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Passenger dragged off overbooked United flight – CNN News

A man's refusal to give up his seat on an overbooked United Airlines flight led to a disturbing scene Sunday that has travelers up in arms over airline policies. The Department of Transportation said it will review the incident, in which a passenger was forcibly removed from the Louisville, Kentucky-bound United flight 3411 at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. The incident has prompted one security officer's suspension and created a publicity nightmare for United. Several passengers recorded the incident on their phones and posted video on social media showing three Chicago Department of Aviation security officers dragging the man, who has not been identified, down the aisle by the arms and legs while other passengers shout in protest. He continued to resist after he was removed and ran back onto the airplane, face bloodied from the encounter. &'8220;It was very traumatic,&'8221; passenger Jade Kelley said. She did not witness the entire event but she said the sound of the screams still haunt her. &'8220;It was horrible. I had trouble sleeping last night and hearing the video again gives me chills.&'8221; The incident sparked criticism of a system that allows airlines to involuntarily boot passengers from flights. United was acting within their rights and following policy. Then, the situation turned physical. United asked passengers to give up their seats voluntarily for compensation. Four crew members needed to get on the flight in order to work another one in Louisville or else that flight would be canceled, airline spokeswoman Maddie King said. When no one volunteered, the airline was forced into an &'8220;involuntary de-boarding situation,&'8221; airline spokesman Charlie Hobart said. United weighs a number of factors to determine which passengers would leave the flight, such as connecting flights and how long the delay will leave the customer at an airport, Hobart said. United employees explained the situation to the man several times, Hobart said. When he refused they followed Department of Transportation protocol and called local law enforcement to forcibly remove him from the plane. Passenger Tyler Bridges said the request for volunteers came after everyone had boarded. It was easy to understand why no one responded &'8212; it was Sunday night and the next flight was not until the following afternoon, he said. Bridges said two officers tried to calmly talk the man out of his seat before a third approached him in an aggressive manner. The officer told him he had to get off the plane, and when he resisted, the officer grabbed him out of his seat and carried him out with the other officers. The man hit his head on an armrest, Bridges said. He yelled that he was a doctor and that he was being profiled for being Chinese. The scene left everyone unsettled, including children who started crying, Bridges said. &'8220;It was pretty shocking that it got to the level that it got to. In part that's the man's fault, when the police came on he shouldn't have resisted, he should have just left. But it was a pretty unbelievable scene with them grabbing him and pulling off,&'8221; he said. Overbooking is not illegal, and most airlines do it in anticipation of no-shows, according to the US Department of Transportation. If no one volunteers, the airline can select passengers for removal based on criteria such as check-in time or the cost of a ticket, according to the US Department of Transportation's Fly-Rights. In an internal memo, CEO Oscar Munoz said the crew members approached the gate agents after the flight was fully boarded and said they needed to board the flight. They sought volunteers before commencing &'8220;involuntary denial of boarding process,&'8221; offering up to $1,000 in compensation. When approached, the passenger &'8220;raised his voice and refused to comply with crew member instructions,&'8221; Munoz said. He grew &'8220;more disruptive and belligerent&'8221; with each request, leaving agents with no choice to call security officers. He continued to resist even after he was removed, running back into the plane, Munoz said. Passengers shot video of him with blood streaming down his face. &'8220;Our employees followed established procedures for dealing with situations like this. While I deeply regret this situation arose, I also emphatically stand behind all of you, and I want to commend you for continuing to go above and beyond to ensure we fly right,&'8221; he said. &'8220;I do, however, believe there are lessons we can learn from this experience, and we are taking a close look at the circumstances surrounding this incident.&'8221; Munoz issue a statement calling the incident &'8220;upsetting&'8221; and apologized &'8220;for having to re-accommodate&'8221; customers. &'8220;Our team is moving with a sense of urgency to work with the authorities and conduct our own detailed review of what happened. We are also reaching out to this passenger to talk directly to him and further address and resolve this situation,&'8221; The Chicago Department of Aviation said in a statement that the incident &'8220;was not in accordance with our standard operating procedure and the actions of the aviation security officer are obviously not condoned by the Department.&'8221; That officer has been placed on leave effective today pending a review of the situation, the statement added. The four crew members did indeed board the plane, and it wasn't pretty, Bridges said. Passengers berated them, told them they should be ashamed of themselves and embarrassed to work for this company. &'8220;They just sat down quietly, it was super tense on the [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource: mindanaoexaminer mindanaoexaminerApr 11th, 2017

Airline bumping rates drop to new low, animal incidents also on decline — report

Following the infamous United Airlines incident in which a passenger was violently wrenched from his seat on an overbooked flight last spring, bumping rates on United States carriers fell to its lowest levels in decades in 2017. According to new figures released by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U.S. airlines posted a bumping rate of 0.34 per 10,000 passengers in 2017, the lowest annual rate since 1995. The previous low was 0.62 in 2016. The decline follows a particularly turbulent year in air travel in 2017. Video footage captured by fellow passengers aboard a United Airlines flight in which Dr. David Dao was violently dragged out of his seat, caused a worldwide ...Keep on reading: Airline bumping rates drop to new low, animal incidents also on decline — report.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 12th, 2018

United passenger dragged off overbooked flight

United passenger dragged off overbooked flight.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsApr 11th, 2017

‘United’ passenger dragged off overbooked flight

‘United’ passenger dragged off overbooked flight.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 11th, 2017

Why do airlines overbook? – BBC News

A common overbooking problem on a United Airlines flight on Sunday ended with a man being bloodied and dragged from his seat and an already troubled airline earning more bad press. How did it all go so wrong? Overbooking on flights happens all the time. Empty seats cost airlines money, so they offset the number of passengers who miss flights by selling too many tickets. In this case, the problem arose because United decided at the last minute to fly four members of staff to a connection point and needed to bump four passengers to make way for them. When there's an overbooking issue the first step is to offer an inducement to the passengers to take a later flight. On Sunday passengers were offered $400 (£322), a hotel room for the night, and a flight the following afternoon. When no-one took the offer, the amount was upped to $800. Still no-one bit, so a manager boarded the flight and informed passengers that four people would be selected to leave the flight. That selection is based on several factors, but frequent fliers and higher fare-paying passengers are given priority to stay aboard, a spokeswoman for United confirmed. A couple who were selected agreed to leave the plane voluntarily. A third passenger, reportedly the wife of the man who was forcibly removed, also agreed. The man, who said he was a doctor and had to see patients in the morning, refused. At this point, the airline could have identified another passenger for removal or raised its offer anywhere up to a maximum of $1,350. Erin Benson, a spokeswoman for United, could not confirm whether other passengers were sought. She did confirm that no offer was made above $800, but could not comment on why. According to eyewitnesses, the man who refused to be ejected said he was a doctor and he had appointments to keep the following day, though this has not been confirmed. This was a Sunday night flight; the next flight on offer didn't leave until 15:00 on Monday. An eyewitness said the man was &'8220;very upset&'8221; about the possibility of being bumped and attempted to call his lawyer. An airline manager told him that security would be called if he did not comply. At this point, security officers came to speak to him, first one then two more. As the video shows, their conversation ended with the man being yanked from his seat onto the floor and dragged off, blood visible on this face. United is technically within its rights to forcibly remove the man for refusing to leave the flight, and the step is part of the airline's carriage guidelines, but such instances are extremely rare. Of the 613 million people who flew on major US carriers in 2015, 46,000 were involuntarily denied boarding, according to data from the Department of Transportation &'' less than 0.008%. The majority of those would have been informed before they boarded the flight, said Charles Leocha, the founder of passenger advocacy group Travelers United. He could not remember seeing a passenger violently dragged off a plane. &'8220;It turned my stomach,&'8221; he said. Removing passengers at the last minute to make way for staff was also highly unusual, he said. Staff transport should be identified ahead of time and factored into bookings. US fliers have become resigned to chronic delays and poor service, according to Mr Leocha, and a lack of readily available information about their rights meant they were too dependent on the airline managers in situations like these. &'8220;Our expectations have been driven so low that passengers have begun to accept it,&'8221; he said. &'8220;What they shouldn't have to accept is being dragged off the flight to make way for an employee.&'8221; Oscar Munoz, CEO of United, said in a statement: &'8220;This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United. I apologize for having to re-accommodate these customers.&'8221; Mr Munoz said the airline would review the event and &'8220;reach out&'8221; to the passenger, though a spokeswoman could not confirm whether United was in touch with him yet. One of the security officers involved in the incident was suspended on Monday afternoon, pending a review, said the Chicago Department of Aviation in a statement. The actions of the officer were &'8220;obviously not condoned by the Department&'8221;, the statement said. Whatever happened on the flight &'' and the details will undoubtedly emerge in the coming days &'' it was a bad day for United, Mr Leocha said. The airline had only recently been at the centre of another controversy, when a fortnight ago it refused to let two girls board because they were wearing leggings. &'8220;This isn't really a lesson for passengers it's a lesson for airlines,&'8221; he said. &'8220;The only lesson here for passengers is when security get on throw up your hands, because otherwise you're going down the aisle with a fat lip.&'8221;( Oscar Munoz, CEO of United, said in a statement: &'8220;This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United. I apologize for having to re-accommodate these customers.&'8221; Mr Munoz said the airline would review the event and &'8220;reach out&'8221; to the passenger, though a spokeswoman could not confirm whether United was in touch with him yet. One of the security officers involved in the incident was suspended on Monday afternoon, pending a review, said the Chicago Department of Aviation in a statement. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 11th, 2017

United passenger dragged off overbooked flight

United passenger dragged off overbooked flight.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsApr 11th, 2017

United passenger dragged off overbooked flight

United passenger dragged off overbooked flight.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 11th, 2017

Officer who dragged man from plane sues United Airlines – BBC News

A former Chicago aviation security officer who was fired after dragging a man off a flight last year has filed […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 13th, 2018

4 statements by United on passenger s removal from flight

CHICAGO — United Airlines has released four official statements in response to the backlash against the company since a customer was dragged from an oversold.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 14th, 2017

WATCH: Passenger dragged off overbooked flight

WATCH: Passenger dragged off overbooked flight.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  pepRelated NewsApr 13th, 2017

Top North Korean official heads to US for pre-summit talks

BEIJING --- A top North Korean official headed to New York on Wednesday for talks aimed at salvaging a summit between Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump on the future of Kim's nuclear program, in the North's highest-level mission to the United States in 18 years. Associated Press reporters saw Kim Yong Chol at Beijing's airport just after noon. South Korea's Yonhap news agency cited diplomatic sources as saying that Kim was on an Air China flight to New York that departed later Wednesday afternoon. Yonhap said Kim, who had arrived in Beijing on Tuesday, was traveling with five other North Korean officials. Kim, one of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's most trusted aides,...Keep on reading: Top North Korean official heads to US for pre-summit talks.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 30th, 2018

Heed these tips on how to ensure a safe, uneventful flight with your pet

News that a dog died after being placed in the overhead bin of a three-hour flight with United Airlines serves as a tragic reminder on how to safely fly with pets. Calling the incident a tragic accident, the United States carrier has issued an apology to the family aboard the Monday night flight from Houston to New York, and said they assume full responsibility for the death of the French bulldog puppy. The carrier in which the dog was traveling was placed in the overhead bin because the bag extended into the aisle, despite the family's protests. The flight attendant claims she did not realize a dog was inside the bag. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, over...Keep on reading: Heed these tips on how to ensure a safe, uneventful flight with your pet.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 15th, 2018

Dog dies after airline worker has it placed in overhead bin

A dog died on a United Airlines plane after a flight attendant ordered its owner to put the animal in the plane's overhead bin. United said Tuesday that it took full responsibility for the incident on the Monday night flight from Houston to New York. In a statement, United called it "a tragic accident that should never have occurred, as pets should never be placed in the overhead bin." The dog was in a small pet carrier designed to fit under an airline seat. Passengers reported that they heard barking during the flight and didn't know that the dog had died until the plane landed at LaGuardia Airport. Passenger Maggie Gremminger posted a photo on Twitter of the dog's ow...Keep on reading: Dog dies after airline worker has it placed in overhead bin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 14th, 2018

Aseman Airlines plane crash kills 66 in central Iran – Al Jazeera

An Iranian passenger plane with 66 people on board has crashed in central Iran during a flight from Tehran to the city of Yasuj, according to Iranian news media reports. A spokesperson for Iran Aseman Airlines told […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2018

Feces-smearing passenger causes plane to force land

An airline flight was forced to land after a passenger caused a major disturbance by spreading his feces in the plane's bathrooms. United Airlines flight 895, which was to fly to Hong Kong from Chicago, had to make an emergency landing in Anchorage, Alaska, because of the incident, KTVA reported on Friday. The disruptive passenger, who was not named but was described as a 22-year-old male, was also said to have taken off his shirt and tried to stuff it in the toilet. He also poured soda and water on the floor and on laptops, as well as shook the seats around him, a passenger named Tricia Mason witnessed. Some people aboardhelped calm the man down. One passenger, Tri Nguyen, ...Keep on reading: Feces-smearing passenger causes plane to force land.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 6th, 2018

Women detail sexual allegations against Trump – CNN News

A group of women who have publicly accused President Donald Trump of sexual harassment and assault detailed their accounts of being groped, fondled and forcibly kissed by the businessman-turned-politician at a news conference on Monday. “This was serial misconduct and perversion on the part of Mr. Trump. Unfortunately, this behavior isn’t rare in our society, and people of all backgrounds can be victims. The only reason I am here today is that this offender is now the President of our country,” said Rachel Crooks, a former Bayrock Group receptionist who accused Trump of kissing her on the mouth without her consent in 2005. Samantha Holvey, the former Miss North Carolina 2006 who has accused Trump of inspecting beauty pageant contestants, and Jessica Leeds, who has accused the President of grabbing her chest and attempting to move his hand up her skirt on a flight, also sat with Crooks at Monday’s event. The firsthand accounts come as a public conversation on sexual assault and harassment — spurred by a series of accusations against high-profile figures in politics, Hollywood and journalism — rages throughout the United States. Brave New Films, a production company that realized a film on the women who have accused Trump of sexual assault, hosted the event. At least 15 women have come forward with a wide range of accusations against Trump, ranging from sexual harassment and sexual assault to lewd behavior around women. Of the women, 13 say Trump attacked them directly and two others say they witnessed behavior that made them uncomfortable. All the alleged incidents took place prior to his assuming the presidency. On Monday, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said that the allegations took place “long before he was elected president” and that Trump has “addressed these accusations directly and denied all of these allegations.” Sanders also claimed that “eyewitnesses” have backed up Trump’s denials. “The President has denied any of these allegations, as have eyewitnesses,” Sanders said. “Several reports have shown those eyewitnesses also back up the President’s claim in this process and again, the American people knew this and voted for the President and we feel like we are ready to move forward in that process.” Asked by CNN to detail these eyewitness accounts, a White House official noted two reports that were made public during the 2016 campaign, one from The New York Post and another from The New York Daily News. The first eyewitness was Anthony Gilberthorpe, who the Trump campaign made available to the Post during the 2016 contest to rebut Leeds’ claim that Trump groped her on a flight. Gilberthorpe claimed to be on the same flight and has been known in British media for making claims about the sexual conduct of politicians. The second eyewitness is Katie Blair, the Miss Teen USA 2006 who told TMZ that she never saw Trump come backstage during a beauty contest. “As far as the rumors surrounding him coming backstage and things like that, dressing rooms — absolutely not,” she told TMZ, but Blair was not present at the 1997 Miss Teen USA pageant, where Trump was accused of walking in. Trump bragged on the Howard Stern show in 2005 about going backstage during beauty pageants. “Before a show, I’ll go backstage and everyone’s getting dressed, and everything else, and you know, no men are anywhere, and I’m allowed to go in because I’m the owner of the pageant and therefore I’m inspecting it,” he said. “You know, I’m inspecting because I want to make sure that everything is good.” The White House failed to provide other examples of eyewitnesses corroborating the President’s denials. In addition to the woman at the press conference on Monday, Trump’s accusers include Temple Taggart, the former Miss Utah USA who accused Trump of kissing her on the lips in 1997; Mindy McGillivray, who accused Trump of grabbing her butt at his Mar-a-Lago club in Florida in 2003 and Natasha Stoynoff, who accused Trump of “forcing his tongue” down her throat during a photo shoot at Mar-a-Lago in 2005. Crooks called on Congress to “put aside party affiliations and investigate Trump’s history of sexual misconduct.” “In an objective setting, without question, a person with this record would have entered the graveyard of political aspirations, never to return,” she said. “Yet here we are with that man as President.” Leeds added that while some areas of society are “being held accountable for unwanted behavior … we are not holding our President accountable for what he is and who he is.” Trump has personally vehemently denied the accusations. “The events never happened. Never. All of these liars will be sued after the election is over,” Trump said months before the 2016 election in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Trump, however, has never filed a lawsuit against the accusers. Sanders said earlier this year that the White House’s position is that all the women are lying. “Yeah, we have been clear on that from the beginning and the President has spoken on it,” Sanders said in October. Trump opened the floodgates of accusations against him during the 2016 campaign when he downplayed the release of a 2005 “Access Hollywood” video that showed him saying he was able to “grab them by the p**sy” because he was famous. Trump downplayed his remarks as nothing more than “locker room talk” at the second presidential debate and said he never kissed or groped women without consent. But not all those […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsDec 12th, 2017

United settles with dragged passenger, changes practices

United settles with dragged passenger, changes practices.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsApr 28th, 2017

United reaches settlement with dragged passenger

United reaches settlement with dragged passenger.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 28th, 2017

Man dragged off flight will sue United Airlines – lawyers

Man dragged off flight will sue United Airlines – lawyers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 14th, 2017

Passenger dragged off flight

Passenger dragged off flight.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  pepRelated NewsApr 13th, 2017

United Airlines boss sorry for ‘horrific’ passenger removal – BBC News

United Airlines boss sorry for ‘horrific’ passenger removal – BBC News.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 12th, 2017