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Preen Gift Guide: Last-Minute Gifts that Don’t Feel Rushed At All

Having trouble with your gift list for the holidays? Ourweekly gift guide serieswill help you figure out what you can get your loved ones this coming season. From food to fashion and beauty, we'll be covering all possible areas to make sure you have the best options to choose from. We will be posting gift guides every week till Christmas comes around so keep checking back for more! It's crunch time for the last-minute Christmas shoppers out there. You only have two weeks to figure out what to get your loved ones. But the challenge here isn't just braving the holiday mall rush, you also have to make sure that you exerted effort in your gifts. Of course, the thought is what count...Keep on reading: Preen Gift Guide: Last-Minute Gifts that Don’t Feel Rushed At All.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerDec 14th, 2017

Christmas Gifting Hacks For Last-Minute Shoppers

It's just three days till Christmas and some of us still aren't done shopping for gifts. With the stress of having to finish everything on time, we thought we'd list some tips for all the last-minute shoppers out there. Check out the pointers below and get shopping. Check the Preen Gift Guide Series If you're not sure what to get the people left on your Christmas list, check our gift guide series. We have curated lists for different categories. You can pick from gifts for kids and even shop from different local brands. Shop online If you don't have to make your way to the mall or don't have the patience to wait in traffic, try shopping online. Whether you're looking for ...Keep on reading: Christmas Gifting Hacks For Last-Minute Shoppers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2017

Super’s 2018 last-minute holiday gift guide

Crazy work deadlines? Overwhelming home errands? Demanding social calendar? Scared of hellish traffic or the mad mall rush? It's all right---not everybody's built for the Christmas season. That doesn't mean giving up completely on spreading holiday cheer to our loved ones, though. Here are Super's online recommendations for late but thoughtful gifts.     MEL CASIPIT ILLUSTRATIONS Super picks: Casipit, who creates diverse art from comics to murals (like his "Kapit Kamay" at BGC High Street), can be commissioned to make superhero cartoon caricatures. Merchandise based on his original work, such as the adorably funny "Cat Puns," make cool gifts, too. Rates: ...Keep on reading: Super’s 2018 last-minute holiday gift guide.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2018

Preen Gift Guide: Get Sentimental with Presents Inspired by Movies

Having trouble with your gift list for the holidays? Ourweekly gift guide serieswill help you figure out what you can get your loved ones this coming season. From food to fashion and beauty, we'll be covering all possible areas to make sure you have the best options to choose from. We will be posting gift guides every week till Christmas comes around so keep checking back for more! Every holiday season, we want to give gifts that has some sentimental value, especially for those who matter to us the most. This Christmas, we are all pretty much excused to be extra cheesy, so why not go for the home run and get your friends and family gifts that will remind them of a movie they reall...Keep on reading: Preen Gift Guide: Get Sentimental with Presents Inspired by Movies.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 23rd, 2017

SM gift guide for the last-minute shopper

  On top of rounding up the year and running errands before the Christmas break, shopping for gifts can be a stressful chore. We're all crammers and, sometimes, what we want is a place where we can buy everything---before we even know they have the perfect gifts. The SM Store in SM Makati may solve your gift-giving problems. At the store's SM Woman alone, you can get a floral-printed jumpsuit, perfect for transitioning to festive summer. For something bold, there's a crimson-lace fedora hat at SM Accessories, and a pair of nude peep-toe boots from Parisian. Stylish men will like the cool tones of the apparel at SM Menswear---a classic striped polo on dress-down da...Keep on reading: SM gift guide for the last-minute shopper.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017

Preen Gift Guide: The Practical Items You Never Knew You Needed

Having trouble with your gift list for the holidays? Our weekly gift guide series will help you figure out what you can get your loved ones this coming season. From food to fashion and beauty, we'll be covering all possible areas to make sure you have the best options to choose from. We will be posting gift guides every week till Christmas comes around so keep checking back for more! Think back to when you received mundane gifts for Christmas. You probably thought that these were not-so-great things to get for the holidays. Maybe it was even fueled by the many articles that say you shouldn't give stuff like socks and mugs to your loved ones. As time goes by, you'll realize that...Keep on reading: Preen Gift Guide: The Practical Items You Never Knew You Needed.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 16th, 2017

Steelers edge Bengals 16-13 but miss out on AFC North title

By Will Graves, Associated Press PITTSBURGH (AP) — The win they needed but at times didn't act like they particularly wanted finally secured, the Pittsburgh Steelers lingered on the Heinz Field turf after a sluggish 16-13 victory over Cincinnati on Sunday and turned their eyes to the massive videoboard in the south end zone. A season filled with promise six weeks ago before things came undone boiled down to something entirely out of Pittsburgh's control: whether Cleveland could pull off a stunning rally in Baltimore. As a decidedly out-of-place chant of "Let's Go Browns" reverberated and Cleveland marched into Ravens' territory, a third straight AFC North for the Steelers seemed possible. Then Cleveland rookie quarterback Baker Mayfield threw a late pick. The Ravens held on. Optimism evaporated. Replaced by a mix of harsh reality and a hint of wistfulness. The Steelers (9-6-1) firmly believe they would be a tough out in the playoffs. Barring the slim hope of a tie between Indianapolis and Tennessee on Sunday night, Pittsburgh won't get the chance. The team that appeared assured of a fifth consecutive playoff berth following a six-game midseason winning streak instead will miss the postseason for the first time since 2013. "It just sucks," Steelers guard David DeCastro said. "How hard we work, how much effort we put in. To go from 7-2-1 to where we are now is heartbreaking." And avoidable. Yet four losses in five games — all of which the Steelers led at some point in the second half — forced them to enter Week 17 needing to beat the injury ravaged Bengals and a hope surging Cleveland could upset the Ravens on the road. "It's just tough," said Pittsburgh running back James Conner, who ran for 64 yards in his return to the lineup after missing three games with a sprained left ankle. "We're relying on somebody else to advance." The team that stressed it wouldn't spend all afternoon scoreboard watching certainly looked distracted as Cincinnati took a 10-3 halftime lead. Pittsburgh eventually rallied behind quarterback Ben Roethlisberger — who threw for 287 yards and a touchdown despite missing injured star receiver Antonio Brown to finish with a career-best and NFL-high 5,129 yards passing — and new kicker Matt McCrane booted three field goals, the last a 35-yarder with 1:56 to go that put the Steelers ahead to stay. Pittsburgh held on when Cincinnati backup quarterback Jeff Driskel's fourth-down pass intended for Josh Malone fell incomplete with 1:08 to go. Roethlisberger then took a pair of knees to run out the clock, setting the stage for the bizarre sight of the Steelers and thousands of black-and-gold clad fans cheering on the Browns. For a few anxious minutes, the dominoes appeared to be falling into place. When they didn't, Pittsburgh didn't place blame on Cleveland but countless missed opportunities. "It just makes me mad that as a leader of this group, we put ourselves in this situation like this, looking for others to do our job," Steelers defensive end Cam Heyward said. "Cleveland played a heck of a game ... it's frustrating and as a leader of this group it's just unacceptable." Roethlisberger vowed to return for a 16th season. He turns 37 in March and doesn't think Pittsburgh's window is closing as long as the offensive line in front of him remains intact. "I still feel good," he said. "We keep that line together, that'll give us a good fighting chance." MARVIN'S MURKY FUTURE Joe Mixon rushed for 105 yards for the Bengals but Cincinnati (6-10) — which entered Sunday with 18 players on injured reserve, including quarterback Andy Dalton and wide receiver A.J. Green— lost for the seventh time in eight games and head into another offseason unsure about the future of longtime head coach Marvin Lewis. Cincinnati's season turned at home against the Steelers back in October, when the Bengals let Pittsburgh go down the field in the final minute to pull out a 28-21 victory on Antonio Brown's 31-yard catch and run with 10 seconds to play. An avalanche of injuries and losses followed. Lewis headed to the locker room surrounded by cameras, which he found "ridiculous" after his beat-up squad took the Steelers basically to the wire. "I think it's sad (my status) is the only thing they can point to," Lewis said. "This isn't about me. This is about this football team and what they do. To make this about one person. It's not about one person. This is my job. That's it." INJURIES Bengals: WR Cody Core left late in the first quarter with a left elbow injury. Core was hurt while diving for a pass deep down the left sideline. ... LT Cordy Glenn injured his left ankle after getting rolled up on during a scrum following fumble by Driskel in the third quarter. Safety Brandon Wilson left in the second half with a chest injury and tight end Matt Lengel exited with a left knee issue. Steelers: Brown missed his first game of the season while dealing with a knee injury. Pittsburgh also sat starting safety Sean Davis (quadriceps) and inside linebacker Vince Williams (toe). UP NEXT Bengals: Owner Mike Brown will meet with Lewis to decide whether a 17th season is in the offing for the winning coach in franchise history. Steelers: While head coach Mike Tomlin is on firm ground, changes to the coaching staff could be made. Defensive coordinator Keith Butler's unit struggled to create turnovers and the special teams were a mess under coordinator Danny Smith......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 31st, 2018

Last-minute gift guide: Asian variety store edition

MANILA, Philippines – For many, Christmas shopping only comes a few days before the big day. We get it, procrastination may never change, but the countless shops, bazaars, and affordable household brands make the habit a bit more bearable. Luckily, Miniso, the popular "Japanese" minimalist lifestyle brand, the budget-conscious hoarder’s ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2018

6 last-minute gift ideas under P300 from Maybelline

Maybelline comes out with the best makeup gifts for the holidays......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 17th, 2018

Must-Have Christmas Bundles on Your Shopping List

Everyone’s favourite holiday is a few carols away. To help everyone check off items on their holiday shopping lists, HMD Global, the home of Nokia phones, offers timely and reliable gift ideas that will definitely make your special ones feel the love this Christmas. A+ Nokia mobile gifts to share One way to enjoy the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsDec 16th, 2018

ONE Championship: Eduard Folayang Wants To Celebrate His Birthday With A World Title Win

With his highly-anticipated encounter against Singapore’s Amir Khan for the vacant ONE Lightweight World Championship set to take place a day after his birthday, local hero Eduard “Landslide” Folayang cannot think of a better present for himself than to have a gold-plated belt wrapped around his waist once again. The Filipino superstar will celebrate his 35th birthday on Thursday, 22 November, a day before his scheduled five-round championship bout with Khan in the co-main event of ONE: CONQUEST OF CHAMPIONS, which emanates from the 20,000-capacity Mall Of Asia Arena in Manila. “There’s no greater gift I can receive on my 35th birthday other than winning the ONE Lightweight Word Title back,’’ he expressed. “And there’s no better place to do it but in front of my countrymen.” After relinquishing his lightweight crown to Martin “The Situ-Asian” Nguyen in November 2017, Folayang immediately went back to the drawing board to check where things went wrong. He amazingly worked his way back to the upper echelon of the talent-filled lightweight division — first dominating Kharun Atlangeriev in three rounds last May, and then edging out Aziz Pahrudinov in a 15-minute thriller two months later. The Baguio City native treats the opportunity of reclaiming the ONE Lightweight World Championship both as a reward and vindication. “There were some who doubted my decision to continue fighting after the knockout loss to Martin Nguyen nearly a year ago. After two wins in ONE Championship, I am back in the title picture,” Folayang stated. “I feel very fulfilled because I made the right decision to compete again. Also, my hard work has paid off. It will be a great birthday present for me to bring home the belt again. It's an added motivation going into the bout against Amir Khan.” Even if he is pegged as the heavy favorite to win the bout against the Singaporean, Folayang stressed that he is not taking his opponent for granted. Khan holds the exceptional records for the most wins (11) and finishes (10) in ONE Championship, scoring impressive victories over the likes of Bashir Ahmad, Jimmy Yabo, Jaroslav Jartim, and Sung Jong Lee. The 24-year-old phenom is coming off the biggest win of his promotional stint yet, submitting Folayang’s Team Lakay stablemate Honorio “The Rock” Banario with a first-round rear-naked choke this past September. “Landslide” knows the Evolve MMA representative poses a dangerous threat, but he is confident of his chances. “He is young and talented. I am also sure that he is hungry,” Folayang said.  “There is no room for complacency in this match. Of course, the momentum is on my side, but I plan to sustain it. I started the year with a win. I followed it up with another big win. The timing speaks for itself.” In his return to the global stage, Folayang boldly predicts that fans in attendance at the Mall Of Asia Arena will witness the coronation of a fifth Filipino mixed martial arts World Champion on Friday. “2018 has been a very good year to me,” he continued. “After November 23, I’m confident that the Philippines and Team Lakay will have another new world champion in the sport.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

US OPEN 18: On the clock! 25-second countdown s Slam debut

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press Any discussion of the serve clocks that will make their Grand Slam debut during the U.S. Open's main draw starting Monday, and could become a regular part of tennis as soon as next year, inevitably turns to Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic. They are two of the greatest players in history — and two of the slowest between points. For one thing, Djokovic's incessant bouncing of the ball before a service toss delays things. So do Nadal's habitual mannerisms: the touching of the nose, the tucking of the hair, the grabbing at the shorts, and on it goes. And while neither was a big fan of introducing digital readouts on court to show the 25-second countdown before each first serve, the two men with a combined 30 Grand Slam singles titles seem ready to accept that they must abide by a change intended to add uniformity to their sport. "I just need to go faster," Nadal said, matter-of-factly. Djokovic's take: "I'm pretty comfortable with it." Both got a chance to see what this new, stricter world will look like during a test run at a handful of hard-court tuneup tournaments over the past month. "Some of the guys might think this is targeted to them," said Gayle Bradshaw, the executive vice president for rules and competition on the men's tour. Referring to Nadal and Djokovic, specifically, Bradshaw added: "They'll adjust. And I think for Rafa, it's going to be a benefit: Him wearing down the other guy." The U.S. Tennis Association, ATP and WTA are tracking what competitors, spectators and TV broadcasters make of the new system. Reviews from players so far have mostly been positive or indifferent, although Serena Williams said she's "not a fan of it at all." "You're aware of it. You certainly look at it and notice it. I do think it's a good thing," said Andy Murray, a three-time major champion. "It's one of those things in tennis that is so stupid: The players were sort of expected to sort of be counting to 25 in their head. ... How are you supposed to know how much time you're actually taking?" Wimbledon semifinalist John Isner and others noted they would step to the line to serve and still have plenty of time — sometimes 10 seconds or more — left, enabling them to catch their breath or think about how to approach the next point. "I didn't feel rushed at all, by any means," Isner said. "Maybe it can slow you down." That might have contributed to one unintended consequence during the three men's tournaments where clocks were used for qualifying and main draws: longer matches. It's a small sample size, and, of course, it's dependent on the particulars of individual contests — nearly 30 percent more matches went to 7-5 or a tiebreaker in the third set in 2018 than 2017 at those events. But third sets lasted an average of 5 minutes longer this year than last year. First sets were nearly 1 1/2 minutes longer this year while second sets were a minute shorter. Servers were warned 74 times and returners received nine warnings at the ATP and WTA tournaments with the clocks. It's possible this setup will become more widespread as soon as 2019; the ATP Board could consider that for the men's tour during its U.S. Open meeting. The amount of time taken between points has been a subject of discussion in tennis for quite a while now, just as other sports are concerned about whether events that take too long are losing viewers in this age of short attention spans and competition for eyeballs (take Major League Baseball's limits on mound visits, time between innings and movement toward a pitch clock). "This just makes it a little more transparent, a little more visible," U.S. Open tournament director David Brewer said. "North American fans are used to shot clocks. They actually expect this sort of thing." There already was a time limit in tennis, but it was entirely up to a chair umpire's discretion, because no one — most importantly players, but also folks in the stands and TV viewers — knew exactly how many seconds had elapsed. Now it will be apparent to everyone, much like a shot clock in the NBA and college basketball or a play clock in the NFL and college football. The serve clocks — along with a strict 7-minute period from when players enter a court until a match begins, also shown on digital readouts — were tested during 2017 U.S. Open qualifying. The basics of the serve clock: After announcing the score, chair umpires start the countdown (they have leeway to wait if a particularly long point merits an extra pause). If the 25 seconds expire before the service motion begins on a first serve, the server will receive a warning, then be assessed a fault for each subsequent violation (second serves are supposed to happen without delay, so clocks won't be used). If the returner isn't ready at the end of 25 seconds, first comes a warning, then the loss of a point with every other violation. The basics of the pre-match period: Clocks will count a minute from when players step on court until the coin toss, 5 minutes for the warmup, then another minute until the opening point. Delays can result in fines of up to $20,000, according to USTA spokesman Chris Widmaier. He said players already have been docked as much as $1,500 during recent tournaments. "The intent is not to fine players. The intent is to get players used to this new procedure and also to truly build consistency," Widmaier said, "so the matches start when they're supposed to start for television and for fans.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 26th, 2018
Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2018

Rappler Gift Guide: Presents that artists will appreciate

MANILA, Philippines – If you have a friend on your gift list who can paint or letter their way through anything, Christmas is the best time to upgrade their art supply closet. Here are some gifts that will be appreciated for sure: These artist journals by Cogon Papers are ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2017

Preen Gift Guide: Make the Life of a New Mom Easier With These Items

Having trouble with your gift list for the holidays? Ourweekly gift guide serieswill help you figure out what you can get your loved ones this coming season. From food to fashion and beauty, we'll be covering all possible areas to make sure you have the best options to choose from. We will be posting gift guides every week till Christmas comes around so keep checking back for more! Becoming a new mom can be hard work. If you read our weekly Momhood columns, you'd know it even if you don't have a kid of your own yet. Sure, it's fun to spoil and play with your friends' or relatives' babies, but it's also important to help out the ones taking care of them. This Christmas, make the...Keep on reading: Preen Gift Guide: Make the Life of a New Mom Easier With These Items.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 28th, 2017

Conscientious Giving and Why It’s the Way to Go

Every week, Preen tackles motherhood sans the rose-tinted glasses. Our columnistsL. Juliano,Marla Darwin,Monica Eleazar-Manzano,Rossana Unson, and Ronna Capili-Bonifaciotell their personal experiences like it is---at times frustrating, oftentimes confusing, but always enlightening. This year I'm proud to say I'm nearly done with my Christmas shopping. Our tree isn't up yet, the gifts haven't been wrapped, and my closet looks like Thor and the Incredible Hulk had a battle inside it, but hey, at least I'm almost done! So yay for me. Over the years I've noticed how people have different styles of gift-giving... and gift buying, too. There are the people who just buy a ton of the s...Keep on reading: Conscientious Giving and Why It’s the Way to Go.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 21st, 2017

Preen Gift Guide: Grab These Novelty Items From Asian Shops

Having trouble with your gift list for the holidays? Our weekly gift guide series will help you figure out what you can get your loved ones this coming season. From food to fashion and beauty, we’ll be covering all possible areas to make sure you have the best options to choose from. We will be… link: Preen Gift Guide: Grab These Novelty Items From Asian Shops.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsNov 14th, 2017

Could a VR walk in the woods relieve chronic pain? – CBC News

When pain researcher Diane Gromala recounts how she started in the field of virtual reality, she seems reflective. She had been researching virtual reality for pain since the early 1990s, but her shift to focusing on how virtual reality could be used for chronic pain management began in 1999, when her own chronic pain became worse. Prior to that, her focus was on VR as entertainment. Gromala, 56, was diagnosed with chronic pain in 1984, but the left-sided pain that extended from her lower stomach to her left leg worsened over the next 15 years. &'8220;Taking care of my chronic pain became a full-time job. So at some point I had to make a choice — either stop working or charge full force ahead by making it a motivation for my research. You can guess what I chose,&'8221; she said. Now she's finding that immersive VR technology may offer another option for chronic pain, which affects at least one in five Canadians, according to a 2011 University of Alberta study. &'8220;We know that there is some evidence supporting immersive VR for acute pain, so it's reasonable to look into how it could help patients that suffer from chronic pain.&'8221; Gromala has a PhD in human computer interaction and holds the Canada Research Chair in Computational Technologies for Transforming Pain. She also directs the pain studies lab and the Chronic Pain Research Institute at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C. Using VR to relieve or treat acute pain has been done for a while. In the 1990s, researcher Hunter Hoffman conducted one of the earliest studies looking at VR for pain relief in the University of Wisconsin human interface technology lab. His initial focus was burn victims. Since then, the field has expanded. Gromala's lab focuses on bringing evidence-based therapies that work specifically for chronic pain, such as mindfulness-based stress reduction. They have published studies on their virtual meditative walk to guide and relax patients. Movement and exercise are a key part of chronic pain management in general. But for many patients, it can be too difficult. &'8220;Through VR we can help create an environment where, with a VR headset, they can feel like they are walking through a forest, all while hearing a guided walking meditation,&'8221; Gromala said. The team also designed a meditation chamber — where a person lies in the enclosed space, breathing becomes more relaxed and a jellyfish viewed through VR dissolves. Each experiment gives real-time feedback to the patient through objective measures of pain such as skin temperature and heart rate. For instance, while feeling pain, skin surface temperature and heart rate can increase. While pain medications can be important, chronic pain treatment should also address lifestyle aspects, says Neil Jamensky, a Toronto anesthesiologist and chronic pain specialist. &'8220;Physical rehabilitation therapy, psychological support and optimizing things like nutrition, exercise, sleep and relaxation practices all play key roles in chronic pain management,&'8221; he said. Other researchers like Sweden's Dr. Max Ortiz-Catalan from Chalmers University of Technology have looked at virtual and augmented reality for phantom limb pain — the particularly challenging syndrome among amputees who experience pain in a limb that is not physically there. In his study, published in The Lancet in December 2016, Ortiz-Catalan demonstrated a 47 per cent reduction in symptoms among VR participants. He believes the reason behind it is a &'8220;retraining&'8221; of the brain, where pathways in the brain effectively re-route themselves to focus more on movement, for instance. &'8220;We demonstrated that if an amputee can see and manipulate a 'virtual' limb — which is projected over their limb stump — in space, over time, the brain retrains these areas. &'8220;Through this retraining, the brain reorganizes itself to focus on motor control and less on pain firing,&'8221; said Ortiz-Catalan. With only 14 patients, this was a pilot study, but he plans to expand the work into a multi-centre, multi-country study later this year. The University of New Brunswick is one of the planned study sites. Others in the United States have published their own findings of VR for chronic pain. Last month, Ted Jones and colleagues from Knoxville released results of their pilot study of 30 chronic pain patients who were offered five-minute sessions using a VR application called &'8220;Cool!&'8221; — an immersive VR program administered through a computer and viewed through a head-mounted device. All reported a decrease in pain while using the app — some decreased by 60 per cent — and post-session pain decreased by 33 per cent. The findings were presented in the journal PLoS. &'8220;What was interesting to observe was that the pain decreased for six to 48 hours post-VR experience. It's not as long as we would like, but does illustrate that relief can be sustained over some period of time,&'8221; Jones said. His team will be expanding the research this year and will also look at how VR can help with the challenging mental health side-effects of chronic pain. Jamensky points out while VR could be a promising treatment one day, one challenge with clinical trials is the dependence on looking at pain scores when assessing the effectiveness of VR. This may overshadow individual patient goals. For instance, while the ability to decrease any individual's pain score from a &'8220;seven out of 10&'8221; to a &'8220;three out of 10&'8221; can be challenging, improving functionality and quality of life can often be more valuable to the patient. &'8220;A pain score may not [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2017

These vintage music boxes will make romantic Valentine’s Day gifts!

Here’s your friendly reminder to start shopping for Valentine’s! These vintage music boxes will make romantic Valentine’s Day gifts! Valentine's Day is right around the corner! That has been your friendly reminder to start preparing for a gift for your loved ones and/or significant other. If you have no clue as to what to get… link: These vintage music boxes will make romantic Valentine’s Day gifts!.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJan 17th, 2019

PBA: Abueva saves Chua’s career game

Justin Chua had Calvin Abueva to thank for saving his career game. Chua almost saw his best scoring night go down the drain with a defensive lapse late in regulation but Abueva, who was throwing bricks for most of the game, came to the rescue with the game-winning putback that helped Phoenix escape Meralco, 93-92, in overtime Wednesday in the 2019 PBA Philippine Cup at the Big Dome. The big man breathed a sigh of relief as Abueva nailed his last of only two field goals in 13 attempts in the closing stretch of the extension. “Unang-una nagpapasalamat ako kay Calvin kasi kung hindi n’ya na-shoot ‘yun yari ako kay coach,” said Chua, who posted a career-best 24 points. “For me I feel like I lost that game for the team buti na lang nandoon talaga si Calvin.” Chua shot 9-of-17 from the field and pulled down six boards. But his night could’ve turned sour with a bad defensive play that forced the extra five minutes. Phoenix was protecting an 83-81 advantage with under a minute left in regulation when Chua’s defensive lapse on Ranidel De Ocampo almost cost them the game. Chua failed to box out De Ocampo after Reynel Hugnatan missed on his long range shot, allowing the Bolts forward to haul the offensive board for a putback that tied the game at 83. The Fuel Masters failed to convert on the other end. “Medyo napagalitan namin kanina kasi na-shoot ni Ranidel, he stopped, talagang pinanood niya 'yung sitwasyon,” said Phoenix coach Louie Alas. “Sabi ko, wala tayong pinag-uusapan from start to finish kun'di one possession, one possession, and you blew that one possession. Binawi naman niya ng overtime.” Chua admitted that he struggled on defense. “Actually the whole game medyo ang sama ng depensa ko talaga eh. Talon ako ng talon sa mga fakes tapos hindi ako buma-box out,” said Chua. “Ilang beses na akong sinasabihan ni coach pero parang ang tigas ng ulo ko this game. I’ll review the tape and try to be better next game para di na maulit.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 16th, 2019

Nadal, Sharapova and Wozniacki advance at Australian Open

By John Pye, Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Rafael Nadal has missed a lot of tennis since last September. He hasn't missed a beat. The No. 2-seeded Nadal had a 6-4, 6-3, 7-5 win over Australian wild-card entry James Duckworth on Monday in the first round of the Australian Open, his first match back on Rod Laver Arena since he had to retire during his quarterfinal match last year. The 17-time major winner hasn't played since retiring from his semifinal at the U.S. Open because of a knee injury, and then had surgery on his right ankle in November. He also withdrew from a tune-up tournament in Brisbane because of a muscle strain in his thigh, mainly as a precaution, to ensure he's fit for the season-opening major. "Not easy to come back after a lot of months of competition, especially against a player playing super aggressive every shot," Nadal said. "It's very difficult to start after an injury — I know it very well. "So that's an important victory because is the first victory since a while, and at the same time, because that gives me the chance to be on court again." Wearing a sleeveless top, he showed no signs of any issues against Duckworth. His only hiccup came when he served for the match in the ninth game of the third set and was broken. He returned the favor quickly, though, to seal his spot in the second round. Nadal has only lost twice in the first round at Grand Slams — to Steve Darcis at 2013 Wimbledon, and to Fernando Verdasco here in 2016. Maria Sharapova's record in the first round is good, too. She was the first of five Australian Open winners to play on Rod Laver Arena on Day 1, starting with a 6-0, 6-0 win over Harriet Dart. No. 2-ranked Angelique Kerber, the 2016 Australian Open champion, opened with a 6-2, 6-2 win over Polona Hercog and defending champion Caroline Wozniacki beat Alison Van Uytvanck 6-3, 6-4 in the first of the night matches on the main arena. Sharapova has the second-best record (behind Serena Williams) among active women's players in first-round matches at the majors, and she gave an illustration of why that's the case in a 63-minute disposal of Dart. Stung by a first-round loss at Wimbledon last year, 2008 Australian Open champion Sharapova said she couldn't afford to feel any empathy for Dart. "There is no time for that, I'm sorry to say ... when you're playing the first round of a Grand Slam," said Sharapova, who is still feeling pain in her right shoulder despite sitting out the end of last season after the U.S. Open. "I think I was just focused on not having a letdown." Also advancing were 2017 U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens, No. 9 Kiki Bertens, No. 11 Aryna Sabalenka, local favorite Ash Barty, No. 19 Caroline Garcia, No. 20 Anett Kontaveit, No. 24 Lesia Tsurenko, No. 29 Donna Vekic and No. 31 Petra Martic. Katie Boulter earned the distinction of winning the first 10-point tiebreaker under the Australian Open's new system for deciding sets, and she celebrated twice. Boulter beat Ekaterina Makarova 6-0, 4-6, 7-6 (6), including 10-6 in the tiebreaker. Boulter started celebrating and went to the net when she reached 7-4 in the tiebreaker, forgetting it wasn't a conventional count. The new rule was introduced to ensure matches don't get too lengthy — previously the third set in women's matches and the fifth set in men's matches at the Australian Open had to be decided by a two-game advantage. Fifth-seeded Kevin Anderson won his first match at Melbourne Park since 2015 when he beat Adrian Mannarino 6-3, 5-7, 6-2, 6-1. Also advancing on the men's side were No. 14 Stefanos Tsitsipas, no. 18 Diego Schwartzman, No. 19 Nikoloz Basilashvili, No. 20 Grigor Dimitrov, No. 26 Fernando Verdasco and No. 27 Alex de Minaur, who won the Sydney International final last weekend. It was high stakes when ninth-seeded John Isner lost 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6), 6-7 (4), 7-6 (5) to No. 97-ranked Reilly Opelka in a match featuring two of the tallest players on tour. Tomas Berdych sent 2018 Australian Open semifinalist Kyle Edmund home early with right away with a 6-3, 6-0, 7-5 win over the No. 13 seed on Melbourne Arena in the match before five-time finalist Andy Murray took on Roberto Bautista Agut......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 14th, 2019