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One last time: Phelps, Lochte duke it out in Olympic pool

RIO DE JANEIRO — Olympic roommates Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte maintain a relaxed vibe at the athletes' village......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarAug 11th, 2016

Homeward-bound Schooling set for next phase at Asian Games

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The hardest lap for any swimmer is usually the one coming home. That's when they have to try their hardest, giving it everything they have to get to the finish. Singapore's Olympic gold medalist Joseph Schooling is about to discover what that means when he's not in the competition pool. After spending the last nine years in relative anonymity in the United States, the 23-year-old Schooling is getting ready for the second half of his sporting career back in southeast Asia, knowing he probably won't be able to walk down the street or go for dinner without being noticed. "It's everywhere but it shows that they support you and they're excited to see you, and so you can't complain," Schooling said. "You can never brush aside your fans. You've always got to reciprocate so I'm completely fine with it." Schooling is competing this week at the Asian Games in Indonesia, where he has entered in the 50- and 100-meter butterfly races, three relays and the 50 freestyle. He will bid to defend his title in the 100 butterfly on Wednesday. Despite leaving Singapore in his teens to chase his dream of winning an Olympic gold medal, the island-state has always been in Schooling's heart. But so too has Texas, where he has been studying at University and training under the watchful eye of Eddie Reese. Schooling will complete his economics degree later this year before returning to Singapore, but will take back two permanent reminders of his time in the U.S. that changed his life. One is the tattoo on his left shoulder of the University of Texas mascot, the Longhorn. The other, inked after he won Rio, is the Olympic rings on his right bicep. The Longhorns won the NCAA national title four years in a row while Schooling was on the team and he credits his time there for helping him win the ultimate prize when he beat American great Michael Phelps for the Olympic title in the 100 fly. "It's great, it's a different atmosphere, great teammates," Schooling said. "I feel like it's the perfect environment for high performance." Schooling wants to keep swimming through to the 2024 Olympics in Paris and, although he hasn't made a final decision on his training plans, he has spent the past few months practicing with Singapore's new high-performance unit and likes what he sees. Australia's Stephan Widmer, who helped Libby Lenton and Leisel Jones win Olympic titles, has been appointed performance director at the institute while Gary Tan is the national head coach and Sonya Porter, who has extensive experience coaching in the U.S., is the technical director. Schooling's biggest challenge could be how to deal with his celebrity status but after he held off Phelps on the biggest final lap of his life to date, he's confident he can manage. "It takes some getting used to but at the end of the day if you focus on what you're doing and you don't care about outside distractions it's ok," he said. "I like being in that position and I don't see it as a burden at all.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 21st, 2018

Phelps has 'no desire' to return to swimming

em>By Paul Newberry, Associated Press /em> Michael Phelps wondered if watching others compete at the world championships would pique his desire for another comeback. Nope. Phelps said Tuesday he has 'no desire' to return to competitive swimming, but he is eager to stay involved with the sport and cheer on those who follow in his enormous wake. In an interview with The Associated Press while promoting a healthy pet food campaign, Phelps said he is excited about having his second child and building a life beyond swimming. 'For me, it's about being happy where I am and happy where my family is,' Phelps said. 'We have more goals we want to accomplish outside the sport.' It was around this time four years ago when Phelps got serious about ending his first retirement, but he now seems content with his decision to step away again after the Rio Olympics. His wife, Nicole, is about four months pregnant. The couple already have a 16-month-old son, Boomer. 'I've got no desire — no desire — to come back,' the 32-year-old Phelps said flatly. Phelps has attended a handful of swimming meets since the Rio Games, where the winningest athlete in Olympic history added to his already massive career haul by claiming five gold medals plus a silver . A few months ago, he conceded to the AP that he wasn't sure how he would feel about a possible comeback after watching the worlds in Budapest, Hungary. 'We'll see if I get that itch,' he said in April . Turns out, it had no impact. Phelps said the second-biggest meet after the Olympics 'truly didn't kick anything off or spike any more interest in coming out of retirement again.' He is excited to follow the development of his heir apparent, Caeleb Dressel, who emerged as the sport's newest star by winning seven gold medals at Budapest . The 21-year-old Floridian joined Phelps and Mark Spitz as the only swimmers to accomplish that feat at a major international meet. 'I'm happy Caeleb decided to go off this year instead of last year,' quipped Phelps, who won 23 golds and 28 medals overall in his Olympic career. 'I'm kind of happy to see him swimming so well when I'm not there.' While he still travels extensively for his many sponsors, Phelps said he's much more involved in his wife's second pregnancy than he was before Boomer's birth, when he was consumed by full-scale training for the Olympics. 'It's definitely different going through it again,' he said. Boomer, meanwhile, is a chip off the old block. 'He skipped the walking part and went right to running,' Phelps said, chuckling. 'He just scoots around the house. It's funny when we get him in the pool. He basically just splashes around the whole time. He's literally nonstop. As soon as he wakes up from a nap or his night's sleep, he's just go, go, go. There's no time for slow moving in our family. He likes to go fast. I guess that's a good thing.' Boomer is even starting to show some good form in the pool. His mom and Phelps' longtime coach, Bob Bowman, have detected a bit of the stroke that was his father's strongest. 'Nicole and Bob both say he's got a good butterfly technique that he's working on,' Phelps said. 'I guess he's seen his dad doing it a couple of times and kind of picks it up. He's also now in a stage where it's like all five senses are coming together. He feels everything, recognizes everything. It's really fun to watch, as a dad, just watching these transitions in his life.' In his latest business endeavor, Phelps is spearheading a marketing campaign for Nulo Pet Food , which he describes as a healthy alternative for dogs and cats. He's an investor in the company and accompanied in ads by his French bulldogs, Juno and Legend. 'Our bodies are like a high-performance car. You have to make sure you're putting the correct fuel in your body,' Phelps said. 'We obviously treat our pets like human beings. I'd like my animals to be fed in the right way, with good nutrition and healthy foods. If we can do that with a company that's putting good, natural ingredients into a pet food, it makes sense for me with what I'm doing in my own life. It's something that goes hand in hand.' With Dressel and Katie Ledecky now leading the American team, the U.S. is expected to remain the world's dominant swimming country heading into the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Even without Phelps. 'It's time to kind of move on,' he said, 'and watch other people come into their own.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2017

Lochte seeks treatment for alcoholism

LOS ANGELES, United States – Six-time Olympic gold medalist Ryan Lochte is seeking treatment for alcohol addiction, his lawyer told US media. Attorney Jeff Ostrow told celebrity website TMZ on Friday that Lochte was pursuing treatment and remained hopeful of qualifying to swim in a fifth Olympics at Tokyo in 2020. “Ryan knows that conquering […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 7th, 2018

ASIAN GAMES: Pinay spikers take on Kazakhs

JAKARTA --- After getting clobbered by Olympic champion China on Wednesday night, the Philippine women’s volleyball team shoots for some measure of respect when they battle Kazakhstan in the battle for fifth to eight places. The consolation round match between the Filipinas and Kazakhs is set at 2:30 p.m. (3:30 p.m. in Manila) on Friday. The Chinese shoved the Filipinas to the exit with a methodically easy 25-15, 25-9, 25-7 victory in the quarterfinals, the same night the Kazakhs fell to the Japanese, 25-16, 25-18, 25-21. If the Philippine volleybelles beat the Kazakhs, they get a chance to finish fifth if they topple the winner of the other consolation round match between host Indonesia and Vietnam also set on Friday. The Filipinas fell to the Kazakhs twice in last year's AVC Asian Senior Women's Volleyball Championship, losing in straight sets in pool play before a sorry five-set defeat in the classification match for 7th place. China surged to the semifinals against Japan. Reigning champion South Korea tangles with Southeast Asian champion Thailand in the other semifinal pairing. If the Filipinas lose, the best they could attain for is a seventh-place finish—but that they have to earn by beating the loser of the Vietnam-Indonesia tussle. Zhu Ting, arguably the best and highest-paid player of this generation, delivered only five points in a very limited time on the floor, but just the same, the Chinese were still too strong and too dominant for the Filipinos to overcome. So strong that China ended the match in less than an hour with 6-foot-6 Jaja Santiago serving as the lone bright spot with 12 kills, three blocks and an ace for the Philippine side that is looking to gain experience for the 30th Southeast Asian Games next year. Philippine head coach Shaq Delos Santos admitted that they were awed with how China played them. “All I can say is that they played one heck of a match,” said Delos Santos, who obviously had a tough time matching the strategy of his counterpart, China’s legendary coach Jenny Lang Ping. “They are very tall with a combination of speed, skills and talent. They are very smart on the court. It’s really an honor being on the opposite floor with them.” Delos Santos reiterated that their aim is not to win the gold, but to gain experience they would need for the SEA Games the country is hosting next year. The Philippine campaign in the Games included losses to Japan, Thailand and Indonesia—which went to four sets—and a lone win over lowly Hongkong. “For us, this is truly a great experience. I hope this inspires the team,” de los Santos said. “As I’ve told them, we don’t need to feel down. Instead, we have to be inspired because we’re learning whenever we play against these giants regardless of the results.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 30th, 2018

ASIAN GAMES: Pinay volleybelles face another tough squad in Japan

JAKARTA — After collapsing to powerhouse Thailand in the opener, the Philippines marches to battle anew as it clashes with another super team — Japan — in the preliminaries of the women’s volleyball tournament of the 18th Asian Games Tuesday at the Bulungan Sports Hall here. Action starts at 4:30 p.m. (5:30 p.m. in Manila) with the Filipinas coming in with zero expectations knowing that the Japanese are force to be reckoned with. Japan is a five-time Asian Games champion and a regular fixture in elite tourneys like the World Championships, Volleyball Nations League, World Cup and the Olympics. The squad is marching with chip on its shoulder after Thailand dominated it in the bronze medal match of the previous Asian Games in Incheon in 2014. Seasoned international campaigners Nana Iwasaki, Risa Shinnabe and Yuki Ishii remain as the leaders under the guidance of head coach Kumi Nakada. In the opening-day salvo, the troika did most of the damage as the Japanese clobbered the Indonesians, 25-20, 25-11, 25-19, to join Thailand on top of Pool A. Philippines’ head coach Shaq Delos Santos knows that Japan is nearly indestructible so they would use the match as an opportunity to gauge where they stand against an ultra elite team that had already tested its mettle against the world’s best teams like Olympic champion China, Serbia and the United States. “We will study them and train hard in preparation for our match against these Japanese,” said Delos Santos, who just came from a two-week training in Osaka and Okayama City in Japan where they polished their floor defense and blocking. The Thais gave the Filipinos a rude welcome into the Games after a 36-year absence. They had an impressive start, but collapsed in the final stretch of the first set as rising star Chatchu-on Moksri and Pimpichaya Kokram started to wax hot while veteran Pleumjit Thinkaow and Onuma Sittirak asserted their will over the Filipinos. Jaja Santiago and Alyssa Valdez were the bright spots in the first set, but their luster faded as Delos Santos opted to dig deep into his bench in quest of a spark. “They made us realized that the Asian Games is no picnic,” said Delos Santos following their 22-25, 12-25, 15-25 setback to the 11-time Southeast Asian Games champion. “We still have a lot of catching ups to do. We have to work hard and hope for the best. Hopefully, we can match up well against Japan. We’re looking forward to playing them in a tournament like the Asian Games.” Aside from Santiago and Valdez, also tipped to step up are Mika Reyes, team captain Aby Marano, Kianna Dy, Kim Fajardo and Dawn Macandili. Other members of the team are Denden Lazaro, Majoy Baron, Mylene Paat, Maika Ortiz, Dindin Santiago, Cha Cruz and Julia Morado......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 21st, 2018

Sun scorches rivals to win historic Asian Games swim title

Chinese battering ram Sun Yang smashed his rivals to create history Monday as the swimming goliath scooped the first-ever Asian Games men's 800 metres freestyle gold with another monstrous performance. For once though he didn't have it all his own way. Greeted like a rock star by high-pitched squeals from excitable female fans in Jakarta, the three-time Olympic champion returned to the pool expecting to anchor China to victory in the 4x200m free -- only for the pesky Japanese to tear up the script. Meanwhile, Japan's Olympic hope Rikako Ikee picked up her second and third Asian titles in the women's 50m butterfly and 100m freestyle. But it was the talismanic Sun who sprinkled stard...Keep on reading: Sun scorches rivals to win historic Asian Games swim title.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 20th, 2018

Swimming bad boy Sun just a big softie, says coach

Chinese giantSunYanghas all the tools to be the perfect swimmer -- the predatory instinct and a two-metre physique that can intimidate before a race has even started. But the triple Olympic champion and nine-time world title holder is also one of the most divisive competitors in the pool, a magnet for controversy who seems to upset officials and rivals wherever he goes. He's been labelled a drug cheat after serving a three-month suspension in 2014 for using a prescribed medication to treat a heart condition, saying he was unaware it had been added to the banned list. Suntriggered a diplomatic row with Japan at the lastAsianGamesfour years ago when he petulantly branded their nationa...Keep on reading: Swimming bad boy Sun just a big softie, says coach.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 19th, 2018

After the fireworks, 1st medals up for grabs at Asian Games

JAKARTA, Indonesia --- Sun Yang has the international profile, three Olympic gold medals, and he'll compete in the first of the men's events in the pool on the first day of medal competition at the Asian Games. But there's one thing he's not likely to win on Sunday. The honor of winning the first medal in the games will likely come in wushu, one of the traditional martial arts, and could even go to another Sun of China. The men's changquan competition in wushu starts at 9 a.m. local time and is predicted to be the first final completed at the 18th Asian Games. Sun Peiyuan won the changquan when the 2015 world championships were held in Indonesia and is one of the favorites for gold ...Keep on reading: After the fireworks, 1st medals up for grabs at Asian Games.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Phelps lauds ‘Superman’

LOS ANGELES, United States — Superstar Michael Phelps offered a Twitter shout-out to Clark Kent Apuada after the 10-year-old broke his 23-year-old meet record in the 100m butterfly at the Far West International Championship at the weekend. “Big congrats to #clarkkent for smashing that meet record!!! Keep it up dude!! #dreambig” Phelps, a 23-time Olympic […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

10-year-old Fil-Am Clark Kent breaks Michael Phelps’ swim record

A 10-year-old swimmer nicknamed "Superman" broke a record made by Michael Phelps set in 1995. Clark Kent Apuada, a Filipino-American, overcame the 1:10.48 record set by retired competitive swimmer Michael Phelps in 1995. The young swimmer competed in the 2018 Long Course Meters Far Western International Age Group Championships for the 100-meter butterfly on July 29. He clocked in at 1:09.38, according to a post by the Salinas Aquatic Center MCAT on Facebook. Apuada's time slashed off over a second from Phelps' record, which had gone unbroken even as the competitive swimmer went on to win numerous Olympic medals. Apart from breaking Phelps' record, the young swimmer also hel...Keep on reading: 10-year-old Fil-Am Clark Kent breaks Michael Phelps’ swim record.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 1st, 2018

Jordan Clarkson to Gilas for Asian Games?

Maybe this time, Jordan Clarkson to Gilas Pilipinas actually happens. The Fil-Am guard of the Cleveland Cavaliers may finally suit up for the Philippine nation team as the Philippine Olympic Committee confirmed that Clarkson is in the 18-man lineup submitted to tournament organizers for the 2018 Asian Games in Jakarta, Indonesia. In a report by Rappler Tuesday, POC President Ricky Vargas says that Clarkson's name is indeed in the new Gilas pool for the Asiad. "Si Clarkson, nandoon sa listahan. That's true. We're interested in inviting Jordan," Vargas said via Rappler. Joining Clarkson in the Philippine pool is the core of the Rain or Shine Elasto Painters. TNT was supposed to banner the Philippine team in the Asian games but the KaTropa's core has been decimated by FIBA suspensions following the unfortunate Gilas-Boomers brawl earlier this month. The 2018 Asian Games will run from Aug. 18 to Sept. 2 in Indonesia......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

Swimmer Ryan Lochte suspended until July 2019 for use of IV

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.--- Ryan Lochte posted a photo for the world to see, and the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency noticed. It got him suspended --- again. The longtime U.S. swimming star has been banned from competition until July 2019, which means the 12-time Olympic medalist cannot compete as planned in the national championships that start this week in California. Lochte will also be ineligible for other top meets, including the Pan Pacific Championships later this year and next year's world championships. "This is devastating," Lochte said. He did not take a banned substance. But he got an intravenous injection of vitamins in May --- and since it exceeded 100 milliliters, n...Keep on reading: Swimmer Ryan Lochte suspended until July 2019 for use of IV.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

Swimmer Ryan Lochte banned 14 months for anti-doping violation

LOS ANGELES, USA – Six-time Olympic gold medalist Ryan Lochte has been suspended 14 months for an anti-doping violation after he received an intravenous infusion, the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) announced on Monday, July 23.  While USADA said Lochte was not using a banned substance, athletes can typically only receive IVs ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

Brazil court allows prosecution of US swimmer Ryan Lochte

By Sarah DiLorenzo, Associated Press SAO PAULO (AP) — The prosecution of U.S. swimmer Ryan Lochte for filing a false police report during the 2016 Olympics is back on after a Brazilian court decision this week. During the games in Rio de Janeiro, the 12-time Olympic medalist told NBC that he and fellow swimmers were robbed at gunpoint in a taxi by men with police badges as they returned to the Olympic Village from a party. But prosecutors said Lochte invented the story to cover up the swimmers' vandalism of a gas station and an ensuing confrontation with security guards. The confrontation was captured by surveillance cameras at the gas station. Lochte later acknowledged he was intoxicated at the time and his behavior led to the confrontation. The initial claim appeared to confirm widespread fears before the Olympics that the event would be marred by rising crime rates in Rio de Janeiro, which has long struggled with violence. As Lochte's version of events began to shift, many Brazilians became annoyed that a false story about crime drew so much attention, when the city had hosted the games without major problems. The scandal drew international headlines and grew to overshadow the final days of the games. Lochte ended up serving a 10-month suspension from the U.S. national swim team for his behavior. Last year, a court dismissed the case against Lochte, but the Superior Court of Justice reversed that decision Tuesday. Prosecutor Rodrigo de Almeida Maia said Thursday that the next step is for Lochte's lawyers to present their defense. Lochte does not have to appear in person to defend himself, de Almeida Maia said. Steve Lochte, the swimmer's father, said by telephone that he had no comment and directed questions to his son or his son's lawyers. Jeff Ostrow, a lawyer who has represented Lochte in the past, did not immediately respond to an email and a voicemail message seeking comment. It was not clear if he would represent Lochte in this case......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 29th, 2018

Modern bigs to dominate 2018 Draft

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com NEW YORK – There was a ballroom full of NBA centers in midtown Manhattan Wednesday – not one of them eager to follow in the sizeable footsteps of Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Moses Malone, Shaquille O’Neal or Dwight Howard. In fact, on the very day that the top prospects for the 2018 Draft were made available to the media – a talent pool particularly long on length this year – Howard was on the move again, in a reported deal from Charlotte to Brooklyn that will land the eight-time All-Star with his fourth team in four seasons and sixth overall. That bit of news – of an old-school NBA big man being shuffled off again,  primarily for salary-cap purposes, into what looks to be basketball irrelevancy – served as a counterpoint to the young giants just starting out. There will be plenty of guards and forwards selected in the first round Thursday at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, including Michael Porter Jr., Trae Young, Collin Sexton, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Mikal Bridges, Kevin Knox and Lonnie Walker. But the lottery will be top-heavy with big men, with Deandre Ayton, Marvin Bagley III, Mo Bamba, Jaren Jackson Jr., Wendell Carter Jr., and Robert Williams all hearing their names called. All six are listed at 6'10" or taller, though they’ll bear little resemblance in style or production to the Hall of Famers cited above or even to Howard. The last time last time six players that size were drafted in the top 10 was 2007, when Greg Oden, Al Horford, Yi Jianlian, Brandan Wright, Joakim Noah and Spencer Hawes all went early. Much has changed in 11 years. These young guys represent basketball’s new-age pivot men, er, which means we’d better drop the “pivot men” nomenclature. Rather, the word that got tossed around most often Wednesday during conversations about these guys’ fit – with specific teams and in the league generally – was modern. Modern centers for a modern NBA. “Modern-day 5,” is how Mamba put it. “Defend multiple positions, can shoot it, handle it a little. Can do a little bit of everything,” the 20-year-old from Harlem, by way of Pennsylvania and Texas. Said Jaren Jackson, Jr., fresh from one season at Michigan State: “At times, I’ve heard that I’m right on time for the way the game is going. A lot of bigs can handle the ball and be versatile and they’re able to make plays.” If you want to feel old, consider the NBA’s prevailing definition of “modern.” With major league baseball, for example, what’s known as the “modern era” historically is thought to have begun in the year 1900. By contrast, the NBA’s modern era dates back to about a week ago last Tuesday. That’s how quickly the contributions from the center position have changed. After ruling the NBA landscape for most of the league’s first 50 years, traditional big men looked at now as dinosaurs, both in form and function. Plodding isn’t allowed. Posting up, back to the basket, and backing into the paint seems as dated in this league as helmetless players in the NHL. There have been noticeable markers along the way. In the ‘90s, players who naturally would have been trained and used as centers – Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett, Rasheed Wallace, Amare Stoudemire, Antonio McDyess – demanded to face the basket and be referred to as power forwards. Then in 2012, the league joined them, eradicating “center” from its All-Star ballot and opting for “frontcourt” as a catch-all category for everyone from 6'5" wings to seven-foot shot swatters. This latest era dates back just a few years, if you go by a few key analytics. A recent ESPN.com story tracked the minutes played by seven-footers in the playoffs, compared to the regular season, and identified the tipping point as the 2016 postseason. Even if you back it up by a year to include Golden State’s heavy use of small ball in winning its championship in 2015, that’s still barely more than a heartbeat. But the full embrace of the three-point shot and the type of pace favored by a majority of current NBA coaches has put a premium on centers – we’re taking liberties in even calling them that anymore – who are mobile, who can switch defensively, challenge perimeter shooters, do some of that shooting of their own and still crash the boards and protect the rim. The next Shaq or Kareem? Now the model is Houston’s efficient Clint Capela, Boston’s savvy Al Horford or Minnesota’s ridiculously skilled Karl-Anthony Towns. Big guys such as DeMarcus Cousins and Anthony Davis have added range to their shots. Some – Andre Drummond, Jonas Valanciunas, a few more – have status or contracts assure them minutes. Yet other old-style bigs are out of the league (Roy Hibbert, Andrew Bogut) or logging long stretches on the bench (Greg Monroe, Al Jefferson, Hassan Whiteside). Just two years ago, Jahlil Okafor was the No. 3 pick in the 2016 Draft. These days, he’s an afterthought with little market value. Teams don’t want to play the way Okafor and others like him need to play. So the challenge for a fellow such as Ayton, projected to be the near-consensus No. 1 pick this year, is to make sure no one confuses him or his game with DeAndre Jordan. Asked about the trend Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), Ayton at one point sounded a little defiant. “I’m not changing my way of play in the NBA,” he told reporters. “I’m still an inside-out type of player. I’m going to start inside and establish myself down low until I have to stretch the floor.” It helps, of course, to have that option. Ayton already is built like an NBA veteran, but he has sufficient quickness to cover ground defensively and to keep up with a faster offensive pace. And for those who haven’t been paying attention to him since the NCAA tournament ended – or in Arizona’s case, barely got started with that opening loss to Buffalo – Ayton has a surprise: a more reliable three-point shot he’s willing to unleash. “The NBA three-ball is way farther than the college three-ball,” he said. “I’ve really put on some range and put on some muscle. When I’m fatigued in games, I really can [still] get my shot off in a perfect arc.” Bagley, depending where he lands, might end up playing more out on the floor than the other bigs in this draft. That’s his experience, having had Carter next to him at Duke to handle the basics. Williams will likely benefit from shifting in the opposite direction. He played a lot at power forward for Texas A&M but is rated highly for how his game translates to, you guessed it, modern center play. Bamba has drawn comparisons to Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid, as much for his charisma as for any play similarities. He allegedly has overhauled his shot this spring, and also was eager to tout his three-point range Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Then there is Jackson, who has been rated as the best two-way player of the bunch. That includes not just his defense against fellow bigs but his ability to keep up with and guard nearly any position. Jackson seemed to speak for all the big men among the future pros in New York Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Unlike a previous generation of centers, many of whom got caught in the NBA’s transition to a smaller, faster, position-less style, the young centers of 2018 grew up watching it. And preparing for it. Nothing frustrating about it, Jackson said, though it’s a far cry from the league in which his father, Jaren Sr., (1989-2002) played. “No. Whatever helps each team do their best is what lineup they’re going to put out,” Jackson said. “They’re going to put the best players on the floor every time. You look at a team like the Warriors, they switch everything. They can play all different positions. That’s what they’re good at.” That’s what these guys, given their size, are remarkably good at too. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2018

Two '23for23 members among March Madness participants

Gilas #23for23 members Remy Martin and Dwight Ramos will have another chance of obtaining college basketball experience as their respective teams both qualified to the NCAA men's basketball tournament, which will begin later this week. Remy Martin, who was recently named as one of the PAC-12 Sixth Men of the Year, will be beginning the tournament as his Arizona State Sun Devils will face Texas Christian University in Detroit on Saturday (PHL time). The team, coached by former Duke legend Bobby Hurley, was in a very festive mood as their team was announced as part of Selection Sunday. Several Sun Devils even dove to a nearby pool and swam in jubilation. WE'RE GOING DANCING!!!!!!!! pic.twitter.com/D6Jta576Ju — Sun Devil MBB (@SunDevilHoops) March 11, 2018 LET'S GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! pic.twitter.com/QWTFfz35wi — Sun Devil MBB (@SunDevilHoops) March 11, 2018 LET'S GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! pic.twitter.com/QWTFfz35wi — Sun Devil MBB (@SunDevilHoops) March 11, 2018 Meanwhile, Dwight Ramos' team, the 15th-seeded Cal State Fullerton Titans, who qualified for the tournament for the first time since 2008, will meet second-seeded Purdue on Friday in Detroit's Little Caesar Arena. See you in Detroit on Friday! CSF vs. Purdue. @marchmadness #TusksUp pic.twitter.com/w0HDnDLNps — Titans Men's Basketball (@FullertonHoops) March 11, 2018 The 6'0" Martin averaged 9.8 points and 2.9 rebounds for the Sun Devils while the 6'5 Ramos normed 2.2 points, 0.9 rebounds, and 0.5 assists this season......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte marries mother of his infant son

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte has wed the mother of his 7-month-old son. Lochte and former Playboy model Kayla Rae Reid were married by a judge Tuesday in Gainesville, Florida, where Lochte attended college. Their son, Caiden, was born last June. According to the marriage license obtained by TMZ Sports, Lochte's father, Steven, was a witness. Lochte, a 12-time Olympic medalist, and Reid appear to be holding off on a honeymoon. He is scheduled to be in Austin, Texas, on Saturday to sign autographs at a swim meet, while Reid tweeted Thursday that she was on her way back to their California home with Caiden. The couple got engaged in October 2016, not long after L...Keep on reading: Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte marries mother of his infant son.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Atlanta Hawks get in sync at new practice facility

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com ATLANTA -- The pregnant check written by Hawks owner Tony Ressler for the team’s glossy new 90,000 square foot training center didn’t concern him as much as the more numerous, smaller ones. As in: Double practice courts? Check. Outdoor swimming pool? Check. Grilling area and on-site gourmet chefs? Check. Video game consoles and a fleet of flat-screen TVs? Check and double check. Still, Ressler and the folks at Emory Healthcare, which teamed with the Hawks to blueprint the place, wanted more for the $50 million. And so they checked off another amenity: An East Coast hub of a California sports science lab that developed a cult following among a number of players and over half the league’s teams. Peak Performance Project carted computers, high-tech gadgets and cutting edge fitness equipment from its Santa Barbara headquarters to set up shop in Atlanta. The company, or P3, helped the Hawks raise the bar in what’s become a practice facility building boom in the NBA, where the Bulls, Sixers, Nets, Kings and Raptors all recently moved into or building swanky centers that could double as country clubs. Yes, the gourmet meals, hydrotherapy pools and theater seating is quite a refreshing change from the prehistoric places in which teams trained before. The Hawks’ old setup was inside Philips Arena, where ironically players had to climb stairs to reach the Stairmaster machines and had the disadvantage of only one practice court. Perhaps the Ground Zero of practice centers, however, was used by the Nets some 20 years ago in New Jersey. They shared a gym, weight room and a locker room with pot-bellied drivers from the owner’s trucking company. Yes, Derrick Coleman sometimes showered next to Fred from Bayonne. Not only have facilities come a long way — the Nets now train on the Brooklyn waterfront with a panoramic view of Lower Manhattan — so has sports science and how it’s being embraced as a necessary part of the game. Ten years ago nobody in the NBA had their bodies poked by scientists or 'scoped by modern technology to learn more about the way those bodies function. Then P3 came along and quickly became the gold standard of technology and sports and a go-to place in the offseason for players looking for an edge. If the NBA All-Star Game draws the biggest collection of talent around the league during the year, then an athletic science lab in Santa Barbara might be next. Damian Lillard, Karl-Anthony Towns, Rudy Gobert, Zach LaVine, Andre Drummond and Kyle Korver are just some of those seduced by science. P3 collects data through assessments of a player’s body and his high velocity movements to identify his physical strengths and weaknesses, raise red flags for areas that could be prone to potential injury, and give him and his team information to help improve performance. There’s also training sessions designed to prevent injuries and enhance the muscles and movements needed to reach potential, an elite athlete optimization that’s suddenly vital to careers. “Their assessments and the data they collect are so valuable to helping you understand what needs to be done,” said Korver. “No question it was so important for my career.” In a section of the Hawks facility used exclusively for P3, there’s a straight running track, some free weights, and hi-tech treadmills. It looks simple, and in a sense, it is, although the science and technology sets it apart and makes it unique. The center can test and train 12 to 15 athletes at a time over a two-hour period. Thousands of athletes from various Olympic, amateur and pro sports have been through the doors in Santa Barbara. No athlete can train without an assessment first. Once the data is received, then a workout conducted by bio-mechanists and performance specialists and tailored specifically for that athlete, based on the results. There’s no one-size-fits-all philosophy at P3. “It’s all individualized,” said Adam Hewitt, the director of operations at P3. “All bodies are different. You can have two guys the same size and have completely different systems. One might have flexibility in his lower, but the other doesn’t. Our thought is, how do we make the athlete better using this technology?” Hewitt said this process is light years ahead of what athletes and teams did just a few years ago, mainly because science and technology is evolving and P3 is trying to stay ahead of the curve. “Others aren’t using bio-technology to assess their athletes,” he said. “We’re showing the value that we can offer. We’ve invested so much and for so long.” P3 looks at the bodies in motion with the help of motion-capture technology similar to those used in video games. The images and information allow P3 to craft workouts to strengthen limbs and also to avoid injury. Just as NBA teams have spent millions building new practice facilities and hiring nutritionists and massage therapists, Elliott thinks it’s wise they make an investment in science. “There’s a revolution going on in sports science and athlete care,” he said. “I think it was overdue in professional sports. Your average sprinter or speed skater has more science data in his physical development and he’s working a part time job at a restaurant to make ends meet. He has more resources going for him than someone you’re paying $20 million a year. That made no sense to me. Contracts are too big and players are too important to take anything to chance. There’s a lot to lose. Even if you don’t understand it all, why wouldn’t you at least want the information on the table? If you don’t have all the information then is hard to play the probability game. You’re making bets on big contracts and on players being able to perform and stay healthy.” The use of force plates to measure explosiveness while jumping is of great use for NBA players and why P3 has growing influence on most of the league. “The NBA is leading our pro sports leagues,” Elliott said. “As a league, they should be proud. The other leagues are trying to copy them. The NFL is trying to catch up, baseball, hockey, teams are starting to hire smarter people and investing more in their performance sports science staffs. A lot has changed. I feel the biggest thing is we’ve been so invested in getting insight into the data. “There’s people in academics asking questions, and people in sport are trying to do the best they can. Rarely do they come together. Our motto is bringing these together. It’s super exciting to see. At the risk of sounding pompous I’d say I’m proud of it. I know the NBA is happy because they can see the bar’s being raised.” The P3 in Atlanta will operate same as usual, with no advertising, just word of mouth and a growing number of clients. The lab anticipates helping NBA players improve their ankle and hip mobility and put them in better position to succeed through science. “It’s about turning it back to advantages to the athlete,” Elliott said. “These guys are super unique.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 16th, 2017

Bird, Taurasi headline US women s hoops national team pool

By Doug Feinberg, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Sue Bird and Diana Taurasi are back for another run with the U.S. women's basketball team. The four-time Olympic gold medalists are among the 29 players chosen Thursday for the national team pool. Eleven members of the 2016 Olympic team that won a sixth consecutive gold medal for the Americans are in the group. The only player missing from that team is Tamika Catchings, who retired after the 2016 WNBA season. "Our strength has always been our best players play over and over. Our veteran players want to play," U.S. national team director Carol Callan said. "They appreciate representing our country and being part of the USA Basketball culture. We've selected athletes that are a mix of young with the older players. We cover each position well." The U.S. already has qualified for next year's FIBA World Cup, which will be held in Spain. There are five college players in the pool: UConn's Napheesa Collier and Katie Lou Samuelson, South Carolina's A'ja Wilson, Ohio State's Kelsey Mitchell and Louisville's Asia Durr. Most, if not all, of them won't participate in a training camp that will be held in South Carolina from Feb. 9-11. U.S. national team coach Dawn Staley said that Wilson, if her class schedule permits, will be around for the training camp. "If she doesn't have class, I want her to sit front and center to see how the Olympians, two-, three-, four-time Olympians operate and approach things," Staley said. "I want the entire team to witness what it's like to see our country's best athletes come together and practice and gear up to play." Staley, who also coaches South Carolina's women's basketball team, will be playing a dual role that weekend, as her Gamecocks are hosting Florida on that Sunday. All 29 players in the pool have previous international experience with USA Basketball. They've combined to win 100 gold, two silver and four bronze medals. "The amount of experience that will be here in Columbia, South Carolina, will be great. Working with the best players that our country has to offer and the 29 players that have been invited," Staley said. "We want to share this experience, being at South Carolina, having them come to see our campus, our university, our city, our state, quite sure they'll find it very enjoyable besides the work we need to put in on the floor." Callan said the pool is fluid and players can be added. One player who it didn't sound like will be added is Candace Parker, who won Olympic gold medals in 2008 and 2012 but did not make the team in 2016. "We generally don't talk about players that aren't here because there's a variety of reasons why they aren't," Callan said. "She's one of them, we choose not to try to speak for them. I would simply suggest you ask her. Candace has been an important part of our program over the years and we talked about the decision when she didn't make the Olympic roster. I don't want to speak for her or try to verbalize.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017

Documentary about anxiety taps Michael Phelps

em>By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press /em> NEW YORK (AP) — A new documentary about anxiety argues that everyone to some extent suffers from stress, nerves and social fear. And, to make their point, the filmmakers have enlisted as Exhibit A the most decorated Olympian in history. Michael Phelps appears in 'Angst' to share his story of being bullied and depressed, leading to severe anxiety. The swimmer, winner of 28 Olympic medals, would look in the mirror and not like what he saw. 'Once I opened up about that and things that I had kept inside of me for so many years, I then found that life was a lot easier. I got to the point where I understood that it's OK to not be OK,' he says in the film. 'Angst,' an IndieFlix film designed to be screened at schools and community centers, features candid interviews with children and young adults discussing their anxiety, along with advice from mental health experts and resources and tools. Phelps is like a muscular explanation mark for what the filmmakers wanted to show — that even world champions can feel low. 'I'm grateful because my mission with this film is to help make the world a better place and I believe he is so additive on that level,' said Scilla Andreen, CEO and co-founder of IndieFlix. 'If we can introduce prevention, self-care and well-being to our children — even in the pre-K and kindergarten years — they can have a completely different life.' Andreen hopes the film will reach more than 3 million people around the world from 25,000 community and school screenings. 'Angst' was filmed in the U.S. and United Kingdom and is appropriate for children starting at age 10. 'Anxiety is totally treatable,' she said. 'It can be a precursor to so many things that can then lead to addiction, homelessness, dropping out of school and a host of other mental health challenges.' Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health challenge in the U.S., impacting 54 percent of females and 46 percent of males, with age 7 being the median age of onset, according to the World Health Organization. The American College Health Association has found that undergraduates reporting 'overwhelming anxiety' jumped to 62 percent in 2016 from 50 percent in 2011. 'Talking about it is the most effective thing you can do and, of course, the last thing you want to do,' said Andreen. In addition to talking, writing about your feelings or connecting to music can help. 'Anything that helps you to take a break from the anxiety and move the energy to the front of the brain.' Andreen, whose distribution streaming service embraces projects that push for social change, was bullied as a child and learned something about herself while working on the film. 'Everyone has anxiety. And I learned in making the movie that I have social anxiety. I never even knew that. I just thought I was born less than everyone else and that was my lot in life. I would always have to work harder, try harder, never fit in,' she said. 'I don't feel so alone.' In addition to the documentary, IndieFlix is creating a web-based series on anxiety to dig deeper into the issue and has produced a virtual reality component that allows users to experience a panic attack firsthand. Andreen believes anxiety levels are so high in part because of the pace of modern life and the amount of time people spend with their electronic devices, which takes away from connecting in person and developing empathy. 'We need more face time with each other,' said Andreen, a former Emmy-nominated costume designer. 'We just stopped doing it. We're out of practice, that's all.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017