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Personal Remittances for the First 11 Months of 2017 Reach US$28.2 Billion

Personal remittances from Overseas Filipinos (OFs) reached US$2.5 billion in November 2017, 3.2 percent higher than the level posted in the same month in 2016. This brought the cumulative remittances for the first 11 months of 2017 to US$28.2 billion, representing a year-on-year growth of 5.1 percent, BSP Governor Nestor A. Espenilla, Jr. The growth […].....»»

Category: newsSource: metrocebu metrocebuJan 20th, 2018

Personal Remittances for the First 11 Months of 2017 Reach US$28.2 Billion

Personal remittances from Overseas Filipinos (OFs) reached US$2.5 billion in November 2017, 3.2 percent higher than the level posted in the same month in 2016. This brought the cumulative remittances for the first 11 months of 2017 to US$28.2 billion, representing a year-on-year growth of 5.1 percent, BSP Governor Nestor A. Espenilla, Jr. The growth […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJan 20th, 2018

Pace of dollar remittance growth continues to ease; up 2.4% in Jan-Aug 2018

The amount of dollars sent home by expatriate Filipinos rose further in the first eight months of the year, but data from the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) also showed a worrisome trend of tapering growth in recent months for remittances, a key leg of the country's economy. In a statement, BSP Deputy Govenor Cyd Tuao-Amador said personal remittances from overseas Filipinos increased by 2.4 percent year-on-year to reach $21.2 billion in the first eight months of 2018. The central bank's data revealed that the monthly rise in the cumulative amounts of remittances this year have been moderating, compared to monthly data for the same periods last year --- a phenomenon which the cen...Keep on reading: Pace of dollar remittance growth continues to ease; up 2.4% in Jan-Aug 2018.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018

PERSONAL REMITTANCES CLIMB TO US$19.5 BILLION IN THE FIRST EIGHT MONTHS OF 2016

Overseas Filipinos’ (OFs) personal remittances in August 2016 increased by 16 percent year-onyear to reach US$2.6 billion, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas Officer-in-Charge Nestor A. Espenilla announced today. On a year-to-year basis, personal remittan.....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsOct 19th, 2016

Remittance growth slowest in 3 months

By Melissa Luz T. Lopez Senior Reporter OVERSEAS FILIPINO workers (OFWs) sent more money home in February than a year ago even as it was the smallest increase in three months, the central bank reported on Monday. Such remittances totalled $2.267 billion for the month, up 4.5% from the $2.169-billion inflows tallied in February 2017, […] The post Remittance growth slowest in 3 months appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsApr 16th, 2018

Remittances hit $31.2B; growth forecast topped

MONEY sent home by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) hit a record high in December, allowing full-year growth to top the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas’ (BSP) forecast for 2017. Personal remittances totaled P3 billion for the month, up 7.9 percent from a year earlier. It brought the 2017 result to $31.3 billion, which was 5.3 percent… link: Remittances hit $31.2B; growth forecast topped.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2018

PH remittances beat gov t target, hit record in 2017

MANILA, Philippines – Money sent home by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) ended last year strong, resulting in all-time high remittance numbers in 2017, said the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) on Thursday, February 15. Full-year personal remittances hit $31.29 billion, 5.3% higher than the $29.7 billion recorded in 2016 and ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2018

Promising signs from Bulls young guns

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com In time, Zach LaVine’s return, development and eventual career arc will determine to a large extent how successful the Bulls’ Draft Night trade of Jimmy Butler to Minnesota was. For now, and until LaVine suits up this season and beyond, his value to Chicago is strictly to be determined. The two-time NBA Slam Dunk champ is back in the practice gym in his recovery from left knee (anterior cruciate ligament) surgery. Playing 1-on-1 with teammates, working out with the G-League Windy City Bulls in Chicago’s northwest suburbs and improving his timing and his conditioning, LaVine is penciled in to make his season debut before the end of 2017. Meanwhile, though, the Bulls have two other pieces to show from the Butler deal: stretch-four forward Lauri Markkanen and point guard Kris Dunn. Both have offered glimpses of what they can do and how they might fit into the team’s long-term vision that someday won’t prioritize losing. Markkanen, the lanky Finn by way of the University of Arizona, is averaging 13.8 points, 7.6 rebounds and in 30 minutes. He’s putting up 7.2 three-point shots per game and hitting 31.7 percent. His 140 attempts from the arc ranked 14th in the NBA – more than Bradley Beal (126), more than Carmelo Anthony (125) – and Markkanen’s 48 makes are the most by any player in his first 20 games. Dunn, whose disappointing 2016-17 rookie season with Minnesota essentially has gotten a reset, was at 12 ppg, 4.8 rpg and 4.2 apg after having 19 points, five rebounds and five assists in Thursday night's (Friday, PHL time) loss at Denver. The 23-year-old from Providence is shooting 43.2 percent on three-pointers (43.2 percent)  and his steal percentage of 3.8 – an estimate of the percent of opponents’ possessions ending in Dunn steals – ranked No. 1 in the NBA. Their trajectories have been somewhat different so far in 2017-18: Markkanen has been consistent while fighting through a flu bug and some road weariness, while Dunn has played his best most recently. But they’ve both contributed in ways that, aside from the Bulls’ relentless losing, suggests brighter days and in time a positive verdict on that headline-grabbing, bit-spitting trade. Markkanen: Stays cool, likes cold, shoots hot It’s fair to say that the Bulls, when they acquired Markkanen as the No. 7 selection in the Draft last June, got a sleeper. No, literally. That’s about all the 20-year-old native of Vantaa, Finland was able to do after a hectic spring leading up to the draft followed by a tortuous summer at the Las Vegas Summer League and a key role for his home country’s national team in the FIBA Eurobasket 2017 tournament. Markkanen’s single season at Arizona not only acclimated him to the American game, it earned him all-American status and a taste of the NCAA tournament before the Wildcats lost to Xavier. In the Euro competition, he averaged 19.5 points and 5.7 rebounds before heading to Chicago for an early jump on training camp. “When he came over here, he was exhausted,” Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg said. “The week before training camp was completely lost time – he needed to recharge his batteries. So, we really didn’t know what we had. He was still tired when we started camp. We didn’t throw him out there for all the drills, just as part of the process in getting his body back. “But then every time he stepped on the floor, he showed a little more.” First Markkanen demonstrated he would crack the rotation. Then – when forwards Nikola Mirotic (facial injuries) and Bobby Portis (suspension for the punch that caused them) rendered themselves unavailable two days before the season opener – Markkanen was thrust into the starting lineup. Butterflies? Rookie mistakes? Not so much. Markkanen looked almost unflappable in averaging 17.2 points and 9.3 rebounds through his first six appearances, with a high of 25 points at Miami and double-doubles against San Antonio and Atlanta. “We had to adjust our offense,” Hoiberg said, “and put in some new things to try to get him the ball in different spots on the floor, because of his versatility to score.” Justin Holiday was one of the teammates who learned quickly to get the ball more often to the tall blond guy. “He’s playing consistent, and that’s a very mature thing to do in this league,” Holiday said. “What’s maybe surprising is his confidence in shooting the ball. He’s not afraid to shoot it.” Said Markkanen, whose father Pekka lettered at Kansas before returning home to play professionally: “I’m expecting big things from myself. I think that’s what motivates me every day. Whatever I do, I’m not satisfied. So, I try to set higher goals every time I step on the court. Try to do things better. “It’s going to get harder, I know that. I’m trying to face it like any other job. Just go at it positively, fight through it, put the work in, and I think it will work itself out.” At 20 games and counting, Markkanen will soon blow by the 37 he played in college, and the workload probably has something to do with his recent production; in his five most recent games before Thursday (Friday, PHL time), he shot 25.4 percent, including 11-of-39 from the arc. He says he has adjusted from one game to the next – “I don’t want to give my scouting report, but I try to add something new and figure out what they’re going to throw at me,” he said. He even drew praise from the great LeBron James after hitting four three-pointers in the fourth quarter of a preseason game against the Cavaliers. Markkanen hasn’t been fooled by Chicago’s relatively balmy late-autumn weather and has to be one of the few NBA players to welcome winter’s chill (“I’m actually looking forward to snow”). He isn’t flinching from the Bulls’ task at hand, either, which looks longer and more laborious with each lopsided defeat. “I understand this part of a process,” said Markkanen, who would appear to be on his way to the Rising Stars Challenge game at All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles. “We’ve got a young group. We’re having tough times. ... It’s about sticking together and having everyone know that. We can’t afford to not trust or not be a good teammate.” Dunn: Pushing a personal reset button Dunn’s young career was looking a little snakebit. He suffered a concussion in the first game he played for Minnesota in the 2016 Las Vegas Summer League. This time, he had to leave the Bulls’ Vegas entry early to attend to family matters. Then the point guard got hurt in a preseason game against Milwaukee Oct. 7 (Oct. 8, PHL time), winding up with an “open dislocation” of his left index finger. All those setbacks cost Dunn valuable learning time, as far as running first the Wolves’ and then the Bulls’ attacks. He never fully recovered from it last season, sputtering through a rookie season that fell far short of his and others’ expectations. His fellow Class of 2016 draftees had voted him the most likely to snag the Rookie of the Year award, but it went instead to Milwaukee’s Malcolm Brogdon, who’d been chosen in the second round 31 spots after Dunn. This time, Dunn was out of action until Chicago’s fifth regular season game. And the delay showed in his performances: 9.8 points per game, 4.5 rebounds, 3.4 assists, and 38.6 percent shooting in his first eight games. One Bulls insider said Dunn “had a lot going on in his head” from last season’s failures, even as he tried to get traction in Chicago. Said Holiday, 28, who went undrafted and bounced through five organizations in barely three years from 2013 to 2016: “When you’re young, man, everybody’s pushing. Who knows what was going on his head? He might have been trying to be perfect. Sometimes it takes time. It’s a big role. “But he has the confidence to do it, where last year maybe he didn’t have as much confidence. All you can really do is go out and play hard, and if it works out, it works out.” Over Dunn’s past seven games before Thursday (Friday, PHL time), he was a more effective, more efficient player: 13.6 ppg, 4.9 rpg, 5.0 apg, while averaging 2.1 steals and 27.7 minutes. He had made 9-of-15 three-pointers, compared to 6-of-21 to start the season. Already in the five weeks he’s been active, he has played about 30 percent of the total minutes he got in 78 appearances for Minnesota’s Tom Thibodeau. The Bulls have been 3.6 points better when he’s been on the floor, too. That’s not enough to tip outcomes, but keep in mind the Wolves were 2.6 points worse a year ago with Dunn in the game. He played probably his best NBA game Tuesday against Phoenix, scoring 24 points on 10 of 16 shooting with eight assists, four rebounds and four steals. If not for a couple of egregious turnovers among his four, he might have agreed with Hoiberg’s “terrific” assessment. That performance came 48 hours after Dunn had scored two points and missed all six of his field-goal attempts against Miami. Hoiberg sought him out and demanded that the second-year guard play more aggressively, and Dunn proved his coach right. “He called me out,” Dunn said. “When a coach calls you out, you try to play as hard as you can. I had to get through my mind, ‘Go out and play the way I used to play. With that aggression. On defense, on offense. Try to stay down in errors as much as I can and get everybody involved.’ “I want to be an elite point guard one day and I understand, the best point guards don’t make those killer turnovers. If I want to reach my goal, I have to get better each and every day in practice, watch film and, y’know, think a little smarter when you’re playing.” Some have suggested Boston’s Marcus Smart as a legitimate comparison for Dunn, given their defensive aptitudes and challenges both face when shooting from range. Dunn is a huge fan of Smart, but believes he can be a full-service, top-notch playmaker. Mostly, he finally looks comfortable with this reset to his NBA experience. “Individually for me, it is a reset,” Dunn said. “I say this is my first year because I didn’t get too many minutes and I didn’t play the right position in Minnesota. I was a two, a three, sometimes a one. But this is my first year of [regularly] playing the point guard. As a team, we don’t have Jimmy, we don’t have [Rajon] Rondo, we don’t have Dwyane Wade, so we’re all trying to figure it out. Everybody is trying to step up and come together as a unit.” With LaVine’s debut now weeks rather than months away, the Bulls – and their skeptical fans – will be able to more fully judge the yield from that Butler trade. Two out of three so far are giving glimmers of hope. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 1st, 2017

OFW remittances hit 5-mth low in Sept

Money sent home by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) slumped to the lowest level of remittances in five months in September, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas reported on Wednesday. Personal remittances dropped to $2.44 billion from $2.62 billion a year ago, down 7 percent and the smallest monthly inflow since the $2.31 billion posted in April… link: OFW remittances hit 5-mth low in Sept.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsNov 15th, 2017

OFW remittances hit 5-mth low in Sept

Money sent home by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) slumped to the lowest level of remittances in five months in September, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas reported on Wednesday. Personal remittances dropped to $2.44 billion from $2.62 billion a year ago, down 7 percent and the smallest monthly inflow since the $2.31 billion posted in April [...] The post OFW remittances hit 5-mth low in Sept appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 15th, 2017

URC’s net sales reach P92.4B

UNIVERSAL Robina Corp.'s net sales amounted to P92.415 billion, a 13.1 percent increase for the first nine months of 2017 as a result of strong performances of core snacking and joint ventures (J.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsNov 8th, 2017
Category: newsSource:  manila_shimbunRelated NewsMar 15th, 2017

LeBron shines in debut, but Lakers still have lots to do

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com PORTLAND, Ore. -- His first basket of this new era was much like many others, in terms of impact and its ferocity and jaw-dropping nature. LeBron James stole the Trail Blazers’ cross-court pass and before him was the open court … and thousands of open mouths, all bracing in anticipation of a moment. His fast-break dunk was just as you expected it would be, jammed through the basket with a cocked arm and followed by a brief pose at landing, for emphasis and style. The greatest player in the game was back in full soar Thursday but, as it were, his new team remained stuck to the floor. Overall, this process is gonna take some time, you think? Before the Los Angeles Lakers whip the basketball world into a frenzy, they must whip Portland. And also the Houston Rockets, who visit Staples Center on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) for the Lakers’ home opener. And the Golden State Warriors. And Anthony Davis and the New Orleans Pelicans. And any team in the Western Conference that considers itself a contender. But you knew this, right? “We’ll have to go through some moments,” LeBron said after the Lakers lost at Moda Center, 128-119. “We’ll have some adversity.” True, this isn’t an overnight sensation in the making. “Not as fast as you (media) guys think it’s going to happen,” LeBron said. The Lakers will get more chances to make a first impression, and that’s a good thing for them as they navigate through a potentially tricky transition period with their shiny new showpiece. There is only one thing that’s a lock through this bumpy path: LeBron is still the force he was in Cleveland and Miami, his only other NBA stops. Months before turning 34, his flow and his basketball instincts remain steak-knife sharp and his pride is intact. He tipped off his season by playing 37 minutes -- so much for reduced minutes here after 15 years of deep tread wear on his wheels -- and delivered 26 points, 12 rebounds and six assists. “I mean, that’s crazy, a guy to be in his 16th year playing at that pace and above the rim the way he was,” said Blazers guard Damian Lillard. “He looked like himself.” That said, he and his teammates are still working on their wavelength. This was evident for much of the night, when connections were missed and confusion reigned at times. On Thursday (Friday, PHL time), LeBron threw a behind-the-back pass that in Cleveland or Miami would usually hits is mark to teammates aware of his tendencies and timing. Last night, LeBron tried it and the ball dribbled out of bounds, all of which flummoxed LeBron and Kyle Kuzma (the nearest Laker). After the whistle blew and possession went to Portland, LeBron and Kuzma had a brief chat. “I expected Kuz to pop,” explained LeBron, “and he rolled. Then another time (Rajon) Rondo went to the hole, JaVale (McGee) thought it was going to him and it was meant for me. We’ll get better at that.” These first few weeks, if the Lakers are fortunate, will be conducted in a vacuum and a laboratory. Transitions are usually like that. LeBron had a similar one in Miami eight years ago, when a 9-8 start playing alongside Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh had folks thinking the sky was falling. With these Lakers, the reaction will -- or should, anyway -- be more muted if only because the expectations aren’t through the ceiling this season. The Lakers are trying to nourish the limited basketball experience of Kuzma, Lonzo Ball, Josh Hart and Brandon Ingram with LeBron (and Rajon Rondo) taking on more of a mentor role. That means class will be in session most, if not all, season. LeBron is preaching patience not only for those in and outside of the organization, but for himself as well. Sometimes, it’s easier said than done. LeBron realizes that he’s on the clock personally, even though his stamina and level of play remain high. “A lot of these guys don’t have as much experience, so I have to understand that,” James said. “And I do.” LeBron seems cursed by celebrated season openers, falling to 0-4 all-time in his debut games. He scored 25 points in his rookie opener, but Cleveland lost to the Sacramento Kings. He had 31 in his Miami opener in a loss to the Boston Celtics. And he had 17 points in his Cleveland return in 2014, a home loss to the New York Knicks. The Lakers’ crime Thursday (Friday, PHL time) was a failure to tighten up defensively and of course the mistakes that could be blamed on a getting-to-know-you game. And then there’s another issue that LeBron will soon discover, if he hasn’t already: He’s not in the easy East anymore. “There’s a tough game every night,” Lillard said. The West had 10 teams with winning records last season fighting for eight playoff spots. Coaches and players in the West were fond of tweaking their neighbors across the Mississippi in 2017-18, saying the non-playoff teams in the West should take some East spots. Of last season’s playoff teams, none return seriously weaker -- unless you’re ready to bury the San Antonio Spurs (who have a 21-year playoff streak going) or Minnesota Timberwolves (who are coping with the Jimmy Butler crisis). The Blazers were the No. 3 seed and were swept in the first round by the Pelicans, which puts the depth and overall strength of the West in perspective. Only three games separated the Blazers and the ninth-seeded Nuggets during the regular season. Meanwhile, the Rockets and Warriors were beyond the reach of mortals. LeBron chumped the East eight straight times to reach the NBA Finals. Yet by most indications, he’s an A-list teammate away from spooking the Warriors -- and that teammate isn’t in a Lakers uniform this season. This journey through the West could either humble LeBron or, at the least, make him realize the work needed for the Lakers to regain contender status. Heck, the Lakers couldn’t even prevent Nik Stauskas from having the biggest night of his NBA life. He scored 24 points and made more three-pointers (five) than the Lakers’ starting lineup (two). It was telling that Lakers coach Luke Walton started Rondo over Ball at point guard -- an understandable move after Ball missed several months recovering from knee issues. Rondo was mainly stellar (11 assists, three steals) while the Lakers’ fourth-quarter lineups excluded Ball. Meanwhile, Hart (20 points off the bench) earned crunch time minutes. “Everyone had different roles last year,” Walton said, “and some of those roles could change.” Well, someone’s role will remain the same. Regarding that guy, Walton said: “Glad he’s on our team. He’s pretty good at the game of basketball.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 19th, 2018

Remittances down 1.4% in Aug – BSP

MONEY sent home by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) fell by 1.4 percent in August from a year earlier, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas reported on Monday. Personal remittances—comprising OFWs’ net compensation, personal transfers whether in the form of cash or in kind, and capital transfers between households—hit $2.76 billion during the month, down from $2.8 billion a year [...] The post Remittances down 1.4% in Aug – BSP appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018

Remittances decline in August 2018

Personal remittances from overseas Filipinos declined by 1.4 percent to $2.76 billion from the $2.8 billion in August recorded in the same month last year, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas reported yesterday......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 15th, 2018

Banks actively tap rediscount loans, availments reach record P30.6 billion

Rediscount loans extended to local banks to finance the expansion needs of businesses and households hit a record P30.6 billion in the first nine months amid the series of interest rate hikes by the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) to check rising inflation......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

Remittances up 4.5%, hit $2.7B in July

MONEY sent home in July by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) rose from a year earlier and the prior month, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) reported on Monday. Personal remittances, which sum up the net compensation of OFWs, personal transfers whether in cash or in kind and also capital transfers between households, totaled $2.675 billion. The… link: Remittances up 4.5%, hit $2.7B in July.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

Remittances up 4.5%, hit $2.7B in July

MONEY sent home in July by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) rose from a year earlier and the prior month, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) reported on Monday. Personal remittances, which sum up the net compensation of OFWs, personal transfers whether in cash or in kind and also capital transfers between households, totaled $2.675 billion. The [...] The post Remittances up 4.5%, hit $2.7B in July appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

Remittances recover in July 2018

Personal remittances from overseas Filipinos bounced back in July, rising by 4.5 percent to $2.67 billion from $2.56 billion in the same month last year, according to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Current account gap hits $3.1B

The Philippine economy spent substantially more than what it earned through foreign trade in the first half of 2018, with the resulting currency outflows further depressing the value of the peso against the US dollar. In a statement, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) said the country's current account posted a deficit of $3.1 billion in the first six months of the year. This was markedly higher than the $133-million deficit recorded in the same period in 2017. At this level, the current account---which tallies the country's trade surplus of gap with the rest of the world---already hit the $3.1-billion full year target of the central bank only halfway into 2018. "This outcome...Keep on reading: Current account gap hits $3.1B.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

PVL: Alessandrini drops 31 despite shoulder pain

University of Sto. Tomas hitter Milena Alessandrini played her best game so far in a Tigresses uniform. The sophomore was all over that stat sheet in the Tigresses’ 25-20, 27-29, 13-25, 25-19, 17-15, win over Adamson University in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference battle for third. Alessandrini registered a personal-best 31 points on 24 kills, six kill blocks and an ace to lead UST’s offense. The Fil-Italian did it all while nursing a lingering shoulder injury. “Masakit pa rin ng konti siyempre sumusumpong-sumpong pa rin pero nato-tolerate naman niya, kaya okay lang,” said Alessandrini’s Tita Cora, who served as a translator for the spiker who is still struggling with English and Filipino.   The Tigress suffered a right shoulder injury during UST’s campaign in UAAP Season 80 that forced her to miss the squad’s last four games in the elimination round. Alessandrini did return to action during that season but struggled in form as the Tigresses bombed out in the Final Four race. Months into her recovery, Alessandrini slowly regained her form and played a vital role on offense together with rookie Eya Laure for UST.    “Very happy siya nagpapasalamat siya sa kanyang mga coaches na na-reach niya ‘yan (career-high) so ngayon nakaka-adjust adjust siya,” said Tita Cora. “‘Yun lang very happy siya, satisfied naman siya sa naging laro niya.” Aside from playing great on offense in the Tigresses’ revenge win over their elimination round tormentor, 6-foot-2 Alessandrini also churned up impressive numbers on floor defense. She had 13 digs and 11 excellent receptions for UST. With the bronze medal within reach, expect Alessandrini to once again lead the charge of the Tigresses on Wednesday in Game 2.   ---     Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 9th, 2018