Advertisements


PNP to deploy tracker teams after 15-day grace period

ILOILO CITY, Sep. 11 (PIA) - The Philippine National Police (PNP) will deploy tracker teams to capture detainees who have availed of the Good Conduct Time Allowance (GTCA), but refuse to surrender.....»»

Category: newsSource: manilanews manilanewsSep 11th, 2019

PNP to deploy tracker teams after 15-day grace period

ILOILO CITY, Sep. 11 (PIA) - The Philippine National Police (PNP) will deploy tracker teams to capture detainees who have availed of the Good Conduct Time Allowance (GTCA), but refuse to surrender.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsSep 11th, 2019

'GCTABalikLoob: 121 CIDG tracker team na hahanting sa pinalayang convicts, kasado na!

Manila, Philippines – Nakahanda na ang Philippine National Police (PNP) Criminal Investigation at Detection Group (CIDG) sa pag-deploy ng 121 tracker teams sa buong bansa sa Huwebes (Sept. 19) para sa paghunting sa mga hindi kusang loob na sumukong convicts na napalaya sa Good Conduct Time Allowance (GCTA) law. Sinabi ni CIDG Deputy Director, Brig. […] The post #GCTABalikLoob: 121 CIDG tracker team na hahanting sa pinalayang convicts, kasado na! appeared first on REMATE ONLINE......»»

Category: newsSource:  remateRelated NewsSep 15th, 2019

30 Teams in 30 Days: Nuggets to keep rolling with Nikola Jokic, Jamal Murray

Like most summers in the NBA, the 2019 edition was chock full of trades, free agent news and player movement. From the defending-champion Toronto Raptors to just about every other team in the league, change was the most applicable word when it came to describing team rosters for the 2019-20 season. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- in order of regular-season finish from 2018-19 -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: Denver Nuggets 2018-19 Record: 54-28, lost in the second round of the playoffs Key additions: Jerami Grant, forward (trade); Bol Bol, forward (draft). Key subtractions: Trey Lyles, forward; Isaiah Thomas, guard. The lowdown: The steady growth of the Nuggets was evident in a 50-win season and a first-round victory in the playoffs over the more-experienced Spurs, which was clearly a step forward; then the journey ended with a sour taste after Denver lost a Game 7 at home to a lower seed, the Blazers. In all, the Nuggets received almost everything they’d hoped for from a developing contender, especially in the form of Nikola Jokic. The multi-skilled Serb established himself as the league’s most talented big man, if not the best period, with a stellar performance that attracted some MVP notice. He averaged 20 points, almost 11 rebounds and seven assists in an offense that ran through him, rare in today’s spread-the-floor league where centers are being phased out or pegged as role players and pick-setters. Jokic reminded many of Bill Walton or maybe Vlade Divac for his precise and sometimes entertaining passing skills from the high post. His co-star was Jamal Murray, who made generous strides as a leader and shot-maker and fit well with Jokic. The Nuggets also played some of the best defense in the league for much of the season and had solid back-court depth with Monte Morris and Malik Beasley averaging a combined 21 points off the bench. There were mixed reviews, however, from Gary Harris; the starting two-guard didn’t improve and in some areas actually regressed as he struggled with injuries in a 57-game season. Same for Will Barton, who shot 40 percent and played 43 games. But those were nit-picks. The Nuggets finally arrived after going a league-leading 34-7 at home, reaching the second round of the playoffs for the first time in a decade, and using the draft and trades to remake the roster over the last few years to stay in the attic in the very competitive West, which was no easy task. Summer summary: When an NBA team reaches a critical stage of the developing process and checks all the necessary boxes, it’s time to keep the continuity. Which means, time to pay up, and the Nuggets did just that this summer with two of their important figures: Murray and GM Tim Connelly, and both were easy calls. Murray went from a rookie who played behind Emmanuel Mudiay to a dependable, sometimes clutch-shooting guard in just three seasons. While he’s obviously the starter at the point for the Nuggets, Murray’s value lies in his flexibility; he can play off the ball and be just as valuable whenever Jokic assumes the “point-center” role. He averaged 18.2 points and 4.8 assists and showed growth despite struggling at times in his first postseason. He also doesn’t turn 23 until February. So the Nuggets gave him $170 million over five years, banking on his continued growth, which appears to be a safe investment. Therefore, Denver’s two most important players, Jokic and Murray, are under contract together for the next three seasons. Connelly replaced Masai Ujiri in 2013 and repaid the Nuggets’ faith by overseeing a basketball operation that has run mostly smoothly ever since. He drafted Jokic at No. 41 and hired Mike Malone as coach. The Nuggets have gone from 33 wins in Malone’s first season to 54. Even better, the meat of the roster is trending in the right direction and there’s no dead weight. This summer, the Wizards, after firing Ernie Grunfeld, chased after Connelly, a Baltimore native who attended college in D.C. Connelly broke into the business as an intern for the Wizards and has family ties to the D.C area, so the prospect of leaving Denver was a real threat. Ultimately, Nuggets boss Josh Kroenke was successful in persuading Connelly to stay. Usually that comes with a promise of a significant raise, but more importantly, Connelly saw what he’s building in Denver and couldn’t leave unfinished business. Denver has solid mix of youth and vets and is coming off a season where it was the No. 2 seed in the West. Hard to walk away from that. Paul Millsap also cashed in when the Nuggets agreed to pick up his 2019-20 option year for $30 million. There was some question whether the Nuggets would tie that much into a soon-to-be 35-year-old forward who, statistically anyway, is coming off his worst season since 2009-10 and his fewest minutes since 2008. But Millsap still brings a solid defensive mindset and experience, and anyway, the Nuggets were all about maintaining the flow this summer. Plus, Denver will remain under the luxury tax with with Millsap’s option. Millsap’s minutes could be reduced this season because the Nuggets traded for a more athletic option in Grant. With the Thunder, Grant improved his 3-point shooting last season and became more of a well-rounded forward. If used correctly by Malone, he can thrive in Denver, which badly needs his physical gifts. Of course, there’s also the wild card: Michael Porter Jr. The club’s first-round pick two summers ago sat all last season while recovering from a back issue, then was scratched from summer league play in July because of a minor knee issue which was more of a precautionary move. In a best-case scenario, Porter stays healthy and gives the Nuggets three options at power forward. Connelly didn’t have a first-round pick this summer but swung a deal to fetch a second-rounder once Bol Bol dropped to No. 44 in the draft. The son of former NBA player Manute Bol, he suffered a foot injury last season at Oregon and NBA teams were wary of his potential for recovery. Well, Connelly and the Nuggets will essentially treat Bol as they did Porter; Bol will be an injury red-shirt and prepare for 2020-21. And so, the Nuggets’ summer wasn’t about making wholesale changes, but keeping the pace they’ve set over the last three seasons and rewarding some of the key personnel responsible for it. Patience has allowed the Nuggets to get this far and so there was no reason to panic or rush the process this offseason. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 15th, 2019

FIBA: Iran sends Gilas home with a 20-point World Cup rout

It was false hope. Gilas Pilipinas had its best start in the 2019 FIBA World Cup Sunday and yet the Philippines still got demolished by Iran at the Wukesong Arena in Beijing, 95-75. After another two losses in the 17-32 classification phase, Gilas ended the horror trip to China with a 0-5 record, one of two sure teams to finish winless in the World Cup through the weekend. At -147, Gilas is in the running to finish in last place unless Japan (-115), and Jordan (-132) also finish with 0-5 records and end up with worse point differentials than the Filipinos. Ivory Coast is also 0-5 but they have better point differential than Gilas. The Philippines actually had a strong start, firing six three-point shots in the opening period. However, Iran still led after one, 30-24. Gilas’ offense cooled off, managing only 26 point through the next two quarters and the Iranians made their move, dominating for a 75-50 lead. Iran cruised in the fourth, making sure to maintain a huge lead. With China’s loss to Nigeria, the Iranians clinched an automatic Olympics slot in beating Gilas, ending up as the best Asian team in the World Cup. Iran and China both finished with identical 2-3 marks but the Iranians (+7) had superior point differential compared to the Chinese (-10). Hamed Haddadi was the high man for Iran, finishing with 19 points. Nikkhah Bahrami added 17 while Benham Yakhchali dropped 14 points. Robert Bolick hit a couple of triples in garbage time to lead Gilas in scoring with 15 points. June Mar Fajardo was good for 10 points and Andray Blatche finished with 12 before being ejected. Arguing a call, Blatche was given two technical fouls in the fourth quarter.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 8th, 2019

UAAP 82: Douanga saves day as Adamson survives scare from NU

Lenda Douanga's improbable three-point shot rescued Adamson University from an upset ax by National University in overtime, 84-83, Saturday at Araneta Coliseum. The two teams were going at it way into overtime and Dave Ildefonso already looked like he had lifted the Bulldogs to the upset by willing a short stab over all of Simon Camacho, Aaron Flowers, and Douanga. Still with 1.4 ticks to go on the clock, however, Douanga threw up a triple that swished through the net and saved the Soaring Falcons from their worst start to the season in their four years under head coach Franz Pumaren. "We needed that win. I guess we're still searching for the right combination because having new guys, we're still searching for chemistry," he said after his young wards bounced back from a loss to open the tournament. It was also the Congolese big man who converted his couple of charities in the dying moments of regulation to force the extra period. Once there, Adamson allowed Dave Ildefonso drop nine of his 29 points, including what was supposed to be the improbable game-winner over three defenders. Only, Douanga had other plans and had his own improbably game-winner, punctuating a 26-point, 19-rebound performance while Simon Camacho had his own 14-marker, 11-board double-double. Valandre Chauca and Jerom Lastimosa did damage as well with the former finishing with 13 points and four rebounds and the latter ending with 10 markers, seven assists, and six boards. Top gun Jerrick Ahanmisi only had 10 points in 4-of-14, but his supporting cast, indeed, proved to be the difference. For NU, Issa Gaye and John Lloyd Clemente backstopped Ildefonso with 16 and 11 points, respectively. At the wrong end of the improbable game-winner, however, they suffered a setback to start the season. BOX SCORES ADAMSON 84 - Douanga 26, Camacho 14, Chauca 13, Lastimosa 10, Ahanmisi 10, Flowers 7, Zaldivar 2, Fermin 2, Bernardo 0, Yerro 0, Mojica 0, Manlapaz 0, Magbuhos 0. NU 83 - Ildefonso 29, Gaye 16, Clemente 11, Oczon 7, Joson 5, S. Ildefonso 5, Mosqueda 3, Minerva 2, Mangayao 2, Diputado 2, Rangel 1, Tibayan 0, Yu 0, Gallego 0. QUARTER SCORES: 15-21, 31-30, 54-58, 74-74, 84-83. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 7th, 2019

PNP sends tracker teams to find inmates freed due to GCTA

he head of the Philippine........»»

Category: newsSource:  manila_shimbunRelated NewsSep 5th, 2019

PNP sends teams to get freed convicts

  General Oscar Albayalde, chief of the Philippine National Police (PNP), has ordered the deployment of police tracker teams to locate the 1,700 convicted criminals, including three of the perpetrators of the rape-slay of Chiong sisters in Cebu, who were released through the Good Conduct Time Allowance (GCTA) Law. Albayalde said his order is in […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsSep 5th, 2019

Kansas City Royals being sold in deal expected to fetch $1B

By Dave Skretta, Associated Press KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — David Glass and his family had a very specific set of qualities they were searching for in a potential owner when they decided to put the Kansas City Royals on the market. They wanted an astute and successful businessman, someone with local ties who, perhaps most importantly, had a deep love for baseball. John Sherman fit that description perfectly. So on Friday, the Glass family announced the sale of the two-time World Series champions to an ownership group led by Sherman in a deal expected to be worth about $1 billion. Sherman and his local co-investors will become only the third owners since Ewing Kauffman founded the club in 1969. "The decision to sell the Royals was difficult for our family," said Glass, whose son Dan has served as the Royals' president. "Our goal, which I firmly believe we've achieved, was to have someone local, who truly loved the game of baseball and who would be a great steward for this franchise going forward. In John Sherman we have found everything we were looking for in taking ownership. The 64-year-old Sherman has lived in Kansas City for more than four decades, even after he bought an interest in the Cleveland Indians. He founded, built and then sold a series of energy companies, and he has remained an influential local businessman, dabbling in agriculture and biosciences. Sherman, who played quarterback at nearby Ottawa University, is also a well-respected civic leader, even though he keeps a low profile. He has given time and money to the Truman Presidential Library in nearby Independence, the Negro Leagues Museum in Kansas City, and several local schools. He and his wife, Marny, also work with Teach for America and other programs serving underprivileged youth. "I am enormously grateful to David and the Glass family for this extraordinary opportunity," Sherman said in a statement, "and am humbled by the chance to team up with a distinguished group of local investors to carry forward and build on this rich Kansas City Royals legacy. "Our goal will be threefold: to compete for a championship on behalf of our fans; to honor their passion, their experience and their unwavering commitment; and to carry their hopes and dreams forward in this great Kansas City region we all love for decades to come." Sherman will need to divest his interest in the Cleveland Indians, believed to be about 30 percent of the franchise, and the deal is subject to the approval of Major League Baseball. Those hurdles should be cleared before owners vote on the sale at their meeting Nov. 21. "There's no way that Mr. Glass and the Glass family would entertain selling this team unless they could find what they believe to be the perfect owner who represents everything they stand for, and would go on and represent what baseball means to Kansas City," Royals general manager Dayton Moore said. Sherman was introduced to Dolan by Steve Greenberg, the son of Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg. His financial involvement allowed the Indians to push their payroll over the years, including in 2016, when they acquired All-Star reliever Andrew Miller from the Yankees before the trading deadline. The Indians proceeded to reach the World Series for the first time since 1997. "We're very supportive of John and his group reaching an agreement to acquire ownership of his hometown Kansas City Royals," Indians president Paul Dolan said. "His acquisition of the Royals is good for the game of baseball and I wish him nothing but the best." Before the Indians broke through, the Royals had represented the American League in the previous two Fall Classics, winning their second World Series title when they defeated the New York Mets in 2015. But the back-to-back pennants, and the accompanying rise boom in fan interest, came after a long period of dismal performances that left Glass with a mixed legacy in Kansas City. On one hand, the 83-year-old longtime Wal-Mart executive and his family kept the club in town following Kauffman's death in 1993. Glass helped serve as caretaker of the organization until April 2000, when he purchased sole ownership for $96 million — considered a strong bid at the time. On the other hand, Glass was derided during the Royals' many 100-loss seasons for being unwilling to spend money on payroll, something he rectified in more recent years. Many fans also viewed him as an absentee owner whose family was more committed to northwest Arkansas than Kansas City. "He's one of the most unique people I've ever met," countered Royals manager Ned Yost. "Probably starting in 2012, my whole focus was to win a world championship for him. I didn't have any understanding or inkling what it would mean to win a championship for the city. I found that out later. But I wanted to win a championship for him. Every waking moment was meant with him in mind." Yost said watching Glass raise the World Series trophy at Citi Field in 2015 was "one of the top three highlights of my baseball career, because we had accomplished it for him." Glass has reportedly been in declining health, increasing the urgency to find a new owner. The goal all along was to identify someone with ties to Kansas City who would keep the club in town. "I will never forget the thrill of seeing over 800,000 people of this community come together on one sunny November day to salute the newly crowned world champions. It's been a fantastic ride," Glass said, "and I want to thank our great fans for supporting us through the years. But now it's time for someone else to oversee this franchise into its next championship." The sale comes at an opportune time for other reasons, too. Their local television contract expires after this season, and the Royals are expected to sign a new deal that would double annual rights fees to about $50 million. They also have just 12 years left on their lease at Kauffman Stadium, meaning the push for more renovations or a new ballpark — potentially one in the revitalized downtown area — is expected to begin in the next few years. On the field, the club is in the midst of a massive rebuilding effort while barreling toward another 100-loss season. But the Royals have a bevy of young prospects rapidly rising through the minors, and the front office is hopeful the Royals will contend within the next two years. "I heard he's a former season-ticket holder, so that's nice to have someone who's had some love for this city and wants to do what's best," said outfielder Alex Gordon, the Royals' longest-tenured player and a part of both AL championship teams. "This is a great town with great fans. We haven't been giving them a lot the last few years. Hopefully this is just the start of turning things around." ___ AP Sports Writer Tom Withers and AP freelance writer David Smale contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 31st, 2019

MPBL: Nimes, Teng and Manalang step upi to give Pasig big road win

The Pasig Sta. Lucia Realtors thwarted a determined Quezon City Capitals WEMSAP with a 91-82 victory in Wednesday night's main clash of the Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League Lakan Season. The crowd at the Jesus Christ Saves Global Outreach Seed Dome witnessed the Realtors obtain bragging rights over Corinthian Gardens in a game that saw great offensive performances, but was soured by an ill-tempered ending. The game was played in JCSGO instead of QC's usual home court, the Blue Eagle Gym. Pasig enjoyed big nights from three of their stars, with Robbie Manalang pumping in 22 points, Josan Nimes contributing 18 points and 6 assists, and Jeric Teng providing 17 markers as the club goes to 6-5. Black topscored for the Capitals with 21, followed by Santos with 16. Quezon City's record is now 6-4. "(We won because) we had a sense of urgency. It was the way we practiced after the loss (to Batangas last week). We put in the hard work," said Nimes.  Both offenses were in a rhythm in the first half as Pasig led QC 51-45 after 20 minutes. In the third the Capitals twice got to within two on a pair of Tweety Santos buckets but at the end of the period Pasig still had the advantage, 68-62. Santos and Mark Carongoy began the fourth with triples to tie the game but Teng answered with a triple of his own to spark a 15-3 run that put Sta. Lucia back in the driver's seat, 83-71. Tonino Gonzaga and Aaron Black put up some resistance to get to within 9, 87-78, but another Teng three-bomb in the last 3 minutes was the dagger to give the visitors an unassailable 90-78 lead. Teng was dribbling the ball out with mere seconds to go when QC's Joco Tayongtong rashly hacked at him. The former UST Growling Tiger took exception to the contact, and barked out at Tayongtong. Tayongtong was slapped a regular foul and both players, and members of the staffs of both teams were given offsetting technicals. Since Teng had fouled out, Pasig sent in Tristan Medina for the charities. After missing the first, QC player Jonathan Boholano appeared to chirp aggressively at the Pasig bench, drawing a technical and reigniting the hard feelings. Medina seemed to deliberately miss the next two free throws and Sta Lucia played no defense as QC scored an uncontested lay-up as time ran out. There were no handshakes between the two sets of players after. In the second match-up of the evening Makati Super Crunch stunned the Pampanga Giant Lanterns - ADG Group of Companies with a come-from-behind 96-94 win. The hero for Makati was Kib Montalbo, who produced two nearly-identical 17-foot jumpers, one to knot the game at 94-all with 27 seconds left and another to win it as time expired. The Giant Lanterns controlled the game for much of the second half and with four minutes left in the final quarter led 92-82 thanks to a Reil Cervantes triple and a split from the line from Mark Cruz. But triples from John Rey Villanueva and Josh Torralba, plus a lay-up from Joseph Sedurifa, helped Super Crunch claw to within two at 94-92, setting up Montalbo for his game-winning clutch baskets. The ex-Green Archer contributed only five points for Makati, but Josh Torralba hung up 27 points, a career record, to lead all scorers. Pampanga's John Maiquez led his club with 18 points and 11 rebounds. Pampanga coach Bong Ramos will rue the fact that his side had five players in double digits and still lost. Makati's slate is a gaudy 7-1 while Pampanga goes to 6-4. The match day opened with the Caloocan Supremos - Victory Liner coasting to a 90-75 victory against Paranaque Patriots - Yabo Sports. Almond Vosotros left spectators slack-jawed with a mammoth 35-point outing, shooting 12 for 16 from the field and 6 for 9 from three-point land. It's a new career-high for the former DLSU star. Incredibly he was also able to dish out 7 assists and 4 steals. Caloocan led by as much as 26 in the game and won all three quarters comfortably. Only late garbage time production from the Patriots kept the score respectable. Damian Lasco continued his fine form for Caloocan with 13 points. Yabo Sports did, however enjoy a breakout game from James Abugan, who came up with 23 points, more than quadruple his average for the season. The Supremos level their record at 5-5 while Paranaque go to 3-7......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2019

Red Cubs survive Jr. Pirates to stay as top team in NCAA 95

STANDINGS San Beda 7-1 Arellano 5-2 LPU 5-3 CSB-LSGH 5-3 JRU 4-4 Letran 4-5 Perpetual 4-5 Mapua 3-5 San Sebastian 2-5 EAC 1-7 San Beda High School had to go deep into its bag of tricks to be able to put away very game Lyceum of the Philippines University, 99-97, in overtime, Tuesday at Filoil Flying V Centre. Little-known Dom Cabanero's midrange jumper with under 40 ticks to go proved to be the difference between the two teams fighting over the top spot in the NCAA 95 Juniors Basketball Tournament. "Talagang fighter talaga yang batang yan. Buti, matapang talaga yung bata," a beaming head coach Manu Inigo said post-game. Cabanero would not have had that chance, however, if not for Tony Ynot and Justine Sanchez who connived in the last three minutes of the extra period to overturn a three-point deficit and tie the tally at 97-all. There was still time for the Jr. Pirates to make something happen, but both Mac Guadana and John Barba were well-defended and muffed on their inside baskets. In the end, Cabanero had eight points to his name while Sanchez and Yukien Andrada both posted 19 markers and nine rebounds. Rhayyan Amsali also just missed out on a triple-double with 18 points, 11 assists, nine rebounds, and two steals. Showing character when it mattered most, the Red Cubs retained solo first in the standings now at 7-1. "Yung LPU, gusto rin talaga manalo kasi pagtinalo nila kami, no. 1 sila so sinabi talaga namin sa players, dapat ready kami. Alam ko nga, talo na, pero buti na lang, binigay pa rin sa amin," coach Manu said. The pleasant surprise of heroics from Cabanero spoiled a big-time 31-point outing by Guadana to go along with seven rebounds, three assists, and three steals. Barba and Jae Omandac posted their own double-doubles with the former finishing with 22 points and 11 rebounds and the latter ending with 21 markers and 10 boards. All of those still weren't enough, however, as LPU sank to 5-3. Meanwhile, both Colegio de San Juan de Letran and University of Perpetual Help got their campaigns back on track with victories versus separate foes. First, the Squires overwhelmed San Sebastian College-Recoletos with their balanced attack for a 72-64 decision. Lenard Santiago and Joshua Ramirez were the only ones in double-digit scoring with 14 and 13 points, respectively, but Shawn Umali, Andrei Romenez, CJ Saure, and Stacey Tibayan each also added seven markers for the blue and red which has now won four of its last six following a 0-3 start to the season. Also standing at 4-5 are the Jr. Altas who braved through a late rally by Emilio Aguinaldo College for a well-earned 71-70 win. Perps was in control for majority of the matchup until the Brigadiers battled back to even notch a one-point lead inside the final minute. Emman Galman, however, would take matters into his own hands and hit a floater over the outstretched arms of two defenders for what proved to be the game-winner. That was the biggest make of his total of 16 points on top of seven rebounds and three assists while rookie John Escalante chippined in a career-best 21 markers. With their respective losses, the Staglets fell to 2-6 and the Brigadiers fell to 1-7 BOX SCORES FIRST GAME LETRAN 72 - Santiago 14, Ramirez 13, Argente 11, Umali 7, Romenez 7, Saure 7, Tibayan 7, Tolentino 2, Cauguiran 2, Flauta 1, Omega 1, Lim 0, Cabal 0, Miranda 0, Delas Alas 0 SAN SEBASTIAN 64 - Janao 14, Darbin 14, Are 10, Concha 8, Perez 6, Una 4, Balo 4, Dailo 3, Gomez 1, Bulasa 0, Lustina 0, Brizo 0 QUARTER SCORES: 22-15, 38-29, 54-44, 72-64 SECOND GAME PERPETUAL 71 - Escalante 21, Galman 16, Kawamura 10, Orgo 8, Cuevas 7, Gelsano 6, Angeles 2, Nunez 1, Dela Cruz 0, Balazuela 0 EAC 70 - Balowa 22, Ilustrisimo 17, Cabuhat 11, Dandoy 8, Sanosa 6, Calipco 4, Macaraya 2, Sollestre 0, Rodrin 0, Mejia 0, Baruelo 0, Reyes 0 QUARTER SCORES: 16-7, 34-25, 53-48, 71-70 THIRD GAME SAN BEDA 99 - Sanchez 19, Andrada 19, Amsali 18, Ynot 16, Cabanero 8, Pascual 6, Llarena 3, Delfino 3, Oftana 3, Nicdao 2, Pelipel 2, Valencia 0, Alao 0, Alcantara 0, Peregrina 0. LPU 97 - Guadana 31, Barba 22, Omandac 21, Montano 10, Panganiban 6, Garro 3, Garing 2, Gamlanga 1, Ragasa 1, Dejelo 0, Santos 0, Dumon 0, Caringal 0, Caduyac 0, Gudmalin 0. QUARTER SCORES: 23-12, 47-36, 67-56, 87-87, 99-97. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 20th, 2019

Raiders GM to absent Brown: Time to be All in or all out

By Josh Dubow, Associated Press Oakland Raiders general manager Mike Mayock told disgruntled receiver Antonio Brown it's time to decide whether he's "all in or all out" about playing this season after losing a fight with the NFL and NFLPA over his helmet. Mayock issued a statement to reporters that the Raiders released in a video on Twitter expressing his frustration that Brown didn't participate in practice Sunday despite being healed from the frost-bitten feet that have sidelined him for most of training camp. GM Mike Mayock issued a statement today regarding Antonio Brown. pic.twitter.com/5ueLsrOmid— Oakland Raiders (@Raiders) August 18, 2019 "You all know that A.B. is not here today. So here's the bottom line. He's upset about the helmet issue. We have supported that. We appreciate that," Mayock said. "But at this point, we've pretty much exhausted all avenues of relief. So from our perspective, it's time for him to be all in or all out. So we're hoping he's back soon. We've got 89 guys busting their tails. We are really excited about where this franchise is going and we hope A.B. is going to be a big part of it starting Week 1 against Denver. End of story. No questions." Brown has been upset that the NFL and NFLPA won't allow him to use the same Schutt Air Advantage that he has used throughout his career. Brown filed a grievance over the issue that he lost on Aug. 12 and then set out to find a newer version of the helmet that was less than 10 years old to get approved. Brown's agent, Drew Rosenhaus, said last week after Brown returned to the Raiders training camp facility that they had found several helmets and were waiting formal approval. Brown took part in pregame warmups before an exhibition game in Arizona on Thursday night and took part in a walkthrough on Saturday, prompting coach Jon Gruden to express confidence that he would soon be able to practice. The helmet was sent to the independent Biokinetics Inc. lab in Ottawa for testing with results shared with biomechanical engineers from both the league and union, a person familiar with the testing said on condition of anonymity because the results weren't released. The person said the helmet was no different than the 2010 version that had previously been rejected and both the league and union determined it wasn't safe enough to be used. Pro Football Talk first reported the failed test after the Raiders walkthrough on Saturday, prompting a profane response from Brown on Twitter. He then didn't take part in practice Sunday, leading to Mayock's forceful statement. Brown had 686 catches and 9,145 yards receiving the past six seasons in Pittsburgh, the best marks ever for a receiver in a six-year span. But he still wore out his welcome with the Steelers after leaving the team before a crucial Week 17 game last season and was able to be acquired by Oakland in March for the small price of third- and fifth-round draft picks. But the drama that surrounded Brown in Pittsburgh didn't stop upon his arrival with the Raiders even though he was given a hefty raise with a three-year contract worth $50.125 million. Brown injured his feet while getting cryotherapy treatment in France, forcing him to start training camp on the non-football injury list. Brown was activated on July 28 and participated in parts of two practices before leaving the team to get treatment on his feet and deal with the grievance with the NFL. Brown returned to the Raiders on Aug. 13 but still hasn't participated in a full practice all of training camp. The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment sets performance and test standards for equipment. Brown's Schutt Air Advantage helmet is no longer allowed because the NFL follows the National Athletic Equipment Reconditioners Association (NAERA) rule that helmets 10 years or older cannot be recertified. Schutt discontinued making the helmet three years ago because current technology had moved past it, according to the company. Brown was one of 32 players using helmets last season that are now banned by the league and players' association. Those players, including Tom Brady, were able to use the helmets last season under a grace period but were required to make the change in 2019......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 19th, 2019

PBA Finals By the Numbers: One more to go

San Miguel Beer is pretty much inevitable, right? After Game 5, the Beermen are all of a sudden on the brink of yet another PBA title and they now lead the 2019 PBA Commissioner’s Cup Finals against TNT, 3-2. TNT will now need some Tony Stark level of switcheroo to pull this one off or the Beermen will continue to pad their lead against all PBA teams with an incredible 27 championships. But before that, one last By the Numbers look for San Miguel’s amazing Game 5 win.   19 Total points for San Miguel import Chris McCullough in that incredible fourth-quarter run. C-Mac outscored TNT by himself in the last 12 minutes, 19-14, as he willed the Beermen to victory in the final quarter. His basket over the defense of Terrence Jones late finally pushed San Miguel ahead, 95-94, which would later turn into a 99-94 win.   16 Largest lead of the night for the KaTropa. After scoring the first five points in the fourth quarter, TNT was up by 16, 85-69. It went downhill after that. Chris McCullough scored 19 points and the Beermen went on a 30-9 run to end the game for the win.   96 Combined minutes for imports Terrence Jones and Chris McCullough. The two imports did not rest in the pivotal Game 5 for TNT and San Miguel respectively however, the younger McCullough got the upper hand late as he just had the extra bounce in his step during crunch time. They both scored 35 points each in Game 5.   22 Total points for Terrence Romeo. Bro fired 15 points in the opening period as he kept San Miguel within striking distance of TNT. If the Beermen are to win this championship, Romeo is a darkhorse candidate for Finals MVP, he’s been that impactful off the bench for San Miguel Beer.   14 Total three-pointers for TNT. Despite the monumental collapse, the KaTropa were still on target from deep, connecting 14 treys on 34 percent shooting.  Jayson Castro and RR Pogoy had four triples each while Terrence Jones was good for another three. TNT is still playing well in these Finals, they just have to finish. Game 6 is Friday at the Big Dome.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 15th, 2019

PBA Finals By the Numbers: Making it rain

The 2019 PBA Commissioner’s Cup Finals is heating up. Game 3 didn’t go into double overtime but there were still a ton of things that happened between TNT and San Miguel. Before Game 4, we’ll break some of them down here in By the Numbers.   24 Straight points for TNT in the second quarter. The KaTropa were down by 17 early but then responded with a 24-0 run that completely turned the tide. TNT used that run to power a strong Game 3 win for a 2-1 series lead. TNT’s 24-0 run is the longest in PBA Finals history in 28 years or since Ginebra’s 31-0 run over Shell in Game 5 of the 1991 First Conference Finals.   45 Total free throw attempts for TNT in Game 3, most in the PBA Finals since San Miguel shot 46 in Game 4 of the 2016 Philippine Cup Finals against Alaska aka the game that started the Beeracle run. The KaTropa connected on 30 free throws and the Beermen were called for 30 fouls. Terrence Jones shot the bulk of them, going 14/23 from the line SMB shot 21/28 from the line after 26 TNT fouls.   5 Total players from both teams that had five fouls each. Terrence Jones, Brian Heruela, Don Trollano, Chris McCullough, and Terrence Romeo were all in deep foul trouble, part of the reason wh Game 3 took so long because of all the fouls. June Mar Fajardo and Troy Rosario had four fouls each and in the case of Troy, he already had three in the opening period.   10 Total three-pointers for Terrence Jones and RR Pogoy. After combining for just one triple in Game 2, Jones and Pogoy shot 5/9 each from deep to power TNT’s assault from rainbow country. The KaTropa connected on 15 triples in Game 3. San Miguel was down to eight triples after 18 in Game 2.   18 Total points for Don Trollano, a career-high. Trollano’s production has been incredible in these Finals, making sure that the TNT starters always put up double figures each game. Game 3 was Trollano’s best perfomance scoring 18, eight in the fourth quarter. Game 4 is Sunday still at the Big Dome.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2019

Lots of questions, few answers as Team USA opens training camp

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com LAS VEGAS -- The U.S. Men's Senior National Team tipped off training camp on Monday. This was the start of a six-week process that they hope ends with the gold medal game of the FIBA World Cup in Beijing on Sept. 15. This week includes four days of practice, followed by an intrasquad scrimmage on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Before we get into the next six weeks, let's review how we got to Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) with a much different pool of players than national team managing director Jerry Colangelo originally anticipated. The originals - Last year, there were 35 players named to the 2018-20 USA roster for a 2018 minicamp, this year's World Cup and next year's Olympics. - Of those 35, only 14 were on the 20-man training camp roster for the World Cup when it was announced on June 10. - Between June 10 and the start of camp on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time), nine of those 14 backed out. - The five remaining are Harrison Barnes, Kyle Lowry, Khris Middleton, Myles Turner and Kemba Walker. The additions - As part of the 20-player training camp announcement on June 10, six players were added to the 14 from the original 35-player list. - Since then, one of those six - Paul Millsap - backed out. - Six more players were added on July 25. - In the 10 days since then, two of those six - Montrezl Harrell and Julius Randle - backed out. - Last week, Bam Adebayo was added to the roster. - Before camp opened, De'Aaron Fox and Joe Harris were (sort of) promoted from the Select Team to the Senior Team. The absences Going back to who's not here: There are 33 players - 30 from the 2018-20 roster and three that signed up and backed out this year - who have decided not to play. That's almost three full rosters of American players, and it doesn't include any guys that were offered a spot, but declined before being named to the roster. J.J. Redick is a player that reportedly declined an invite. They can't all be lumped into one group of guys who just don't want to make the six-week commitment. Some have family business to tend to. But one reason cited by multiple players who have backed out is preparing for next season. And in that regard, the World Cup schedule, along with the travel, is not ideal. The gold medal game is Sept. 15. So players will be returning from China (on a flight of 15 hours or so) on Sept. 16. The start of NBA training camps has been pushed back one week this year, but national team players will have less than two weeks between their return and the opening of camps. Players on the Brooklyn Nets, Houston Rockets, Los Angeles Lakers and Toronto Raptors will have even less than that, along with a trip back to Asia for early-October exhibition games in Japan or China. Colangelo also cited the fact that the World Cup and Olympics are in back-to-back years (with an NBA season in between), instead of two years apart like they were in the past. And while this year's World Cup is toward the end of the summer, next year's Olympics start July 25, with training camp probably opening not long after The NBA Finals. (If it were the same six-week period from the start of camp to the gold medal game as it is this year, next year's camp would actually open on June 29). 17 players for 12 spots Fox and Harris aren't on the official Senior Team roster, but Colangelo said Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) that they have a chance of making the final 12-man roster for the World Cup. So that makes 17 players for 12 spots. By position, they are: PG: De'Aaron Fox, Kyle Lowry, Kemba Walker SG: Joe Harris, Donovan Mitchell, Marcus Smart SF: Jaylen Brown, Kyle Kuzma, Khris Middleton, Jayson Tatum PF: Harrison Barnes, P.J. Tucker, Thaddeus Young C: Bam Adebayo, Brook Lopez, Mason Plumlee, Myles Turner There's obviously some flexibility in there. Two point guards could play together, Mitchell could play some point guard, and all of the small forwards could play some at the four. Lowry, who had surgery on his left thumb just a few weeks ago, isn't participating in camp this week. He's hoping to be cleared to practice when the team reconvenes in Los Angeles from Aug. 13-16 for three more days of practice and an exhibition game against Spain. But right now, it's not guaranteed that he'll be able to play. With or without him, it's still a very talented group. "Thank goodness we're blessed with the depth of talent we have in this country," Colangelo said. "You find guys that want to play and you go with them." Cutting down the list from 17 to 12 won't be easy. Point guard, where Lowry has the experience (see below) and Walker is the star, may be the only position where there's a clear hierarchy. At each of the other positions, different players bring different skill sets, but it's not clear that Player A is better than Player B, who is better than Player C. The World Cup doesn't require final rosters until the day before the tournament starts (it's earlier for the Olympics), so the final decisions don't have to be made before the team flies from L.A. to Australia for three more exhibition games. "We're flexible," Colangelo said. "If we have a tough decision to make, we'll bring an extra guy or two with us." The experience Of the 17 players in camp, only three have played for the United States in an international competition on the senior level. Plumlee was on the 2014 World Cup team, and both Lowry and Barnes were on the 2016 Olympic team. And neither Plumlee (11th on the '14 team in total minutes) nor Barnes (last on the '16 team in total minutes) played integral roles. The 2010 World Cup team was similarly inexperienced - Chauncey Billups and Tyson Chandler played on the 2007 FIBA Americas team - but had four future MVPs: Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, Derrick Rose and Russell Westbrook. The talent That 2010 team had seven players who had been selected in the top five in the NBA Draft. Since 1992, there have been 15 U.S. National Teams comprised of NBA players. And those 15 teams have had an average of seven top-five picks on them, with *no fewer than four. * The two teams with only four top-five picks: The 2002 team that finished sixth at the World Championship and the 2016 Olympic team that won gold in Rio. This 17-man group includes only three top-five picks: Brown (No. 3 in 2016), Fox (No. 5 in 2017) and Tatum (No. 3 pick in 2017). And it would be a surprise if Fox makes the final roster. Since 1992, the only one of those 15 U.S. teams that didn't have a No. 1 pick on it was the 2000 Olympic team, which had nine players who were selected second (4), third (1), or fifth (4). This 17-man roster includes just one player who has made an all-NBA team in the last three years. That's Walker, who was a Third Team selection this year. The opportunity With the ball in his hands Walker could be the star of this team. And he sees the roster attrition as an opportunity. "I think a lot of us are happy those guys pulled out," Walker said Monday. "This is our chance, our chance to get on the big stage and showcase our talent. It's a chance for us to do something new. It'll be a new-look team. Everybody's kind of doubting us, but I think we're hungry." When he was asked why he remained committed, Walker's explanation was pretty simple. "I love basketball," he said. "I love to play. What better opportunity can you have than to play for your country? This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for a lot of us." A monstrous sacrifice Lopez has nominated himself as the player that has made the biggest sacrifice to be in Vegas, because if he wasn't, he'd be in the Scottish Highlands with the rest of his family. "I could be looking for Nessy!" Lopez said. John Schuhmann is a senior stats analyst for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 6th, 2019

Robotics team ng PH naka-silver sa int’l competition

NAKASUNGKIT ng Silver Award ang Philippine Robotics National Team sa FIRST Lego League (FLL) Asia Pacific Open Championship sa Sydney, Australia. Ang national team na “Gracean Whiz” mula sa Grace Christian College, ay nakakuha ng Silver Award for Gracious Professionalism sa kompetisyon na nilahukan ng 43 teams mula sa 21 bansa. Ang Gracean Whiz ay […] The post Robotics team ng PH naka-silver sa int’l competition appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 11th, 2019

Manhunt on for BIR officials’ kidnappers

The Philippine National Police (PNP) has deployed tracker teams to unmask the people reportedly behind the alleged kidnapping of Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) officials and personnel......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 9th, 2019

NBA salary cap for 2019-20 season set at $109.14 million

NBA press release NEW YORK – The National Basketball Association today announced that the Salary Cap has been set at $109.140 million for the 2019-20 season. The tax level for the 2019-20 season is $132.627 million. The Salary Cap and tax level go into effect at 12:01 a.m. ET on Monday, July 1. As announced by the league in May, this year teams can begin negotiating with free agents at 6:00 p.m. ET on June 30 -- six hours prior to the start of the league’s “moratorium period.” The moratorium period ends at noon ET on Saturday, July 6. The minimum team salary, which is set at 90% of the Salary Cap, is $98.226 million for the 2019-20 season. The Collective Bargaining Agreement provides for three different mid-level exceptions depending on a team’s salary level. The non-taxpayer mid-level for the 2019-20 season is $9.258 million, the taxpayer mid-level is $5.718 million, and the mid-level for a team with room under the Salary Cap is $4.767 million......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2019

Five things we learned from Game 4 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 105-92 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 4 of the 2019 NBA Finals on Friday at Oracle Arena: 1. Dynasties eventually become ‘die-nastys’ Will we get one more game at Oracle Arena? The scene of so much Golden State wonderfulness the past five seasons? A building about to be abandoned when the Warriors move from Oakland to a state-of-the-art arena across the Bay? Hold up. Asking one more game out of the Warriors seems a lot at the moment. These guys just suffered their second consecutive home playoff loss by 10 points or more, something that hasn’t happened to this franchise in 50 years. After three straight games scoring precisely 109 points, the Warriors came up 15 short Friday (Saturday, PHL time). They are 0-9 overall this season when held to double digits, and 0-11 in the playoffs during the Steve Kerr era, when they score 94 or fewer. And now they’re on the wrong side of a 3-1 deficit, lacking everything from certain healthy bodies to an edge, a sharpness that was missing in the second half. Granted, Golden State once held a 3-1 edge in a Finals, all the way back in 2016 … when LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and the Cavaliers chased them down and became the only Finals team to claw out of such a chasm. The Warriors did the same to Oklahoma City in the 2016 Western Conference finals. So they not only have a blueprint, they have the know-how and an opportunity to do it again. Like Kerr before him on Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) postgame podium, Warriors forward Draymond Green spoke of simply trying to win one basketball game, the next game, as the proper way to dig out of this series hole. But then he dropped his guard and mentioned winning three in a row, something the Warriors have done often. But they’re a whole year removed from doing that in a Finals (last year’s sweep of the Cavs) with a healthy Kevin Durant. This is a more worn-down, tired team. In fact, Game 4 was more than Golden State’s 102nd game of 2018-19, regular and postseason combined. It was the 102nd playoff game of their five consecutive Finals runs, which means they have crammed an extra season-plus into their schedules compared to the underachievers on lottery teams sitting at home. From the looks of it Friday (Saturday, PHL time), these guys are ready to be toppled, like the Lakers in 1989 and again in 2004, like the Heat in 2014 and the Cavaliers last June. The boisterous Raptors fans who staged their takeover of the Warriors’ building after Game 4 were merely mirroring what their favorite team did on the court from halftime on. Golden State could not stop it. Rudy Tomjanovich might still be inclined to scream into the darkness. (“Never underestimate the heart of a champion!”) But pride only takes you so far, and that’s mostly what the Warriors have left. 2. Third quarter? That’s Toronto’s now It took the Raptors more than 18 minutes to score 30 points Friday night (Saturday, PHL time), stymied by the pace of the game and particularly Golden State’s scrappy, hustling defense. Immediately after halftime, it took Toronto only 12 minutes to put up 37. The time of death for Golden State on Friday was immediately after Kawhi Leonard drained consecutive three-pointers – “F-you” shots, teammate Fred VanVleet memorably coined them – that boosted Toronto from a four-point deficit to a 12-point advantage. The Warriors already had played well enough to rightly feel they should have had a bigger cushion; falling behind so rudely seemed to buckle the defending champs. That they feel third quarters are their birthright made the switcheroo intolerable. “We had a big problem with the third quarter in Game 2,” Toronto coach Nick Nurse said. “We had to make some adjustment there to try to combat the way they come out of the half. We made the decision to put Fred in, [first] in Game 3 and then Game 4 again. Mostly it's to try to keep up pace of our offense going. It gives us two point guards out there that can push the ball, get it in and get it going, and it kind of paid off. “I know Kawhi's two big three's to start the half really changed the whole feel of everybody. Everybody was like, ‘Okay, man, we know we are here, let's go,’ and we just kind of kept going from those two three's.” For the Warriors, who have done that to so many others, turnabout was a pain in the rump. “Oh, this sucks,” Draymond Green recalled thinking as Toronto took control of the quarter. “It sucks really bad. You just try and do whatever you can to change it. Get a stop, get a bucket, get some momentum.  Every time we did, they answered.” Green was asked about the difficulty of rattling the stone-faced Leonard with whatever defensive tactic Golden State could muster, and brushed the question aside. “I don't think you're ever going to rattle Kawhi. Not sure we used that word one time in our scouting report, ‘We're going to rattle him,’” Green said. But it’s not just Leonard now. It’s the Raptors. Time after time, whenever Golden State revved up with a couple of scoring possessions, signaling to their fans they ready to make a run, Toronto snuffed it with a three-pointer or a well-executed pick and roll. They’ve got a team of Kawhis-in-training, unflappable lately if not as inscrutable. “Most teams will take cues from their leaders or their star players, so I think that spreads around a little bit,” Nurse said. But he also praised vets such as Marc Gasol, Danny Green, Kyle Lowry and VanVleet for how steady they’ve been. Now, with the temptation to imagine hoisting a championship trophy, the Raptors might be expected to buy into the stat that, of the 34 teams in The Finals who have led 3-1, 33 of them got their rings. But this team is so focused, so resolute in taking care of business down to the smallest and most mundane task, that all Nurse might have to do is remind them how many aspiring champs won three games in a Finals and still headed into summer empty-handed. (It's 19.) No trophy, no rings. 3. A surge from Serge The chemistry between Serge Ibaka and Kyle Lowry was evident in their playful banter on the podium Friday night. Each slipped into his role, Lowry as the instigator, Ibaka as the target of his playful jibes. “You joining me?” Lowry asked, as Ibaka got to the podium a half minute after him. “Serge Ibaka, everybody. You all know him. Nice outfit. Worth a lot of money. Is that jacket real leather?” “Yes, it’s real leather,” Ibaka said. "Pants too tight, he can't even sit down,” Lowry said. On court, Ibaka’s defensive impact and 20 points in reserve dampened a lot of Warrior enthusiasm. There are nights when Ibaka comes across like Chief in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” a large, lumbering and rather stiff option near the rim with very little to say. Some nights, he even seems to be asleep. But still waters often run deep, too deep for the Warriors in Game 4, it turned out. Ibaka’s here-today, gone-tomorrow shooting touch had him playing in a way that none of Golden State’s three centers – DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney or Andrew Bogut – could match. “Once he gets into the series," Nurse said, "which he did in Game 3 with the blocked shots and the rebounding and stuff, he seems to stay in the series. He usually gives you all of it.” Said Lowry, about knowing when a Serge surge is coming: “He doesn't say anything. When Serge is effective defensively is when he's at his best. I think the scoring just comes. We're going to make sure he gets that pick-and-pop jump shot, he's rolling … When he brings that intensity and that fierceness, it's kind of tough to stop him on both ends of the floor.” 4. Stephen Curry had a bad game One of the most famous pieces of magazine journalism ever was entitled, “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold,” by Gay Talese, a profile written when Sinatra obviously was ill of body and temper, and didn’t even grant Talese an interview. So our headline kind of tells the story as his did: Curry, one of the top five players in the NBA and probably the greatest overall shooter of all time, was not his two-time MVP self. He wasn’t even the Game 3 version (47 points). The Warriors point guard scored 20 fewer points in this one, and was 2-of-9 from three-point range. He missed all five of his shots from the arc in the first half and he picked up some obvious frustration fouls. Curry played 43 of the 48 minutes, and Golden State was outscored by 11 points when he was on the court. “It wasn’t his best game,” Kerr said. Evaluating Curry, for the Warriors, was going to come down to breaking down video and keeping the faith. Evaluating him, for the rest of us, is getting complicated these days by a sense that Curry did not get his due in past Finals – at least in terms of winning the Bill Russell Award as Finals MVP. But that’s no excuse to don rose-colored glasses every time he hits the floor. As scintillating as his performance was in defeat Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) as the Warriors’ only healthy threat, his Game 4 work was raggedy and unproductive. “They have been aggressive all series and trying to take space away from me and Klay,” Curry said. “I missed some shots early that I usually make, especially from the three-point line. But overall, I thought I got good looks.” Every game doesn’t need to be a referendum on the level of Curry appreciation. He might have deserved more consideration as Finals MVP in 2015, when Andre Iguodala snagged it with a strong performance in the clinching game. And even though Kevin Durant was an easy choice in 2017, there were some who felt Curry was more essential (including this voter). In some cosmic and just way, Curry probably should have been recognized with hardware somewhere among the three. But all signs are pointing to Leonard now, so Curry might have to muddle along with "only" those two Maurice Podoloff trophies for regular-season MVP, along with his All-NBA berths and assorted accolades, his ginormous contract and bounty of commercial endorsements, three rings (unless this series turns around) and a better life than most people who’ve ever walked the planet. 5. Durant to play in Game … 8? It’s possible that Durant will come walking through Rick Pitino’s proverbial door and seize what’s left of the championship series by the throat, playing like the two-time Finals MVP he is. Failing that, if there’s a Game 6, maybe that’s the night Durant at least does a Willis Reed impersonation, limping through the Oracle tunnel to a thunderous roar and hitting a couple of early shots to inspire his teammates to something special. (There still, alas, would be a pesky Game 7 for which to account, back in Toronto, likely muddying the drama.) Then again, maybe Durant doesn’t come back at all. For The Finals or with the Warriors, period. Speculation at this point is all over the map. Some think the Warriors planned to hold him out until things got really dire, to buy extra healing time and maybe not use him at all. Others now believe Durant’s rehab process of his strained right calf back-slid to some degree on Thursday, when he participated in a checkpoint workout with the training staff. A few folks think he never was going to return, regardless. After all, the All-NBA forward hasn’t played since May 8 (May 9, PHL time), missing nine fairly important games. This is a league where injuries typically face an “If this were a playoff game, would he play?” threshold. Durant has been nearly as absent from this NBA postseason as LeBron James. Look, all injuries are different, and even the same type of injury can have different timelines with different sufferers. Klay Thompson rushing back from his hamstring issue after skipping only Game 3 is at the crazy-resilient end of the durability scale. Kevon Looney basically rose from the ashes, giving the Warriors a rim runner and 10 points with six rebounds in 20 minutes off the bench. He had been ruled out for the rest of the series after suffering a rib cartilage fracture in his crash to the floor in Game 2. After anticipation of Durant’s availability got out in front of his reality for a few days, the chatter is more tempered now. There’s a shrug and a whiff of uncertainty folded into every mention. If Durant had his Thursday workout, he would have played Friday (Saturday, PHL time). If he had a setback … Heck, at this point it might be more pragmatic for the medical peeps to declare him out and let the Warriors who’ve come this far see this through, yea or nay. “As far as KD, there's been hope that he will come back the whole series,” Draymond Green said. “So that's not going to change now. Obviously we hope to have him, but we'll see what happens. We don't make that final call, he don't really even make that final call.  His body will tell him if he can get out there or not. And if he can, great. And if not, you still got to try to find a way to win the next game.” The Warriors had been holding out hope for Durant’s return as if he was their ace in the hole, imagining him with zero rust or rhythm issues once back and no limitations on his gait. But he has passed the “In case of emergency, break glass” point of urgent help possibilities. Now Durant resembles more the keg hanging from a Saint Bernard dog’s collar. It’s a nice idea, but when was the last time one of those dogs saved somebody who literally drank from the little barrel? Toronto is in a foreign land, by NBA standards. But it ain’t the Alps. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 9th, 2019

Five things we learned from Game 3 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com OAKLAND – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 123-109 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 3 of the 2019 Finals Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) at Oracle Arena: 1. What Stephen Curry learned … Curry was remarkable in Game 3, consciously seizing more of Golden State’s offensive burden to make up for Klay Thompson’s and Kevin Durant’s absences and turning that desperation into something historic. With 47 points, eight rebounds and seven assists, the Warriors point guard became only the ninth man to score at least 45 points in a Finals game. The lesson in that? Curry learned for a night what it has felt like for LeBron James on many such occasions. James put himself on that specific list a year ago when he logged 51 points, eight board and eight assists against Curry’s team in Game 1, same court. Like Curry, James’ team lost that night as well. Struggling mightily in something of a one-against-five predicament is the sort of things James has done often, while Curry never had faced it during Golden State’s five-year run to The Finals. They both -- James in the past and Curry on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) -- had legit NBA players around them. But the responsibility to put up points fell in both cases mostly on their shoulders. This was even a chance to revisit the 2015 Finals MVP selection, which attracted some attention on social media Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) over bogus speculation about the voting process. Andre Iguodala won the award that June, getting seven votes from the panel of media reps to James’ four. Curry got no votes. The point was, Curry had as a single game Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) what James had as an entire series in ’15. He averaged 35.8 points, 13.3 rebounds and 8.8 assists, scoring 38.5 percent of Cleveland’s points (215-of-561) while assisting on 52.7 percent of his teammates’ baskets while he was on the court. Now Curry is the guy in position, if Golden State loses the series, to get a few MVP votes in a losing effort. By the way, Jerry West is the only player to win the Finals MVP trophy in a losing effort. And West is one of the nine to score 45 or more – he did it three times, but his Lakers teams went 1-2 in those games. (The others: Michael Jordan three times, Bob Pettit, Elgin Baylor, Rick Barry, Wilt Chamberlain and Allen Iverson once each. Their teams all won on their big scoring nights.) 2. Is the scoreboard broken? It’s tempting to say that the Warriors’ attack is in broken-record mode, except the resurgence of vinyl might not be sufficient yet to bring that phrase back into the mainstream. So we’ll go with a cultural reference that’s more classic than archaic. Think of The Beatles’ “Revolution 9,” but substitute “109… 109… 109…” Yeah, it’s been about as monotonous and unsatisfying for Golden State as it was on the White Album. At least Warriors coach Steve Kerr was somewhat bemused by his team’s scoreboard consistency. In each game of these Finals, Golden State has scored 109 points. “I just knew we were going to score 109 points because that’s all we’re going to do the rest of this series,” Kerr said. “So if we’re going to keep scoring 109, we got to keep them to 108.” The Warriors kept Toronto to 104 points in Game 2. Some of that was to their credit, some to the Raptors’ misfires and mid-game chill. The simplest stat? Toronto launched 38 three-pointers in both games. The night the Raptors made 11, they lost. When they made 17, they won. Getting Thompson back for Game 4 could make a big difference there. He is one of Golden State’s best defenders. For that matter, Durant’s length could assert itself as a defensive weapon, too, if he comes back later in the series. As for 109 being a winning points total, here is some background: taken in isolation, averaged over a full Finals, that would have been plenty to win 19 of the past 20 championships. The lone exception? In 2017, when Cleveland averaged 114.8 ppg yet lost because Golden State was putting up 121.6 nightly. In 2018, the Warriors averaged 116 points to the Cavaliers’ 101. The only other times a Finals team in the past 20 years averaged within five points of 109 were the Spurs in 2015 (105.6) and in 2007 (104.4) and the Lakers in 2002 (106.0) and 2000 (104.8). Obviously, a few of those were in the game’s relative “dark ages” for use of the 3-ball, but all four won championships. The Warriors are scoring enough points to win. 3. ‘Boogie’ fever has broken   DeMarcus Cousins called his decision to sign with Golden State for a cut-rate contract, while rehabbing from an Achilles injury, his “chess move.” He wound up joining the defending champions and favorite to three-peat, and got his game back in time to contribute. Cousins subsequently suffered a quadriceps injury but returned in time to participate in The Finals. Only thing is, he looked like he was back playing checkers in Game 3. The Warriors center stood out Sunday (Monday, PHL time), scoring 11 points with 10 rebounds, six assists and two blocks. But those numbers drooped to four points, three boards, three turnovers and 1-for-7 shooting in Game 3. Cousins went from plus-12 impact in Game 2 to minus-12 Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). The big man looked a step slow and appeared to be bothered by Toronto’s length, in the forms of Marc Gasol, Pascal Siakam and Serge Ibaka. With little lift these days, he’s playing a little smaller than his 6'11", 270-pound specs. And given how long he was off and the mere eight minutes he got in Game 1, what Cousins did in Game 2 was starting to look more adrenaline-fueled than a reliable return to form. Since Curry handled just about everything else for Golden State in Game 3, he was asked afterward about Cousins’ “regression.” The point guard handled the awkward moment well -- being asked a critical question about a teammate might have tempted Curry to blow it off or lie. Instead, he talked of the Warriors’ shared responsibility on defense and noted a few calls offensively that didn't go Cousins' way. Then Curry added: “Like any great player, if you have a rough game, that resiliency to bounce back and the confidence to know that you can still go out there and impact the game, that’s something that he’ll bring, and we all will follow suit for sure.” 4. Danny Green’s big moment Understandably, when an All-Star and potential Kia MVP candidate gets traded, the deal becomes all about him. Next, folks focus on the key player or players swapped out and how the move might work for the other team. Only then do we play much attention to the guy or guys accompanying the All-Star to his new destination. That’s how it’s been for Danny Green for much of the 2018-19 season. Green and Kawhi Leonard were teammates in San Antonio for seven seasons. They went to two Finals together with the Spurs, winning rings in 2014. But when Leonard wanted out after an injured and rancorous 2017-18, the deal the Spurs put together with Toronto shipped out Danny Green, too. The reality of NBA trades is that salaries must match up, so teammates often become collateral damage to even up the dollar sufficiently to satisfy league rules. Sometimes, a teammate is thrown into a deal because he and the star are chums. A familiar face gives the featured guy some comfort -- or someone to carry his bags. But Green was a helpful playoff performer in his own right with the Spurs -- in his 12 Finals games before this year, he had made 52 percent of his three-pointers. And in 2013 he made 27 of them against the Miami Heat, a Finals record that was his for all of three years until Curry drained 32 in 2016. Green struggled with his shot in the Eastern Conference finals against the Milwaukee Bucks, going 4-for-23 on three-pointers. But his marksmanship early in Game 3 and against near the end of the third quarter propelled the Raptors’ victory. 5. Those rebounds are offensive   Toronto dominated on the offensive glass 15-6 in Game 2 and lost. Golden State dominated on the offensive glass 13-5 in Game 3 and lost. Typically, that’s a positive category for the team that wins it, something coaches hate when the other guys are reclaiming their own misses time and again. But lately, the demerits associated with offensive rebounds have loomed larger than the benefits. You grab a shot you or your teammate missed, that ought to be a good thing. But the Raptors in Game 2 (37.2 percent) and the Warriors in Game 3 (39.6 percent) were beset by inaccuracy, so there were more offensive rebounds to be had, period. The other down side of a generally positive stat is how you go about getting them. If you get overeager and the defense controls the errant shot, you might denude your transition defense. Both the Raptors and the Warriors in Games 2 and 3 respectively built considerable edges in second-chance points off their offensive rebound totals. Toronto had a 23-0 scoring advantage Sunday (Monday, PHL time), yet lost by five. Golden State held it 23-12 Wednesday, yet lost by 14. The losing team in both cases slightly won the battle of fast-break points, but offensive-rebounding strategy still forces a choice on teams. “We have a general kind of rule of thumb that once a shot goes up, we tell our guys to make a really quick, good decision,” Raptors coach Nick Nurse said before Game 3. “Either they're going hard to the offensive rebound or they're going hard to defense transition. … There's certain moments of the game – I mean, some of those late are almost scrambles, right, you're behind five and you're throwing it up there and everybody's trying to rebound, just to keep the game alive as well.” It’s a stat worth watching, even if it’s inversely related lately to the games’ outcomes. Sing it loud, sing it proud ???????? #WeTheNorth pic.twitter.com/8HfjoM9Cht — Toronto Raptors (@Raptors) June 6, 2019 Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 7th, 2019

Warriors injuries create opening with Finals in balance

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. — From now until further notice, each game of the 2019 NBA Finals will be largely influenced not by a go-ahead basket or a big stop or a rally-induced comeback, but a hot-off-the-press medical update prior to tipoff. Is Klay Thompson's tweaky hamstring a go? Will this be the day Kevin Durant finally shakes that lingering calf strain and suits up? The hints and subtle signs seem to point toward the positive for Golden State. Thompson was a late scratch Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) because the Warriors -- with a mixture of confidence and arrogance and concern -- felt the guard missing Game 3 was perhaps best for his recovery without proving deadly in the long run. And as for Durant, he’s still “ramping up” his workouts, in the description of coach Steve Kerr, and so his status has been upgraded to "stay tuned." It has become must-watch after a 123-109 loss. Yet if the answer is negative to all of the above, the next entry on the medical report might be the grim health of the dynasty built by these two-time defending champions. Their still-under-construction monument now teeters, prone to a nudge from Toronto. The Warriors find themselves down 2-1 to the Raptors, lacking any guarantee they’ll see two of their three leading scorers back in the lineup Friday (Saturday, PHL time) for Game 4 ... or for however long this series lasts. Thompson joined Durant on the sideline, and the Raptors (as could be anticipated) pounced on the gift to seize control of the series. It was a game the Raptors had to win, and they did. The production came from multiple players, with Kyle Lowry finally making an imprint on this series and Danny Green rediscovering his long-lost three-point touch. Meanwhile, the Warriors consisted of Steph Curry and not much else. The two-time Kia MVP dazzled and fought through traps and triple-teams all night to drop a career-high 47 points, some of it on shot-making wizardry. But the short-handed Warriors were doomed when Draymond Green and DeMarcus Cousins in particular were underwhelming on a night they needed to be stellar for Golden State to have a chance. As a result, the atmosphere inside Oracle Arena was flatter than most of the shots taken by Curry's teammates, and this was partly due to the introduction of the starting lineups, when Thompson’s name wasn’t announced. The fans knew then, officially, that their eyes and the home team were in for a long night. While the Warriors fought, scrappy doesn’t win games at this point in the postseason, not when the other team is good and opportunistic. Playing in a hostile building for the first time in the Finals, the Raptors made a collective decision to greet fire with fire. Or, as they wrote on the blackboard inside the visitor’s locker room: Let It Rip. “I think we all kind of followed that advice,” said Danny Green. “We hadn’t really had a good team shooting night and I knew we were due.” For Toronto, it wasn’t just that they won, but that they did so with their most impressive outing in the series. And now, the question for the Raptors is this: Will their inconsistent players use this outing to turn the corner and push the Warriors, even if Thompson and/or Durant return? This is aimed, first and foremost, at Lowry. He took the “let it rip” plea personally. Entering this game, he had six baskets total in this series and at times suffered defensively. Challenged by a pregame talk from coach Nick Nurse, Lowry embraced his inner pit bull and was relentless all night. The All-Star point guard took 16 shots, making eight, for 23 points and nine assists while making his presence felt for the first time this Finals. “For me, it was just not being so passive and trying to get everyone else involved and get myself going and let everyone else feed off that,” Lowry said. He and Green re-introduced the three-pointer to the Raptors’ offense. The two shot 11-for-19 and repeatedly stole whatever momentum Golden State could generate by responding with long-distance daggers that forced fans to slump back into their seats. This from the same player who had five total three's in his previous five playoff games, ruining more than a handful of runs with momentum-deflating misses. There’s no other way to describe the last three weeks of Green’s postseason shooting but dreadful. He has only one job: Stand in the corner and shoot open 3s. He’s made a career of that. So what do the Raptors make of Green shooting 6-of-10 from deep Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time)? In the short term, it helped win Game 3. In the big picture, will this confidence carry over from one night to another, or does it depend on whether Green hits his first few? Nurse said: “Danny’s buckets boosted our whole team’s confidence because we were used to relying on those most of the year.” With better production from players who had been mostly missing, the Raptors had the balance needed to deliver their highest-scoring and most efficient (52 percent shooting) contest of the series. Green and Lowry joined Kawhi Leonard (30 points) and Pascal Siakam (18) and Marc Gasol (17) to take turns pummeling the Warriors from all different directions and manners. One reason for this was Thompson’s absence. Not only is he a proven outside shooter, but his defense is top-notch as well. You could even argue that Thompson’s missing defense was just as costly as his jumper. Yet the 109 points Golden State did manage were mainly because of Curry providing nearly half the offense. Given the circumstances of being without Thompson and Durant, and the constant pressing by Toronto whenever he had the ball, this was Curry’s finest post-season effort. His shooting was superb all across the floor, making three's (six) and free throws (13-14) and in general (14-31). “It’s the Finals,” Curry said. “You give everything you’ve got, sacrifice your body when you have the opportunity. Just competitiveness and trying to play until the buzzer.” “He does things that honestly I don’t think anyone has done before," Kerr added. "The way he plays the game, the way he shoots and the combination of his ball-handling, it’s incredible to watch.” If only he had someone riding shotgun. Cousins was sloppy on both ends, with three turnovers and one basket, and a step slow on defense against Gasol. This came one game after he seemingly regained his legs and confidence to gave Golden State a much-needed lift. Green’s continued recklessness was mystifying; he often made questionable decisions as a playmaker, suffered four turnovers and once again struggled to contain Siakam. The Warriors needed Green’s best, given their missing parts, and received something less. “We’ve got to be more solid with the ball and it starts with me,” he said. “I’ve had a bunch of turnovers in every game of this series. I think if I played better with the night (Curry) had, we would have won.” And so the Warriors, while talking bravely about their next-man-up mentality and embracing their “Strength in Numbers” slogan, must realize, deep down, that preventing the Raptors from winning two more games with a handicapped team might be difficult, if not impossible. Keep in mind that Golden State hasn’t sparkled for four quarters since the first game of the Western Conference finals. The last three games of that series, and the first three of the NBA Finals, the Warriors trailed by double digits. Thompson has an off day and Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) pregame period for therapy on his hamstring, although such strains are unpredictable and tricky. Will he be able to cut and fight through screens and be bouncy for 35-plus minutes through the intensity of an NBA Finals game, or will the injury restrict him and cause Kerr to seek a healthier, yet less productive replacement? “The whole point was to not risk a bigger injury that would keep him out the rest of the series,” said Kerr, explaining a decision made in consultation with the team doctors. “I feel very comfortable with it. I never would have forgiven myself if I played him and he had gotten hurt. So you live with the decision you made. The good thing is Klay has done well the last two days; hopefully he’ll be out there Friday.” Then there’s Durant, who last played May 8 (May 9, PHL time). After doing nothing but individual drills the last few days, he’ll go through a more normal practice session that will be simulated with the help of some assistant coaches and bench players. They'll see how Durant holds up. But that won’t match the stress level of a real game. And even if Durant gets clearance for Game 4, he hasn’t played in roughly a month. What about his timing? His wind? His touch? His ability to bring the same energy on defense? All legit questions and concerns for the Warriors -- until they’re not, whenever that is. “No one cares if guys are hurt,” Green said. “Everyone wants to see us lose anyway. So I’m sure people are happy they’re hurt.” Chances are that basketball fans, even if they’re against the Warriors, want to see stars on the floor this time of year. That’s what the NBA Finals is always about: Premium players doing premium things, or failing to do so, and letting the championship odds rise or fall on their performances. This year’s Finals have been denied one star for every game, and an additional star for one game. The battle with star attrition finally cost the Warriors a postseason loss, and at the worst possible time. The flow of the remainder of the NBA Finals, then, could rest with aching tendons and muscles and the recovery powers of those who own them. “We’re missing 50 points with KD and Klay, but we’ll adjust,” said a confident Curry. “It’s a long series, you know. It’s going to be fun for us.” The next Warriors medical update will arrive Thursday afternoon (Friday, PHL time). And another one Friday (Saturday, PHL time) just prior to tipoff. All along, the Warriors have led everyone to believe that it’s only a matter of time before they’re fully healthy. But will it be in time? And even then, will it be enough against a Toronto team suddenly thinking big? Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 6th, 2019