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Oprah speech has Democrats buzzing about possible 2020 run

DES MOINES, Iowa — Oprah Winfrey's impassioned call for "a brighter morning even in our darkest nights" at the Golden Globes has Democratic Party activists b.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 9th, 2018

Most Americans ‘don’t want’ Oprah to run for president

  NEW YORK - Americans may love Oprah Winfrey, but most don't want the chat show queen to run for president, although if she did she would beat Donald Trump, a poll revealed Friday.   Winfrey's rousing speech at Sunday's Golden Globe Awards ceremony ignited speculation that the billionaire entertainment mogul, the first black woman to own a television network, is harboring Oval Office ambitions.   Sixty-four percent of respondents have a favorable view of Winfrey, including 43 percent of Trump supporters, according to the NPR, PBS NewsHour and Marist survey.   But when asked if they wanted Winfrey to run in 2020, only 35 percent said yes. A ma...Keep on reading: Most Americans ‘don’t want’ Oprah to run for president.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

From Reagan to Trump, and maybe Oprah, American celebrity politicians abound

WASHINGTON — Talk show queen Oprah Winfrey’s impassioned Golden Globes speech triggered speculation about her political future. A 2020 presidential race between Oprah and Donald J. Trump, himself a TV titan, would be the celebrity-political battle of the millennium, made for — and by — television. But they are by no means the first American […] The post From Reagan to Trump, and maybe Oprah, American celebrity politicians abound appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Trump would welcome challenge from Oprah for US president

ABOARD AIR FORCE ONE — US President Donald J. Trump would gladly face Oprah Winfrey as an opponent in the 2020 presidential race, a White House spokesman said on Monday after social media buzz from her speech at an awards show thrust her name into the political arena. “We welcome the challenge, whether it be […] The post Trump would welcome challenge from Oprah for US president appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Trump would welcome challenge from Oprah Winfrey for president

U.S. President Donald Trump would gladly face Oprah Winfrey as an opponent in the 2020 presidential race, a White House spokesman said on Monday after social media buzz from her speech at an awards show thrust her name into the political arena. #BeFullyInformed Trump would welcome challenge from Oprah Winfrey for president ABOARD AIR FORCE… link: Trump would welcome challenge from Oprah Winfrey for president.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Oprah for President? Twitter fans make the case

LOS ANGELES --- Oprah Winfrey's moving speech at the Golden Globes has some fans and fellow celebrities calling for her presidential run. The actress accepted the Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award at Sunday's ceremony, and it didn't take long for Twitter to start lighting up with the hashtag #Oprah2020. Comedian Sarah Silverman tweeted "Oprah/Michelle 2020." Leslie Odom, Jr., who played Aaron Burr in the Broadway musical "Hamilton" tweeted "She's running. A new day is on the way." Winfrey's longtime partner Stedman Graham tells the Los Angeles Times "it's up to the people" whether she will be president, adding "she would absolutely do it." Winfrey brought the...Keep on reading: Oprah for President? Twitter fans make the case.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 8th, 2018

entertainment.mb.com.ph

US President Donald Trump weighed in Tuesday on fevered speculation about a potential 2020 White House bid by Oprah Winfrey, saying she probably would not run against him, but if she did, he would win. #BeFullyInformed entertainment.mb.com.ph Source link: entertainment.mb.com.ph.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJan 10th, 2018

Oprah for President? Twitter Fans Make The Case

LOS ANGELES - Oprah Winfrey's moving speech at the Golden Globes has some fans and fellow celebrities calling for her presidential run. The actress accepted the Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Trump would welcome challenge from Oprah Winfrey for president

By Jeff Mason ABOARD AIR FORCE ONE (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump would gladly face Oprah Winfrey as an opponent in the 2020 presidential race, a White House spokesmanThe post Trump would welcome challenge from Oprah Winfrey for president appeared first on DZRH News......»»

Category: newsSource:  dzrhnewsRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Oprah for president? Speech sparks fevered speculation

NEW YORK, USA – Could Oprah Winfrey run for president and beat Donald Trump? Hollywood, liberals and fans are abuzz with speculation that the billionaire chat show queen is harboring White House ambitions after an impassioned Golden Globes speech . Winfrey had barely heralded a "new day" following a sexual harassment watershed, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

Winfrey says time is up for abusive men in Globes speech

Oprah Winfrey earned multiple standing ovations at Sunday's Golden Globes as she accepted the Cecil B......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 8th, 2018

WATCH: Oprah Winfrey’s inspiring speech at the Golden Globes 2018

MANILA, Philippines – Entertainment star Oprah Winfrey made history once again, becoming the first black woman to receive the honorary Cecille B. De Mille Award at the 2018 Golden Globes, held at the Beverly Hilton hotel on January 7 (January 8, Philippine time). The award is given by the Hollywood ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 8th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

MVP name drops Ravena brothers, Ricci, and Pogoy for 2023 Gilas team

With the Philippines being the main host of the 2023 FIBA World Cup, the search is on for the next wave of Gilas Pilipinas stars. Because let's face it, the current core of the team might be too old to play six years from now and their last stand, realistically, is going to be the 2019 FIBA World Cup and/or the 2020 Olympics. That's why the national team is fighting hard to make the 2019 tournament in China. But still, it's never too early to plan for the future and Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas President Manny V. Pangilinan, in his speech Thursday celebrating the country's win to take the hosting rights of the 2023 World Cup, name-dropped a handful of players that might make up the core of Gilas during that time. MVP mentions Kiefer, Thirdy, Ricci, and RR Pogoy as possible Gilas Pilipinas players for 2023. Then again, he also said that he's no coach #PlayLouderIn2023 | @abscbnsports — Paul Kennedy Lintag (@paullintag8) December 14, 2017 All players mentioned will be in that 26-32 year-old range or basically the peak years of a young basketball player. National team head coach Chot Reyes, adding to the statements of his boss, says that that's the most logical way to go about the 2023 lineup. However, he's not taking out players who are younger still. "As we develop the players, we develop as well the conditions to make the team at its strongest in 2023. Who they are, we still have to sit down -- coach Jong is there and the rest of the national team coaches -- and identify players," Reyes said. "Pero like MVP said, its most likely players who are between 26 and 32 years old in 2023. We're not discounting an exception of 22-, 23-year-olds, of course, pero most probably its within that [range]," he added. More importantly though, Reyes mentioned the need for the national team to make the program as early as now. Continuity and unity is key he says. "It's going to be a difficult task but we have to seek the assistance of all the stakeholders in basketball," he said. "Not only the PBA, but the commercial leagues -- even the UAAP and the college leagues. We will need to plan a calendar now pa lang and not wait until 2021 or 2022 to put that calendar together. Dapat ngayon pa lang may plano na tayo," Reyes added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 14th, 2017

Virginia elects Democrat governor, in rejection of Trumpism

WASHINGTON DC, USA (UPDATED) – US Democrats claimed a resounding win Tuesday, November 7, in a crucial governor's race in Virginia, dealing a blow to Donald Trump's politics of division and testing the president's influence ahead of larger battles in 2018 and 2020. The marquee race has national ramifications as ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 8th, 2017

Republican Karen Handel beats Jon Ossoff in runoff – The Guardian

Democrats fell short of a special election victory yet again on Tuesday when Jon Ossoff, long the best hope of Democrats to win a special election in the Trump administration, suffered a narrow loss to Republican Karen Handel in the Sixth Congressional District. The race was the latest in a series of special elections in Republican seats where Democrats managed to deliver moral victories – rather than actual victories – as they proved unable to notch a major electoral win in the Trump administration. With 100% of precincts reporting, Handel had 52.7% and Ossoff had 47.3%. Sporadic downpours and flash flood warnings helped to put a damper on Democratic turnout in base precincts and on the hopes of progressives to thwart Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Combined with an energized Republican base that kept Ossoff from accumulating a significant lead among early voters, it doomed the hopes of the anti-Trump activists who made the first time Democratic candidate a minor political celebrity. The runoff came after a first round of voting in April where Ossoff won just over 48% of the vote and Handel finished second in a splintered Republican field with just under 20% of the vote. However, Ossoff struggled to match that total as Handel consolidated the Republican vote in a traditionally conservative district in the northern suburbs of Atlanta and ended up falling a percentage point short of his much hyped performance in the first round of voting. Trump took to Twitter to hail the result as a personal victory “Thank you @FoxNews “Huge win for President Trump and GOP in Georgia Congressional Special Election.” The seat had been vacated by Tom Price when the former congressman joined Trump’s cabinet to become secretary of health and human services and previously held by Republican stalwarts like Senator Johnny Isakson and former speaker Newt Gingrich. Although Price won by 23% in 2016, Donald Trump only narrowly won this wealthy, well-educated district by just over 1%. Trump’s narrow win sparked optimism among Democrats that the district, where nearly 60% of residents have a college degree, could flip as part of the political realignment around the president’s upset victory in 2016. Roughly $50m ended up being spent by both parties and allied groups in the race as it became the most expensive congressional campaign in the history of the United States. However, while Democrats had motivated their base and won over skeptical Republicans, the conservative slant of district proved too much even for the nearly unprecedented resources that Democrats invested in the race, even flying in volunteers for last minute doorknocking as local television stations had been saturated by 30-second advertisements. The two candidates took different tones in their election night speeches after the race was called. Ossoff, speaking to a distraught crowd in a packed ballroom, cast the race in historical terms. “As darkness has crept across this planet you have provided a beacon of hope to people in Georgia and people in around the world,” Ossoff told attendees. He cast the race in broader metaphysical terms. “The fight goes on, hope is still alive,” said Ossoff. In contrast, Handel gave a far more traditional speech. She mentioned the obligation that came with “being the first Republican woman elected to Congress from the great state of Georgia” and cast herself an inspirational story, telling attendees “anything is possible with hard work, inspiration, grit and people that believe in you.” Handel also touched on policy priorities like “finishing the drill on health care” and lowering taxes including repeal of the estate tax. Although the race had been cast a referendum on Trump – an opinion the President seemed to endorse after the result had been reported – both candidates awkwardly danced around his looming presence on the campaign trail. At Handel’s campaign events, Trump’s name went unmentioned by the candidate and introductory speakers. Instead, there was constant refrain of attack on Ossoff for his ties to House minority leader Nancy Pelosi and praise for previous holders of the seat like Price and Gingrich. Ossoff was regularly bashed for the amount of money he raised out of state, for having “San Francisco values” and, particularly, for the fact that he did not actually live in the district. Handel, who suggested in the first televised debate of the campaign that Trump should use Twitter less often, told the Guardian in an interview on Monday that she didn’t pay attention to the president’s use of social media. She said “I am focused on my campaign, I have precious little time to be on Twitter.” Several hours later, her campaign sent out a fundraising email signed by the former secretary of state with the subject line “did you see what Trump just tweeted?” after the President used his ubiquitous social media account to tout her campaign. Ossoff has also been measured in his attacks on Trump in a traditionally Republican district albeit one that the president barely won in 2016. Instead, the lanky and measured political neophyte focused on banal and politically non-controversial issues like government waste and turning Atlanta into “the Silicon Valley of the South” and let the progressive anti-Trump enthusiasm of the Democratic base carry him. Instead, he has focused on Handel’s stint as Georgia secretary of state as well as her brief stint with the Susan Komen Race For The Cure, a charity which combats breast [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 21st, 2017

Vladimir Putin denies he has compromising material on Donald Trump – The Guardian

Russian President Vladimir Putin has denied he had any compromising material about US President Donald Trump. “Well, this is just another load of nonsense,” Putin said on NBC News’ Sunday Night with Megyn Kelly, when asked whether he had any damaging information on the Republican president. The remarks were the latest in a series of denials from Moscow that have had little impact so far on a political crisis in the United States over potential links between Russia and Trump’s inner circle. The issue will be front and centre this week in Washington, where former FBI director James Comey is due to testify on whether Trump tried to get him to back off an investigation into alleged ties between Trump’s election campaign and Moscow. Comey, who was leading the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s probe into alleged Russian meddling in last year’s US presidential election, was fired by Trump last month, four years into his 10-year term. Putin also told NBC he had no relationship with Trump and had never met him, regardless of Trump’s previous travel to Russia as a businessman. Putin noted that executives from perhaps 100 American companies were currently in Russia. “Do you think we’re gathering compromising information on all of them right now or something?” Putin asked, before saying: “Have you all lost your senses?” Have you all lost your senses? Vladimir Putin Trump has offered contradictory accounts of his relationship with Putin over time but has also said the two never met. He has called an FBI investigation into alleged ties between his campaign and Russia a “witch hunt” designed to undermine the legitimacy of his 2016 election win. Trump has also disparaged a dossier of unsubstantiated allegations that purported to show Russian intelligence operatives had compromising information about him, but which he has described as a “hoax.” US intelligence agencies concluded in January that Moscow tried to tilt the election campaign in Trump’s favour, including by hacking into the emails of senior Democrats, a charge the Kremlin denies. “They have been misled,” Putin told NBC, in an interview NBC said was recorded on Friday. “And they aren’t analysing the information in its entirety. I haven’t seen, even once, any direct proof of Russian interference in the presidential election.” Trump has denied any collusion but the FBI and congressional probes into the Russia matter have dogged the early months of his presidency. Former CIA director John Brennan said last month he had noticed contacts between Trump’s campaign associates and Russia during the 2016 election and grew concerned Moscow had sought to lure Americans down “a treasonous path.” After Comey’s dismissal, news reports emerged that Trump asked Comey to end the probe into former national security adviser Michael Flynnduring a February meeting in the Oval Office, the day after Flynn was fired for misrepresenting his contacts with the Russian ambassador, Sergei Kislyak. Flynn has declined to testify to the US Senate Intelligence Committee about his Russian ties, invoking his constitutional right to avoid self-incrimination. Putin downplayed Flynn’s appearance with him at a December 2015 gala dinner in honor of the Russian television network Russia Today (RT), which US officials consider a state-run propaganda outlet. “I made my speech. Then we talked about some other stuff. And I got up and left. And then afterwards I was told, ‘You know there was an American gentleman, he was involved in some things. He used to be in the security services’,” Putin said. “That’s it. I didn’t even really talk to him. That’s the extent of my acquaintance with Mr Flynn,” he added. Reuters has reported that Flynn and Trump’s son-in-law and close adviser, Jared Kushner, discussed with Kislyak the idea of creating a back channel between Trump and Putin that could have bypassed diplomats and intelligence agencies. Putin said he was unaware of any such discussion and criticized NBC for asking about contacts between the ambassador and the Trump administration. “You created a sensation out of nothing. And out of this sensation, you turned it into a weapon of war against the current president,” Putin said. … today we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading the Guardian than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many news organisations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can. So we think it’s fair to ask people who visit us often for their help. The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too. If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, helps to support it, our future would be much more secure.( “I made my speech. Then we talked about some other stuff. And I got up and left. And then afterwards I was told, ‘You know there was an American gentleman, he was involved in some things. He used to be in the security services’,” Putin said. “That’s it. I didn’t even really talk to him. That’s the extent of my acquaintance with Mr Flynn,” he added. Reuters has reported that Flynn and Trump’s son-in-law and close adviser, Jared Kushner, discussed with Kislyak the idea of creating a back channel between Trump and Putin that could have bypassed diplomats and intelligence agencies. Putin said [&'].....»»

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President Oprah? Winfrey doesn't rule out 2020 run

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President Oprah? Winfrey doesn t rule out 2020 run

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President Oprah? Winfrey doesn't rule out 2020 run

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Trump budget plan shows how he would reshape nation – CNN News

An early glimpse at President Donald Trump's first budget proposal offers the clearest blueprint yet of how he plans to remake the nation. The plan envisages a 10% hike in military spending to be paid for by sharp cuts in other government departments, with the State Department and the Environmental Protection Agency each bracing for a particularly painful hit. If enacted, the plan would involve a radical domestic reshaping of the federal government paired with a shift in the posture of American diplomacy around the world. It is an approach that flows directly from the rhetoric and positions adopted by Trump on the campaign trail playing to his grass-roots supporters' deep distrust of Washington and his &'8220;America First&'8221; political creed. &'8220;This is a landmark event, a message to the world, in these dangerous times, of American strength, security and resolve,&'8221; Trump said Monday. The budget plan comes at a time when the administration is making strenuous efforts to flesh out the ideological and political foundations on which the new GOP White House is built. Top officials, including the President, previewed a strident change of political direction at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) last week, and Trump will intensify the effort with his first address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night &'8212; a crucial moment for the new administration. But the controversial nature of Trump's emerging budget &'8212; always a magnet for partisan opposition &'8212; guarantees a fight that will test the White House's capacity to corral lawmakers and shape public opinion. It also demonstrates a desire to boost military might and de-emphasize diplomatic reductions that will reverberate in foreign capitals of friends and foes alike. Already, a cadre of retired generals and admirals has warned that cutting State Department funding on diplomacy and development would make America less safe. Democrats say they will use every tool at their disposal, which includes the power of the filibuster in the Senate, to block Trump's plans. The President could also face resistance from Republican budget hawks in Congress. Defense hawks, meanwhile, are arguing that the $54 billion dollar hike in defense spending is not enough after years of budget sequestration that capped military funding. It is not yet clear exactly where the cuts will come from. Monday's announcement involved top-line numbers from the 2018 budget sent to government agencies that must now work out how to adjust their spending. Any budget issued by the White House is merely an opening bid, and many soon become worthless documents once Congress, with its competing demands on the public purse, gets to work. Democrats, who could try to frustrate Trump by refusing to lift caps on defense spending by wielding the Senate filibuster, sensed a political opportunity to undercut Trump's appeal to working-class voters as they try to rebuild their party's support ahead of midterm elections next year. &'8220;The budget proposal is a reflection of where the President is at and who he is (and) what today's hard-right Republican party &'8212; which has done this budget through its Cabinet &'8212; believes in,&'8221; said Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. &'8220;Which is relieve the burdens on the wealthy and special interests, whether they be coal companies or financiers, and put the burden on the middle class.&'8221; But Trump styles himself as a shrewd negotiator steeped in the give-and-take of real estate transactions and is known for making the kinds of bold opening gambits that the budget announcement on Monday represents. The proposals were also formulated directly from the fiery speeches of the President's campaign, which underpinned his belief that he has a mandate for radical change and might make any compromise harder. &'8220;When you see these reductions, you'll be able to tie it back to a speech the President gave, or something the President had said previously,&'8221; Trump's budget director, Mick Mulvaney, told reporters on Monday. &'8220;We are taking his words and turning them into policies and dollars.&'8221; The goals are consistent with the theory of Trumpism laid out by the President's political adviser, Steve Bannon, at CPAC last week, which included a push to &'8220;deconstruct the administrative state.&'8221; Indeed, the budget would remold the federal government by paring back programs introduced by the Obama administration &'8212; for example, EPA regulations on the fossil fuels industry &'8212; and other agency reductions. In practice, according to Mulvaney, that involves a sweeping reset of political priorities. &'8220;It is a true 'America first' budget,&'8221; said Mulvaney. &'8220;It will show the President is keeping his promises and doing exactly what he said he was going to do when he ran for office. It prioritized rebuilding the military, including restoring our nuclear capabilities, protecting the nation and securing the border, enforcing the laws currently on the books, taking care of vets and increasing school choice.&'8221; Still, with Trump vowing not to touch popular non-discretionary spending targets like Medicare and Social Security, his budget team faces a tortuous task in wringing out savings at agencies while preserving room for Trump's promised big tax cuts. Every dollar that is cut from discretionary spending could affect other popular and vital programs, including transportation, conservation, agriculture and commerce &'8212; all of which have powerful lobbies ready to go into battle for their funding. And Trump does not want to tighten the national belt everywhere. For instance, he is proposing spending billions of dollars on his pet project of a southern border wall, though he has promised [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2017