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Olympic leader Nuzman sends resignation letter from jail

em>By Stephen Wade, Associated Press /em> RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Carlos Nuzman sent his resignation letter as head of the Brazilian Olympic Committee from a prison on Wednesday. He's been held there since last week amid an investigation into a vote-buying scheme to bring the 2016 Olympics to Rio de Janeiro. The national Olympic committee immediately designated vice president Paulo Wanderley to replace Nuzman, who had headed the BOC for 22 years. Wanderley will serve the three years remaining on Nuzman's term. Speaking after meeting with the BOC's membership, Wanderley described Nuzman's resignation as 'a relief.' 'The resignation of the president, on a personal level, I think will speed up resolving our problems,' he said. Nuzman, who also headed last year's Rio Olympics, had already been suspended as a member by the International Olympic Committee. Nuzman's arrest has further tarnished last year's games, which were plagued budget cuts, spotty attendance, and reports of endemic corruption. They also left behind a half-dozen 'white elephant' sports venues. Brazil officially spent $13 billion to put on the games. A year after, the organizing committee still owes creditors between $30-40 million. Wanderley said 'all of us were taken by surprise' by Nuzman's arrest and allegations he helped channel at least $2 million to Lamine Diack, a former IOC member from Senegal. Brazilian and French investigators also said Nuzman had 16 kilos of gold — worth about $750,000 — stored in a depository. Wanderley's main job is to convince the IOC to lift Brazil's suspension, which cuts of some its funding. '''I will send answers to the IOC as soon as possible to all the questions they have asked us about,' Wanderley said, adding that he'd had a courtesy phone call recently with IOC President Thomas Bach. As the Olympic body met inside its headquarters, a handful of protesters gathered outside. Many carried placards saying 'Give the athletes a true vote.' Luiz Lima, who quit several months ago as the No. 2 person in the federal sports ministry, was among those carrying a signboard. Lima, an Olympic swimmer at the 1996 and 2000 Olympics, said Brazilian athletes had 'almost no power.' He said the 30 federations that make up the Brazilian Olympic Committee each have one vote in setting policy. He said athletes as a collective have only one. 'This is only one vote in 31, which does not seem like any fair representation,' Lima. Lima said Brazil's national government gives the Brazilian Olympic Committee about 200 million reals ($65 million) yearly. He said in his tenure in the sports ministry he pushed for giving athletes and federations the money directly, bypassing the BOC. 'That got little support and was one of the reasons I left,' he said. .....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnOct 12th, 2017

FIFA suspends Brazilian soccer president Marco Polo del Nero

By Stephen Wade and Mauricio Savarese, Associated Press RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Marco Polo del Nero was suspended as president of Brazil's soccer confederation on Friday, two years after he was indicted in the United States on charges of wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy. FIFA said Del Nero was under an ethics investigation and has been banned for 90 days from all soccer activities. Del Nero fled Zurich in May 2015 when other FIFA colleagues were arrested. They included Jose Maria Marin, who was at the time the head of the Brazilian confederation, known as the CBF. Marin and two other South American soccer officials have been on trial in New York. Del Nero was indicted on Dec. 2, 2015. "As many Brazilians that love soccer, my hope is that he is banned for good," soccer great Romario — now a Brazilian federal senator — wrote on his Facebook page. "Del Nero has already had his crimes exposed along with those of other crooks like Jose Maria Marin, who is in jail in the United States, and (former CBF president) Ricardo Teixeira who is still on the loose in Brazil. They all used CBF to get illegally rich." Del Nero's lawyers said in a statement that he is going to appeal FIFA's suspension. They insisted there was no evidence against him. The attorneys labelled the ethics committee report "funny investigative speculations." They argued Del Nero took office as CBF president in 2015 and should not be linked to contracts from previous administrations. FIFA failed to ban Del Nero until Friday. FIFA President Gianni Infantino has been questioned about him in recent days. Infantino was photographed at last year's Olympics receiving a Brazilian soccer shirt from Del Nero, and reporters questioned him about Del Nero at the World Cup draw this month in Moscow. "So whatever comes out of these trials, we will deal with it," Infantino said of the U.S. investigation. "We have ethics committees, disciplinary committees. They will deal with these questions. It's not for the FIFA president to deal with them. We have institutions for that." Del Nero has not traveled from Brazil for several years, fearing arrest and extradition to the United States. Brazil has an extradition treaty with the U.S. but seldom sends its own citizens abroad for trial. Brazil's team is among the favorites to win next year's World Cup, but many doubt Del Nero will go there to support the team. The CBF appointed vice president Antonio Carlos Nunes to fill in for Del Nero and did not offer an immediate comment on Del Nero's suspension. Brazilian law does not ban private or commercial corruption. There needs to be a government body or official involved, or taxpayer money. Carlos Nuzman, the head of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, was arrested two months ago in Brazil, partly for trying to hamper an investigation into his Brazilian tax declaration. He was eventually charged with money laundering and running a criminal organization. Brazilian and French authorities say Nuzman helped channel $2 million in bribes to help win votes from International Olympic Committee members to stage the 2016 Olympics. Del Nero's name has come up in the U.S. corruption trial. Prosecution witness Jose Hawilla, a Brazilian sports marketing executive, testified Del Nero was among top South American soccer officials who needed to be bribed to secure media contracts to tournaments. In one taped conversation, jurors heard Hawilla in an exchange talk about a $900,000 payment apparently owed to Del Nero or Marin. Del Nero has also been openly criticized by Brazil coach Tite, who is credited with making the team a World Cup favorite. Tite signed an open letter opposing Del Nero before Tite was hired as coach last year. Since then, he has softened his stance but still opposes Del Nero. "This is the best way I can contribute to soccer, offering what I know," he said after being hired as coach. "The ideas of transparency and democratization remain as my principles." ___ Savarese reported from Sao Paulo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 16th, 2017

$500M settlement in Nassar case won t be shared equally

By Ed White and David Eggert, Associated Press DETROIT (AP) — The $500 million settlement between Michigan State University and hundreds of Larry Nassar's victims will be divided up after weighing many factors, including the date and victim's age when the sexual assaults occurred and the impact it had on their lives, lawyers say. The school, where the sports doctor worked for nearly 20 years, announced Wednesday that it would set aside $425 million for 332 women and girls who say Nassar abused them and another $75 million to cover future claims. But it won't have a role in determining how much each victim will receive. That will likely fall to one or two former judges or experienced mediators who will be selected by lawyers to oversee the process, said John Manly, who represents roughly 200 victims in the worst sexual abuse case in sports history. "This can be wrapped up in four or five months," he predicted. Simple math says $425 million divided by 332 people would be $1.28 million each. But it's not "share and share alike," said attorney David Mittleman, whose Lansing-area firm represents 111 victims. Indeed, claims must be evaluated in many ways. Manly said some people could receive "substantially" more than $1.28 million while others get much less. Attorneys will also get a share of any award under agreements they have with clients. "The age of the abuse, the duration of the abuse," Manly said, listing the likely factors. "Treatment in the future and the past. Have you lost earnings? Are there things about a particular case that are aggravating or mitigating." Mittleman said the dates of the assaults will be important. Older abuse probably will be worth less because without the settlement, Michigan State could have been shielded by a statute of limitations. New York attorney Michael Barasch is not involved in the Nassar case but has represented hundreds of victims sexually abused by New York priests. He said a pool of money is "definitely the way to go." "You've got to have a sensible, systematic and transparent solution," Barasch said. "Who better than a fair mediator accepted by everybody? ... Some of these people are going to be disappointed — guaranteed. But I can tell you from my church abuse cases, the vast majority are so appreciative of having finality." Michigan State was accused of ignoring or dismissing complaints about Nassar, some as far back as the 1990s. The school had insisted that no one covered up assaults, although Nassar's boss was later charged with failing to properly supervise him and committing his own sexual misconduct. In a statement Thursday, his first since the settlement, Michigan State President John Engler apologized, calling Nassar an "evil doctor" whose assaults "shocked our campus and the nation." The former Michigan governor was hired as interim leader after Lou Anna Simon's sudden resignation in January. Michigan State hasn't disclosed how it will pay for the settlement besides leaning on insurance companies. Engler told reporters in Lansing on Thursday that he doesn't plan to ask state lawmakers for money. Dianne Byrum, a member of the school's governing board, said Michigan State likely would borrow money, tap savings, delay big projects and consider budget cuts. She said a tuition increase tied specifically to the Nassar case is unlikely. Nassar, 54, will be locked up for the rest of his life under three decades-long sentences for molesting athletes with his hands and possessing child pornography. He's at a federal prison in Arizona. In addition to working at Michigan State, Nassar worked with Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics, which trains U.S. Olympians. His assaults were mostly committed in Michigan at his Lansing-area home, campus clinic and area gyms, but his accusers also said he molested them at a gymnastics-training ranch in Texas and at national and international competitions. The settlement applies only to Michigan State. Lawsuits are still pending against USA Gymnastics, the U.S. Olympic Committee and an elite gymnastics club in the Lansing-area. The deal surpasses the $100 million-plus paid by Penn State University to settle claims by at least 35 people who accused assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky of sexual abuse, though the Nassar agreement covers far more victims. ___ Eggert reported from Lansing......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 18th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Russian court sends Navalny s ally to jail for a month

MOSCOW — A Russian court on yesterday sentenced a close ally of opposition leader Alexei Navalny to a month in jail for organizing an unauthorized rally......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2017

Venezuela sends opposition leader back to jail, expels Ecuadoran lawmakers

Venezuela sends opposition leader back to jail, expels Ecuadoran lawmakers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 28th, 2016

Cebu provincial jail acting warden resigns after series of controversies

CEBU CITY, Aug. 16 &'8212; Jail Warden Romeo Manansala of the Cebu Provincial Detention and Rehabilitation Center (CPDRC) resigned Tuesday as acting jail warden. Manansala handed his resignation letter to Cebu Gov. Hilario Davide III shortly before noon T.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 16th, 2016

Sri Lanka PM resigns, ends crisis

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — Sri Lanka’s disputed Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa has resigned, saying he wants to end a political impasse over his appointment. Rajapaksa signed his letter of resignation Saturday, flanked by lawmakers of his party and blessed by Buddhist and other religious leaders in the presence of media. It is not immediately clear […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsDec 15th, 2018

Sotto laughs off lame duck solons crying for Diokno’s resignation

      MANILA, Philippines --- Senator Vicente "Tito" Sotto III on Friday brushed aside some members of the House of Representatives who were urging President Rodrigo Duterte to fire Budget Secretary Benjamin Diokno, saying their term would soon end.   "Kami sa mga Senado, 'wag nila ikagalit, with due respect, natatawa kami yung mga nagpapa-resign kay Diokno hanggang June 30 na lang e. Tapos pinapa-resign nila si DBM Secretary [Department of Budget and Management]," Sotto told radio station dzMM.   Sotto's reaction came after Minority Leader Danilo Suarez filed House Resolution No. 2365 which urged Duterte to "reconsider his appointment" o...Keep on reading: Sotto laughs off lame duck solons crying for Diokno’s resignation.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 14th, 2018

Xi Jinping writes thank you letter to Duterte | Philstar.com

Chinese President Xi Jinping has expressed gratitude to President Duterte following a two-day state visit here this week, wishing the Philippine leader good health and success, prosperity for the coun.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2018

Dabing Espinosa quits post as village chief

CONTROVERSIAL Barangay Captain Keith “Dabing” Espinosa has finally called it quits. In a letter dated Nov. 25, 2018 addressee to Mayor Jose Espinosa III of Iloilo City, Espinosa tendered her irrevocable resignation as punong barangay of Barangay Monica, Iloilo City effectively immediately. The lady village chief quit after her mayor, who is also her uncle-in-law, “had […] The post Dabing Espinosa quits post as village chief appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 26th, 2018

Xi, in letter, tells Duterte: Our tree will bear more fruits

  Chinese President Xi Jinping waxed Confucian in thanking President Rodrigo Duterte for hosting the Chinese ruler in the Philippines, saying his and the Philippine leader's "tree" will "bear more fruits."   In a Nov. 22 letter, Xi thanked the Philippine president and Filipinos for showing friendship and "warm hospitality" during the Chinese ruler's two-day state visit in Manila last week.   Xi recalled his meeting with the President as well as Senate President Vicente Sotto III and Speaker Gloria Macapagal Arroyo.   "We had in depth exchange of views, reached important agreement on our bilateral relations and issues of shared interest and wit...Keep on reading: Xi, in letter, tells Duterte: Our tree will bear more fruits.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 24th, 2018

Xi Jinping writes ‘thank you’ letter to Duterte

Chinese President Xi Jinping has expressed gratitude to President Duterte following a two-day state visit here this week, wishing the Philippine leader good health and success, prosperity for the country, happiness for the people and stronger friendship between Manila and Beijing......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2018

Anti-palo bill no child’s weapon vs parents

House Bill 8239 or the “Anti-Palo” bill cannot be used by children to send parents to jail. House assistant majority leader Rep. Bernadette Herrera-Dy said this in a radio interview, shortly before the bill was approved on third and final reading by the House of Representatives on Wednesday. “Children cannot invoke this law to get […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsNov 14th, 2018

Bangladesh opposition to challenge Hasina in election

DHAKA, Bangladesh – Bangladesh's main opposition party announced Sunday, November 11, it would not boycott next month's general election and would challenge Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina in the polls, despite its leader being in jail. The Bangladesh Nationalist Party said it would contest the December 23 election but has expressed fears it ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 11th, 2018

Cagayan governor seeks to cancel bail of Enrile

  Cagayan Gov. Manuel Mamba has requested Ombudsman Samuel Martires to seek the cancellation of former Sen. Juan Ponce Enrile's bail in the veteran politician's plunder case.   In a two-page letter sent to the graft buster on Tuesday, Mamba claimed that the 94-year-old Enrile's registering to run for the Senate in next year's midterm elections belied the Supreme Court finding that he should be released from jail on humanitarian grounds.   "This only proves that Juan Ponce Enrile falsely appealed to the Supreme Court's pity to gain the relief of bail. It means that he is not so 'ill' as to be incapable of flight, as the Supreme Court declared," Mamba said...Keep on reading: Cagayan governor seeks to cancel bail of Enrile.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 25th, 2018

FIBA secretary general Patrick Baumann dead at 51

      BUENOS AIRES, Argentina – FIBA onfirmed the passing of Patrick Baumann, FIBA secretary general and International Olympic Committee (IOC) member, on Sunday, October 14. He was 51. Baumann succumbed to a heart attack during the Youth Olympic Games (YOG) here. "Basketball has lost a leader, an advocate and a friend and our thoughts are ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

Cambodia offers to resume search for U.S. Vietnam War missing

PHNOM PHEN, Cambodia – Cambodian leader Hun Sen has offered to resume working with a US program that recovers the remains of American soldiers killed during the Vietnam War, as the premier seeks to defuse criticism of a flawed election . Hun Sen stated his intention to restart the "important" mission in a letter ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018

Isko Moreno eyes resignation from DSWD to run for Manila mayor

Francisco "Isko Moreno" Domagoso has asked to resign as Undersecretary of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) because he decided to run for Manila City Mayor in the 2019 elections. In a handwritten letter sent to the Palace on Thursday, Domagoso told President Rodrigo Duterte he wanted to step down from his post as he was concerned with the current situation in Manila. "Mahal na pangulo, ipagpaumanhin po ninyo ang aking pagbitiw. Bagama't nais kong manatili sa kagawaran na inyong itinatalaga sa akin, hindi ko na po matitiis ang mga kasalukuyang nangyayari, sitwasyon at pangaabuso sa mamamayan sa lungsod ng Maynila," Domagoso said. (My beloved President, p...Keep on reading: Isko Moreno eyes resignation from DSWD to run for Manila mayor.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

YOUTH OLYMPICS: Golfer Saso tied for joint second after first round

BUENOS AIRES — Yuka Saso scored a one-over 71 for joint second place at the start of women’s golf while fencer Lawrence Everett Tan and swimmer Nicole Oliva failed to medal in their events on Tuesday in the 2018 Youth Olympic Games. Saso, the Asian Games individual champion, had to contend with the wind at the Hurlingham Club here after she bogeyed six holes to stay two shots behind leader Alesia Nobilio of Italy. The 17-year-old miscalculated three holes on the front nine and another three coming home, but her five birdies, including back-to-back efforts after a par on the par-3 No. 12, was enough to keep the Filipino-Japanese within striking distance. ``Mahangin sa course, mabuti na lang at naka-adjust ako,’’ said Saso, who shared second place with Maria Fernanda-Martinez of Mexico, Emille Oeveraas of Norway, Grace Kim of Australia and Hoyu-An of Chinese Taipei. Carl Jano Corpus, on the other hand, fired a similar 71 performance for a share of fifth place in men’s individual play. The Filipino was two strokes behind the leaders after he birdied holes No. 3, 4, 6 and 14. Akshai Bathia of the United States, Vanchai Luangnitikul of Thailand, Karl Vilips of Australia and Andrea Romano of Italy shared the lead at 69. In fencing, Tan bombed out of the medal stages after falling to Pak Chan of Hong Kong, 11-15, in the round of 16 of the men’s foil event. Chan raced to an early lead, 11-6, in their race-to-15 face-off but had to fend Tan’s rally late in the first three minutes of action. Filipino-Norwegian Christian Tio is still in the hunt for a podium performance after finishing second, fifth and eighth in the three races on Day 2 of the men’s kiteboarding competitions where the medalists will be determined on Oct. 12. Swimmer Nicole Oliva again failed to qualify in the finals of her second event at the Olympic Park pool. After missing the medal race in the women’s 100m freestyle on Monday, the Filipino-American based in Sta. Clara, California wasn’t able to make it in the 800m free after landing third in her heat with a 8:52.29 clocking......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 10th, 2018

'MeToo movement sends Hollywood figures into exile, not jail

LOS ANGELES (AP) --- The #MeToo movement has sent dozens of once-powerful Hollywood players into exile, but few of them have been placed in handcuffs or jail cells. And it's increasingly apparent that the lack of criminal charges may remain the norm. Harvey Weinstein has been charged with sexual assault in New York, and Bill Cosby was sent to prison in Pennsylvania in the year since stories on Weinstein in The New York Times and The New Yorker set off waves of revelations of sexual misconduct in Hollywood. But those two central figures are exceptions. A task force launched last November by Los Angeles County District Attorney Jackie Lacey to handle the surge in allegations agai...Keep on reading: #MeToo movement sends Hollywood figures into exile, not jail.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 7th, 2018