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POSTSCRIPT: Daughters of Mary Mother of the Church “50 Remarkable Years”

August 5, 1966: Feast of Our Lady of Snow Sister Therese Vicente (a pious, smart, energetic carmelite nun) receives approval from Archbishop Teopisto Alberto to start a new order of nuns dedicated to the service of the Catholic Church by rende.....»»

Category: newsSource: bicolmail bicolmailAug 25th, 2016

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

UCCP bishop, staunch Marcos critic, dies in Baguio

BAGUIO CITY - Bishop Emeritus Juan Marigza of the United Church of Christ of the Philippines (UCCP), a vocal critic of dictator Ferdinand Marcos, died this week. He was 89 years old. Marigza spoke out against Marcos and pushed for the organization of Baguio chapters of the Free Legal Assistance Group (FLAG) and the North Luzon Human Rights Organization (NLHRO). He placed Martial Law detainees like the late Corazon Cortel, wife of slain rebel priest Conrado Balweg, under his protection. In 1984, his eldest daughter Mary Lou and six others disappeared. The bishop and his wife visited every military camp for two weeks in search of Mary Lou until soldiers finally admitted arresting the...Keep on reading: UCCP bishop, staunch Marcos critic, dies in Baguio.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

Houston s Harden wins NBA MVP over James and Davis

By Beth Harris, Associated Press SANTA MONICA, Calif. (AP) — James Harden of the Houston Rockets was voted the NBA’s Most Valuable Player, beating out four-time winner LeBron James and Anthony Davis of the Pelicans at the NBA Awards on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time). Harden joined Michael Jordan as the only players to average at least 20 points, eight assists, five rebounds and 1.7 steals in a season. He led the league in scoring, three-pointers and 50-point games with four while helping the Rockets to an NBA-leading 65 wins. James didn’t attend the show in Barker Hangar at the Santa Monica Airport amid speculation about his future. He has until Friday (Saturday, PHL time) to tell the Cavaliers if he will pick up his $35.6 million option for next season or opt for free agency. Harden, who is from Los Angeles, led his mother on stage before he accepted the trophy from Commissioner Adam Silver. “I’m not going to get emotional,” he said from behind dark sunglasses. “She’s my backbone in good times and bad times.” Ben Simmons of the Philadelphia 76ers won Rookie of the Year. The guard averaged 15 points, eight rebounds and eight assists, joining Hall of Famer Oscar Robertson as the only rookies to post those numbers in a season. Simmons helped Philadelphia to a 52-30 record, including ending the season with a 16-game winning streak. He beat out finalists Donovan Mitchell of Utah and Jayson Tatum of Boston. Guard Victor Oladipo of the Indiana Pacers earned Most Improved Player. He averaged 23.1 points in his first season with the Pacers while nabbing his first All-Star berth. He also led the league in steals for the first time. The Defensive Player of the Year went to center Rudy Gobert of the Utah Jazz. He was the leading vote-getter for the league’s All-Defensive first team while anchoring a Jazz defense that ranked second in the NBA in defensive rating. Lou Williams of the Los Angeles Clippers took Sixth Man honors. The guard became the first player to average at least 20 points for the first time in his 13th season or later. He led the league in fourth-quarter points and scoring average. Williams kissed his two young daughters on his way to the stage after becoming the Clippers’ third winner in the last five years. Dwane Casey was chosen Coach of the Year for his work with the Toronto Raptors, who fired him last month. He has since become coach of the Detroit Pistons. “Can’t look in the rear view mirror,” Casey said backstage. “Winston Churchill said success is measured by failure, failure, and then come back with enthusiasm, and that’s what I’ve done.” Casey led the Raptors to the No. 1 seed in the East for the first time in franchise history after winning a team-record 59 games. Casey coached the East in the All-Star Game for the first time. Casey won over Quin Snyder of Utah and Brad Stevens of Boston. Robertson received the Lifetime Achievement Award from presenters Charles Barkley and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. After Barkley mentioned last year’s recipient Bill Russell, Boston’s Hall of Fame center flipped his middle finger in Barkley’s direction. Robertson is the career leader in triple-doubles and was the first player to average one for a season. His antitrust case against the NBA also ushered in free agency for players, which Robertson said was his most important assist. Backstage, Robertson commended the activism of today’s players, although he wondered why more white athletes aren’t speaking out. “The only thing that really bothers me is where are the white athletes when this is happening?” he said. “This is not a black athlete problem. You see injustice in the world. It’s all around.” Robertson went on to say he hopes “the whites and the blacks get together, even with the football,” a reference to NFL players who have taken a knee or sat in silence during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial inequality......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 26th, 2018

Deadly Indonesia church suicide bombings committed by one family

SURABAYA, Indonesia – A family of six including two young daughters staged suicide bombings at three Indonesian churches during Sunday services, killing at least 13 people and wounding dozens in attacks claimed by the Islamic State group. The bombings at three churches in Surabaya were Indonesia's deadliest for years, as the world's biggest ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 13th, 2018

Zsa Zsa Padilla to hold ‘The Best Day of My Life’ concert

  After celebrating her 35th year in show business with a sold-out concert in Cebu, Divine Diva Zsa Zsa Padilla is set to stage an intimate concert titled "The Best Day of My Life" at the Newport Performing Arts Theater in Resorts World Manila at 8 p.m. on May 11. Apart from marking her 35 years stellar showbiz career, the multi-awarded singer/actress will also celebrate Mother's Day and her upcoming birthday, with daughters Zia Quizon and Karylle joining her onstage. More surprise guests are set to join the Divine Diva, mostly long-time industry friends. Her godchild, Paolo Valenciano, directs the concert. Padilla first came into the entertainment scene in the mid-7...Keep on reading: Zsa Zsa Padilla to hold ‘The Best Day of My Life’ concert.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 12th, 2018

Frankenstein author Mary Shelley kept her dead husband’s heart for 30 years

MARY Shelley is perhaps most well known for writing Frankenstein. Aside from being the mother of all “creating a monster” stories, she was also the wife of well-known poet Percy Shelley. Percy was still married when he and Mary began their affair in 1814. Perhaps that was a bad omen….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Prince Harry, Meghan Markle to marry May 19 on FA Cup day

By Jill Lawless, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will marry in St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle on May 19 — the same day as one of the biggest English sports events of the year, the FA Cup final. The date was confirmed Friday by the prince's Kensington Palace office. While most British royal weddings are on weekdays, this one is a Saturday, and the same day as the soccer showdown at London's Wembley Stadium. Harry's grandmother Queen Elizabeth II and other royals are expected to attend the wedding, along with Markle's parents, Thomas Markle and Doria Ragland. The climax of soccer's oldest cup competition could present a distraction for guests at the royal reception, although the events should at least be at different times. The FA Cup competition, which is open to hundreds of teams all the way from the top-ranked Premier League down to amateur clubs, began in August and is played every month until two teams meet in the final. England's Football Association said in a statement that "May 19 promises to be a wonderful day with such a special royal occasion being followed by English football's showpiece event." The timing could be an issue for Harry's older brother Prince William, who is expected to be the best man at the wedding. William is president of the Football Association. He attended this year's match and presented a trophy to the winner, Arsenal — but will likely be otherwise engaged in 2018. Harry is an Arsenal fan, and may find himself conflicted if his team makes the final for a fourth time in the last five years. The prince and Markle announced their engagement last month after an 18-month romance. The 33-year-old prince, who is fifth in line to the British throne, and the 36-year-old divorced American actress met through a mutual friend in 2016, bonded during a camping holiday in Botswana and managed to keep their relationship secret from the media for several months. In a joint interview last month, Markle said Harry proposed over a roast-chicken dinner at home. He gave her a ring set with two diamonds that belonged to his late mother, Princess Diana. Markle is to be baptized in the Church of England before the wedding, and has said she will acquire British citizenship. That will require passing an eclectic citizenship test on British life and history that is famous for tripping up applicants. The wedding venue holds a central place in the history of the royal family. Windsor Castle, west of London, is one of Queen Elizabeth II's main residences. The 15th-century chapel is as historic but more intimate than Westminster Abbey, where William married Kate Middleton in 2011. When the engagement was announced, the palace said the wedding of Prince Harry and Markle will "reflect their characters and personalities" and be a moment of "fun and joy.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 16th, 2017

One Rohingya’s struggle to empower women in Malaysia – Al Jazeera

Tucked away upstairs at a shopping plaza in this city’s north end is a small storefront turned classroom for dozens of Rohinyga women and children. The sound of these women reciting English phrases, laughing and the occasional cries of kids can be heard in the stairwell. Its founder, Sharifah Husain, 24, said she wanted to do something to help women and children in her community, who are not allowed to work or study in Malaysia. “I noticed we didn’t have a Rohingya women’s organisation that was standing up for women – to be the voice of women,” Husain said. Husain comes from Buthidaung village in Myanmar’s restive Rakhine state. Her father fled to Malaysia when she was five-years old, fearing for his life. Husain was left behind with her mother and two younger siblings. The village was attacked soon afterward, so Husain’s mother took them to Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar – then known as Burma. Her recollection of the traumatic moment when a local mob attacked her village is hazy. It took place almost 20 years ago. But it mirrors the accounts of Rohingya refugees now in Bangladesh, who’ve recently fled the Myanmar’s army clearance operations and local Buddhist mobs. “My mother was arrested in Yangon and sentenced to prison for not having official [identification or travel] documents,” Husain recounted. “This left me in charge.” Husain can’t remember how long she spent in Yangon, but she said she was separated from her siblings and sent north to Mandalay and forced into servitude. She spoke to her father in Malaysia, over the phone, and he agreed to pay human traffickers to bring Husain and her siblings to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia’s largest city. All three, including Husain, were smuggled by land, into Thailand and Malaysia. At that time the Southeast Asia trafficking route wasn’t as defined as it is today. Human trafficking groups in Bangladesh and Thailand now make a lot of money off of poor, desperate refugees fleeing war and violence in Myanmar. Today, the concern faced by the Malaysia government is if it recognises its refugees then that could send a signal to more to make the perilous journey, now taken by sea from Myanmar and Bangladesh to sanctuary in Malaysia, where they don’t face violent persecution. The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, states there are 152,170 registered refugees in Malaysia. The majority are Rohingya, displaced from their homes in Myanmar, like Husain. But the amount of unregistered refugees varies widely from 40,000 to 140,000, according to Asylum Access Malaysia. “The big question is – when are the boats going to come? There’s no indication they will now, but there’s definitely a high possibility that they will. And once new groups arrive, that complicates [the] situation,” said Deepa Nambiar, Asylum Access Malaysia director. UNHCR runs what it calls a “parallel school system” for refugees in Malaysia, allowing children to  access basic, primary-level education. Refugee groups and local faith-based organisations fund these schools, staffed by volunteers. One-hundred and twenty-eight informal refugee schools in Malaysia access funding from the UN. It provides education to 7,154 children, according to UNHCR. Malaysia’s Prime Minister’s Office states 16,809 Rohingya refugee children are registered with UNHCR. This means about 10,000, or more, refugee children in Malaysia are unable to access any form of education. A dozen or so more informal refugee schools exist but rely solely on donations and are understaffed, said Asylum Access. “To live in Malaysia, yes you can live, but you don’t have a future. You are in a box. You can’t go out of the box,” Husain said. Husain has received no formal education in Malaysia. This is remarkable considering her drive to educate refugee women and children. Malaysians are supporting Rohingya Women’s Development Network by volunteering as teachers and support staff. Rohinyga Women’s Development Network started officially last year. But Husain has spent the last decade educating her community’s most vulnerable women and children in their own homes. “I have built up a trust. The men especially trust me. They feel safe sending their wives to our centre because they know me,” Husain said. Word has spread and more refugee families are now attending Rohingya Women’s Development Network classes, where they receive English-language instruction, leadership training and brand new self-defence classes. “We want to stop domestic violence. We want to stop child marriages in the community. We want to build up women’s empowerment,” Husain said. “We really need the Malaysia government to recognise us.” Husain is trying to change the mentality in the Rohingya and wider refugee community in Malaysia, that women and girls can’t study, work, or earn an income. She receives some funding from UNHCR to run programmes but uses her own money to keep them going. “Of course I have support from my family. My father is my hero. My husband is my hero. Both of these men have really pushed me forward,” Husain added. The Rohingya Women’s Development Network has teamed up with Asylum Access Malaysia on a refugee theatre project. This will allow refugee women to educate the community on issues of sexual violence. “What I think is so innovative about Sharifah and the team is that when we were discussing this project they said ‘we need to get men involved’,” Nambiar said. Husain is appealing to others in the refugee community to support initiatives set up by the Malaysia government and civil society groups to help […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Missing Marian statue recovered after 4 decades

A REVERED statue of the Blessed Mother that disappeared mysteriously from a shrine in southern Philippines almost 42 years ago has been recovered and will be returned to church authorities. Señora de Triunfo de Ozamiz is a 17th century image of the Immaculate Conception that went missing from the altar….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsNov 17th, 2017

Daughter says she was abused by polygamous sect leader

SALT LAKE CITY--- A daughter of polygamous sect leader Warren Jeffs said he sexually abused her for years when she was a child growing up in the secretive group, according to an interview aired Friday on "Megyn Kelly Today." Rachel Jeffs, now 33, told NBC News the abuse began when she was 8 and happened countless times, despite her mother's attempt to intervene, before she confronted him about it in a letter at age 16. Other former members of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, including son Roy Jeffs, have also accused him of sexually abusing them as children. Rachel Jeffs has penned a book about her experiences titled "Breaking Free: How I Escaped ...Keep on reading: Daughter says she was abused by polygamous sect leader.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 11th, 2017

Texas church gunman sent hostile text messages before attack

  SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas, United States --- The gunman who killed 26 people at a small-town Texas church sent threatening text messages to his mother-in-law before the attack, which appeared to have been driven by domestic tensions, authorities said Monday. A day after the deadliest mass shooting in state history, investigators also revealed that the shooter had been confronted about domestic violence at least twice in the last five years, including an assault on his ex-wife and a child that ended his Air Force career and another report of violence against a girlfriend who became his second wife. In the tiny community of Sutherland Springs, population 400, grieving t...Keep on reading: Texas church gunman sent hostile text messages before attack.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

Flanagan upsets Keitany, ends US drought at NYC Marathon

NEW YORK (AP) — Shalane Flanagan thought about the seven years building to this race, possibly her last. She thought about the running star striding next to her. She thought about her family. She thought about Meb. With one hellacious holler at the finish, it all poured out. Flanagan dethroned Mary Keitany on Sunday and became the first American woman to win the New York City Marathon since 1977, potentially ending her decorated career with her first major marathon victory. Flanagan's breakthrough came in the last career race for American great Meb Keflezighi. The 2009 New York winner collapsed at the finish line, his 42-year-old body pushed to its limit in his 26th marathon. Keflezighi finished 11th, about five minutes behind 24-year-old winner Geoffrey Kamworor of Kenya. This may have been Flanagan's final race, too, although the four-time Olympian wasn't ready to commit. But she likes the idea of her and Keflezighi going out together. "I was thinking of Meb, and I was thinking of how I wanted to make him proud," Flanagan said. Her win came five days after the bike path terror attack in lower Manhattan killed eight and raised questions about security for Sunday. That hit home for Flanagan, a Massachusetts native who completed the 2013 Boston Marathon shortly before a bomb went off at the finish line, killing three and wounding more than 260 others. "It's been a tough week for New Yorkers, and a tough week for our nation," Flanagan said. "I thought of, 'What a better gift than to make Americans smile today?'" Flanagan ended a dominant stretch in New York by Keitany, a Kenyan runner who had won here three straight years. Flanagan stalked Keitany most of the way, hovering behind her during an unusually slow first 20 miles by the lead women. Flanagan, Keitany and third-place finisher Mamitu Daska of Ethiopia broke from the pack in the 21st mile, and with about three miles left, Flanagan hit the jets. She finished in 2 hours, 26 minutes, 53 seconds, about a minute faster than Keitany. Flanagan cried and yelled as she approached the finish line without another runner in sight. "It's indescribable," the 36-year-old said. "It's a moment I'm trying to soak up and savor." The last American woman to win New York was Miki Gorman, who took consecutive titles in 1976-77. "Way too long," Flanagan said. Flanagan knows about long waits. She finished second here in her debut marathon in 2010 but hadn't run New York since. It was also her first marathon since finishing sixth at the Rio Games. She fractured her lower back last winter and missed the Boston Marathon in the spring. She was "heartbroken" to miss her hometown race, but the injury set her up to take aim at Keitany in New York. Flanagan had called Keitany "the alpha racer" and said she was ready to "suffer dearly" while keeping pace with the unpredictable Kenyan. As she went stride-for-stride with Keitany in the middle miles, Flanagan wasn't sure what she'd have for the final stretch. "There's always creeping doubts of whether I was going to have enough to beat the best in the world," she said. Keitany never found her top gear Sunday, though, and finished with her slowest New York time since a third-place result in 2010. Keitany said she had a problem of a personal nature Saturday afternoon that affected her Sunday, but she would not disclose the issue. Flanagan held a stern look on the course until getting emotional near the finish in Central Park. On the podium, she put her hands over face and began to cry again when she was announced the winner. She turned to hug Keitany before accepting her medal. "This is the moment I've dreamed of since I was a little girl," Flanagan said. She's determined to pass on that dream, too. She and husband Steven Edwards — a former track and field star — have been fostering two teenage daughters who are also aspiring runners. Flanagan's parents were also marathoners, and her mom, Cheryl Treworgy, once held the world record. "This means a lot to me, to my family," Flanagan said. "And hopefully inspires the next generation of American women to just be patient." Kamworor beat countryman Wilson Kipsang by three seconds, winning with a time of 2:10:53. Kamworor separated from the pack late and seemed like he would cruise to his first major marathon victory, but Kipsang sneaked up on him at the very end. Kamworor was surprised to see the 2014 New York winner behind him on a large video board located near the finish line. "I look at the camera, I saw someone was coming, which was Wilson," Kamworor said. "And I had to believe in myself because I was holding out for the finish." Kamworor kissed the pavement right after crossing the finish, then turned to embrace Kipsang. Ethiopia's Lelisa Desisa finished third. A few minutes later, the Central Park crowd gave perhaps its loudest cheers of the day to Keflezighi. He waved and blew kisses to the grandstands through the home stretch, then had to be carried away after crumbling at the finish line. "It was a beautiful victory lap, you could say," Keflezighi said. The race went off as planned a few days after New York's biggest terror attack since 9/11. Police had promised an unprecedented effort to secure the course, a plan including hundreds of extra uniformed patrol and plainclothes officers, roving teams of counterterrorism commandos armed with heavy weapons, bomb-sniffing dogs and rooftop snipers. Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city was expecting 2 million fans to line the streets. The only interruption came when firetrucks had to cross the course to address an emergency that organizers said was unrelated to the race. The course was briefly closed around Mile 18 to let the trucks through, but that was well after the elite runners had finished. Beverly Ramos competed with a Puerto Rican flag headband two months after her home island was ravaged by Hurricane Maria. Like many in Puerto Rico, Ramos was without power after the storm. Still, she decided to continue training near San Juan, seeking out safe places to run amid the wreckage. "You have to stay strong no matter what," Ramos said. "A lot of runners encouraged me to continue and to push." The wheelchair events were a Swiss sweep. Manuela Schar finally upended four-time defending champion Tatyana McFadden to win the women's race, while countryman Marcel Hug repeated as the men's champ. Schar had been runner-up the last three years but beat her nemesis McFadden by nearly three minutes. Hug has won New York three times. Comedian Kevin Hart made his marathon debut at New York. Forget about chasing gold — the actor and fitness nut was mostly worried about avoiding humiliation. "I don't want to see a bunch of memes of me looking weird out here," Hart said shortly before starting.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 6th, 2017

POSTSCRIPT: Naga – A Pilgrim City (like no other)

The shouts of  “Viva El Divino Rostro” and “Viva La Virgen de Penafrancia” are in itself a form of adulation to our Almighty God, our Creator. Jesus and His Mother Mary are the object of our adoration and thanksgi.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bicolmailRelated NewsSep 15th, 2016

Turning two

Diners looking for Pinoy comfort food will also be happy to find lots of classic Filipino favorites on the desserts menu. Two years ago, on 8 September, the birthday of Mama Mary, celebrity chef and restaurateur Jessie Sincioco opened Chef Jessie Grill at The Grove by Rockwell in Pasig. It was a dining concept born […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

Tadashi Shoji: Making all women beautiful

I’D LIKE you to imagine what it’s like to be Octavia Spencer — or any other woman who has had to go against the flow, for that matter. Ms. Spencer was born in 1972, with the backdrop of the South’s racial attitudes. Her mother worked as a maid in the American South. Her father died when she was 13, and she graduated from university with a degree in English — despite being dyslexic. She would spend the next years of her life climbing her way up Hollywood’s ladder. And in 2012, when she swept the awards season of 2012 for her work in The Help, designers refused to dress her for her big nights. “I’m just a short, chubby girl,” she was quoted as saying in Elle magazine. The post Tadashi Shoji: Making all women beautiful appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

[Two Pronged] My husband is leaving me and my son for his church

Rappler's Life and Style section runs an advice column by couple Jeremy Baer and clinical psychologist Dr Margarita Holmes. Jeremy has a master's degree in law from Oxford University. A banker of 37 years who worked in 3 continents, he has been training with Dr Holmes for the last ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

Read the letter Lucy Torres-Gomez wrote for daughter Juliana 16 years ago

MANILA, Philippines – Juliana Gomez celebrated her 18th birthday on September 8, but her mother, former actress and Leyte representative Lucy Torres-Gomez was apparently already preparing for the moment 16 years ago. Lucy penned a letter to her daughter on September 10, 2002, on the set of the talk show, SiS. ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Fatima: How the Virgin Mary scooped CNN on world events

Fatima, Portugal, is the site of the most famous of the Virgin Mary's apparitions. Many are aware that it involved children and a startling solar miracle. However, few know that it predicted great world tragedies.   The 1917 apparitions revealed to the three young shepherds of coming events: the end of World War I; an even worse war, or World War II; the rise of communism and future wars it would bring; and the fall of communism.   These prophecies have come true.   In the apparition of July 12, 1917, during World War I, the Virgin Mary said that a worse war was coming. She also made two urgent requests to the Catholic Church.   "The war is...Keep on reading: Fatima: How the Virgin Mary scooped CNN on world events.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

From the Bay to the PH: Stephen Curry s Manila Tour

Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry made good on a promise he made to Filipinos three years ago -- to return to Manila.  Stephen’s game-breaking approach to basketball has scored him legions of adoring Filipino fans and followers from all around the globe who revel in every deep 3, every slippery drive to the rim, every sneaky steal.  His popularity has transcended borders, languages and cultures, and nowhere was that more evident than in Manila. Stephen’s first day began with a more than two hour on court workout with his trainer Brandon Payne. From shooting to speed and agility drills, Curry put in off season work as he continues to prepare for the upcoming NBA season. Steph Curry early practice in Manila ! pic.twitter.com/gCYsttNQIa — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 7, 2018 Curry wasted no time in tasting the local cuisine, and he couldn't have started with anything better, as he tried out some halo-halo.  Curry tries halo halo pic.twitter.com/Nn6Nm6zdGE — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 7, 2018   A cold dessert that includes shaved ice, and various fruits such as shredded coconut, mangoes, jackfruit mixed with gelatin and milk. After touring a Jeepney, he traveled to Mall of Asia for the Under Armour Southeast Asia 3x3 Finals which saw he and his father, Dell Curry, on court for a shooting contest with other local fathers, sons and daughters. The competition was fierce but Dell and Stephen secured the win. From a press conference with journalists who came from all around Southeast Asia to cover the UA Brand House ribbon cutting to a skills competition shootout with his dad Dell, everywhere Stephen went in public, his Filipino fans followed in lockstep, fascinated by the presence of the two-time MVP and three-time World Champion. The fans weren’t the only ones awestruck - Stephen himself was blown away by the incredible landscape and cultural significance of the dense and bustling Manila.  Taking a quick tour of some city sights, Stephen then toured a Jeepney, the flamboyant WWII era truck that still can be found transporting residents throughout Manila. Curry capped off the day with a relaxing Filipino scalp massage at Titan and a visit to his shoe brand's main store. Before leaving the country, Curry dropped by the opening ceremony of UAAP season 81, where he led the legions of student-athletes in reciting the oath of sportsmanship. .@StephenCurry30 officially opens #UAAPSeason81! 🔥 pic.twitter.com/GhSKYky44j — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 8, 2018 After a busy three-day visit to Manila, much is left for the MVP's Asian Tour. Curry still has scheduled visits to Japan and China, among other Asian nations. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

The pure gift of God

WESTERN and Eastern Catholic Churches celebrate the birthday of the Blessed Virgin Mary today (September 8). No woman is so well-known and loved than the Mother of Jesus, an honor that began with the Apostles even before Jesus ascended into heaven. The affection of Catholics for her arose from her many appearances and intercessions through […] The post The pure gift of God appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018