Olympic leader Nuzman sends resignation letter from jail

em>By Stephen Wade, Associated Press /em> RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Carlos Nuzman sent his resignation letter as head of the Brazilian Olympic Committee from a prison on Wednesday. He's been held there since last week amid an investigation into a vote-buying scheme to bring the 2016 Olympics to Rio de Janeiro. The national Olympic committee immediately designated vice president Paulo Wanderley to replace Nuzman, who had headed the BOC for 22 years. Wanderley will serve the three years remaining on Nuzman's term. Speaking after meeting with the BOC's membership, Wanderley described Nuzman's resignation as 'a relief.' 'The resignation of the president, on a personal level, I think will speed up resolving our problems,' he said. Nuzman, who also headed last year's Rio Olympics, had already been suspended as a member by the International Olympic Committee. Nuzman's arrest has further tarnished last year's games, which were plagued budget cuts, spotty attendance, and reports of endemic corruption. They also left behind a half-dozen 'white elephant' sports venues. Brazil officially spent $13 billion to put on the games. A year after, the organizing committee still owes creditors between $30-40 million. Wanderley said 'all of us were taken by surprise' by Nuzman's arrest and allegations he helped channel at least $2 million to Lamine Diack, a former IOC member from Senegal. Brazilian and French investigators also said Nuzman had 16 kilos of gold — worth about $750,000 — stored in a depository. Wanderley's main job is to convince the IOC to lift Brazil's suspension, which cuts of some its funding. '''I will send answers to the IOC as soon as possible to all the questions they have asked us about,' Wanderley said, adding that he'd had a courtesy phone call recently with IOC President Thomas Bach. As the Olympic body met inside its headquarters, a handful of protesters gathered outside. Many carried placards saying 'Give the athletes a true vote.' Luiz Lima, who quit several months ago as the No. 2 person in the federal sports ministry, was among those carrying a signboard. Lima, an Olympic swimmer at the 1996 and 2000 Olympics, said Brazilian athletes had 'almost no power.' He said the 30 federations that make up the Brazilian Olympic Committee each have one vote in setting policy. He said athletes as a collective have only one. 'This is only one vote in 31, which does not seem like any fair representation,' Lima. Lima said Brazil's national government gives the Brazilian Olympic Committee about 200 million reals ($65 million) yearly. He said in his tenure in the sports ministry he pushed for giving athletes and federations the money directly, bypassing the BOC. 'That got little support and was one of the reasons I left,' he said. .....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnOct 12th, 2017

FIFA suspends Brazilian soccer president Marco Polo del Nero

By Stephen Wade and Mauricio Savarese, Associated Press RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Marco Polo del Nero was suspended as president of Brazil's soccer confederation on Friday, two years after he was indicted in the United States on charges of wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy. FIFA said Del Nero was under an ethics investigation and has been banned for 90 days from all soccer activities. Del Nero fled Zurich in May 2015 when other FIFA colleagues were arrested. They included Jose Maria Marin, who was at the time the head of the Brazilian confederation, known as the CBF. Marin and two other South American soccer officials have been on trial in New York. Del Nero was indicted on Dec. 2, 2015. "As many Brazilians that love soccer, my hope is that he is banned for good," soccer great Romario — now a Brazilian federal senator — wrote on his Facebook page. "Del Nero has already had his crimes exposed along with those of other crooks like Jose Maria Marin, who is in jail in the United States, and (former CBF president) Ricardo Teixeira who is still on the loose in Brazil. They all used CBF to get illegally rich." Del Nero's lawyers said in a statement that he is going to appeal FIFA's suspension. They insisted there was no evidence against him. The attorneys labelled the ethics committee report "funny investigative speculations." They argued Del Nero took office as CBF president in 2015 and should not be linked to contracts from previous administrations. FIFA failed to ban Del Nero until Friday. FIFA President Gianni Infantino has been questioned about him in recent days. Infantino was photographed at last year's Olympics receiving a Brazilian soccer shirt from Del Nero, and reporters questioned him about Del Nero at the World Cup draw this month in Moscow. "So whatever comes out of these trials, we will deal with it," Infantino said of the U.S. investigation. "We have ethics committees, disciplinary committees. They will deal with these questions. It's not for the FIFA president to deal with them. We have institutions for that." Del Nero has not traveled from Brazil for several years, fearing arrest and extradition to the United States. Brazil has an extradition treaty with the U.S. but seldom sends its own citizens abroad for trial. Brazil's team is among the favorites to win next year's World Cup, but many doubt Del Nero will go there to support the team. The CBF appointed vice president Antonio Carlos Nunes to fill in for Del Nero and did not offer an immediate comment on Del Nero's suspension. Brazilian law does not ban private or commercial corruption. There needs to be a government body or official involved, or taxpayer money. Carlos Nuzman, the head of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, was arrested two months ago in Brazil, partly for trying to hamper an investigation into his Brazilian tax declaration. He was eventually charged with money laundering and running a criminal organization. Brazilian and French authorities say Nuzman helped channel $2 million in bribes to help win votes from International Olympic Committee members to stage the 2016 Olympics. Del Nero's name has come up in the U.S. corruption trial. Prosecution witness Jose Hawilla, a Brazilian sports marketing executive, testified Del Nero was among top South American soccer officials who needed to be bribed to secure media contracts to tournaments. In one taped conversation, jurors heard Hawilla in an exchange talk about a $900,000 payment apparently owed to Del Nero or Marin. Del Nero has also been openly criticized by Brazil coach Tite, who is credited with making the team a World Cup favorite. Tite signed an open letter opposing Del Nero before Tite was hired as coach last year. Since then, he has softened his stance but still opposes Del Nero. "This is the best way I can contribute to soccer, offering what I know," he said after being hired as coach. "The ideas of transparency and democratization remain as my principles." ___ Savarese reported from Sao Paulo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 16th, 2017

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Russian court sends Navalny s ally to jail for a month

MOSCOW — A Russian court on yesterday sentenced a close ally of opposition leader Alexei Navalny to a month in jail for organizing an unauthorized rally......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

Venezuela sends opposition leader back to jail, expels Ecuadoran lawmakers

Venezuela sends opposition leader back to jail, expels Ecuadoran lawmakers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 28th, 2016

Cebu provincial jail acting warden resigns after series of controversies

CEBU CITY, Aug. 16 &'8212; Jail Warden Romeo Manansala of the Cebu Provincial Detention and Rehabilitation Center (CPDRC) resigned Tuesday as acting jail warden. Manansala handed his resignation letter to Cebu Gov. Hilario Davide III shortly before noon T.....»»

Category: newsSource: NewsAug 16th, 2016

Missing prize sends PCSO cashier to jail

A FORMER cashier of the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office has been convicted of malversation of public funds over for failing to account for P1.877 million in prize money. In a 26-page ruling the Sandiganbayan affirmed the verdict rendered by the Quezon City Regional Trial Court branch 224, sentencing Angelica Fajardo….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsMar 22nd, 2018

Seguerra resigns as NYC’s chairperson

Singer Aiza Seguerra as tendered in her resignation as chairperson of the National Youth Commission. The resignation letter of Seguerra already made it to the office of the Executive Secretary,The post Seguerra resigns as NYC’s chairperson appeared first on DZRH News......»»

Category: newsSource:  dzrhnewsRelated NewsMar 13th, 2018

Drilon: No one can force Sereno to resign

No one can force Chief JusticeMaria Lourdes Serenoto resign, Senate Minority Leader Franklin Drilon said on Monday. "The matter of resignation is a personal decision on thepart of the Chief Justice... No one can force her to resign," Drilon told Senate reporterswhensought for commenton the resignation call against Sereno by judges and employees of the Supreme Court. READ:'Resign!' judges, court employees tell Sereno The House of Representatives Committee on Justice has alreadyfoundprobably cause to impeach Sereno, butthe chamber has yet to vote on it in the plenary. Drilon raised the possibility, however, that the impeachment complaintmightno longer reach the Senate should th...Keep on reading: Drilon: No one can force Sereno to resign.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

City asked to penalize erring jail visitors

THE Iloilo City Government was asked to help the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology (BJMP) penalize individuals that sneak in contraband into Iloilo City District Jail-Mail Dormitory (ICDJ-MD). In its regular session on March 6, 2018, the Sangguniang Panlungsod (SP) referred to the Committee on Rules the letter of Superintendent Vicente Papelera, ICDJ-MD warden, […] The post City asked to penalize erring jail visitors appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsMar 7th, 2018

Cojuangco, Vargas battle anew for POC presidency

The battle for the Philippine Olympic Committee presidency continues after incumbent leader Jose “Peping” Cojuangco Jr. and Ricky Vargas of Association of Boxing Alliance of the Philippines filed their certificates of candidacy Wednesday. Both parties submitted their certificates of candidacy at the POC office inside the Philsports Complex in Pasig City where an election committee headed by Frank Elizalde will review their eligibility to run in the scheduled election on Friday. Cycling federation president and Tagaytay City representative Abraham ‘Bambol’ Tolentino and table tennis head Ting Ledesma also filed their COCs. The 82-year-old former Tarlac representative Cojuangco won his fourth term as president unopposed during the November 2016 POC election after Vargas was disqualified to run after allegedly failing to meet the qualifications of being active members of the POC general assembly. Tolentino, who ran as POC chairman during the poll two years ago, was also disqualified for the same reason. Vargas, whose attempt for a temporary restraining order on the 2016 poll was denied by the Pasig Regional Trial Court, won an election case his camp filed on the same court December last year.   According to the court decision, the ‘elections of POC last Nov. 25, 2016 for Chairman and President is null and void” and ordered a reelection. An extraordinary POC general assembly was called Monday regarding the election with Vargas again fearing disqualification.   The election will be held 12:00 noon at Wack Wack Golf and Country Club......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 21st, 2018

Disheartened Cantonjos leaving UST after seven years as coach

With all the questions hanging over University of Sto. Tomas’ basketball program, Chris Cantonjos has already forwarded the answer most important for him. “This is my last year na. Kahit i-renew ako, ayoko na rin naman so ito na rin yung last year na magko-coach ako sa UST,” he told reporters on Tuesday after his Tiger Cubs ended their campaign in the UAAP 80 Juniors Basketball Tournament with a loss in the semifinals. With that, Cantonjos himself put an end to speculations about his future with UST High. Earlier in the year, reports surfaced that Aldin Ayo is set to have complete control over UST’s Men’s and Juniors basketball programs. This meant that Ayo will have a say in the Tiger Cubs – whatever happens in the campaign Cantonjos was overseeing. This also meant that Cantonjos’ seven-season stint – five in the Women’s and two in the Juniors – in Espana was uncertain of continuing. It didn’t help matters that Ayo’s camp opted to keep mum about the matter. Now, it’s Cantonjos himself who is making his status certain. While he is yet to set the date when he will hand in his resignation letter, Cantonjos said that his decision is already final. “Pagagandahin ko muna yung isusulat ko sa resignation, pero final na yun. Kahit i-acquire nila ako ulit, hindi na,” he said. He then continued, “Nawala yung puso ko – hindi sa school ha. Linawin ko lang, worth fighting for ang UST kasi nung naglalaro ako, talagang nakikipagpatayan ako para sa UST.” Cantonjos then went on to say that he became disheartened after how, in his eyes, the school’s support for him and his wards wavered as the season went on. “Sabi ko nga, yung support, naisantabi kami. I think I have the right to say something naman kasi hindi balanced yung nangyari,” he said. Ever since the news broke about UST’s basketball program, Cantonjos said that he and Ayo are yet to get together to talk things over. Even then, however, he said he wished the Growling Tigers’ new mentor would just approach him. “Apat yung binigay kong championship tsaka may MVP ako (sa UST). Magpasintabi muna siya kasi sinasagasaan niya is UST. Respeto naman. Wag naman ganun,” he said then. Still, Cantonjos was thankful for his alma mater for giving him a chance to prove his coaching chops. “Thank you sa opportunity na binigay sa akin ng UST. Ito ang pinakamagandang experience na nangyari sa akin,” he said. He then continued, “Gusto ko lang namang makapag-serve mung anong pinakamagandang way na makapag-serve. Sana, nagawa ko naman yun.” Now, Cantonjos said he welcomes with open arms this break away from basketball. As he put it, “It’s about time naman na siguro, sa wife and daughter ko muna ako. For seven years, laging nagagalit sa akin ang wife ko kasi kahit may sakit siya, inuuna ko yung UST.” He then continued, “Ganun ko kamahal ang UST, kung alam niyo lang. Hindi lang nila nakita kung paano ko minahal ang UST.” —- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2018

LeBron James helps spark new All-Star Game era

By Shaun Powell, LOS ANGELES -- Before tipoff at the 2018 All-Star Game, LeBron James took the courtside mic and thanked the fans and the city for showing out. Two hours later, when he accepted the Kia All-Star MVP trophy, he was barely audible, his throat too scratchy to explain what just happened. Well: To quote an ex-All-Star and noted philosopher Rasheed Wallace, both teams played hard. Those words were never used to describe recent All-Star Games, especially the last two, when defense (196 and 192 points for the winning teams) and the competitive spirit took an extended break, embarrassingly so. The league’s midseason showcase absorbed a rather well-deserved thrashing from fans and even players themselves. Nobody was fooled. Something had to change and someone had to volunteer to be the game-changer. And so, on Sunday (Monday, PHL time), the NBA season took on an 83rd game, as in a real game, thanks to commissioner Adam Silver’s willingness to fix what was broken and LeBron’s desire to set the tone for the most meaningful All-Star Game in years. The players gave the Staples Center crowd the usual acrobatic thrills associated with the game, naturally, but also some spills. As in, bodies on the floor. Every player who checked in did so with a strut and a mission to make a February game feel like June, or close enough, and not just during the close finish, either. Virtually from the start, when LeBron soared and swatted a cross-course pass just minutes into the game, this atmosphere had an edge. As Kevin Durant said: “We just wanted to change the narrative of the All-Star Game being a joke.” It was Team LeBron 148, Team Stephen 145 in the new format where sides were chosen regardless of conference and captains were assigned by fan vote. This created a new and fresh mix of players, intriguing tandems and raised overall interest for the game. It also helped that prize money, $100,000 to each winning player, was increased and lent a financial incentive. Yet it wouldn’t have mattered if layups went unchecked and jumpers were uncontested. Everything had to fall in line, and everyone had to cooperate. And that’s what led to this, a game decided by defense when it truly mattered, with LeBron and Durant swamping Stephen Curry beyond the three-point line on the final possession, keeping Curry and his team from getting a potential game-tying shot off as time expired. This is what the NBA needed, a more representative effort and result from the collection of the game’s finest players. It was a much cleaner look and it’s not a stretch to say the format and intensity rescued the All-Star Game from itself. “The hope is that, as we go forward, it gets even better than this,” said Kyrie Irving. “The game started to get away and we took it personally.” It’s hardly a surprise that LeBron was the force of change. His 29 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists in the win earned him his third Kia All-Star MVP trophy, yet those numbers didn’t accurately reflect how involved he was for four quarters. He lost his voice because of constant yelling and instructing and prodding his teammates to finish the job. He actually influenced both teams; his own by motivating them to play harder, and Team Stephen’s by issuing a challenge. Here’s the final sequence, dictated by LeBron: - His step-back three-pointer tied the score at 144; - He switched onto James Harden and forced the league’s scoring leader to badly miss a 3-pointer; - He put his team up for good on a driving layup on a give-and-go, thanks to a pair of timely passes from Irving and Russell Westbrook; - His double-team with Durant on Curry deep in the corner was the finishing touch. LeBron encouraged his team to apply a full-court press to end the first half -- has that ever been used in an NBA Game, let alone an All-Star Game? -- and simply took charge throughout. It was a personal mission to keep folks intrigued and interested. This was his game, his tempo, his personality taking over. “I believe I can make an impact and make a difference,” he said. At 33, and winning his first All-Star MVP in a decade, LeBron helped launch a standard that the game badly needed and, if this spirit holds true in the coming years, he’ll serve as the torch-bearer for a new age All-Star Game. Just one more productive layer to his lengthy legacy. “We all know how great a player he is,” said Team LeBron coach Dwane Casey. “I’m jealous of [Cavs coach Ty Lue] that he has someone like that. But tonight, he was on our team. He’s a joy to coach. He reiterates exactly what should be said, the right things. No BS. In the huddle, defensively, he got the guys jacked up and juiced as far as wanting to get a stop.” There was help; Durant was LeBron’s teammate for the first time in an NBA-sanctioned game and scored 19 points (the two were Olympic teammates in 2012). Irving rejoined LeBron after bolting from the Cavs last summer and they connected on the game-winning shot. Paul George was terrific defensively and chipped in 16 points. If not for Team LeBron winning, the MVP could have gone to DeMar DeRozan, who returned to his hometown and dropped 21 points (but threw an errant pass in the final seconds). Or maybe Damian Lillard, who matched DeRozan’s 21. Or Joel Embiid, a first-timer who supplied a big blocked shot right before LeBron’s layup. Therefore, an exhibition game that had grown stale and suffered from lapses and a lack of energy suddenly has a new beginning. East vs. West doesn’t exist anymore, and players purposely feeding a specific player so he can win MVP, and maybe no more matador defense, either, at least not for 48 minutes. It’s a small sample size, and the game must prove itself each year, but this is a push from LeBron and Silver into the right direction. The only possible tweak, perhaps next year, will be with televising the team selection. But that’s a nit-pick. This worked out well. “The format was great,” James said. “I think the fans did a great job of reacting to it in a positive way. It definitely worked out for everyone., not only for the players, not only for the league, but for the fans, everybody. It was a great weekend and we capped it off the right way.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2018

South Korea to pay $2.6 million for North s Olympic presence

SEOUL, South Korea – Seoul on Wednesday, February 14, approved a $2.6 million budget to cover expenses for North Koreans visiting for the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, officials said, after the North's leader praised the South's hospitality. The 2.86 billion won will cover transport, hotel, food and other cost for 229 ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 14th, 2018

North Korean leader as ‘role model’ for POC

For “role models,” the Philippine Olympic Committee (POC) need not look farther and beyond the Korean Peninsula. South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un had agreed to bury the hatchet, at least for the duration of the ongoing Winter Olympic Games in Pyeong­chang south of Pyongyang, apparently in keeping with the [...] The post North Korean leader as ‘role model’ for POC appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 13th, 2018

Kim Jong Un invites S. Korea s Moon to Pyongyang

SEOUL, South Korea (2nd UPDATE) – North Korean leader Kim Jong Un invited the South's President Moon Jae-in for a summit in Pyongyang on Saturday, February 10, Seoul said, even as the US warned against falling for Pyongyang's Olympic charm offensive. The invitation, delivered by Kim's visiting sister Kim Yo Jong , said ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2018

Joint Olympic team makes history for two Koreas

GANGNEUNG, South Korea – North and South Korea competed together for the first time at an Olympics on Saturday, February 10, as the first of 102 gold medals were decided against a fast-moving backdrop of diplomatic maneuvering. Kim Yo Jong, the powerful sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, was ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2018

Two Koreas hold top-level talks in Olympic rapprochement

SEOUL: South Korea’s president held landmark talks with the North’s ceremonial head of state and the sister of its leader Kim Jong Un Saturday, even as the US warned against falling for Pyongyang’s Olympic charm offensive. Moon hosted the elderly Kim Yong Nam — technically the highest-level Northern official ever to go to the South… link: Two Koreas hold top-level talks in Olympic rapprochement.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2018

Kim invites Moon to Pyongyang

SEOUL: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un invited the South’s President Moon Jae-in for a summit in Pyongyang on Saturday, Seoul said, even as the US warned against falling for Pyongyang’s Olympic charm offensive. The invitation, delivered by Kim’s visiting sister Kim Yo Jong, said Kim was willing to meet the South’s leader “at the [...] The post Kim invites Moon to Pyongyang appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2018

Two Koreas hold top-level talks in Olympic rapprochement

SEOUL, South Korea – South Korea's president Moon Jae-in held landmark talks with the North's ceremonial head of state and the sister of its leader Kim Jong Un on Saturday, February 10, even as the US warned against falling for Pyongyang's Olympic charm offensive. Moon hosted the elderly Kim Yong Nam – technically ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2018

Two Koreas, Kim’s sister star at freezing Olympic opener

PYEONGCHANG: The Pyeongchang Winter Olympics open on Friday with North and South Korea marching together at a bitterly cold ceremony attended by the first member of North Korea’s ruling family to visit the South since the Korean War. Kim Yo Jong, the influential sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, is among a 500-strong [...] The post Two Koreas, Kim’s sister star at freezing Olympic opener appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 9th, 2018