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PPTC forms paratriathlon national training team

The Philippine Paratriathlon Committee has announced the formation of the national paratriathlon training team, initially composed of three athletes but with slots still open for new entries......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarApr 17th, 2018

PPTC forms train team

THE Philippine Paratriathlon Committee (PPTC) has just announced the formation of the national paratriathlon training team, initially composed of three athletes but with slots still open for prospective paratriathletes. The athletes are the Nelmida twins, Jerome and Joshua, 17 years old and both visually impaired paratriathletes and Cebuano Alex Silverio,… Source link link: PPTC forms train team.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsApr 16th, 2018

PPTC forms train team

THE Philippine Paratriathlon Committee (PPTC) has just announced the formation of the national paratriathlon training team, initially composed of three athletes but with slots still open for prospective paratriathletes. The athletes are the Nelmida twins, Jerome and Joshua, 17 years old and both visually impaired paratriathletes and Cebuano Alex Silverio,….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsApr 15th, 2018

Israel in uproar over Argentina pre-World Cup friendly snub

By Aron Heller, Associated Press JERUSALEM (AP) — The sports-crazed nation of Israel was in uproar Wednesday over Argentina's abrupt cancellation of a World Cup warmup match following pro-Palestinian protests, with some of the country's leaders accusing Lionel Messi and his teammates of caving to terrorism. Israel was eagerly awaiting the sold-out international friendly scheduled for Saturday night at Jerusalem's Teddy Kollek Stadium and the arrival of some of the world's best players. Argentina is one of the most popular national teams among Israelis and fans had been scrambling to get a chance to see Messi in person. But after a fierce Palestinian campaign, which included images of Argentina's white and sky-blue striped jersey stained with red paint resembling blood and threats to burn Messi posters, Argentina's football federation announced it was skipping the event. Claudio Tapia, president of the Argentine Football Association, apologized for cancelling the match but said the safety of the players was at stake. "What has happened in the last 72 hours, the actions, the threats that have occurred have led us to take the decision not to travel," he said during a news conference in Barcelona, where the Argentine team is training prior to the start of the World Cup next week. "(We) apologize to the Israeli community. It's nothing against the Israeli community, the Jewish community and I would like everyone to take this decision as a contribution to world peace," he said. "In the end, they've done the right thing, and this is behind us," Argentina striker Gonzalo Higuain told ESPN. "Health and common sense come first. We felt that it wasn't right to go." Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called Argentine President Mauricio Macri and urged him to intervene, to no avail. Later Wednesday, Israel's Sports Ministry said a "negotiation" about the match was underway, perhaps in hopes of salvaging it, but gave no further details. "It's unfortunate the soccer knights of Argentina did not withstand the pressure of the Israeli-hating inciters, whose only goal is to harm our basic right to self-defense and bring about the destruction of Israel," said Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman. "We will not yield before a pack of anti-Semitic terrorist supporters." The head of the Palestinian football association, Jibril Rajoub, had called on Arab soccer fans to burn Messi posters and T-shirts if he participated. He has long tried to get soccer's world governing body, FIFA, and the International Olympic Committee to impose sanctions against Israel. Rajoub believes Israel should be punished for restricting movement of Palestinian players, and for forming teams in West Bank settlements. Rajoub had also objected to holding the match in Jerusalem, whose eastern sector the Palestinians claim as their capital. Although the Kollek stadium is in west Jerusalem, it is located in a neighborhood built where a Palestinian village once stood before it was destroyed in the war surrounding Israel's independence in 1948. Following the move, he held a press conference in Ramallah featuring a picture of him with Messi and a sign reading: "From Palestine, thank you Messi." Rajoub had accused Israel of playing politics with the game, by moving it from its original location in Haifa to Jerusalem, and by trying to link it to celebrations surrounding Israel's 70th anniversary. He called it a victory for "ethics and values" of sports. "They tried to use sport as a tool for political ends, and for this I think, they failed," Rajoub said. Israeli President Reuven Rivlin said it was a sad morning for Israeli sports fans, including his own grandchildren. "But there are values that are greater than even Messi. The politicization of the Argentinean move worries me greatly," he said. Opposition figures, however, accused Israel's headline-seeking sports minister Miri Regev of bringing on the politicization of the sporting event by insisting on moving the game from Haifa to contested Jerusalem and by trying to orchestrate a politicized photo-op with Messi. Israel captured east Jerusalem in the 1967 Mideast war and annexed the area in a move that is not internationally recognized. Israel considers the entire city to be its capital, while the Palestinians seek east Jerusalem as the capital of a future state. Regev rejected the backlash at a press conference Wednesday evening saying "there is no bigger lie" than claims her decision to hold the match in Jerusalem aided in its cancellation. She said the Argentinians had not objected and that Messi himself had wanted to visit sacred Christian and Jewish sites in the holy city. Regev said the match was canceled following "threats by terror elements sent to Messi and his family and to other players." Opposition leader Isaac Herzog called the snub a "spectacular own goal" by Regev that delivered victory to boycotters of the Jewish State. Labor Party leader Avi Gabbay called for a police investigation into Regev's "corrupt conduct." "We just absorbed a shot in the face. This is not just sports," he tweeted. "This, unfortunately, could start an international tsunami." Regev claimed that "terrorist" groups had made threats against Argentina's players and their families, sending them images of dead children, though she gave no further evidence. She accused members of the Israeli parliament, or Knesset, of backing the boycott advocates. "Unfortunately, we have Trojan Horses in the Knesset who give headwind to terrorism," she said. The Palestinian militant Islamic group Hamas praised Argentina for canceling the game. Spokesman Husam Badran said Hamas "applauds" the move and reiterated its position that rejects "all forms of normalization" with the Jewish state. A senior official at the Argentine Football Federation said the national team decided to call off the match with Israel after receiving threats from Hamas. The official, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity due to safety concerns, did not provide evidence or details of the alleged threats. A Hamas official mocked reports that the group had threatened the players, calling them unrealistic, and saying they don't deserve a comment. The Hamas official was not authorized to comment in the issue and also spoke on condition of anonymity. Hamas is sworn to Israel's destruction and has ruled Gaza with an iron fist since it took over the territory in 2007. Israel and the United States consider it a terror organization for its bombings, shooting and rocket attacks targeting civilians. Israel has largely fended off the boycott campaign with only a small number of artists and organizations shunning the country. Argentina's snubbing would appear to be the boycott movement's greatest achievement thus far. The grassroots movement advocates boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel in what supporters say is a way to promote Palestinian rights through nonviolent means. Israel says the campaign goes beyond Israeli occupation of lands claimed by the Palestinians and masks a deeper aim of delegitimizing or even destroying the country. It has formed a government ministry whose primary mission is to combat the boycott movement. The Argentinean move, which featured on the front pages of all the major Israeli dailies, raised fears that it could serve as a template for future boycotts of Jerusalem, most notably next year's scheduled hosting of the popular Eurovision song contest. The Palestinians celebrated the cancellation as a major triumph. Israeli organizers said an offer had been floated to have the game played in Barcelona instead, but it was highly unlikely. "I think sports should never be involved with politics," said Shahaf Ashraga, a fan in Jerusalem. "It just makes me sad to think that the game has to be canceled because of the Palestinian pressure." Argentina opens its Group D campaign in Russia against Iceland on June 16. It then plays Croatia on June 21 and Nigeria on June 26. It is unclear whether Argentina will play another warmup, or if it will arrive in Moscow ahead of schedule. ___ Associated Press writers Debora Rey and Victor Caivano in Buenos Aires, Argentina, contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 7th, 2018

2018-19 NBA referees: By the Numbers

NBA press release NEW YORK – Sixty-five referees will compose the NBA officiating staff for the 2018-19 season.  Below are some numbers and tidbits pertaining to this season’s NBA officials. On The Court · 33 – Ken Mauer is entering his 33rd season as an NBA referee, the most for any current official.  He is followed by Ron Garretson, who begins his 32nd season. · 1,904/238 – Garretson has called 1,904 regular-season games and 238 playoff games, the most of any current official in each category. · 1,408 – Monty McCutchen worked 1,408 regular-season games – along with 169 playoff games (including 16 NBA Finals games) – before stepping off the court last season to oversee day-to-day management and on-court performance of all officials as Vice President, Head of Referee Development and Training. · 20 – Mike Callahan leads active referees with 20 NBA Finals games officiated, followed by Mauer with 19 and Scott Foster with 18. · 37/27 – 37 of the 65 officials (57%) have at least 10 years of experience, while 27 of the 65 (42%) have 15 or more years of experience. · 75.4 – 49 of the 65 referees (75.4%) have worked in the G League. · 33.8 – 22 of the 65 referees (33.8%) have WNBA officiating experience. Off The Court · 3,600 – Senior Vice President and Head of Referee Operations Michelle Johnson logged more than 3,600 flight hours as a pilot for the United States Air Force during her 36-year career. The former three-star general was the 19th Superintendent at the U.S. Air Force Academy, where she was a graduate and the first woman inducted into the Air Force Sports Hall of Fame after a stellar basketball career for the Falcons. · 1987 – President of League Operations Byron Spruell was an offensive lineman and co-captain of the 1987 Notre Dame football team helping future Pro Football Hall of Famer Tim Brown win the Heisman Trophy that season. · 1977 – Mauer earned All-Big Ten honors in 1977 for the University of Minnesota’s baseball team, helping lead the Golden Gophers to the College World Series alongside future Baseball Hall of Famer Paul Molitor. · 87 – NBA official Eric Dalen wore No. 87 as a two-time letterman at tight end for the University of Minnesota. · 12 – NBA official Leroy Richardson spent 12 years in the United States Navy (1982-94), serving as a surface warfare specialist and underwater sea surveillance specialist. · 9 – Historically Black Colleges and Universities are represented by nine referees: Bennie Adams (Southern University); Tony Brown (Clark Atlanta University); Derrick Collins (Xavier University in New Orleans); Sean Corbin (Coppin State University); Courtney Kirkland (Southern University); Karl Lane (Philander Smith College); Eric Lewis (Bethune Cookman College); CJ Washington (Southern University); and Tom Washington (Norfolk State University). · 7 – The NBA referee roster features seven officials who have earned advanced degrees: Adams (MS, Southern University, 1993); Brent Barnaky (JD, Nova Southeastern Law School, 2001); Kevin Cutler (MS, Cal State Dominguez Hills, 2005); Tyler Ford (MA, Ball State University, 2009); Lauren Holtkamp (MS, Drury University, 2004; MDV, Emory University, 2010); Kevin Scott (MS, Georgia Southern University, 2002); and Sean Wright (MBA, University of Mobile, 1996). · 4 – This year’s staff features four second-generation NBA referees: James Capers, the son of former NBA referee James Capers, Sr.; JB DeRosa, the son of former official Joe DeRosa; Brian Forte, the son of Joe Forte; and Garretson, the son of former NBA official Darell Garretson. · 4 – Four referees – Derek Richardson, Leroy Richardson, Wright and Zach Zarba – were born in New York City, the most for any major U.S. city.  New Orleans and Miami have produced three referees each. · 3 – Three officials have served in the U.S. military, including Matt Boland (Connecticut National Guard), Rodney Mott (U.S. Navy) and Leroy Richards (U.S. Navy). In addition, NBA Senior Vice President and Head of Referee Operations Michelle Johnson is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. · 2 – Two referees were born in Eastern Europe: Marat Kogut (Kiev, Ukraine) and Gediminas Petraitis (Kaunas, Lithuania). · 2 – This year’s officiating staff includes two sets of referees with family ties.  Lauren Holtkamp and Jonathan Sterling are married to each other, while Jacyn and John Goble are the only brothers officiating this season......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 16th, 2018

Youth team addresses teen pregnancy in T boli community

  The following is a press release from Ideas Positive. Out of 16 National Finalists, Team TeenPUYOG from Region XII – SOCCSKSARGEN was named the Grand Champion of Ideas Positive Run 8. Their project, IDOLescent M.A.T.T.E.R., aimed to address teen pregnancy in Kiamba, Sarangani, by training 25 peer ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

Part 2: Assessing PH women’s volleyball

We end our two-part analysis of the recent performances of the Philippine women's volleyball national team with the aim to provide an objective evaluation that may help its journey back to Asian competitions. Coach Mac Gepuela currently coaches the middle school team of Miriam College and has produced champion squads there at different levels. She is also the soothing and informative live game announcer of the Premier Volleyball League. For the national team, she suggests a long-term program anchored on a vision, leadership, training, competition at various levels, financial support and proper coordination among the various volleyball stakeholders. Gepuela recommends a five-year pr...Keep on reading: Part 2: Assessing PH women’s volleyball.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 8th, 2018

Kings’ best yet to come

Help is coming for Barangay Ginebra. Greg Slaughter, Sol Mercado and Art dela Cruz may return from injuries this Saturday when the Gin Kings head to Lucena City, Quezon, to face the winless Rain or Shine Elasto Painters. Slaughter has not played since early September due to a sprained ankle while Mercado had surgery on his meniscus. Dela Cruz, on the other hand, has yet to make his Ginebra debut due to an Achilles tendon injury he sustained while training for the National team last year. There is also the probability that Joe Devance, who is recovering from a stress fracture in his left foot, may be available for the Oct. 13 duel at Quezon Convention Center. The Kings' s...Keep on reading: Kings’ best yet to come.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 8th, 2018

UAAP: Hubert Cani blames FEU s blowout loss to bad practices

Good teams are not made in games, but in practices. This was the narrative Hubert Cani was going for after Far Eastern University saw themselves at the losing end of a 25-point drubbing versus the surprising University of the East, Sunday in UAAP Season 81 action. "Kasi nung bago nitong UE, we had two practices tapos sobrang pangit nung practice namin. As in. Kaya siguro ganito yung nangyari sa amin kasi pangit nung practice talaga namin nung Friday and Saturday. Nadala namin dito," said Cani. The FEU Tamaraws are perennial Final Four contenders but unfortunately this season, they already lost to two teams who were in the bottom four last year, namely UST and UE. According to Cani, this is something they should think about and fix as soon as possible. "Dalawa na yun eh. Tingin ko, mali talaga yung approach namin sa game. Parang dinadaya namin eh. Sa amin bumabalik yun. Kunyari malakas yung kalaban namin, dun kami babawi tapos pag may mga teams na parang nasa average, dun kami nagse-step down eh. Yun talaga yung pagkakamali namin," said the Tamaraw point guard. Cani also bared that they might have been underestimating other teams in UAAP Season 81, that is why now they are paying the consequences. "Same lang ng UST, parang in-underestimate namin yung game kaya ngayon yung mga shots nila kahit naka-challenge na, kahit anong gawin namin, talagang shumu-shoot na kasi binigyan namin sila ng confidence. So dun palang sa una palang, mali na," he explained. FEU shot 33.87-percent from the field, which paled in comparison to UE's sweet shooting at 45.95-percent. As early as the first half, Red Warriors Alvin Pasaol and Jason Varilla already had 15 points each across their names, while no one from the Tamaraws had double digits. Entering the last two quarters, FEU was already down by 12 and that just ballooned to as big as 34-points as UE's shooting kept getting sweeter, while FEU's turned sour. "Tingin ko, shumu-shoot lang talaga yung tira nila tapos kami, di namin sinundan yung scheme na gusto ni Coach Olsen," he said after scoring the most for FEU with 12 points and three rebounds. After what can be considered as an embarrassing loss for FEU, a lengthy post-game meeting followed. Head coach Olsen Racela left it to his squad to talk among themselves about what happened and what should be done. "Parang ang gusto niya sa aming sabihin na kami pa lang, kaya naming ayusin 'to. Hindi na niya kailangang pagalitan kami or whatsoever. Parang sa amin pa lang, i-take na namin yung commitment," shared Cani. "Pinag-usapan lang namin yung commitment sa team as individual players. Kahit sinong kalaban namin dapat same approach lang kami sa game," he added. With so-so practices and an underestimating mindset considered as the culprit for this recent loss, Cani looks forward to going to practice tomorrow to try to fix their course. They will prepare for their next game versus National University on October 3. "Bukas tingin ko sobrang ganda ng kakalabasan nung training namin, kasi kung hindi, parang di namin tine-take seriously itong UAAP, yung team namin. Tingin ko bukas, dun pa lang sa practice, magsa-start na kami," he said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 30th, 2018

Volleybelles jump back to training in October

The national women’s volleyball team arrived safely in Manila late Monday following a grueling campaign in the AVC Asian Women’s Volleyball Cup last week in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018

Jimmy Butler made his move - now it s Wolves turn

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — Jimmy Butler knows that NBA players can force their way into trades. Forcing their way into a trade that suits the player, that’s an entirely different story. Butler has told the Minnesota Timberwolves that he has no intentions of re-signing with the club next summer, his way of saying “trade me now” or “lose me for nothing later.” The Athletic first reported Butler’s decision. It’s a power move that players can make. Thing is, it comes with risk — because what happens next is not up to Butler. This was the lesson learned from the Kawhi Leonard situation, from the Kyrie Irving situation, from the Paul George situation. Leonard supposedly was hoping for a trade from San Antonio to the Los Angeles Clippers. Irving wanted to be sent by Cleveland to either San Antonio and Miami. George was widely assumed to leave Indiana for the Los Angeles Lakers. Leonard is in Toronto , at least for one season. Irving got sent to Boston , and is a free agent next summer. George landed in Oklahoma City, and probably will be there for years. Not a whole lot of people saw those exact moves coming. But the teams did what was best for them. In all three cases, the Spurs, the Cavs and the Pacers got the best deal they could make. Now it’s Butler’s turn. It should be easy to deduce that Butler can see himself with the Clippers, New York or Brooklyn, since all of those teams will have the cap space to give him the $140 million (or $190 million) max contract he’s seeking. Miami would interest him as well, since Butler has raved about the city in the past and he’s still very tight with fellow Marquette alum and former Chicago teammate Dwyane Wade. Toronto is believed to be on his radar. Playing alongside LeBron James with the Lakers is something that hardly anyone in the NBA would sneeze at. A person with knowledge of the Timberwolves’ situation said that Minnesota has been talking to multiple teams, gauging the Butler market. The person spoke to The Associated Press Thursday on condition of anonymity because talks are ongoing. The Timberwolves aren’t exactly in a position of strength, since now everyone knows that Butler wants out and training camps start in a few days. But that doesn’t mean Minnesota doesn’t control how this will play out. When Leonard asked for his trade, the Spurs had the luxury of time and wound up getting a very good deal from Toronto. The Cavs and the Pacers also had plenty of time to work out something to their likings when moving Irving and George. Minnesota doesn’t have that same cushion. That’ll eventually lead to Butler being asked why he waited until the final days of the offseason to inform the team of his unhappiness, because not only did he potentially limit Minnesota’s options but he could have limited his own. “You should always try to get a perennial All-Star,” former NBA forward Caron Butler told TMZ Sports, adding that he thinks Jimmy Butler is “a real winner.” The Timberwolves can basically make any of the following decisions: — Move Butler right away and start camp without distraction; — Hang onto him for a while and see if he changes his mind; — Work out a sign-and-trade; — Make him play out the year. Butler was their leading scorer last season. He’s an All-Star. He helped them end a 14-year playoff drought. Losing him, no matter what they get back, wouldn’t seem to help the Wolves’ chances of returning to the playoffs in a still-loaded Western Conference. Sometimes, even irreconcilable differences work out. Houston won NBA championships in 1994 and 1995, led by Hakeem Olajuwon. People forget that in 1992, he demanded a trade in a very ugly situation sparked by the Rockets thinking that he was faking a hamstring injury. They mended fences and won titles. Most of the time, though, when a player wants out, they get out. Dwight Howard demanded to be traded by Orlando in 2012, and got his way. Shaquille O’Neal wanted to leave the Lakers in 2004, got sent to the Heat, and then eventually forced them to send him to Phoenix. Chris Paul and Chris Webber have forced trades, too. And it’s not a new thing — Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wanted trades and got them. Butler got his trade ball rolling. Where it goes, at least this season, that’s up to Wolves coach and president Tom Thibodeau — whose own future in Minnesota might be hanging by a thread as well right now — more than anyone else. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

Gilas Pilipinas back in Manila, gets down to work for Qatar match

The Philippine national men's national basketball team arrived in the country Saturday morning following a 12-hour delay that bumped their arrival by a day. Gilas Pilipinas was originally scheduled to land in Manila Friday evening but typhoon "Ompong" forced the Nationals to endure a 12-hour layover at Dubai International Airport. According to the PBA website, the Filipinos had a game-viewing Saturday afternoon to prepare for their closed-door game against Qatar on Monday at 7:30pm at Smart Araneta Coliseum. Unable to practice Saturday, Gilas Pilipinas will return to the floor for one more training session on Sunday before game day. Head coach Yeng Guiao is also expected to ...Keep on reading: Gilas Pilipinas back in Manila, gets down to work for Qatar match.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Injured Fajardo drops by Gilas practice; Guiao appreciates gesture

He may be unable to play for the national team in its coming game, but that hasn't stopped June Mar Fajardo from showing up at training. The PBA's reigning four-time MVP made a surprise appearance to show his support for the national team which is preparing for its game against Iran on September 13. Head coach Yeng Guiao admitted that he didn't invite Fajardo to attend and appreciated the giant's gesture. "We appreciate it very much and we know he wants to play but due to circumstances beyond his control he cannot but he showed his support and desire to be with the team," said Guiao after the team's practice at Meralco Gym. "I don't know who invited him, I didn't invite h...Keep on reading: Injured Fajardo drops by Gilas practice; Guiao appreciates gesture.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

Nigeria bans national team coach for accepting money

Coach of Nigerian national football team Gernot Rohr (R) discusses with his technical crew Salisu Yusuf (C) and keeper trainer Aloy Agu during the training his team ahead of FIFA World Cup qualifie.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

Top women s college players practicing with Team USA

By PETE IACOBELLI, AP Sports Writer   COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Dawn Staley told the U.S. national team players, many returning to college soon, to keep working and improving no matter who is on the court.   Staley, the women's national team coach, held a three-day training camp as players began preparations for the FIBA World Cup in the Canary Islands this month. Many of America's best players are tied up with the WNBA playoffs and Staley brought in several of country's top college players to beef up practice and gain valuable experience before vying for a spot on the Olympic roster.   "We just have to keep moving forward. We can't worry about who we have, who we don't have," Staley said this week. "We have to implement the style of play we want on both sides of the ball and just fill players in."   Some of those fill-ins won't start playing for another two months when the college season tips off. The young camp roster includes guard Sabrina Ionescu and forward Ruthy Hebard of Oregon, Final Four hero guard Arike Ogunbowale and forward Jessica Shepard of Notre Dame and guard Tyasha Harris of Staley's South Carolina Gamecocks.   New York Liberty center Tina Charles is the most accomplished veteran in camp — and the only one with Olympic gold from 2012 and 2016.   Charles, 29, said part of her mission this week is to make the younger players feel as welcome by the veterans as fellow UConn alums Diana Taurasi and Sue Bird did when Charles first played with the national team in 2009.   "I'm trying to do the same thing here, make them feel comfortable, allow them to play their game, talk to them," Charles said. The WNBA playoffs have kept veterans like Elena Delle Donne, Taurasi, Brittney Griner, Breanna Stewart and Jewell Loyd, among others, tied up. Staley said some of those players may join when their pro teams get eliminated.   For Staley, its full speed ahead, no matter how young and wide-eyed some of the faces.   Ionescu was winded after her first practice Monday, trying to pick up the increased pace of the game.   "I think at every level, it just gets harder and harder," said Ionescu, reigning Pac 12 women's player of the year. "They were just definitely a lot stronger, quicker and had a better understanding of the game and adjustments."   Ionescu believes this experience will help when she's older and competing for a national team spot.   Ogunbowale, who hit back-to-back game winners against Connecticut in the national semifinals and Mississippi State in the title game, spent her offseason as somewhat of a celebrity. She was a guest on Ellen DeGeneres' show and on "Dancing With The Stars." At camp, she's simply a rookie trying to soak up lessons.   Los Angeles Sparks forward Nneka Ogwumike spoke to the team before the first practice, urging them to ramp it up early and don't be afraid to compete. "We're all here for the same reason," Ogunbowale said. "We're all here to get better."   Camp ends with a split-squad scrimmage at South Carolina's Colonial Life Arena before they head north for a game with Canada in Bridgeport, Connecticut, on Saturday and another with Japan at in Washington, D.C., on Monday.   The first practice overseas is in France on Sept. 13. The Americans will play three exhibitions in France and head to Tenerife, Canary Islands. World Cup pool play starts on Sept. 22 against Senegal.   Staley's not certain who'll be on the bench when that game starts, but isn't worried about it.   "We have to move forward to the ones that are committed," Staley said. "And that are going to help us compete for another World Cup gold medal."  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

ASIAN GAMES: Gold medal winner Saso eyes Youth Olympics next

JAKARTA — Yuka Saso, owner of an individual gold in golf at the 18th Asian Games that also towed the women’s team to the crown, intends to bring her winning act to the Youth Olympic Games (YOG) Buenos Aires is hosting in October. The Filipino-Japanese was still in could nine over the double-gold victory on Sunday but she couldn’t wait to buckle down to serious training for the YOG. The Asian Games gold medals were  overwhelming for Saso and teammates Bianca Pagdanganan and Louis Kay Go that they could not seem to get over their success that easily. “These [gold medals] are really, really big. The Asian Games are like the Olympics,” Saso, 17, said. “I’m proud of myself, my team and everyone who supported us.” Their coach, Rick Gibson, a journeyman on the Asian Tour who has won the fabled Philippine Open, was as ecstatic as the young girls. “Unbelievable,” Gibson said. “Wow, these girls!” “It’s my honor to be part of the team, to be part of NGAP [National Golf Associaton of the Philippines] and put the pieces [of these championship team together.” Saso’s path to the gold medal—and so as the team’s—were laced with sheer talent and destiny. An eagle-3 in the 18th and final hole coupled with the collapse of erstwhile leader Liu Wenbo, who had a quadruple bogey in the same hole, spelled a double victory for the Philippines four days after weightlifter Hidilyn Diaz won the country’s first gold. The 17-year-old Saso was in her best form when it mattered most at the Pondok Indah Golf and Country Club course, rallying from four shots down to end a gold medal drought that started after Ramon Brobio won the men’s individual title in the 1986 Seoul Games. Pagdanganan also clinched bronze in individual play as the Philippines dominated the podium for the first time in the Games.  “I just never lost faith in myself and I never doubted this team form the beginning,” Saso said. “We are all fighters and we really fought hard for our country.” Although still in their teens, Gibson said Saso and her teammates already possess the experience to excel under pressure and win major tournaments. “Yuka is a US NCAA champion. She has the makings of a world champion,” Gibson said. Gibson confided that it was only Pagdanganan and Go who walked the course ahead of the Games. “Yuka? She didn’t join the two girls. But she knows the course, she played there three years ago,” he said. The YOG are set October 6 to 18 and Gibson said Saso is eager to get back to the course and prepare herself for another gold. Saso’s No. 48 world ranking qualified her for the YOG. She will be joined by Luis Miguel Castro, who also played here in the Games along with Lloyd Jeferson Go and Ruperto Zaragoza but finished eighth behind Japan, China and South Korea. “The girls have shown that Filipinos could win in the Asian Games,” Gibson said. “It was a great day for Filipinos.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 27th, 2018

Cowboys move on at center with ill Frederick on their mind

By Schuyler Dixon, Associated Press FRISCO, Texas (AP) — A year ago, Dallas Cowboys offensive lineman Joe Looney grabbed the spotlight during training camp as the prankster who took the field in star running back Ezekiel Elliott's jersey, his cover blown by the gut sticking out under No. 21. Now that Looney has become the starting center under the serious circumstances of Travis Frederick's battle against a rare neurological disorder, the career backup plans to keep his sense of humor. "Things are still the same," Looney said Thursday, almost exactly a year after a similar throng of reporters surrounded his locker to discuss his antics in practice at team headquarters. "Football is a game. And I'm going to come out here and have fun every day doing it. Sometimes it's not going to be perfect. But at the end of the day, this is a game and I've got to enjoy it." Looney and the rest of the Cowboys will have Frederick on their mind as they prepare to start the regular season. The 27-year-old Frederick will likely miss the visit to Carolina on Sept. 9 and any number of games after that. The Cowboys simply don't know how long Frederick will be out as he undergoes treatment for Guillain-Barre Syndrome, an auto-immune condition that causes the body to attack a network of nerves around the brain and spinal cord. Weakness is one of the primary symptoms, in some cases signaled by burning sensations similar to what football players call "stingers," usually injuries around the neck. That's what Frederick was describing to the team when the Cowboys were still in California for training camp. Frederick was cleared by a specialist in the Los Angeles area over concerns about his neck. But symptoms persisted after the Cowboys returned to Texas. He got the diagnosis this week and was in his third day of treatment Thursday. The 2016 All-Pro said in a statement issued by the team that treatment will continue for several days. And while Frederick and his teammates are optimistic he will return soon, nobody can say when. Most people recover from even the most severe cases of the disease, but some will continue to have some degree of weakness, according to the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Former NFL lineman Mark Schlereth missed the second half of the 1993 season with Washington because of Guillain-Barre and wrote on Twitter that he didn't fully regain his strength for a year. But Schlereth played until 2000 and won two Super Bowls with Denver after the diagnosis. "It's tough," said 2014 All-Pro guard Zack Martin, one of Frederick's best friends on the team. "During training camp, he really didn't know what was going on. He was kind of telling us how he was feeling. It's tough that he didn't know until a couple of days ago." Owner Jerry Jones said he was relieved to get the diagnosis but deflected several questions about the severity of the illness, which likely will determine how long Frederick is out. Frederick said he was encouraged by doctors telling him they thought they caught the disease early. In retrospect, there was a telling moment early in camp in California when Frederick was uncharacteristically pushed back several feet right after the snap by defensive tackle Antwaun Woods in one-on-one drills. A frustrated Frederick shoved Woods, causing a brief scuffle. "It's amazing to me that he's been out here going through two-a-days and creating half the fights because he probably wasn't satisfied within himself how he was responding (as) I look back on it," Jones said. "But that's Frederick." Jones didn't want to discuss the idea of adding another center, although the Cowboys did sign undrafted rookie Jacob Ohnesorge this week. "I haven't and I don't have a plan as to how we'll work through this relative to the position on the team," Jones said. Martin, the right guard, has taken snaps at center occasionally since joining Dallas but is still viewed as an emergency option. He will miss the rest of the preseason but expects to be ready for the opener after hyperextending his left knee in the exhibition loss to Cincinnati last weekend. Looney, who turns 28 next week, has started 13 of 59 games in six years. He has played all 32 games in two seasons with the Cowboys, with three starts. Looney started a career-best six games in his only season with Tennessee in 2015. "Joe's played more football with the ones this year than he ever has," coach Jason Garrett said. "I think we're playing better in combination because of the reps he's gotten. He's a veteran. He's poised. He's composed. He's smart. I think he's fit in really well." The 315-pound Looney didn't fit into Elliott's jersey very well. The increased importance of his role — replacing a four-time Pro Bowl player who hasn't missed a game in five seasons — doesn't mean Looney has stopped thinking about his next gag. "You've got to be the same person every day," he said. "It's unfortunate what's going on right now. We're praying for Travis and wish nothing but the best for him. I'm definitely going to crack some jokes when I see him." The Cowboys can use the humor right now......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 24th, 2018

Homeward-bound Schooling set for next phase at Asian Games

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The hardest lap for any swimmer is usually the one coming home. That's when they have to try their hardest, giving it everything they have to get to the finish. Singapore's Olympic gold medalist Joseph Schooling is about to discover what that means when he's not in the competition pool. After spending the last nine years in relative anonymity in the United States, the 23-year-old Schooling is getting ready for the second half of his sporting career back in southeast Asia, knowing he probably won't be able to walk down the street or go for dinner without being noticed. "It's everywhere but it shows that they support you and they're excited to see you, and so you can't complain," Schooling said. "You can never brush aside your fans. You've always got to reciprocate so I'm completely fine with it." Schooling is competing this week at the Asian Games in Indonesia, where he has entered in the 50- and 100-meter butterfly races, three relays and the 50 freestyle. He will bid to defend his title in the 100 butterfly on Wednesday. Despite leaving Singapore in his teens to chase his dream of winning an Olympic gold medal, the island-state has always been in Schooling's heart. But so too has Texas, where he has been studying at University and training under the watchful eye of Eddie Reese. Schooling will complete his economics degree later this year before returning to Singapore, but will take back two permanent reminders of his time in the U.S. that changed his life. One is the tattoo on his left shoulder of the University of Texas mascot, the Longhorn. The other, inked after he won Rio, is the Olympic rings on his right bicep. The Longhorns won the NCAA national title four years in a row while Schooling was on the team and he credits his time there for helping him win the ultimate prize when he beat American great Michael Phelps for the Olympic title in the 100 fly. "It's great, it's a different atmosphere, great teammates," Schooling said. "I feel like it's the perfect environment for high performance." Schooling wants to keep swimming through to the 2024 Olympics in Paris and, although he hasn't made a final decision on his training plans, he has spent the past few months practicing with Singapore's new high-performance unit and likes what he sees. Australia's Stephan Widmer, who helped Libby Lenton and Leisel Jones win Olympic titles, has been appointed performance director at the institute while Gary Tan is the national head coach and Sonya Porter, who has extensive experience coaching in the U.S., is the technical director. Schooling's biggest challenge could be how to deal with his celebrity status but after he held off Phelps on the biggest final lap of his life to date, he's confident he can manage. "It takes some getting used to but at the end of the day if you focus on what you're doing and you don't care about outside distractions it's ok," he said. "I like being in that position and I don't see it as a burden at all.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 21st, 2018

PH volleyball team to skip Asiad opening rites to focus on Thailand preps

The Philippines national women's volleyball team has decided to skip the opening ceremonies of the 2018 Asian Games scheduled Saturday night. The team, which is fresh off a training camp in Ja.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Is yoga more beneficial than stretching for NFL players?

By Terrin Waack, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — During the mandatory rookie camp back in June, the New York Giants required players to take a yoga class. Running back Robert Martin walked in, looked around at his new teammates and thought, man, this is crazy. "We usually don't do yoga," he said. "We stretch, but we don't do yoga." Even as a first-timer, though, Martin immediately knew how the two were different . "It definitely felt weirder than regular stretching," he said. "It was a lot harder because you have to sit in certain positions we've never been in before." Players like New York Jets defensive lineman Leonard Williams and Giants quarterback Davis Webb prefer yoga because it requires a set amount of time dedicated to the practice. That is the activity. They can focus on their body without worries of what's next and feel an immediate difference afterward. The poses in yoga are more beneficial than typical stretching because they incorporate all parts of the body into the movements, Los Angeles Chargers Director of Football/Medical Services James Collins said. Stretching is linear. Yoga is non-linear, helping multidirectional joints such as the elbow, wrist, ankle, hip and shoulder. All of the major joints are encased in a capsule and contain fluid to help prevent friction between bones. Yoga helps maintain the capsules. "I describe it to (a player) as really thick saran wrap that covers his joint so that the fluid stays in there," said Collins, also the Professional Football Athletic Trainers' Society president. "But at the same time, that saran wrap needs to have its flexibility — keep it stretched out — so the join can function properly." Joint integrity comes down to maintaining mobility, he said. Because yoga is a multidirectional exercise, it allows the joint to move in every direction it can. Take the hip. Downward dog, pigeon pose or runner's lunge are just some of the yoga poses that benefit the hip. Downward dog alone has multiple variations to stretch the hip in different directions. "But if we lay down on the floor at home and just pull our leg straight up over our head, that's linear," Collin said. "So that joint is only getting work in that direction." The knee is not multidirectional, he said, which is why it's so vulnerable to getting hurt. It's not made to go certain ways. National Athletic Trainers' Association president Tory Lindley, who's Director of Athletic Training Services at Northwestern University, believes yoga creates a more conducive environment for muscle lengthening. It doesn't just jump right into poses. It's a progression, working through the whole body rather than just parts. Static stretching doesn't allow that. "We've gone away from pre-practice stretching," Lindley said. "There's much better benefits from a pre-practice dynamic workout, which is what the vast majority of teams regardless of sport will do. And then post-practice, when flexibility training is beneficial, in most cases that environment is much more about let's get off the field as quickly as we can versus let's take time to dedicate to the stretching or flexibility piece." The debate isn't if yoga should be done before or after practice, it's when is there time to aside for yoga and yoga alone. Gwen Lawrence, the founder of Power Yoga for Sport who worked with Giants for 18 seasons, said NFL players should do yoga twice a week with sessions lasting an hour. That's best case scenario and more realistic for the offseason. Right now, Kaleen Lugo gets 45 minutes once or twice a week with the Chargers, depending on their preseason schedule. During the regular season, players should at least do it on their recovery day, whether the team offers it or they do it independently. It should become a routine so players can develop and advance their personal practice. "Just a straight sun salutation," Giants linebacker Jordan Williams said of doing progression of yoga moves. "When you start getting that flow through — warrior, warrior lunge, runner's lunge and then bring that through with downward dog and upward dog — I love that." Is yoga more beneficial than stretching for NFL players? By TERRIN WAACK,  AP Sports Writer NEW YORK (AP) — During the mandatory rookie camp back in June, the New York Giants required players to take a yoga class. Running back Robert Martin walked in, looked around at his new teammates and thought, man, this is crazy. "We usually don't do yoga," he said. "We stretch, but we don't do yoga." Even as a first-timer, though, Martin immediately knew how the two were different. "It definitely felt weirder than regular stretching," he said. "It was a lot harder because you have to sit in certain positions we've never been in before." Players like New York Jets defensive lineman Leonard Williams and Giants quarterback Davis Webb prefer yoga because it requires a set amount of time dedicated to the practice. That is the activity . They can focus on their body without worries of what's next and feel an immediate difference afterward. The poses in yoga are more beneficial than typical stretching because they incorporate all parts of the body into the movements, Los Angeles Chargers Director of Football/Medical Services James Collins said. Stretching is linear. Yoga is non-linear, helping multidirectional joints such as the elbow, wrist, ankle, hip and shoulder. All of the major joints are encased in a capsule and contain fluid to help prevent friction between bones. Yoga helps maintain the capsules. "I describe it to (a player) as really thick saran wrap that covers his joint so that the fluid stays in there," said Collins, also the Professional Football Athletic Trainers' Society president. "But at the same time, that saran wrap needs to have its flexibility — keep it stretched out — so the join can function properly." Joint integrity comes down to maintaining mobility, he said. Because yoga is a multidirectional exercise, it allows the joint to move in every direction it can. Take the hip. Downward dog, pigeon pose or runner's lunge are just some of the yoga poses that benefit the hip. Downward dog alone has multiple variations to stretch the hip in different directions. "But if we lay down on the floor at home and just pull our leg straight up over our head, that's linear," Collin said. "So that joint is only getting work in that direction." The knee is not multidirectional, he said, which is why it's so vulnerable to getting hurt. It's not made to go certain ways. National Athletic Trainers' Association president Tory Lindley, who's Director of Athletic Training Services at Northwestern University, believes yoga creates a more conducive environment for muscle lengthening. It doesn't just jump right into poses. It's a progression, working through the whole body rather than just parts. Static stretching doesn't allow that. "We've gone away from pre-practice stretching," Lindley said. "There's much better benefits from a pre-practice dynamic workout, which is what the vast majority of teams regardless of sport will do. And then post-practice, when flexibility training is beneficial, in most cases that environment is much more about let's get off the field as quickly as we can versus let's take time to dedicate to the stretching or flexibility piece." The debate isn't if yoga should be done before or after practice, it's when is there time to aside for yoga and yoga alone. Gwen Lawrence, the founder of Power Yoga for Sport who worked with Giants for 18 seasons, said NFL players should do yoga twice a week with sessions lasting an hour. That's best case scenario and more realistic for the offseason. Right now, Kaleen Lugo gets 45 minutes once or twice a week with the Chargers, depending on their preseason schedule. During the regular season, players should at least do it on their recovery day, whether the team offers it or they do it independently. It should become a routine so players can develop and advance their personal practice. "Just a straight sun salutation," Giants linebacker Jordan Williams said of doing progression of yoga moves. "When you start getting that flow through — warrior, warrior lunge, runner's lunge and then bring that through with downward dog and upward dog — I love that."  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018