine boards, five assists and two steals. Roy Cayanan of Tiebreaker Times stood out with 11 points, while Altamirano had 10 markers and seven boards, all from the offensive end. The media also got significant contributions from the Philippine Daily Inquirer’s Cedelf Tupas, Spin.ph’s Karlo Sacamos, Abante’s Cyreel Zarate, ESPN5's AJ Bolando, PM's Paul Carpio and Courtside.ph’s Niel Masoy in the game, with Randolph B. Leongson of Spin.ph, Yo Sarmenta of ESPN5, and Matthew Li of Tiebreaker Times calling the shots from the sidelines. Bacon Austria flirted with a triple-double to carry the load for Ateneo with 29 points, 13 rebounds and eight assists, while Ikeh churned out a monster double-double of 25 markers and 21 boards. This season's hosts also fielded UAAP treasurer Erika Caitlyn Dy, Blue Eagles assistant coach Yuri Escueta, and ex-Ateneo players Frank Golla and Shaggy Almond in the game. It was a sweet bounce back victory for Team Media after its highly controversial defeat to the Technical Group/Stats. Media shoots for back-to-back titles when it faces its rival Technical Group/Stats in the Finals set on Sunday, still at the Big Dome. The Scores: MEDIA 102 - Monteclaro 28, Pasaol 26, Bulanadi 20, Cayanan 11, Altamirano 10, Tupas 2, Zarate 2, Bolando 1, Carpio 0, Lozada 0, Masoy 0. ATENEO 94 - Austria 29, Ikeh 25, Fortuna 18, Escueta 13, Golla 4, Dy 3, Mercado 2, Almond 0. Quarters: 23-23, 43-50, 71-69, 102-94......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 7th, 2019

Sixers dominate rival Celtics with stout defense in season opener

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com PHILADELPHIA -- The Philadelphia 76ers' 107-93 win over the Boston Celtics on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) was an ugly foul-fest at the Wells Fargo Center. But it also confirmed the Sixers could be incredibly disruptive defensively. The shortest player in their nine-man rotation is 6-foot-5 Matisse Thybulle, who led all players (who played at least 50 minutes) in the preseason with 4.9 steals per 36 minutes. On Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), the rookie contributed to Kemba Walker's 4-for-18 shooting performance and finished with two steals and two blocks in less than 22 minutes. The Sixers' own offense was rough. Through three quarters, they had scored just 77 points on 78 possessions, even though they had attempted 31 free throws. They were 3-for-21 from three-point range, struggling to find a rhythm against a Celtics team that had lost two of its most important defenders - Aron Baynes and Al Horford - this summer. "Had our defense not been our defense," Brown said, "we might have seen a different result. I think our defense, by in large, was what I had hoped." The Sixers managed to hold a nine-point lead through the third. The Celtics closed to within four early in the fourth, before Philly finally found some offense, scoring 29 points over a 16-possession fourth-quarter stretch that put the game away. ???? 10.23.19 | @celtics ???? presented by @ShopRiteStores pic.twitter.com/SmD6b7KvSC — Philadelphia 76ers (@sixers) October 24, 2019 The offense may continue to struggle as the Sixers figure out how to evolve without the movement of J.J. Redick and the off-the-dribble work of Jimmy Butler. They lack shooting, so much so that Sixers head coach Brett Brown used Furkan Korkmaz -- who played 36 total minutes in the 2019 playoffs and has shot 32 percent from three-point range over two seasons in the league -- as his ninth man, in the hope that the 6-foot-7 wing can turn into a facsimile of Redick. "I need to grow a bomber," Brown said. "Somebody's got to emerge where they're lightning in a bottle, they can come in and go bam, bam, bam, and make a three. Why not Furk? So we'll look at it." The Sixers tried spacing Ben Simmons beyond the three-point line when his teammates (mostly Josh Richardson and Tobias Harris) ran pick-and-roll with Joel Embiid. Simmons didn't take a shot from outside the paint on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), but size helps on offense too, and the 6-foot-10 point guard got downhill enough (once while spaced on a pick-and-roll) to lead the Sixers with 24 points on 11-for-16 shooting. With Embiid being double-teamed whenever he tried to post up, nine of his 14 shots came from outside the paint. That's not a good number, and Embiid wasn't the only Sixer to struggle from the outside. The defense was plenty enough, though. And it was long and active inside (Boston shot just 19-for-45 in the paint), outside (keeping the Celtics from getting into their sets comfortably) and even in the backcourt, where Richardson and James Ennis forced the Celtics into an eight-second violation early in the third quarter. The defense is there and should continue to be there. Now that every player's heights have been adjusted in the official ledger, the Sixers aren't getting any smaller. But to get to where they want to go, there will eventually need to be offensive improvement. And really, an ugly first game shouldn't be all that discouraging. "You see it every one of my many years in the league," Brown said, "offense needs to keep up to the defense, because if you play hard and you stick to the simple rules and there's a high level of accountability early, and you have a team like I have with the length that they possess, then I would expect our defense to be quite good and our offense maybe not so." This certainly looks like a top-five defensive team, maybe the best defense in the league if Embiid plays enough games. And league-wide, offense typically gets more efficient as the season goes on. The question for the Sixers in regard to their ability to compete for a championship is just how high the ceiling is on that end of the floor. John Schuhmann is a senior stats analyst for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 24th, 2019

Dehesa the hero as Balanga claims third leg of Chooks 3x3 Magiting Cup

Karl Dehesa capped the most dominant outing of Wilkins Balanga Pure in this season, knocking down the game-winner to sink archrival Equalivet-Pasig Kings, 21-20 (8:02), Tuesday at SM BF Paranaque Events Center. "It was an experimental phase for us in the first leg but we've been for a long time now. We've been developing chemistry," said Dehesa. "But this is just the beginning. We can't be complacent and settle as the Chooks league champions. It's a great honor, but we want to win international competitions." Seeing their once five-point lead turn into a 20-19 advantage for Pasig with 2:07 left, Dehesa took matters into his own hands, knocking down a clutch deuce nine seconds later to seal Balanga's second winning leg in the 2019 Chooks-to-Go Pilipinas 3x3 Magiting Cup, presented by Coca-Cola. "The shot was really set up for Chris. We wanted to get a two...Chris ended up passing it to me instead of Alvin, and I was like f--k it, I'm going to shoot it!" recalled Dehesa who had five points in the contest. Balanga saw contributions from all four of its players as Alvin Pasaol had seven points, Santi Santillan added five markers, and Chris De Chavez finished with four of his own. Balanga, who missed the second leg of the level-seven FIBA-endorsed tournament due to them preparing for the Manila Challenger, remained on top of the table with 260 points. Pasig, who also missed the third leg, was led by Joshua Munzon's 10 points. Dylan Ababou added eight markers in the finale. The Kings rose to second place with 220 points. The Pure dominated the leg, winning by an average margin of 7.8 points in five games. This included a 22-15 win over Uling Roasters-Gulf Bulacan in the quarters and a 21-14 triumph over second leg champions Fyr Fyter Bacolod in the semis. Completing the top four after three legs are Phenom-Basilan Steel and Bacolod, who both have identical 210 points. In the Chooks-to-Go Harissa Roast side-events, Basilan's Franky Johnson took down the two-point shootout while David Carlos scored a hattrick in the slam dunk competition. The penultimate leg of the Magiting Cup takes place on Sunday still at the SM BF Paranaque Events Center......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 10th, 2019

USA opens basketball World Cup quest, undaunted by doubters

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press SHANGHAI (AP) — Kemba Walker sees an irony in the notion that USA Basketball is vulnerable going into the World Cup. It might be new for the U.S. program. It isn’t that new for these U.S. players. The 12-man squad that makes its World Cup debut Sunday isn’t overpowering on paper. There’s a couple second-round picks in Joe Harris and Khris Middleton, a guard in Derrick White who had zero scholarship offers out of high school, and many who made the team weren’t prominent — or in many cases, even included — on USA Basketball’s wish list of players when the roster-building process started last year. Walker tried to say none of that matters. And then he explained why it probably should matter. “I think a lot of us have grown up with doubt coming into our careers,” Walker said. “It’s nothing new to us. That’s unnecessary at this point. Nobody really cares what people think. At the end of the day, we want to win. We have one goal: We want to win the gold medal. And we want to be here.” The quest begins for the U.S. with its group-play opener against the Czech Republic. If they make the medal round the Americans — looking for an unprecedented third consecutive men’s World Cup title — will play eight games in four cities over the next 15 days. The U.S. went 3-1 in its warmups for the World Cup, beating Spain by nine, Australia by 16 and Canada by 16. The Americans also lost to the Australians by four in Melbourne, the outcome in that stretch that obviously got the most attention and the first loss for a U.S. roster stocked with NBA players since Sept. 1, 2006. The loss doesn’t mean anything in terms of World Cup standings. But it was a very big wake-up call. “This is do-or-die now,” Harris said. “There is no more exhibitions, no more mulligans at it. We’ve talked about how important every single possession is in the FIBA game. You have 40 minutes of can’t turn the ball over, can’t make mental mistakes. Now it is 40 minutes of being locked in ... and we have enough depth on this team, on the roster, to play maximum effort whenever you’re on the court.” The FIBA world rankings still list the Americans as the No. 1 team in the world, by a fairly significant margin. But FIBA has also published an unofficial World Cup “power ranking” in recent weeks, one that has Serbia — which has made little secret of its belief that it can win the tourney — listed ahead of the U.S. going into the tournament. It apparently hasn’t been bulletin-board material for the Americans. “I don’t think about things like that,” U.S. coach Gregg Popovich said. “I didn’t know that, but it doesn’t really mean much.” For the record, the Serbians still want the U.S. considered the favorite. “I’m not thinking about the USA team,” Serbia coach Sasha Djordjevic said. “I do respect them. I do think they’re the biggest favorite. Nevertheless, they don’t have some of their players but they still have a great, great team with great players and a great coach.” The last World Cup was in 2014, when the Americans outscored opponents by 116 points in four warm-up games — as opposed to the 37-point margin in this year’s four friendlies. The closest game the U.S. played in that World Cup was 21 points, and the Americans beat Serbia by 37 in the gold medal game. There was no doubt from the outside five years ago. “The outside might have not given that to us in ’14, but I think as a competitor you always have a realistic respect for your opponent and you know that in a one-and-done tournament anything can happen,” said Mason Plumlee, the only returnee from that 2014 World Cup-winning squad. “So I felt that in ’14, I feel that now and that’s just what competition is.” The 2016 Olympics was the last competition for the national team, though there was some doubt at times in that run to gold in Rio de Janeiro. Half of the eight U.S. games in the Olympics were decided by 10 points or less. The U.S. won them all, including a pair of three-point decisions — one of them against Serbia. The Americans saw Serbia again in the gold-medal game and it was a rout, the U.S. winning by 30. “We obviously hear the noise,” said Harrison Barnes, the only member of that Olympic team who is on this World Cup roster. “But at the end of the day, we’re the ones that’s putting in the time, we’re the ones that have to live with the results and we’re the ones who have to come together as a team. I think that’s what’s most important.” Walker said the easiest way to silence doubters is simple — to win. “We’re the ones who took on this opportunity to play for our country and represent our country,” Walker said. “So who cares about the outside noise at this point?”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 1st, 2019

NCAA: Red Cubs remain unbeaten, take win no. 4

Rhayann Amsali filled the stats sheet as he powered San Beda University to its fourth straight win in a row after drubbing San Sebastian College, 89-73, on Friday in the NCAA Season 95 juniors basketball competitions at FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Amsali tallied 21 points, eight rebounds, three assists, and two steals as the Red Cubs kept its unblemished record intact. San Beda blasted 29 points in the final frame to turn a tight 60-56 lead to a 16-point blowout. Yukien Andrada collected 14 points, seven rebounds, three blocks, and two assists while Charles Delfino got the job done on the point with 11 points, nine assists, and four boards. The Golden Staglets fell to 2-2. Milo Janao scored 21 points on a four triples, on top of six rebounds and two assists for SSC-R. Nikko Aguilar added 13 points, two rebounds, and two assists, as Kim Bulasa and Dylan Darbin had 12 and 10, respectively. In the other match, Jose Rizal University squeaked past Lyceum of the Philippines University, 77-74, for a 4-2 card. Condrad Famaranco topscored for the Light Bombers with 15 points, five rebounds, and two assists while Gholam Garcia, Arlen Lenon and Raul Gentalan tallied 13 points each. The Junior Pirates, which fell to 3-2, had a chance to force overtime, but Mac Guadana's trey in the endgame clanked off the rim. Guadana had 18 points, 10 rebounds, three steals, and two assists in a lost cause. Gyle Montano finished with 21 points, seven rebounds, and three assists, while John Barba chipped in a double-double with 14 points, 13 boards, three dishes for LPU.   The Scores: First Game: SAN BEDA (89) -- Amsali 21, Andrada 14, Delfino 11, Nicdao 8, Valencia 8, Pelipel 8, Llarena 6, Oftana 6, Pascual 3, Alao 2, Sanchez 2, Peregrina 0. SAN SEBASTIAN (73) -- Janao 23, Aguilar 13, Bulasa 12, Darbin 10, Balo 6, Perez 4, Concha 2, Are 2, Una 1, Dalio 0, Gomez 0, Lustina 0, Besa 0, Brizo 0. Quarters: 13-23, 38-33, 60-56, 89-73.   Second Game: JRU (77) -- Famaranco 15, Lenon 13, Garcia 13, Gentalan 13, Fortuna 11, Joson 5, Icban 5, Medina 2, Ramirez 0, J. Sy 0, W. Sy 0, Pallares 0, Ganut 0. LYCEUM (74) -- Montano 21, Guadana 18, Barba 14, Omandac 7, Garro 7, Garing 7, Ragasa 3, Caduyac 3, Dejelo 0, Santos 0, Gudmalin 0, Caringal 0. Quarters: 17-25, 44-41, 60-54, 77-74......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 26th, 2019

Tanzania in danger following Ebola cases in neighbor Uganda – minister

NAIROBI, Kenya – Tanzania's health minister issued an Ebola 'alert' Sunday, June 16 after the disease, which has killed over 1,400 people in the Democratic Republic of Congo, appeared in their shared neighbor, Uganda . "I want to alert the public that there is the threat of an Ebola epidemic in ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 16th, 2019

Warriors injuries create opening with Finals in balance

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. — From now until further notice, each game of the 2019 NBA Finals will be largely influenced not by a go-ahead basket or a big stop or a rally-induced comeback, but a hot-off-the-press medical update prior to tipoff. Is Klay Thompson's tweaky hamstring a go? Will this be the day Kevin Durant finally shakes that lingering calf strain and suits up? The hints and subtle signs seem to point toward the positive for Golden State. Thompson was a late scratch Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) because the Warriors -- with a mixture of confidence and arrogance and concern -- felt the guard missing Game 3 was perhaps best for his recovery without proving deadly in the long run. And as for Durant, he’s still “ramping up” his workouts, in the description of coach Steve Kerr, and so his status has been upgraded to "stay tuned." It has become must-watch after a 123-109 loss. Yet if the answer is negative to all of the above, the next entry on the medical report might be the grim health of the dynasty built by these two-time defending champions. Their still-under-construction monument now teeters, prone to a nudge from Toronto. The Warriors find themselves down 2-1 to the Raptors, lacking any guarantee they’ll see two of their three leading scorers back in the lineup Friday (Saturday, PHL time) for Game 4 ... or for however long this series lasts. Thompson joined Durant on the sideline, and the Raptors (as could be anticipated) pounced on the gift to seize control of the series. It was a game the Raptors had to win, and they did. The production came from multiple players, with Kyle Lowry finally making an imprint on this series and Danny Green rediscovering his long-lost three-point touch. Meanwhile, the Warriors consisted of Steph Curry and not much else. The two-time Kia MVP dazzled and fought through traps and triple-teams all night to drop a career-high 47 points, some of it on shot-making wizardry. But the short-handed Warriors were doomed when Draymond Green and DeMarcus Cousins in particular were underwhelming on a night they needed to be stellar for Golden State to have a chance. As a result, the atmosphere inside Oracle Arena was flatter than most of the shots taken by Curry's teammates, and this was partly due to the introduction of the starting lineups, when Thompson’s name wasn’t announced. The fans knew then, officially, that their eyes and the home team were in for a long night. While the Warriors fought, scrappy doesn’t win games at this point in the postseason, not when the other team is good and opportunistic. Playing in a hostile building for the first time in the Finals, the Raptors made a collective decision to greet fire with fire. Or, as they wrote on the blackboard inside the visitor’s locker room: Let It Rip. “I think we all kind of followed that advice,” said Danny Green. “We hadn’t really had a good team shooting night and I knew we were due.” For Toronto, it wasn’t just that they won, but that they did so with their most impressive outing in the series. And now, the question for the Raptors is this: Will their inconsistent players use this outing to turn the corner and push the Warriors, even if Thompson and/or Durant return? This is aimed, first and foremost, at Lowry. He took the “let it rip” plea personally. Entering this game, he had six baskets total in this series and at times suffered defensively. Challenged by a pregame talk from coach Nick Nurse, Lowry embraced his inner pit bull and was relentless all night. The All-Star point guard took 16 shots, making eight, for 23 points and nine assists while making his presence felt for the first time this Finals. “For me, it was just not being so passive and trying to get everyone else involved and get myself going and let everyone else feed off that,” Lowry said. He and Green re-introduced the three-pointer to the Raptors’ offense. The two shot 11-for-19 and repeatedly stole whatever momentum Golden State could generate by responding with long-distance daggers that forced fans to slump back into their seats. This from the same player who had five total three's in his previous five playoff games, ruining more than a handful of runs with momentum-deflating misses. There’s no other way to describe the last three weeks of Green’s postseason shooting but dreadful. He has only one job: Stand in the corner and shoot open 3s. He’s made a career of that. So what do the Raptors make of Green shooting 6-of-10 from deep Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)? In the short term, it helped win Game 3. In the big picture, will this confidence carry over from one night to another, or does it depend on whether Green hits his first few? Nurse said: “Danny’s buckets boosted our whole team’s confidence because we were used to relying on those most of the year.” With better production from players who had been mostly missing, the Raptors had the balance needed to deliver their highest-scoring and most efficient (52 percent shooting) contest of the series. Green and Lowry joined Kawhi Leonard (30 points) and Pascal Siakam (18) and Marc Gasol (17) to take turns pummeling the Warriors from all different directions and manners. One reason for this was Thompson’s absence. Not only is he a proven outside shooter, but his defense is top-notch as well. You could even argue that Thompson’s missing defense was just as costly as his jumper. Yet the 109 points Golden State did manage were mainly because of Curry providing nearly half the offense. Given the circumstances of being without Thompson and Durant, and the constant pressing by Toronto whenever he had the ball, this was Curry’s finest post-season effort. His shooting was superb all across the floor, making three's (six) and free throws (13-14) and in general (14-31). “It’s the Finals,” Curry said. “You give everything you’ve got, sacrifice your body when you have the opportunity. Just competitiveness and trying to play until the buzzer.” “He does things that honestly I don’t think anyone has done before," Kerr added. "The way he plays the game, the way he shoots and the combination of his ball-handling, it’s incredible to watch.” If only he had someone riding shotgun. Cousins was sloppy on both ends, with three turnovers and one basket, and a step slow on defense against Gasol. This came one game after he seemingly regained his legs and confidence to gave Golden State a much-needed lift. Green’s continued recklessness was mystifying; he often made questionable decisions as a playmaker, suffered four turnovers and once again struggled to contain Siakam. The Warriors needed Green’s best, given their missing parts, and received something less. “We’ve got to be more solid with the ball and it starts with me,” he said. “I’ve had a bunch of turnovers in every game of this series. I think if I played better with the night (Curry) had, we would have won.” And so the Warriors, while talking bravely about their next-man-up mentality and embracing their “Strength in Numbers” slogan, must realize, deep down, that preventing the Raptors from winning two more games with a handicapped team might be difficult, if not impossible. Keep in mind that Golden State hasn’t sparkled for four quarters since the first game of the Western Conference finals. The last three games of that series, and the first three of the NBA Finals, the Warriors trailed by double digits. Thompson has an off day and Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) pregame period for therapy on his hamstring, although such strains are unpredictable and tricky. Will he be able to cut and fight through screens and be bouncy for 35-plus minutes through the intensity of an NBA Finals game, or will the injury restrict him and cause Kerr to seek a healthier, yet less productive replacement? “The whole point was to not risk a bigger injury that would keep him out the rest of the series,” said Kerr, explaining a decision made in consultation with the team doctors. “I feel very comfortable with it. I never would have forgiven myself if I played him and he had gotten hurt. So you live with the decision you made. The good thing is Klay has done well the last two days; hopefully he’ll be out there Friday.” Then there’s Durant, who last played May 8 (May 9, PHL time). After doing nothing but individual drills the last few days, he’ll go through a more normal practice session that will be simulated with the help of some assistant coaches and bench players. They'll see how Durant holds up. But that won’t match the stress level of a real game. And even if Durant gets clearance for Game 4, he hasn’t played in roughly a month. What about his timing? His wind? His touch? His ability to bring the same energy on defense? All legit questions and concerns for the Warriors -- until they’re not, whenever that is. “No one cares if guys are hurt,” Green said. “Everyone wants to see us lose anyway. So I’m sure people are happy they’re hurt.” Chances are that basketball fans, even if they’re against the Warriors, want to see stars on the floor this time of year. That’s what the NBA Finals is always about: Premium players doing premium things, or failing to do so, and letting the championship odds rise or fall on their performances. This year’s Finals have been denied one star for every game, and an additional star for one game. The battle with star attrition finally cost the Warriors a postseason loss, and at the worst possible time. The flow of the remainder of the NBA Finals, then, could rest with aching tendons and muscles and the recovery powers of those who own them. “We’re missing 50 points with KD and Klay, but we’ll adjust,” said a confident Curry. “It’s a long series, you know. It’s going to be fun for us.” The next Warriors medical update will arrive Thursday afternoon (Friday, PHL time). And another one Friday (Saturday, PHL time) just prior to tipoff. All along, the Warriors have led everyone to believe that it’s only a matter of time before they’re fully healthy. But will it be in time? And even then, will it be enough against a Toronto team suddenly thinking big? Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 6th, 2019

Super old Federer to face ex-contemporary s son at French

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — Roger Federer, 37, joked to a stadium filled with screaming kids that he's "so super old." Stan Wawrinka, 34, pulled a crying boy out of a crush of autograph-seekers in the stands. Rafael Nadal, about to turn 33, offered this advice to youngsters at his match who might be pondering a tennis career: "The main thing is, don't think about winning Roland Garros." Schools in France are closed on Wednesdays, bringing out a, um, louder brand of fan to the French Open, and that trio of past champions of the clay-court major seemed to appreciate the adulation from the little ones who attended their straight-set victories. Fitting, too, perhaps, that Federer advanced to a third-round meeting against 20-year-old Casper Ruud, someone so much his junior that the guy's father was in the field when Federer made his debut in Paris in 1999. "I know probably more about his dad," Federer said, "than about him." Federer, the tournament's 2009 champion who hadn't been in the field in four years, will be playing his third opponent in a row who is 25 or younger, after beating 144th-ranked Oscar Otte 6-4, 6-3, 6-4 in the second round. Now the 20-time major champion takes on Ruud, a Norwegian ranked 63rd. He is coached by his father, Christian, who told Casper he once practiced with Federer, although they never played. "Ever since I can remember, I've been watching Roger on TV," said Ruud, who knocked off 29th-seeded Matteo Berrettini 6-4, 7-5, 6-3. Then came this admission from Ruud: "To be honest, I've been a little bit more of a Rafa fan and Rafa guy." Better hope no one tells Roger. Still, even if he always has preferred Nadal, Ruud described what comes next this way: "I'm playing one of the greatest champions ever of this sport on Friday, so I'm just super excited for it. I can play loose and free." Wawrinka, the winner in 2015 and the runner-up two years later, also had no trouble against a much younger foe Wednesday, eliminating 22-year-old Cristian Garin 6-1, 6-4, 6-0. Afterward, Wawrinka came to the rescue of one of his tiniest fans, lifting him away from danger and offering a towel as a keepsake. "I took him out of that mess a little bit," Wawrinka said. "He was in pain and sad." Owner of three Grand Slam titles in all, Wawrinka will bring his signature backhand into what shapes up as a more competitive matchup against two-time major semifinalist Grigor Dimitrov, who eliminated 2014 U.S. Open champion Marin Cilic 6-7 (3), 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-3 over nearly 4½ hours. Nadal's form hadn't been up to his usual standards during much of the clay season: This was the first time since 2004 that he entered May without a title for the year. But he looked good while taking the title at the Italian Open this month, including a victory over Novak Djokovic in the final, and he's been close to untouchable so far as he seeks a record-extending 12th trophy in Paris. His latest tour de force was a 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 win over 114th-ranked Yannick Maden, a qualifier from Germany. OK, so Nadal hasn't really faced much of a test yet. Still, he is displaying the court-covering, ball-walloping style he has perfected, which could come in handy when he plays 2016 French Open quarterfinalist David Goffin in the third round. "I don't like the word 'easy,' because when you win, it always looks easier," Nadal said. "I can say (I had) a comfortable victory. I have been in control most all the time. And that's the only thing that really matters." While plenty of the sport's big names still dot the men's bracket, the women's field keeps seeing top players depart. On Wednesday, No. 4 seed Kiki Bertens, a 2016 semifinalist and considered a contender for her first major title, quit during the first set of her match against Viktoria Kuzmova because she was sick. Tears filled Bertens' eyes as she described waking up at 3 a.m., feeling ill. "Vomiting. Diarrhea. All night long, all day long. I felt a little bit better before the match. I had some sleep, and I just wanted to give it a try," she said. "But then as soon as I start warming up right before the match, it started again. There was not any energy left." Bianca Andreescu, an 18-year-old Canadian who was seeded 22nd, pulled out before her match against 20-year-old American Sonia Kenin, citing an injured right shoulder that sidelined her from March until this week. Kenin will face the winner of Thursday's match between Serena Williams and Japanese qualifier Kurumi Nara. Bertens and Andreescu join two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova, who withdrew before her first match because of an arm injury, and former No. 1s Angelique Kerber and Caroline Wozniacki, who both lost in the first round......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 30th, 2019

PBA: Alaska overpowers Columbian to start Comm’s Cup

All Alaska needed was one strong quarter. The Aces started off the 2019 PBA Commissioner’s Cup on a high note, overpowering Columbian Sunday at the MOA Arena, 111-98. Alaska dominated the third, outscoring the Dyip, 34-13, to completely turn the game around in their favor. With import Chris Daniels at the lead, the Aces join Blackwater as early winners of the mid-season joust with identical 1-0 records. “Always good to start off with a win,” said head coach Alex Compton. “This game was really important for us. We have a nice run of 4 games ?in 10 days?, to get one is good,” he added. After giving up 54 points in the first half, including 31 in teh second quarter, the Aces tightened things up in the third, limiting the Dyip to only 13 markers. Alaska controlled the game from then on, taking its largest lead of the night at 20 points, 89-69, before cruising for the win. Import Chris Daniels was the high man for the Aces, shooting 68 percent from the field for 25 points on top of 16 rebounds. Chris Banchero added 20 points off the bench and Simon Enciso was good for another 19 in a starting role. For the Dyip, it was Kyle Barone that led the way with 30 points and 22 rebounds. Top pick CJ Perez contributed 19 points in a losing effort. The Scores: ALASKA 111 -- Daniels 25, Banchero 20, Enciso 19, Cruz 14, Teng 8, Racal 7, Ayaay 7, Thoss 5, Casio 4, Baclao 2, Pascual 0, Galliguez 0. COLUMBIAN 98 -- Barone 30, Perez 19, McCarthy 13, Calvo 10, Escoto 9, Corpuz 8, Camson 3, Celda 2, Tabi 2, Khobuntin 1, Cahilig 1, Faundo 0, Reyes 0, Agovida 0. Quarters: 25-23, 48-54, 82-67, 111-98 — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 19th, 2019

Curry, Lillard battle for NBA supremacy, Oakland s affection

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com OAKLAND — He arrived at the Western Conference finals wearing the jersey of the Oakland A’s, who play right next door at the Coliseum, just a five-minute drive from where he was born. Damian Lillard paused and signed a few autographs before entering Oracle Arena, because he is a man of the people, and these are his people. None of them mention that, in their hearts, they’re rooting for him to lose this playoff series, and so it goes unspoken, a truce in a sense. For this fleeting moment, they’re Lillard fans, until the ball goes up. And then it’s all for Steph Curry, all night long. There is a competition within the competition between the Warriors and Blazers, and it is the battle for the affection of Oakland. There is Lillard, the pride of the Brookfield Village neighborhood, who has blossomed into a bonafide star with the Blazers. And then there’s Curry, the symbol of a basketball renaissance here, who has raised the profile of Oakland the last several years. Now you see why The Town is a bit conflicted. A bit. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] The conference championship may well hinge on the performance of these All-NBA guards. Game 1 was fairly lopsided, both in terms of the teams — Warriors 116, Blazers 94 — and the two principles. Lillard struggled Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) and appeared whipped, physically if not mentally, no doubt from a grueling seven-game second round that just wrapped up 48 hours earlier. He missed 8-of-12 shots, had seven turnovers and, in a rarity for him, he was a non-factor for Portland. He’s a combined 7-for-29 in his last two games. Meanwhile, Curry rolled, dropping 36 points and the Blazers along with them. And so, this is the verdict: Portland cannot hope to stretch this series beyond four games, five tops, without the max from Lillard. He obviously means that much. And Curry, now working without the comforts of his injured co-star Kevin Durant for the second straight game, and maybe without Durant for another two games, needs to keep his skills elevated to prevent suspense from encroaching on the series. The Warriors are well aware of what Lillard has done to them in the past; he has averaged more points against the hometown team (27.0) than any in his career likely because of provincial pride. Yet Golden State is also aware that he has yet to beat them in any game or series of significance. “He’s one of the best guards in this league and carries a chip on his shoulder and it has (worked) well for him in his career,” said Draymond Green. “A special talent. I know he’s excited to be back home playing in the last year at Oracle. So it’s special for him but it don’t mean nothing to us. We’ve got to come out here and try to stop him. A tall task.” While the East Bay has given birth to its share of NBA stars, with Bill Russell, Jason Kidd and Gary Payton among them, Lillard is still freshly active and refreshingly loyal. The connection between him and Oakland remains unwavering despite fame and distance and the fact it’s his job and desire to shock the world in the next few weeks. He played at St. Joseph Notre Dame in Alameda and then finished at Oakland High, and a thick section of fans at Oracle Wednesday were wrapped in Blazers gear and made their preference clear. Most were either from the old neighborhood or family members. His high school coach, Damon Jones, is a Warriors season ticket holder, and Jones said: “Nobody bought me a drink tonight.” The coach added, playfully: “They gave me a hard time. When the Warriors scored, they wanted to turn around and slap five but then caught themselves at the last minute.” Jones remembers Lillard as being a promising and quick guard who picked up the nuances of the game rapidly. “He was very personable for someone his age, a solid teammate,” Jones said. “He still keeps in touch with all of his former teammates. It’s a brotherhood and he’s the leader. He’s always trying to be a positive influence on everyone around here.” Lillard returns every summer to give away backpacks with school supplies and funded the renovation of the Oakland High gym. He’s a familiar sight around town in the offseason and always approachable, and that loyalty and devotion doesn’t go unnoticed. “People here respect him,” said Raymond Young, Lillard’s AAU coach. “When he comes here to play, people here say they’re going to clap for Damian but cheer for the Warriors. Only he can get that kind of reaction. His loyalty comes from his family. His mother and father were no-problem parents. They let us coach him. He was a joy to be around. Still is.” Lillard is even more endearing because he comes from humble beginnings and is self-made. Both of his youth coaches are admittedly shocked by his impact in the NBA. He wound up at Weber State. He wasn’t highly recruited by the big schools. Even nearby Cal-Berkeley came late. “But if he goes there,” said Young, “does all this happen?” Lillard is revered in another place as well. Portland is also smitten by his loyalty; in an age of transient stars, Lillard has never wanted to play anywhere else. Perhaps this has cost him some visibility, with a majority of his games tipping off at 10:30 ET. It’s a price he’s more than willing to pay. Lillard has never taken a team this deep into the playoffs, where legends and reputations are made, and so being in the conference finals represents some new and deserved shine for him. A layer of that invisibility was peeled off in these playoffs where Lillard has come up massive. His shot from nearly 40 feet that eliminated Oklahoma City in the first round, and the bye-bye wave reaction, became iconic. Then he followed up with a strong second round as well against the Nuggets, although as that series crept to the conclusion, Lillard shot just 3-for-17 in that Game 7, then followed up with a 4-for-12 Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), proof that he might be gassed — and also that the Warriors cooked up a defensive game plan specifically for him. “Obviously it’s a little bit difficult physically and emotionally just because you’re excited about being in the Western Conference finals,” said Lillard. “You come straight here form Denver and get ready for the best team in the league. But once we lace our shoes and put our uniforms on, it’s fair and square. You got to go out there and handle your business. "They did a good job defensively and even when I was trying to find (teammates), they were getting deflections. They were making me play in a crowd. I thought they were successful at that … in this first game.” But his toughest task of all might be upstaging Curry, particularly here in Oakland. While Lillard has flourished through much of the postseason, Curry by comparison has been mild, especially by his standards. The missed layups, a famously flubbed dunk attempt and sporadic three-point shooting was unsightly. And then, after Durant limped off the floor, Curry felt a sense of urgency and a flush of greatness. He buried the Rockets with a pair of epic fourth quarters, then kept the faucet running Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). The Blazers couldn’t limit or at least slow him anywhere on the floor, especially from the three-point line, where Curry was a sizzling 9-for-15. And no missed layups. In his last six quarters of basketball, Curry has scored 69 points with 13-for-24 shooting on 3s. “I know what I’m capable of doing on the floor," Curry said, "and the situation calls for me to be more aggressive and hopefully that will continue. It’s nice to see the ball go in. I want to maintain that. I didn’t shoot well for 4.5 games the last series. Every game is different. You have to reestablish yourself and that’s my perspective no matter how I play.” Curry didn’t arrive wearing the baseball jersey of the home team, and if anything has been spotted at San Franciso Giants games across the Bay, where the Warriors will call home starting next season. But don’t get anything twisted. Curry’s bond with Oakland, developed over time, is genuine and real for someone born and bred a country away in Charlotte, and the feeling is mutual. The tug of war for the heartstrings of Oakland is subtle between the pair of franchise players on the floor in this playoff series. Call it a draw from the standpoint of whom the fans here respect and appreciate. There’s enough love to be shared by both. Yet in the basketball sense, this series is on the verge of being owned by the one wearing the jersey that reps Oakland. Curry has more momentum and better teammates, and Durant is on deck. Oakland, therefore, will indeed cheer for one of its own, for Damian Lillard. But the way this series and these playoffs are going, The Town is anxious to pop bottles with Steph Curry once again, at the usual place and time, for one last time. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 15th, 2019

Bucks learn playoff lesson in closing out late Celtics charge

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com BOSTON — In snatching a 2-1 lead in their Eastern Conference semifinals series, the Milwaukee Bucks demonstrated so much of what’s gone right about their season. They also sputtered through a stretch late in the game during which things most definitely went wrong. The list of happy things stretched long: Giannis Antetokounmpo was the best player on the floor and in Kia NBA MVP contention mode as he scored 32 points with 13 rebounds, eight assists and three blocks in Milwaukee’s 123-116 victory over the Boston Celtics Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) at TD Garden. Fans and viewers got a glimpse of the Bucks’ scoring potency when, coming out of halftime, they posted the first 40-point quarter of this series. The defense that coach Mike Budenholzer demands was especially evident in limiting Boston to 14-of-36 shooting in the second half. Then there was Milwaukee’s deep rotation and trust in reserves – guards George Hill (21 points) and Pat Connaughton (14) led their bench’s 42-16 scoring advantage. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] The down side came near the end, when Milwaukee’s late-game execution was so poor Budenholzer didn’t even want to talk about it in front of the cameras and microphones afterward. He preferred to wait until Saturday (Sunday, PHL time), when he could directly address his players while they review video of Game 3. “I’ll save it for film tomorrow,” Budenholzer said. “It’s not very smart. It’s not very good. That’s the great thing for coaches … we’ll find more things where we can get better. We just touched on one of them for sure.” What happened was, the Bucks opened a fat lead – 17 points in the fourth quarter – and squandered much of it. They did it in the most damaging way possible, too, by sending a parade of Celtics to the foul line to score with the game clock stopped. With 4:51 left Milwaukee was up 114-97, more than doubling the eight-point edge they held when the final period began. With 1:20 left, that lead was down to 118-111, whittled down by Jaylen Brown’s fast-break layup and the Celtics’ perfect 12-for-12 from the line in that stretch. Many of the fans at TD Garden were heading to the exits, even as the Bucks appeared to be heading for trouble. You wondered if some might wind up knocking to get back in, à la the Miami fans who bailed on the Heat before Ray Allen’s famous three-pointer saved Game 6 of the 2013 Finals. Those late minutes of the fourth quarter seemed to last an eternity, and that was just for spectators and viewers. It felt twice that to the Bucks’ players and coaches. “It was [long],” said Pau Gasol, the veteran All-Star watching these days as an inactive player on Milwaukee’s roster. “But I think it’s part of the growth of this team, learning how to deal with those type of scenarios and situations.” It wasn’t just that the Bucks were burning through their lead. It’s that Boston was energized watching their late scramble pay off. Al Horford sank six free throws in the run; Jayson Tatum, four; and Gordon Hayward, two. “On the road, that gets a little dicey,” Connaughton said. “Whenever a team gets a little life at the end of a game, especially when they cut a [17-point lead to seven], that’s never a fun thing. But I think the way we were able to withstand it and make a bucket here or there to nullify what they were doing at the free throw line was good.” Said Gasol: “The Celtics are trying to rush possessions, trying to rush you into bad decisions. So you have to be patient, hold the ball, understand the possessions and get a good shot. Don’t turn it over. We didn’t do a very good job of that at the end.” Step by step, point by point, the Celtics were gaining hope. So … much … time … left. Gasol’s analysis from the side? “We were very aggressive tonight defensively. And at the end, we weren’t able to turn it down and play smarter. We kept that pressure on, and that led us to commit silly fouls or unnecessary fouls, and put them at the line when we didn’t want them there. The experience in your brain has to tell you to be smarter.” Milwaukee did manage a few high notes during the low period: Hill pounced on an offensive rebound to steal a basket. At 118-105, Antetokounmpo blocked Kyrie Irving’s fast-break layup to save two points and stifle a sure crowd explosion. “I don’t think we were really concerned,” said center Brook Lopez. “We just tried to keep our foot on the gas. Keep that intensity. They drew some fouls and made some free throws. And then they had the little funky 1-3-1 defense, whatever that was. They were trying to trap a little. We’ll look at that [on film].” This is not about nitpicking. This is about focusing on the growth still available to a Milwaukee team with lofty ambitions. Antetokounmpo was special. The Bucks were stingy enough on defense. But when they talked about playing their game for 48 minutes, they should have ‘fessed up on the three-and-a-half of those that nearly bit them. The Celtics ran out of time – only 10.6 seconds remained when they got within five, 121-116. And Antetokounmpo, who missed six of his first 20 free throws, didn’t miss his final pair. The Bucks, in essence, earned the ability to swoon by padding their lead early. But their close out was less than optimal, which is probably not how Budenholzer will put it in closed quarters. “We know they’re not going to quit,” Lopez said. “So we’ve just got to stick with it the entirety of the game. I know it’s a boring answer, but Game 4, we’ve got to do the same thing.” Maybe not exactly the same. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 4th, 2019

Beermen clinch no. 1 behind Arwind's MVP outing

Looks like Arwind Santos is truly serious about challenging teammate June Mar Fajardo for this season's PBA Most Valuable Player award. The 2013 PBA MVP came away with his biggest performance of the 2017 Philippine Cup so far and led two-time defending champion San Miguel Beer past Globalport, 106-100, Saturday at the Hoops Dome in Lapu-Lapu City, Cebu. Santos finished with a season-high 31 points on an efficient 58 percent shooting from the field. The Spider-Man also added 10 rebounds and two dimes as the Beermen won an eight straight game to officially clinch no. 1 with a near-perfect 9-1 record. With the Batang Pier keeping things close, Arwind scored seven points in the last three minutes that helped turn a 95-93 San Miguel lead into a 105-100 advantage with eight seconds left. Aside from Santos, Marcio Lassiter came through for the champs, finishing with 22 points, while Fajardo dropped a 19-point, 15-rebound double-double in front of his hometown crowd. Stanley Pringle led Globalport with 21 points but running mate Terrence Romeo, who came into the game averaging a league-best 27.6 points per game, struggled for only 16 on 4-of-14 shooting. The loss also put a damper in the Batang Pier's quest for a top-2 spot as they are now stuck in a five-way tie behind the Beermen with a 5-4 mark.   br /> The scores: SAN MIGUEL 106 - Santos 31, Lassiter 22, Fajardo 19, Heruela 10, Garcia 8, Tubid 8, Espinas 5, Ross 2, De Ocampo 1, McCarthy 0. GLOBALPORT 100 - Pringle 21, Romeo 16, Canaleta 14, Cortez 11, Aban 10, Quinahan 9, Pessumal 8, Mamaril 6, Urbiztondo 3, Andrada 2, Maierhofer 0. Quarters: 22-21, 51-50, 81-81, 106-100   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8 .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 21st, 2017

Bullpups shut down Jr. Archers anew for share of first

strong>TEAM STANDINGS /strong> br /> Adamson 8-1 br /> NU 8-1 br /> FEU-Diliman 7-2 br /> Ateneo 5-4 br /> UPIS 3-6 br /> DLSZ 2-7 br /> UST 2-7 br /> UE 1-8 For the second time in a row in the UAAP 79 Juniors Basketball Tournament, John Lloyd Clemente and Rhayyan Amsali were missing their shooting stroke. Also for the second time in a row, however, the Nazareth School of National University’s other guys showed the way to victory. This time around, it was Winderlich Coyoca and Karl Penano who did the heavy lifting as the Bullpups re-asserted their mastery over De La Salle Zobel, 63-52, at the San Juan Arena, Tuesday. With Clemente only making good on one out of his dozen attempts and Amsali falling short in making his presence felt, the defending champions found themselves in a close contest with their runners-up from a year ago. The Junior Archers were only behind by three after three quarters only to see NU tighten the noose on defense and only allow nine points in the final frame. At the other end, Coyoca and Penano scored six points apiece to outscore their opponents by themselves, 12-9. Coyoca, a revelation at the offensive end this season, wound up with 12 points and eight rebounds while Penano added 12 markers of his own off the bench. This more than made up for the continued struggles of Clemente and Amsali who only combined for 14 points and 14 rebounds. Even with their top guns misfiring, the Bullpups had more than enough to register their eighth win in nine games – tying season-long league-leaders Adamson High School atop the leaderboard. On the other hand, DLSZ dropped to 2-7 and finds itself in graver danger of missing the playoffs a year after its runner-up finish. Meanwhile, Far Eastern University-Diliman remained entrenched at third after making quick work of University of the East, 94-51. Seldom-used Karl Baclay topped the scoring column with 15 points as the Baby Tamaraws improved to 7-2. The loss sent the Junior Warriors to 1-8. BOX SCORES THIRD GAME FEU-DILIMAN 94 – Baclay 15, Torres 12, Gonzales 12, Bieren 9, Roman 8, Celzo 8, Gabane 6, Alforque Roy 5, Gloria 4, Sapinit 4, Alforque Ram 3, Boc 2, Sevilla 2, Abarrientos 2, Mariano 2, Jabel 0 UE 51 – Vinte 13, Dulalia 10, Manaug 8, Cruz 7, Acuesta 4, Balundo 4, Gonzales 3, Angeles 2, Ramos 0, Po 0, Domingo 0, Encelan 0, Canton 0 QUARTER SCORES: 18-10, 46-23, 77-38, 94-51 FOURTH GAME NU 63 – Coyoca 13, Penano 12, Clemente 7, Amsali 7, Malonzo 6, Fortea 5, Manalang 4, Sarip 4, Callejo 3, Atienza 2, Tolentino 0, Peralta 0, Dela Cruz 0, Pangilinan 0, Mosqueda 0 DLSZ 52 – Romero 8, Mariano 8, Sobrevega 7, Natividad 6, Vista 5, Chavez 5, Laurente 4, Cosejo 4, Cortez 3, Carlos 2, Diaz 0, Vesagas 0, Umali 0, Terrado 0, Damiles 0 QUARTER SCORES: 17-13, 30-24, 46-43, 63-52 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2017

Federer: Tennis taking proactive approach to address fixing

JUSTIN BERGMAN, Associated Press br /> MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — At last year's Australian Open, the players were caught by surprise when a report was published on the eve of the season-opening Grand Slam alleging widespread match-fixing in the sport. Every news conference felt like an ambush, a peppering of pointed questions about corruption. This year, Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and other stars of the game seem better prepared. They've got their talking points ready — and they can even have a sense of humor about the subject. 'I thought we were going to finish on a good one,' Federer quipped when a match-fixing question was asked at the very end of his pre-tournament news conference on Saturday. Then he smiled. It most likely won't be the last he'll ever be asked, either. Last season's tournament began beneath a cloud of suspicion after a report by BBC and BuzzFeed alleged that tennis authorities had overlooked suspected cases of match-fixing involving some top players, none of whom were named. Federer, in response, called the situation 'super serious' and argued that anyone who engages in match-fixing should be identified publicly. In the past year, this is what tennis authorities have tried to do. Nine players and officials were sanctioned by the Tennis Integrity Unit in 2016 — the most in a single year since the body was created in 2008. In the first two weeks of this year, six more were added to the list. All of them were lower-ranked players who played primarily on the lower-tier Challenger and Futures tours, considered the most at-risk for match-fixing because of the smaller purses and lack of scrutiny compared with larger ATP and WTA events. Federer said this is where tennis officials need to be focusing their efforts. 'Clearly we have no space for that kind of behavior in our sport,' he said, adding that efforts to combat corruption have had positive spinoffs. 'The good thing is that it's really only zero-point-something percent of players that actually have done something over the course of so many matches and so many players. I think we've done actually OK.' To be exact, the TIU said that only 292 matches generated suspicious betting alerts out of more than 114,000 played last year, or about 0.2 percent. Betting alerts, on their own, are also not conclusive proof that a match has been fixed. Federer also applauded the TIU's decision to name an independent review panel to examine its operations and recommend changes. The report is due later this year. 'That's going to change the sport for the better,' he said. Djokovic also said the problem seems to be confined to the lower-tier tours, taking a subtle shot at the media for making 'a great deal about it' when a case arises. But he, too, stressed that progress has been made and he believes the sport is cleaner than it was 12 months ago. 'Ideally, we don't want to see any kind of match-fixing occurrences,' he said. 'But, unfortunately, they do occur from time to time. 'We haven't experienced too many. Generally looking I think ATP and all the authorities are doing a good job in kind of tracking down those kind of potential match-fixing matches.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 14th, 2017

Match-fixing back in spotlight on eve of first Grand Slam

JUSTIN BERGMAN, Associated Press   For Rafael Nadal and the other stars of tennis, there's a familiar ring to the questions being raised as the first ball is about to be struck at the Australian Open. Recent match-fixing sanctions and a new case are bringing fresh scrutiny to the integrity of the sport a year after corruption allegations cast a pall over the first Grand Slam of the year. '(It's) obviously negative, always in the first month of the season starts to happen,' Nadal said at the season-opening Brisbane International. 'You get tired about this kind of stuff, but the most important thing is fight against these kinds of things.' The headlines started appearing early in the new year. On Jan. 5, police in Australia charged an 18-year-old player with a match-fixing offense at a lower-tier tournament last October in Traralgon, near Melbourne. Days later, another Australian player, Nick Lindahl, now retired but once ranked in the top 200, was handed a seven-year ban and $35,000 fine from the Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU) for offering to throw a match at a minor tournament in the city of Toowoomba in 2013. Lindahl had already been fined after a criminal trial. Two other Australian players received lesser punishments in connection with the incident. While Traralgon and Toowoomba are far removed from the glittering lights of Melbourne Park, the timing of the developments was troubling nonetheless. Last season began similarly beneath a cloud of suspicion after a report by BBC and Buzzfeed alleged that tennis authorities had suppressed evidence of match-fixing and failed to investigate possible cases of corruption. The reports went over old ground, but the timing and the headlines overshadowed the tournament. 'I haven't heard anything (about match-fixing) since last year's Australian Open,' German player Mischa Zverev told The Associated Press last week in Brisbane. 'I think it was funny timing. ... Like the day before the Oscars, they're going to bring something up to make somebody not win it, or win it.' Since then, tennis leaders have gone into overdrive to restore confidence in the sport. An independent panel was created to review the TIU, the internal body tasked with combating corruption, and authorities promised to implement all of its recommendations when it is completed this spring. The TIU also took separate steps to strengthen its monitoring and investigation efforts, develop new anti-corruption education programs for players, and improve the transparency of its operations. In an email statement to The AP, the agency said nine players and officials were sanctioned last year for match-fixing — the most for a single year since the unit was established in 2008. Several were banned for life, including a young South African player and four officials from Turkey and Uzbekistan. The unit also expanded its outreach efforts with betting operators and regulators, leading to increased reporting of suspicious wagers. In 2016, the TIU received 292 betting alerts — an 18 percent increase over the previous year. The vast majority of those came from the Challenger and Futures circuits on the men's tour, considered the most at-risk for match-fixing given the lower likelihood of detection and the smaller earnings of the players. However, the TIU said three alerts were generated at Grand Slam events, as well. The agency was quick to note, though, that an alert isn't necessarily proof of match-fixing. Of the more than 114,000 matches played last year on the professional tours, only 0.2 percent triggered a suspicious betting alert. 'Tennis was one of the first major sports to recognize the potential threat of betting-related corruption and do something about it,' the TIU said. 'It will be for the independent review panel to take a view on the conduct and effectiveness of the unit and to put forward recommendations to improve the current structure and approach.' Whatever the investigators recommend, the fact remains the TIU faces an uphill battle. Technology has shifted the gambling landscape in such a way, it's increasingly difficult for monitors to keep up. In tennis, wagers aren't just placed on who wins or loses; bets can be placed during matches in real time on everything from total points won in a game to whether a set goes to a tiebreak. 'We're talking individual player activities here,' said Hans Westerbeek, dean of the College of Sport and Exercise Science at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. 'It's much easier to get into a situation where you approach individual players to do things that can be, if done well, quite well hidden from it being suspicious.' He likens it to the ongoing battle against performance-enhancing drugs. 'You're always struggling to keep up with the innovations that a better-resourced front of gambling operators, legal or illegal, will have available to advance their technology.' Ryan Rodenberg, an associate professor of forensic sports law analytics at Florida State University, says this is one reason a more sophisticated approach is critically needed. He recommends an internal monitoring system that analyzes each match for suspicious activity in real time, rather than relying solely on betting alerts. 'A robust betting data-monitoring operation would have both in-house capabilities and a number of collaborative information sharing agreements with third parties such as sportsbooks, private monitoring firms or academics,' he said. 'Anything less is sub-optimal.' With a limited budget of just $3.23 million for 2017, however, there is only so much the TIU can do. As such, preventative measures such as education have become a priority. More than 25,000 players and officials have completed the TIU's online anti-corruption training program, and a new version will be launched that players will be required to complete every two years. 'Educating players who are up-and-coming and those who support those players is a very good, positive and necessary thing to do,' Westerbeek says. 'Because the root of the problem is ... people not really (understanding) they're engaging in criminal activity.' ___ AP Sports Writer John Pye contributed to this report. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 13th, 2017

Watson and Clemson dethrone top-ranked Tide, 35-31

div>RALPH D. RUSSO, AP College Football Writer /div> div>  /div> div>TAMPA, Florida (AP) — College football's first national championship rematch was even better than the original, with an incredible twist at the end. /div> div>  /div> div>Deshaun Watson and Clemson dethroned the champs and became the first team to beat Nick Saban's Alabama dynasty in a national title game, taking down the top-ranked Crimson Tide 35-31 Monday night in the College Football Playoff. /div> div>  /div> div>Watson found Hunter Renfrow for a 2-yard touchdown pass with a second remaining to give the Tigers their first national championship since 1981. A year after Alabama won its fourth title under Saban with a 45-40 classic in Arizona, Clemson closed the deal and denied the Tide an unprecedented fifth championship in eight seasons. /div> div>  /div> div>The lead changed hands three times in the fourth quarter, but Watson got the ball last. Likely playing in his final college game, the junior quarterback threw for 420 yards and three touchdowns. In two games against Alabama and the most ferocious defense in college football, Watson has thrown for 825 yards and accounted for eight touchdowns. /div> div>  /div> div>Coach Dabo Swinney, the native Alabaman and former Crimson Tide walk-on receiver, has built an elite program at Clemson that was missing only one thing. Now the Tigers can check that box, too. /div> div>  /div> div>'Eight years ago we set out to put Clemson back on top,' said Swinney, who can turn postgame interviews into a rousing sermon. 'We came up a little short last year, but today on top of the mountain, the Clemson flag is flying.' /div> div>  /div> div>After three quarters of vicious hits and tight defense, Tigers-Tide II ended up looking a lot like the first meeting when the teams combined for 40 points in the fourth quarter. /div> div>  /div> div>Clemson took its first lead when Watson found Mike Williams for a 4-yard touchdown a minute into the fourth quarter to make it 24-21. /div> div>  /div> div>The Tigers took a 28-24 lead with 4:38 left in the fourth quarter when Wayne Gallman surged in from a yard out. /div> div>  /div> div>The Tide's offense, which had gone dormant for most of the second half, came to life with the help of a sweet call from newly promoted offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian. Receiver ArDarius Stewart took a backward pass from Jalen Hurts and fired a strike to O.J. Howard for 24 yards. /div> div>  /div> div>On the next play, Hurts broke free from a collapsing pocket and weaved his way through defenders for a 30-yard touchdown run to make it 31-28 with 2:07 left. /div> div>  /div> div>More than enough time for Watson. /div> div>  /div> div>'I was calm,' Watson said. He said he thought about Vince Young's last-second touchdown for Texas that derailed the Southern California's championship run in the 2005 championship game at the Rose Bowl. He told his team: 'Let's go be great.' /div> div>  /div> div>Watson hooked up with Williams and Jordan Leggett, who made great catches for big gains to get to first-and-goal with 14 seconds left. /div> div>  /div> div>A pass interference on Alabama made it first-and-goal at the 2 with six seconds left. Time for one more play to avoid a game-tying kick and potential overtime. Renfrow slipped away from the defense at the goal line and was alone for an easy toss. It was the walk-on receiver's second TD catch of the night, adding to the two he had last season against Alabama. /div> div>  /div> div>When it ended, Clemson's 315-pound (143 -kilogram) defensive lineman Christian Wilkins did a cartwheel and Ben Boulware, one of the toughest linebackers in the country, was in tears. /div> div>  /div> div>The Tigers had snapped Alabama's 26-game winning streak and beaten a No. 1 team for the first time ever. /div> div>  /div> div>'It's been 35 long years!' Boulware screamed. 'It's coming home baby! It's coming home!' /div>.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 10th, 2017

Green, Parker help Spurs rally to beat Trail Blazers

em>By Raul Dominguez, Associated Press /em> SAN ANTONIO (AP) — In the midst of another dispirited effort, San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich decided not to yell at the Spurs — and they responded as he hoped. Danny Green and Tony Parker each had 18 points and San Antonio overcame another listless first half to beat the Portland Trail Blazers 110-94 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). 'Sometimes I go crazy, sometimes I decide to just sit and let them figure it out,' Popovich said. 'It just depends on how I'm feeling, how I think the game might go, or who's on the court at the time. Tonight, I wanted them to see what was going on for themselves. They did a good job of it.' The Spurs won their ninth game after trailing by 10-plus points, falling behind by 13 in the first half against the Trail Blazers. San Antonio forward Kawhi Leonard sat out his second straight game with a stomach virus and Portland point guard Damian Lillard missed his third consecutive game with an injured left ankle. Even when Leonard has played, the Spurs' first-half struggles have made things difficult. San Antonio is at a loss to understand why that is. 'I don't know,' Parker said. 'If I knew, I would not do it. No idea.' Despite the struggles, the Spurs have won four straight and 13 of 15. San Antonio had another sluggish first half, trailing by double-digits for 12 minutes and falling behind by 13 points midway through the second quarter. Portland forced 14 turnovers and shot 51 percent from the field through two quarters. 'We've got to do a better job of coming out with more of an edge to the game,' said Spurs center Pau Gasol, who finished with 10 points and seven rebounds. 'Teams know we've been having the slow starts and they play with confidence. Then we turn it up and win games, but it's something we need to keep in mind going forward so that it's not something that is repetitive or too repetitive.' C.J. McCollum finished with 29 points for Portland. Maurice Harkless and Allen Crabbe were the only others in double figures, with Harkless finishing with 12, and Crabbe 11. The Trail Blazers shot 43 percent in the third quarter after shooting 51 percent in the first half. Spurs reserve Manu Ginobili's second three-pointer with 3:49 remaining in the third quarter gave San Antonio a 69-67 lead, its first since holding an 11-8 edge 3 minutes into the game. San Antonio had seven three-pointers in the second half to win their seventh straight at home. LaMarcus Aldridge was held to eight points on 2-for-3 shooting, but Jonathon Simmons added 19 points for the Spurs. Green had six three-pointers in scoring a season-high. 'Today their strategy obviously was they were not going to let LaMarcus go off,' Parker said. 'In the last two games LaMarcus has been scoring a lot and been playing unbelievable. That's their strategy and other guys stepped up.' strong>TIP-INS /strong> em> strong>Trail Blazers: /strong> /em> Lillard missed his third straight game after playing in the team's first 32. He leads the team in scoring with 27.0 points and in assists at 6.2 per game. Portland entered Friday (Saturday, PHL time) allowing 111.5 points per game and 38 percent on 3-pointers, which are both 28th in the league. F/C Mason Plumlee had his streak of two straight double-doubles stopped. Plumlee had eight points and five rebounds. em> strong>Spurs: /strong> /em> Green has 33 games with at least five three-pointers, the most in franchise history. San Antonio finished 2016 at 66-15, its most successful calendar year in franchise history. The Spurs are 13-0 when Parker scores in double figures. strong>STILL HELPING OUT /strong> After shooting 25-for-32 and scoring 60 points in his previous two games, Aldridge was limited to three attempts against Portland. 'They double-teamed him all the time,' Popovich said. 'So, you can pretty much take a player out of the game if you do that. So, they decided to do that, and he did a good job getting rid of the ball when he figured it out.' Aldridge only had one assist, but his passes helped set up San Antonio's 11 three-pointers. strong>LEARNING FROM THE MASTER /strong> McCollum said he spent the offseason studying film of Parker's mid-range jumper after taking a step to his left away from a defender. The shot helped McCollum shoot 10-for-19 against the Spurs. strong>UP NEXT /strong> em> strong>Trail Blazers: /strong> /em>At Minnesota on Sunday night (Monday, PHL time). em> strong>Spurs: /strong> /em> At Atlanta on Sunday night (Monday, PHL time). .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 31st, 2016

Don’t touch suspicious packages – PNP

In a turn of event as far as bomb experts are concerned yesterday morning in Manila, two street sweepers took a package suspected to be an improvised explosive device (IED) they found in Intramuros area and brought it with their bare hands to the City Hal.....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsDec 7th, 2016