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PGT Season 6 off to a good start

MANILA, Philippines — The sixth season of Pilipinas Got Talent (PGT) reeled off to a successful start, with the two-night pilot episode readily yiel.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: philstar philstarJan 11th, 2018

UAAP: Aljun Melecio doesn t want to fall in love with threes

Aljun Melecio’s long-range missiles finally hit the mark on Sunday. De La Salle University’s third-year lead guard scored 16 points on efficient 5-of-9 shooting, teaming up with Justine Baltazar to tow their team past University of the East. At the half, he already had 12 points, all coming from threes where he went 4-of-6, to lead the Green Archers in their strong start. That was already a vast improvement from Melecio’s first two games where he went 2-of-16 from deep. In the end, he added one more make from deep, hiking his season mark from long range to a more palatable 30 percent. While the former Rookie of the Year welcomed the development, he also admitted it to be a double-edged sword. “Actually, may positive and negative. Positive, kasi pumapasok yung shots ko tapos negative kasi sabi ni coach if pumapasok na yun, minsan nagre-rely na lang ako sa three-points,” he shared. He then continued, “Mali yun kasi sabi nga ni coach, marami pang opportunity na pwedeng i-drive sa basket. Mas nanggigigil ako if pumapasok yung three-points ko eh.” Indeed, Melecio could do much more than the one assist he had in all of 27 minutes on the floor. Still, that his deep shots are falling is nothing but a good sign both for him and the faithful over at Taft Avenue. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

Tiger Woods with 3-shot lead and 1 round away from winning

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Tiger Woods made it look and sound as if he had never been gone. More than turning back time, every hole seemed like the one before Saturday at the Tour Championship. A tee shot striped down the middle of the fairway. The clean strike of an iron as he held his pose. A sonic boom of the cheers from around the green. Another birdie. "I got off to an ideal start," Woods said. "And the next thing you know, I was off and running." With the most dynamic golf he has played all year, Woods built a five-shot lead in seven holes before he cooled from there, settled for a 5-under 65 that gave him a three-shot lead over Rory McIlroy and Justin Rose and an ideal chance to end this comeback season with a moment that has defined his career. Winning. Woods has the 54-hole lead for the first time since his last victory in 2013 at the Bridgestone Invitational. He has never lost an official tournament when leading by more than two shots going into the final round, and his closing record with the lead is 42-2 on the PGA Tour. He has never been in better position to show he's all the way back from four back surgeries that once made him fear he might never play again. "I've gone through a lot this year to get myself to this point, and understanding and fighting my way through it," Woods said. "I'm certainly much more equipped than I was in March because of what I've gone through." Wood was at 12-under 198 and will be paired for the first time in final group with McIlroy on the PGA Tour. McIlroy birdied two of his last three holes for a 66. "It's obviously exciting for the golf tournament. It's exciting for golf in general that he's up there," McIlroy said. "But for me, all I can do is concentrate on myself. The game is hard enough without looking at other people. Go out there, take care of my business, and hopefully that's good enough." Rose started the third round tied with Woods, but not for long. Rose opened with two straight bogeys before battling back, but the world's No. 1 player already was four shots behind after four holes. He narrowed the gap with a birdie on the 16th as Woods had to scramble for bogey, a two-shot swing. "In some ways, it felt like a Sunday just with the energy," Rose said after a 68. "But I knew that it was halfway through a Saturday. Just wanted to sort of chisel a few back and give myself a chance going into tomorrow." Rose forgot about Woods and tried to beat East Lake, a game of match play in his mind, in a bid to stay in the game. He wound up with a hard-earned 68. There used to be no chance against Woods when he was atop the leaderboard going into the final round. His only losses with the 54-hole lead were the Quad City Classic in 1996 when he was 20 and making third start as a pro, and the 2009 PGA Championship at Hazeltine against Y.E. Yang. He also lost a two-shot lead to Lee Westwood in Germany at a European Tour event in 2000. Now? Woods has gone more than five years without winning. He also has won enough times — 90 tournaments around the world — to remember how. "It's a little more unknown now," Rose said. "Obviously, his history, his statistics from this point are impeccable. They're incredible. But he's human, and there's a lot on it for him tomorrow, as well as the rest of us." Woods has had four finishes in the top 5, a runner-up by one shot at Innisbrook and by two shots at the PGA Championship. Only once this year, however, has he started the final round within closer than four shots of the lead. Being up by three is a much better view. "Simple math says that if I play a clean card, the guys behind me have to shoot 67 to force it into extra holes," Woods said. "That helps. I don't have to shoot 63 or 64 and hope I get help. This is a spot I'd much rather be in than four or five back." The Saturday start was simply mesmerizing. Woods poured in a 20-foot birdie putt on the first hole. His wedge settled 8 feet below the hole on No. 3. His 20-foot birdie putt on No. 4 tumbled into the center of the cup with perfect pace. Two short birdies followed. And when he finally missed a fairway at No. 7, Woods hit a 9-iron from the bunker that hopped out of the first cut to about 5 feet for a sixth birdie in seven holes. The cheers were endless, and there was no doubting what was going on. "I've heard the roars all day, and it's been phenomenal," Paul Casey said after his 66. "What an atmosphere it is out there this week." Woods, however, made only one birdie over his last 11 holes, a wedge to 7 feet on No. 12. He missed badly on his tee shot at the par-3 ninth, and the shaggy rough to the right of the 16th fairway caused the face of his club to open, missing to the right. His flop shot didn't get up the hill and rolled back toward him, and his next pitch was a bump-and-run played to perfection that kept him from another double bogey. McIlroy also started strong, and being in the group ahead of Woods, he knew exactly what was happening. On Sunday, he get a front-row seat. The only other time they were paired together in the fourth round was at the 2015 Masters, when both were 10 shots behind Jordan Spieth. Rose won't be in the final group, but he has plenty on the line even if he doesn't catch Woods. He likely needs to finish in the top five to be assured of winning the FedEx Cup and the $10 million bonus......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

UAAP: Ateneo marches forward to solo second after mowing down NU

Even after a loss to open the UAAP 81 Men’s Basketball Tournament, Ateneo de Manila University still stands in the top two of the standings. Drawing contributions from up and down the roster, the Blue Eagles dominated National University from start to finish for a 72-46 rout on Saturday at the Araneta Coliseum. Thirdy Ravena and Matt Nieto didn’t even have to do much in terms of scoring as the defending champions got much welcome contributions from the likes of Mike Nieto and Adrian Wong in their second straight win following a season-opening loss. Ravena still top-scored with 13 points, but only had to play 13 minutes while Matt Nieto just had two points in 16 minutes. That didn’t prove to be a problem as Mike Nieto and Wong each scored seven points while Anton Asistio also added nine markers. The balance extended to the other end as well as Ateneo allowed no more than 16 points in each and every quarter. “I thought our defense was the way we wanted it to be. There’s no excuse to not play that way after this,” head coach Tab Baldwin said. In fact, the defense was so suffocating that Bulldogs’ super rookie Dave Ildefonso, averaging 17.5 points in the first two games, only had four points in this one. All in all, they only allowed their opponents to make good on 18 of their 65 attempts. With that end-to-end dominance, the Blue Eagles separated themselves from the pack and seized solo second in the standings. “When we get that defensive effort, we can be a prospectively hard team to bet,” coach Tab said. Trending in the opposite direction are the Bulldogs who were dealt back-to-back defeats following a season-opening win. Enzo Joson was the lone player in double-digits for them with 11 points. BOX SCORES ATENEO 72 – Ravena 13, Asistio 9, Wong 7, Nieto Mi. 7, Go 6, Verano 6, Black 6, Kouame 5, Belangel 5, Andrade 3, Nieto Ma. 2, Daves 2, Mamuyac 1, Navarro 0, Mendoza 0, Tio 0. NU 46 – Joson 11, Tibayan 8, Clemente 7, Gallego 6, Ildefonso D. 4, Ildefonso S. 4, Rike 2, Galinato 2, Malonzo 2, Gaye 0, Diputado 0, Sinclair 0, Aquino 0, Yu 0, Morido 0, Salim 0. QUARTER SCORES: 11-9, 33-18, 49-30, 72-46 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2018

Falcons fend off Tigers for 3-0 start

Adamson stayed undefeated but needed to scrape past University of Santo Tomas, 79-71, in the UAAP Season 81 men's basketball tournament Saturday at Smart Araneta Coliseum. Jerrick Ahanmisi led the way with 20 points while also drawing ample contributions from the Falcons' supporting cast for a 3-0 start. "My bench players proved that they are capable of stepping up," said Adamson head coach Franz Pumaren. "I think it was a good test for us to show how well we play as a team down the stretch," said Ahanmisi, who thrived in the crucial stages with nine points in the fourth quarter. Vince Magbuhos had 15 points and four steals, Jonathan Espeleta scored 12 points while Simon Camacho co...Keep on reading: Falcons fend off Tigers for 3-0 start.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2018

PBA: Nash Racela to Bong s son Kiefer: 'Lipat na!'

Kiefer Ravena to TNT? Former KaTropa head coach Nash Racela's got jokes as hours after news broke that he's been replaced by Bong Ravena as chief mentor of the flagship MVP franchise, he used socially media to playfully put a thought out there for PBA fans to argue all week long. Racela tagged Kiefer Ravena, son of Bong and current NLEX point guard, on Twitter and said he should join his father in TNT. "Lipat na! Haha," he wrote. Of course, Racela likewise wished coach Bong good luck. Both of them have been part of the TNT coaching staff for the longest time and Ravena was one of Nash's chief assistants when he got promoted to head coach. [Related: PBA: Ravena takes over as TNT head coach] "Good thigs come to those who wait. Wishing Bong Ravs and his revamped coaching staff the best this conference and beyond," Racela said. Good things come to those who wait. Wishing Bongravs & his revamped coaching staff the best this conference and beyond. @kieferravena lipat na!! Haha. — Nash Racela (@scwtN) September 21, 2018 After a 1-4 start to the Governors' Cup, including back-to-back lopsided defeats, Racela has been on indefinite leave. Eric Gonzales coached TNT on an interim basis during the team's overtime victory over Kia. Racela was also promoted from being an assistant after the 2016 season, taking over from Jong Uichico. In less than two seasons for the KaTropa, coach Nash had three semfinals stints and one Finals. However, this season has been rough for TNT. The KaTropa have yet to make it back to the semis, losing to San Miguel in the quarterfinals of both the Philippine Cup and the Commissioner's Cup.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 21st, 2018

Thunder GM says they won t rush Westbrook back

NBA.com staff report The Oklahoma City Thunder will open camp next week with former Kia MVP Russell Westbrook on the mend from the arthroscopic surgery he had on his left knee a little more than a week ago. As the Thunder hope for a solid season and deep playoff run in 2018-19, OKC general manager Sam Presti told reporters today the team will not rush Westbrook back into the lineup. Westbrook is scheduled to have his knee injury re-evaluated in a few more weeks, which Presti said the team is waiting for before deciding anything else about their star.   “We’d never push Russell or any player onto the floor. It was a pretty minor thing he had done. We’ll see how that re-evaluation goes," Presti said. Sam Presti says the team has never pushed a player to hit a specific date in recovering from injury, and won’t start now by rushing Russell Westbrook to be ready for game one. — Royce Young (@royceyoung) September 20, 2018 Presti on Russell Westbrook surgery/return: “We’d never push Russell or any player onto the floor. It was a pretty minor thing he had done. We’ll see how that reevaluation goes.” — Erik Horne (@ErikHorneOK) September 20, 2018 A re-evaluation of Westbrook's status four weeks since his surgery would be around Oct. 10. That would be six days away from OKC's regular-season opener at the Golden State Warriors. While the Thunder wait for Westbrook to recover from his injury, they received good news on another player coming back from injury. Guard Andre Roberson missed the final two months of the season and the 2018 playoffs with a ruptured patella tendon in his left knee. In July, the Thunder were hoping Roberson would be on track to return to training camp and that seems to be the pace Roberson is on. Roberson will go through parts of training camp, Presti said, and will participate in some non-contact drills. “We don’t think we’re going to be without him very long,” Presti said. However, it did not sound like Roberson will be ready to play on opening night. Presti added that Roberson is doing a lot more this week than he was a week ago and is through the hardest part of his recovery process. The 6-foot-7 Roberson was an All-Defense second-team selection in 2016-17. In 39 games last season, he averaged 5.0 points, 4.7 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.1 steals per game. Sam Presti says Andre Roberson will go through parts of training camp, primarily non-contact. “We don’t think we’re going to be without him very long,” Presti says. Doesn’t sound like he’ll be ready to go on opening night. — Royce Young (@royceyoung) September 20, 2018 Presti said Roberson is doing a lot more this week than he was last week and is through the hardest part of his recovery process. — Erik Horne (@ErikHorneOK) September 20, 2018 Overall, Presti said he expects both Roberson and Westbrook to be back in the early part of the season. And, in a bit of personal news, Presti announced he and his wife had twin girls last night. Sam Presti announces that he and his wife Shannon welcomed twin girls last night. Names are Millie and Elise, joining their three and a half year old, Nicholas. — Royce Young (@royceyoung) September 20, 2018 The Thunder were active in the offseason, parting ways with Carmelo Anthony in a trade with the Atlanta Hawks that netted them Dennis Schroder. Additionally, they re-signed All-Star swingman Paul George and defensive-minded forward Jerami Grant while also picking up Timothé Luwawu-Cabarrot, Abdel Nader and Nerlens Noel in other transactions. Information from The Associated Press was used in this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

Jimmy Butler made his move - now it s Wolves turn

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — Jimmy Butler knows that NBA players can force their way into trades. Forcing their way into a trade that suits the player, that’s an entirely different story. Butler has told the Minnesota Timberwolves that he has no intentions of re-signing with the club next summer, his way of saying “trade me now” or “lose me for nothing later.” The Athletic first reported Butler’s decision. It’s a power move that players can make. Thing is, it comes with risk — because what happens next is not up to Butler. This was the lesson learned from the Kawhi Leonard situation, from the Kyrie Irving situation, from the Paul George situation. Leonard supposedly was hoping for a trade from San Antonio to the Los Angeles Clippers. Irving wanted to be sent by Cleveland to either San Antonio and Miami. George was widely assumed to leave Indiana for the Los Angeles Lakers. Leonard is in Toronto , at least for one season. Irving got sent to Boston , and is a free agent next summer. George landed in Oklahoma City, and probably will be there for years. Not a whole lot of people saw those exact moves coming. But the teams did what was best for them. In all three cases, the Spurs, the Cavs and the Pacers got the best deal they could make. Now it’s Butler’s turn. It should be easy to deduce that Butler can see himself with the Clippers, New York or Brooklyn, since all of those teams will have the cap space to give him the $140 million (or $190 million) max contract he’s seeking. Miami would interest him as well, since Butler has raved about the city in the past and he’s still very tight with fellow Marquette alum and former Chicago teammate Dwyane Wade. Toronto is believed to be on his radar. Playing alongside LeBron James with the Lakers is something that hardly anyone in the NBA would sneeze at. A person with knowledge of the Timberwolves’ situation said that Minnesota has been talking to multiple teams, gauging the Butler market. The person spoke to The Associated Press Thursday on condition of anonymity because talks are ongoing. The Timberwolves aren’t exactly in a position of strength, since now everyone knows that Butler wants out and training camps start in a few days. But that doesn’t mean Minnesota doesn’t control how this will play out. When Leonard asked for his trade, the Spurs had the luxury of time and wound up getting a very good deal from Toronto. The Cavs and the Pacers also had plenty of time to work out something to their likings when moving Irving and George. Minnesota doesn’t have that same cushion. That’ll eventually lead to Butler being asked why he waited until the final days of the offseason to inform the team of his unhappiness, because not only did he potentially limit Minnesota’s options but he could have limited his own. “You should always try to get a perennial All-Star,” former NBA forward Caron Butler told TMZ Sports, adding that he thinks Jimmy Butler is “a real winner.” The Timberwolves can basically make any of the following decisions: — Move Butler right away and start camp without distraction; — Hang onto him for a while and see if he changes his mind; — Work out a sign-and-trade; — Make him play out the year. Butler was their leading scorer last season. He’s an All-Star. He helped them end a 14-year playoff drought. Losing him, no matter what they get back, wouldn’t seem to help the Wolves’ chances of returning to the playoffs in a still-loaded Western Conference. Sometimes, even irreconcilable differences work out. Houston won NBA championships in 1994 and 1995, led by Hakeem Olajuwon. People forget that in 1992, he demanded a trade in a very ugly situation sparked by the Rockets thinking that he was faking a hamstring injury. They mended fences and won titles. Most of the time, though, when a player wants out, they get out. Dwight Howard demanded to be traded by Orlando in 2012, and got his way. Shaquille O’Neal wanted to leave the Lakers in 2004, got sent to the Heat, and then eventually forced them to send him to Phoenix. Chris Paul and Chris Webber have forced trades, too. And it’s not a new thing — Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wanted trades and got them. Butler got his trade ball rolling. Where it goes, at least this season, that’s up to Wolves coach and president Tom Thibodeau — whose own future in Minnesota might be hanging by a thread as well right now — more than anyone else. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

UAAP: Manganti wants people to take Adamson seriously after career-high

First it was Jerrick Ahanmisi. This time it was Sean Manganti who took over and flexed his muscles in Adamson University's latest conquest in the UAAP Season 81 men's basketball tournament. From playing sparse minutes in the first half due to foul trouble, a possessed Manganti emerged in the second half to lead the Falcons to a 90 - 76 victory over the University of the East with a career-high performance of 27 points on 63 percent shooting from the field. On top of that, he thrilled the Adamsonians with a fantastic slam in the third quarter.   Sean Manganti TAKES FLIGHT ✈ #UAAPSeason81 pic.twitter.com/ZHx2JMTXSu — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 19, 2018   "I was so excited because that was my first dunk since Season 79 because [during] Season 80 I was with injuries the whole season so I was excited for that one. I tried to give something to the crowd," he said. Behind his stellar performance is the desire to make up for what he describes as a "terrible" first game last September 9 versus Ateneo. He only scored four points then. "That's what I have been trying to do this whole year even during the preseason. I came out during the first game really, terrible game so I try to make up for it," Manganti explained. Aside from producing points for the team, Manganti, together with Ahanmisi, is also providing leadership in the squad. This is something that head coach Franz Pumaren has specifically asked from both of them. "Prior to this opening of the UAAP, I sat with them, I talked to them about their roles. I mentioned that the young guys will follow them if they play well," Pumaren explained. However, he has yet to see both players explode at the same time. "I guess I'm still waiting for the time that these two guys can really play like an orchestra at the same time, I think that will be a fun thing to watch, both guys playing well," added the Adamson mentor. Regardless, with both seniors' performance in Season 81 so far, Manganti seems to be embracing the role he is expected to fill. After all, he had a good precendent to emulate. "All I do is fill the spot. Last year it was Rob Manalang so I just try to fill that spot, trying to be a leader," added Manganti. With Ahanmisi and Manganti leading the pack and Pumaren directing the shots, the Falcons carved their best start in the UAAP since 2003 with a 2-0 slate. Manganti thinks that this impressive start will spark a big school-strong school mentality in the Adamson faithful. "I want everybody to look at Adamson as a big school. How many years has it been that it is looked at as a small school," Manganti shared. "Nobody takes it seriously. I just want to be taken seriously showing we are a great team.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

ONE Championship: Eduard Folayang relishing opportunity to train in US

For the last month or so, former ONE Lightweight World Champion Eduard Folayang has been putting in work in one of the most renowned mixed martial arts gyms in the world, the Jackson-Wink MMA Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  There, Folayang has been able to work with the likes of world champion producing mentors like Greg Jackson, Mike Winklejohn, and Brandon Gibson, as well was train with the likes of world-class MMA stars such as Carlos Condit, Holly Holm, Diego Sanchez, Michelle Waterson, and more.          View this post on Instagram                   One thing can change everything. A win. A loss. A smart decision. A bad review. A season of success. A season of failure. The color of your skin. According to the world, at least, it seems that one thing can determine who u are-or make u question it. #TimTebow Learning from the great @gregjacksonmma #jacksonwinkmma #teamlakay2018 #onechampionship @the.landslide @jayanthony714 A post shared by Eduard Landslide Folayang (@the.landslide) on Sep 7, 2018 at 1:10pm PDT           View this post on Instagram                   Selfie with the “natural born killer” @carloscondit to wrap the day😉 @jacksonwink_mma @onechampionship @the.landslide A post shared by Eduard Landslide Folayang (@the.landslide) on Aug 28, 2018 at 6:19pm PDT            View this post on Instagram                   “The Preacher’s daughter” @hollyholm #jacksonwinkmma #landslide2018 #albuquerque #newmexico #roadtoredemption @jayanthony714 A post shared by Eduard Landslide Folayang (@the.landslide) on Sep 13, 2018 at 11:42am PDT A proud representative of the Benguet-based Team Lakay stable - which has been regarded as one of the best MMA teams in Asia - Folayang has relished the opportunity of being able to learn and train in one of the most decorated gyms in the world.  The Jackson-Wink MMA Academy of course, has also been home to world champions such as Georges St-Pierre, Jon Jones, Rashad Evans, and many others.  "It was a good experience, I learned a lot of things, especially in the areas where we are still growing and learning, like the wrestling and the ground game." Folayang shared with ABS-CBN's Steve Angeles.  "Of course we also sharpened my striking." added Folayang, who's known for his thunderous punches, kicks, and elbows.  "Napaka-ganda, nabu-boost yung confidence, lalo na pag nakikipag-sabayan ka sa training sa mga nakikita mo na mga malalaki yung pangalan sa MMA, and you experience na makipag-laro sa mga nandito, so it’s really a big experience and a big learning lesson for me." he added.  Considered as the face of Philippine MMA, Folayang has been competing in MMA professionally since 2007, getting his start in the Philippine-based promotion URCC. Folayang was also one of the pioneer members of the Singaporean-based Asian MMA juggernaut ONE Championship, which held their first event in 2011, with Folayang as one of the featured stars.  In 2016, five years after debuting for the promotion, Folayang finally captured the ONE Championship Lightweight World title, defeating Japanese MMA legend and long-time champion Shinya Aoki via third-round TKO.  Folayang would defend the title successfully once, before losing to Martin Nguyen just a day shy of a year after winning the championship.  Since then, Folayang has bounced back impressively, picking up two consecutive wins against a pair of tough, unbeaten Russian grapplers.  The 33-year old Folayang is considered as one of the top contenders in the lightweight division, and could be next in line to challenge Nguyen for the title.  While there's no word yet on what's next for the Team Lakay star, Folayang maintains that it's best to be prepared just in case the call for a world title shot comes once again.  "I’m hoping that I can be able to regain what I had lost, so the best thing to do right now is to prepare, fix those areas where I lack, and sharpen those areas where I am strong." Folayang said. "Yun naman yung pinaka-the best na gagawin kasi wala pa naman yung schedule, hindi natin alam kung kailan darating yung schedule, pero ang pinaka-maganda ay handang-handa tayo whenever the title shot is given, hindi tayo malayo sa pag-kamit ng nawala sa atin." Right now, Folayang is just one of the many willing and deserving contenders in ONE Championship's talent-rich lightweight division.  Names like Aoki, Ev Ting, Timofey Nastyukhin, and Amir Khan are all looking to show that they too are deserving challengers to Nguyen's title.  "There’s a lot, it’s a stacked division in the lightweight division, and yung pinaka-maganda ay nakikita mo kung sino ang umaangat, sino ang nag-iimprove doon sa laban so yung talagang pinaka-magandang gawin talaga ay paghandaan kung sino yung mga magiging kalaban, and then of course you prepare well, kasi anytime they can give you the best." Folayang returns flies back to Manila on Tuesday.    H/T: Steve Angeles, ABS-CBN News  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

Improved Buccaneers insist fast start isn t a surprise

By Fred Goodall, Associated Press TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — The red-hot Tampa Bay Buccaneers scoff at the notion that their first 2-0 start in eight years is a surprise. "I think that's where we expected to be," quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick said after throwing for 402 yards and four touchdowns in Sunday's 27-21 victory over the reigning Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles. "I don't know if everybody else expected us to be there," the 14th-year pro filling in for suspended starter Jameis Winston said, "but we're just going to continue to ride this momentum." Next up is a prime-time matchup next Monday against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Suddenly, what once looked like a potentially tough start to the season with Winston serving a three-game ban for violating the NFL's personal conduct policy is turning into one of the league's best feel-good stories. The Bucs, coming off a 5-11 finish last season, haven't made the playoffs since 2007. "You can't peak too early. We have a lot of football left," receiver DeSean Jackson said. "I just know this team and this locker room is a different team than how we were last year." So are the Eagles (1-1), who fell behind on Jackson's 75-yard TD reception of the first play of the game and never fully recovered. Nick Foles threw for 334 yards and one TD without an interception, however an injury-decimated offense hurt itself with turnovers, penalties and other mistakes. The loss left Eagles coach Doug Pederson in no mood to draw comparisons to last season. "I'm not going to go back and pull out old memories," Pederson said. "New team, new faces. We've got our own set of circumstances now." Some things to know about the Bucs' victory over the defending Super Bowl champs: FAST START Fitzpatrick threw for more than 400 yards and four touchdowns for the second straight week. In addition to teaming with Jackson on the first play from scrimmage, the 35-year-old quarterback connected with tight end O.J. Howard on a 75-yard scoring play in the second quarter. Chris Godwin and Mike Evans had TD catches, too, and Jackson finished with four receptions for 129 yards. "It's unbelievable," Jackson said of Fitzpatrick, who thrown for 819 yards and accounted for nine TDs in two games. "He's playing out of this world right now." SLOW START Philadelphia's defense yielded 271 yards passing and three touchdowns in the first half. The offense, already playing without Carson Wentz, Alshon Jeffery and Darren Sproles, wasn't helped by losing running back Jay Ajayi, receiver Mike Wallace and left tackle Jason Peters in the first half. Nick Foles wound up throwing for 334 yards, but by the time the Eagles began to move the ball consistently they trailed 27-7. "A lot of self-inflicted wounds," Pederson said of his team's sloppy play early. "Guys step up all the time and that's what we did," Foles said. "We gave ourselves an opportunity to win this game." NO TIME TO PANIC Foles, who stepped in for Wentz after the Eagles lost their starting quarterback to injury late last season, tried to put the loss and the team's offensive woes in perspective. "We didn't win every single game last year. I think people forget that," Foles said. "There's a lot of expectations for us, but we can't put that kind of pressure on ourselves." Nelson Agholor's 2-yard TD reception trimmed Philadelphia's deficit to 27-21 with 2:46 remaining. "We had our shots. I just feel like if we had got that ball back one more time, we would have a chance to try to win it," Peters said. "But we were pinned back there with 20 seconds left and we didn't have a lot of options." THE LAST TIME The Bucs are 2-0 for only the second time since 2005, when they went on to finish 11-5. They also won their first two on the way to a 10-6 record in 2010, but did not earn a playoff berth......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Rams defense living up to early expectations after shutout

By Joe Reedy, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — Only two games have been played, yet the Rams defense is living up to its lofty expectations. Los Angeles put on a dominating display in Sunday's 34-0 victory over Arizona as it gave up only five first downs and didn't allow the Cardinals to cross midfield until the final minute of the game. "If we can play elite defense like that and put up zeroes across the board and let our offense just run up and down the field, so be it," defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh said. The Rams ended up making the Cardinals a one-dimensional team. Arizona averaged only 2.6 yards on first-down plays and often found itself getting behind schedule on second and third down. David Johnson also was never able to find any consistency as he was held to 48 yards on 13 carries. While the Rams had 10 plays in which they gained 17 yards or more, Arizona's longest play went for 15 and it had only three of 10 yards or more. "I can't remember the time I've seen a defense play that complete from whistle to whistle," Rams coach Sean McVay said. "We're playing good situationally, stopping the run on early downs and getting ourselves into situations where you can really dictate things." The Rams haven't allowed a point in their last six quarters and have only given up one touchdown, but they face a larger challenge next week against the Chargers and Philip Rivers. Even though things are clicking right now, defensive tackle Aaron Donald thinks there still is a lot ahead of them. "I think we can even get better. That's the scary thing," he said. LONG TIME COMING The Rams are 2-0 for the first time since 2001, when they made their third Super Bowl appearance. What made McVay even more pleased was how his team responded on a short week following last Monday's 33-13 win at Oakland. The Rams had only one day of a regular game week practice, using Wednesday as more of a walkthrough instead of what is normally one of the toughest practice days of the week. "When you've got mature players that know how to take care of themselves, but also get them ready physically and mentally you can take those types of approaches," he said. "Really for the players to be able to handle this week the way that they did says a lot about our team and hopefully we'll continue to take steps." BACKUP PLAN Greg Zuerlein's status is questionable after he strained his groin during pregame warmups and was unable to play. Punter Johnny Hekker handled kickoff duties and was good on a 20-yard field goal and extra point. Hekker is normally the holder on field goals and extra points, but wide receiver Cooper Kupp handled that on Sunday. "I can't imagine thinking you're going to punt the whole game and then like, 'Hey, Johnny (Hekker) you're going to kick field goals, too.' I don't think anyone flinched," quarterback Jared Goff said. "We love Greg and we need him out there and we want to have him back as soon as possible, but stuff like that may happen." If Zuerlein has to miss any more games, the Rams are likely to give Sam Ficken a call. Ficken was with the team during training camp before being released and was with the team for three games last season, including the playoffs, when Zuerlein suffered a season ending back injury. He was 4 of 5 on field goals and 5 of 6 on extra points. STUCK IN NEUTRAL The Cardinals have scored only one touchdown in their first two games and have just two plays of 20 yards or more, which came in their Week 1 loss to Washington. Coach Steve Wilks said he didn't consider replacing quarterback Sam Bradford with first-round pick Josh Rosen during the game and ran down a long list of problems that he has to solve before next week's game against Chicago. "I don't even know where to start right now. We've got to do a much better job running the football. We've got to do a much better job protecting. Receivers got to get off the jam at the line of scrimmage," Wilks said. "I think you have to find ways, number one, you have to find a way to generate positive plays on first and second down, so we don't find ourselves in a third-and-long type situation." INJURIES Cardinals: WR Larry Fitzgerald injured his hamstring during the fourth quarter and did not return. Fitzgerald said after the game that he could have continued to play but that he didn't know how effective he would have been. Rams: RB Todd Gurley did not play during the fourth quarter due to cramping but was fine in the locker room after the game......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

McVay has Rams taking it slow after opening game victory

By Dan Greenspan, Associated Press THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (AP) — The Los Angeles Rams looked like a team that could be playing for a long time based on how they put away the Oakland Raiders in the second half of the teams' season opener. With an eye toward possibly playing into February, coach Sean McVay is willing to play the game to make sure the Rams are physically ready. McVay preemptively canceled Wednesday's practice to give his team extra time to recover from a physically taxing 33-13 win at Oakland on Monday night, planning instead to hold a walkthrough similar to what the Rams did late last season in his first year in charge. Later in the week he will be ramping up the physicality heading into the team's home opener against the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday. "We always try to do what is best for the players, and I think when you take into account what a physical game that was — that's a physical football team that we played last night — we feel like we've got the kind of team where we're mature enough to be able to handle a mental day if we feel like that's going to be best for them getting their bodies, getting their legs back underneath them for a good Thursday and Friday, and then hopefully being ready to go on Sunday against the Cardinals," McVay said Tuesday. That approach would seem to make sense after the Rams showed they can overcome a slow start against the Raiders. In addition to outscoring Oakland 23-0 in the second half, Los Angeles also had a 267-141 yardage advantage and held the ball for exactly 20 minutes. The Rams defense intercepted Raiders quarterback Derek Carr twice and did a better job of adjusting to Oakland's use of tempo and formation in their first game under returning head coach Jon Gruden, something McVay credited to the adjustments made by players and defensive coordinator Wade Phillips. "I think to be able to go through some adversity says a lot about our football team," McVay said. "When you take into account the elements, the atmosphere, some of the unknown with what they presented offensively, even some different things defensively, the way that the half ended they had a lot of momentum. I thought our guys really embodied that attitude of never flinching, never blinking, and then they came out and did an excellent job in the second half." They also showed an improved understanding of how opponents might attack a Los Angeles defense supercharged by the offseason additions of defensive lineman Ndamukong Suh and cornerbacks Aqib Talib and Marcus Peters. Oakland used a heavy dose of bruising running back Marshawn Lynch in an effort to keep the Rams from getting chances to rush the quarterback, while tight end Jared Cook was the focus of the passing game with Raiders receivers held under wraps by the star defensive backs. Despite their struggles in a 24-6 loss to Washington, Arizona has the personnel to try and replicate Oakland's approach. David Johnson is a proven asset carrying the ball or catching it out of the backfield, and tight end Ricky Seals-Jones showed signs of being a difference-maker in the passing game as a rookie. The two Cardinals targets are the kind of players the Rams might try to limit with linebacker Mark Barron, but McVay was uncertain whether he would be available after not playing against Oakland because of an ankle injury. "He's kind of day-to-day right now," McVay said. "It's such a tough thing as far as being able to really project and predict what he's going to be able to do. Whether he is going to be available or not right now I think is definitely questionable and I'll probably have a little bit more information about that as we go forward, but I thought Ramik (Wilson) did a nice job stepping up. You see Marqui Christian get a lot of reps in some of those known passing situations, and I thought both those two players were good for us last night." NOTES: Return specialist Pharoh Cooper is expected to miss several weeks because of a sprained ankle that McVay said might need to be repaired surgically. The Rams might be forced to sign a replacement for Cooper this week as his backup, wide receiver Mike Thomas, is dealing with a groin injury that McVay said could also sideline him......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Darnold recovers from 1st-play pick-6, helps Jets rout Lions

By Larry Lage, Associated Press DETROIT (AP) — Sam Darnold made a stellar debut despite throwing a pick-6 on his first NFL snap and the New York Jets intercepted five passes while routing the Detroit Lions 48-17 on Monday night. The 21-year-old Darnold became the youngest quarterback to start a season opener since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger, and he got off to a shaky start. Quandre Diggs intercepted his ill-advised, across-the-field lob toward the left sideline on the first play from scrimmage and returned it 37 yards for a touchdown 20 seconds into the game. "On that interception, I was pretty nervous," Darnold said. "After that, I put it behind me." The former USC star shook it off and completed 16 of 21 passes for 198 yards and two touchdowns. "He didn't flinch," Jets coach Todd Bowles said. "He didn't even blink." Darnold helped the Jets set a franchise record for points on the road, surpassing the 47 they scored in 1967 against the Boston Patriots. He also outplayed 30-year-old Matthew Stafford. Stafford threw four interceptions — one shy of his career high — and left the game briefly in the third quarter after being hit from the front and back. He was mercifully taken out midway through the fourth quarter and replaced by Matt Cassel with Detroit down 31. Stafford was 27 of 46 for 286 yards and a TD pass to Golden Tate early in the third quarter to tie it at 17. The Jets dominated in all phases. They scored 31 straight in the third quarter to pull away, sending Detroit's fans for the exits and setting off a jolly green party in the Motor City. It was the highest-scoring third quarter in team history and trailed only the 34-point second quarter the Brett Favre-led team scored in 2008 against Arizona. New York scored on the ground and through the air, on defense and on a punt return. The Jets could've piled on even more in the final minutes but turned the ball over on downs after kneeling to take time off the clock. Darnold flipped the ball to a referee after the final kneel down, and the official gave it right back before shaking the rookie's hand. It was a miserable coaching debut for Detroit's Matt Patricia. "Had a couple good plays," Patricia said. "But a couple good plays isn't going to make a game." New NFL head coaches dropped to 0-6 in Week 1, with Oakland's Jon Gruden the group's final hope for an opening victory in the Monday nightcap. Linebacker Darron Lee had two of New York's interceptions, including one he ran back 36 yards for a touchdown in the third quarter. Trumaine Johnson, Morris Claiborne and Jamal Adams also picked off passes in a big opener for the Jets' "New Jack City" secondary. Late in the game, just before Cassel threw an interception, hundreds of New York fans chanted: "J-E-T-S, JETS! JETS! JETS!" A crew clad in green and white filed into seats in four sections along the New York sideline and appeared to outnumber Detroit fans who stuck around for the bitter end. INJURIES Jets: CB Johnson (head injury) and CB Buster Skrine (rib) returned to play after leaving the field with injuries. Johnson was evaluated after he intercepted a pass and fumbled after taking a hard hit from Detroit receiver Kenny Golladay. Lions: DE Ezekiel Ansah, who has struggled to get and stay healthy, left the game with a shoulder after making four tackles, including a sack. OG T.J. Lang left the game with a back injury. CB Darius Slay returned to play after leaving the field to be evaluated for a concussion. UP NEXT Jets: Host the Miami Dolphins on Sunday. Lions: Visit the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

UAAP: Adamson’s Pumaren had the best squeezed out of him by Ateneo’s Baldwin

Adamson University took down Ateneo de Manila University to open the UAAP 81 Men’s Basketball Tournament. Perfectly executing the game plan that was prepared in the last three months by head coach Franz Pumaren and his staff, the Soaring Falcons sent a statement at the expense of the defending champion Blue Eagles. At the end of it all, Adamson’s coach Franz was nothing but satisfied that he got the better of Ateneo’s Tab Baldwin – the reigning and defending champion coach of the league. “I love coaching against Tab Baldwin because he’s a juice extractor. Talagang inii-squeeze whatever knowledge I have in basketball in a good way,” the former told reporters post-game. He then continued, “He pushes me to be thinking one step or even (just) half a step ahead of him.” Between them, Pumaren and Baldwin have six UAAP championships. That is exactly why the winning coach knew that even after the Soaring Falcons seemingly took the fight out of the Blue Eagles, the latter stormed right back to tie the tally at 68-all inside the last 80 seconds. Then, the multi-titled mentor told his wards to keep calm and collected. “When they were making a run, I kept telling my players during the timeout that we’re still good. I specifically mentioned to them that Ateneo is a streaky team and they will make their runs so we just have to hang on,” he shared. He then continued, “My only request to them is to keep the game close and let me coach.” That, Adamson did as its defense only allowed one more make the rest of the way just as Jerrick Ahanmisi, Papi Sarr, and Sean Manganti delivered the goods on offense. With the win, the Falcons soared to start the season. They aren’t getting too ahead of themselves just yet, though. Asked if the win proved that they are contenders, coach Franz answered, “We still have to prove ourselves. Winning one game in opening (weekend) winning one game against Ateneo won’t make us a championship team.” He then continued, “We’re still a team struggling to improve our position last season. I think we still have a lot of work to do.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 10th, 2018

Adamson and FEU open new UAAP season with big wins

TOURNAMENT favorites Adamson Soaring Falcons and Far Eastern University Tamaraws got their University Athletic Association of the Philippines Season 81 campaigns to a good start after booking big victories in their debut outings on Sunday at the Mall of Asia Arena. The post Adamson and FEU open new UAAP season with big wins appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsSep 9th, 2018

NCAA: Knights, Squires win the day for ailing birthday boy Balanza

As always, Colegio de San Juan de Letran’s got the back of Jerrick Balanza. “Right now, naka-admit na siya e, pero nag-request siya na i-dedicate sa kanya ‘to kasi birthday niya,” head coach Jeff Napa told reporters after the Knights dropped Arellano University for a third win in a row on Thursday. Just two days ago, Balanza was diagnosed with a tumor in the temporal lobe of his brain and will have to undergo surgery on Friday. With that, he is not out for the season. Before his operation, the fourth-year swingman celebrated his 22nd birthday. And so, those left playing for Letran gifted him with a big-time win. Even though he will no longer see action, coach Jeff said that Balanza will always be part of the team. “’Di naman mawawala si Jerrick sa team. He’s still part of the team kaya yung presence niya sa dugout sa ensayo, andun pa rin yan,” the former said. And with that, the Knights will always be behind their ailing teammate. “Kami ni coach Jeff, ‘di naman kami nagkukulang sa pag-encourage sa kanya. Sabi ko nga sa kanya, kahit anong mangyari, wag niya isipin ang team namin,” team captain Bong Quinto shared. He then continued, “Ang isipin niya, sarili niya. Kung kailangan niya kami, nandito kami para sa kanya.” Along with the all-out support from Letran, Quinto said they are nothing but thankful for all the love from the rest of the NCAA and the basketball community at large. As he put it, “Good thing naman, buong NCAA, kahit mga kalaban namin, nagkakaisa para makatulong kay Jerrick.” In the end, Balanza will be the rallying point as the Knights try to return to the Final Four for the first time since their champion season in 2015. “At least, dagdag motivation din sa amin para magtrabaho lalo,” coach Jeff remarked. It isn’t just the Knights who are being motivated by Balanza either. Earlier in the day, Letran High School dropped an upset ax on Arellano HS. With the win, the Squires fanned the flames of their playoff hopes. More importantly, however, they also dedicated their biggest win of the season to Letran-lifer Balanza. “Yung isa sa (inspiration) namin, yung nangyari kay Jerrick. Talagang pinu-push ng mga bata na lumaban para sa Letran at para kay Jerrick,” head coach Raymond Valenzona said. Balanza was a start for the Squires before moving up to Intramuros’ Seniors squad. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

UAAP: Adamson believes it s high time to get over the hump

HOW’D THEY DO LAST SEASON? 9-5, lost to La Salle in the Final Four YES, THEY’RE STILL HERE: Jerrick Ahanmisi, Jonathan Espeleta, Sean Manganti, Koko Pingoy, Papi Sarr WELCOME TO THE FAMILY: CJ Catapusan, Jed Colonia, Jerom Lastimosa GOOD LUCK ON FUTURE ENDEAVORS: Tyrus Hill, Kurt Lojera, Robbie Manalang, Dawn Ochea WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM ADAMSON? In Franz Pumaren’s first year as head coach, Adamson University got the fourth-seed before getting ousted by De La Salle University. In coach Franz’s second season, they got the third-seed before getting ousted anew by La Salle. The Soaring Falcons are believers that third time’s the charm, though – especially as they are bringing back a battle-hardened, title-hungry core that is, on paper, better than what their tormentor Green Archers have. “I think we overachieved during our first season under my watch, but basically, our idea right now is to have a better finish than the previous two seasons.” – head coach Franz Pumaren Jerrick Ahanmisi, Jonathan Espeleta, Sean Manganti, Koko Pingoy, and Papi Sarr make up a fearsome fivesome that is right up there with the league’s best. And even with Robbie Manalang, Dawn Ochea, Tyrus Hill, and Kurt Lojera gone, talented youngsters like Jerom Lastimosa and Magbuhos brothers Vince and Wilfrey have taken their place. “Half of the team are all rookies. Basically, we’re just hoping the young guys can mature quicky.” – head coach Franz Pumaren With that, Adamson is not only targeting getting back at La Salle, but perhaps even a long-awaited, much-wanted Finals berth – and who knows, even the championship? WHO IS/ARE THE PLAYER/S TO WATCH OUT FOR FROM ADAMSON? For Adamson to take the next step, Ahanmisi should also take the next step from star to superstar. That means doing much more than scoring he already has on lockdown. “Jerrick is a very special player. There’s no doubt he can shoot the lights out, but basically, you’ll be seeing a different Jerrick. I’ve talked to him and he knows that for us to reach another level, he has to start asserting himself.” – head coach Franz Pumaren Right beside him should be Manganti and Espeleta who are out to spread their own wings as two-way forwards, The big cloud hovering about the heads of the Soaring Falcons, however, is Pingoy and if he is at full strength. The court general has been dealing with a foot injury that kept him out of the PBA D-League and the Filoil Preseason, but now, says he will be back in action. He admitted he’s not at 100 percent yet, but will play through the pain to help his team. WHY SHOULD WE ROOT FOR ADAMSON? Adamson’s last two seasons ended at the hands of Ben Mbala and La Salle. Those losses have only fueled their fire, though, and now, it’s high time for the Soaring Falcons to finally break through. The darkhorse is a darkhorse no more and, in fact, has an inside track for a twice-to-beat advantage. That is the very definition of slowly, but surely. “We have to outwork everybody for us to be really competitive this season. That’s why (you all) will see these guys work hard to achieve their dreams.” – head coach Franz Pumaren WHERE WOULD ADAMSON BE AT THE END OF UAAP SEASON 81? The twice-to-beat advantage is Adamson’s to lose. After defending champion Ateneo de Manila University, the Soaring Falcons have the best chances at a top two finish in the elimination round. We can all count on the fact that Ahanmisi and company will go all out to make that happen. Twice-to-beat or not, though, Adamson will be in the Final Four for the third season in a row. WHEN IS ADAMSON’S FIRST GAME IN UAAP SEASON 81? Adamson puts up the first tough test for defending champion Ateneo on September 9. Of course, It All Begins Here on S+A, S+A HD, LIGA, LIGA HD, and livestream. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

NCAA: Jr. Altas dismiss main man Joshua Gallano, two others

University of Perpetual Help’s rise in the NCAA Juniors has come to a stop before it can even get going. Top scorer and rebounder Joshua Gallano will no longer be playing for the Junior Altas along with two other teammates after the violated house rules. “Out for the season na sila. Meron silang disciplinary action kasi they’re not following the rules of the school,” head coach Mike Saguitguit said. According to sources, the three players were dismissed from the team after they failed to follow the curfew in effect in their dorm in Las Pinas. Gallano has been Perps’ main man with per game counts of 15.3 points, 9.3 rebounds, and 1.7 assists in 29.2 minutes of action. The burly forward is the 10th-best scorer and fourth-best rebounder in the league. Now, he will be unable to wrap up his last season in the NCAA Juniors. Meanwhile, Jasper Coloma and Ezekiel Agbayani have merged for averages of 5.1 points, 2.8 rebounds, and 2.7 assists. Still, Perpetual is firm with its decision that it hopes will re-emphasize to its student-athletes the need for discipline. “Malaki yung pagkakawala ni Gallano, pero naging maganda rin ang nangayri kasi na-realize ng mga player na it’s not all about basketball. Naging maayos lalo yung samahan nila dahil dun,” coach Mike said. Nonetheless, the development comes as a big blow for a Junior Altas side which was the most surprising squad in the earlygoing of the tournament. In fact, they were off to a 4-1 start before cooling down. Now at the end of the first round, they stand at 5-4 and will need the likes of Emman Galman and Ezdel Galoy to step up even more now that Gallano is no longer with the team. The good news is that, in the eyes of the coaching staff, that is already happening. “Last two games na nawala yung tatlo, parang gumanda rin naman yung takbo. Nakita ko yung ibang players na nag-step up,” their mentor shared. ABS-CBN Sports has been trying to get in contact with the dismissed players, but is yet to get a response as of press time. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018