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North Korea preparing more missile launches, says South – BBC News

South Korea says it has seen indications that the North is preparing more missile launches, possibly an intercontinental ballistic missile. Defence officials have been briefing parliament in Seoul after the North's test of a nuclear bomb at the weekend. The South has responded to the test with live-fire exercises, with both ground- and air-launched rockets. The US has warned that any threat to itself or its allies would be met with a &'8220;massive military response&'8221;. The North says it tested a hydrogen bomb that can fit on to a long-range missile. Pyongyang has repeatedly defied UN sanctions and international pressure by developing nuclear weapons and testing missiles, and the provocations have only intensified. launches, possibly an intercontinental ballistic missile. Defence officials have been briefing parliament in Seoul after the North's test of a nuclear bomb at the weekend. The South has responded to the test with live-fire exercises, with both ground- and air-launched rockets. The US has warned that any threat to itself or its allies would be met with a &'8220;massive military response&'8221;. The North says it tested a hydrogen bomb that can fit on to a long-range missile. Pyongyang has repeatedly defied UN sanctions and international pressure by developing nuclear weapons and testing missiles, and the provocations have only intensified. In the past two months it has conducted intercontinental ballistic missile tests, sending one over mainland Japan into the Pacific Ocean. It has also threatened to fire missiles towards the US Pacific territory of Guam. The United Nations Security Council is to hold an emergency meeting later on Monday to discuss its response. Ahead of that meeting, South Korea and Japan's leaders had agreed to push for a stronger UN resolution on North Korea, said a South Korean presidential palace spokesman. The Security Council last imposed sanctions in August, targeting North Korean exports. Chang Kyung-soo, a defence ministry official, told parliament: &'8220;We have continued to see signs of possibly more ballistic missile launches. We also forecast North Korea could fire an intercontinental ballistic missile.&'8221; The ministry also told parliament the US would seek to deploy a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier to seas off the peninsula. It also said there would be more live-fire drills this month, involving Taurus air-to-surface missiles mounted on F-15 jets. Monday's drills by the South simulated the targeting of the Punggye-ri nuclear site in Kilju County, where North Korea carried out its bomb test. &'8220;The training demonstrates the South Korean military's resolve to destroy not only the origin of provocation but also the enemy's leadership and supporting forces if they threaten the security of our people,&'8221; army spokesman Col Roh Jae-cheon is quoted as saying by South Korea's Yonhap news agency. South Korea and the US had also agreed &'8220;in principle&'8221; to revise current guidelines so that the South could double the maximum payload of its ballistic missiles, Yonhap also reported. On Sunday, seismologists started picking up readings of an earth tremor in the area where North Korea had conducted nuclear tests before The US Geological Survey put the tremor at 6.3 magnitude. North Korean state media later confirmed it was no earthquake, claiming it was in fact its sixth and most powerful nuclear test, detonating what it said was a hydrogen bomb that could be loaded on to a long-range missile. Pyongyang then released pictures of leader Kim Jong-un with what state media said was a new type of hydrogen bomb. Officials in China, where the blast was felt as a tremor, said they were carrying out emergency radiation testing along the border with North Korea. &'160; Although experts have urged caution, Sunday's event appears to be the biggest and most successful nuclear test by North Korea to date &'' and the messaging is clear: North Korea wants to demonstrate it knows what makes a credible nuclear warhead. It's become a war of photographs, for a few hours at least. After Sunday's underground nuclear test in the North, the government in the South released images of its own missiles launched at dawn. It's the second time in a week that Seoul has responded with a test bombing run. That's in addition to the show of military might that was on display in its annual exercise with US forces at the end of last month. That enraged Pyongyang, as it does every year, and there are more missiles on the way. South Korea is expected to approve the deployment of the US missile defence system known as Thaad (Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense) &'' an environmental impact report is the final hurdle. But that involves a fourth party. China has criticised the system, claiming it threatens its security. The nuclear test prompted an angry response from US President Donald Trump who denounced the test as &'8220;hostile&'8221; and &'8220;dangerous&'8221;, and called the North a &'8220;rogue nation&'8221;. He added that the US was considering stopping all trade with any country doing business with North Korea, which relies on China for about 90% of its foreign trade. US Defence Secretary James Mattis later told reporters that while the US would respond to any threat &'8220;with a massive military response, a response both effective and overwhelming&'8221;, although they were &'8220;not looking to the total annihilation of a country, namely North Korea&'8221;. A White House statement also said that Washington would defend itself and its allies &'8220;using the full range of diplomatic, conventional, and nuclear capabilities at our disposal&'8221;. South Korean President Moon Jae-in called the test an &'8220;absurd strategic mistake&'8221; [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource: mindanaoexaminer mindanaoexaminerSep 4th, 2017

Anger grows in South Korea over US anti-missile system – ABC News

The anger is palpable on a narrow road that cuts through a South Korean village where about 170 people live between green hills dotted with cottages and melon fields. It's an unlikely trouble spot in the world's last Cold War standoff. Aging farmers in this corner of Seongju county, more than 200 kilometers (125 miles) south of the capital Seoul, spend the day sitting by the asphalt in tents or on plastic stools, watching vehicles coming and going from a former golf course where military workers are setting up an advanced U.S. missile-defense system. &'8220;Just suddenly one day, Seongju has become the frontline,&'8221; said a tearful Park Soo-gyu, a 54-year-old strawberry farmer. &'8220;Wars today aren't just fought with guns. Missiles will be flying and where would they aim first? Right here, where the THAAD radar is.&'8221; THAAD is shorthand for Terminal High Altitude Defense, which the South Korean and U.S. governments say is critical to cope with a growing missile threat from North Korea. When completed, the battery will consist of six truck-mounted launchers that can fire up to 48 interceptors at incoming missiles detected by the system's x-band radar. Anger has boiled over in Seosongri village since last week when U.S. and South Korean military workers used the early-morning hours to rush key parts of THAAD into place. The system had been scheduled to enter operation by the end of the year, but South Korea's Defense Ministry said Tuesday that it is already capable of defending against North Korean missiles. The ministry didn't say when the deployment would be completed. Hundreds of banners hang on trees and fences along a kilometer (half-mile) stretch of the road up to where police have cut off access. They say &'8220;Withdraw the illegal THAAD immediately&'8221; and &'8220;Stop US militarism,&'8221; slogans that would feel familiar in a leftist rally but are unusual in the country's traditionally conservative southeast. &'8220;Yankee, go home!&'8221; a man yelled as he banged his fist on a car apparently carrying American soldiers, before dozens of police officers peeled him and other protesters away from the vehicle. The local anger highlights what has arguably become the most explosive issue ahead of a presidential election next week. The May 9 vote will likely end a decadelong conservative rule that maintained a hard line against North Korea and agreed to the THAAD installation. Front-runner Moon Jae-in, who calls for engagement with the North, has said the deployment of THAAD should be reconsidered. Some media have questioned whether the United States and a caretaker government that took over for ousted former President Park Geun-hye are rushing to complete THAAD before the election. Earlier polls had showed overwhelming public support for THAAD following North Korean nuclear tests and a long-range rocket launch last year. But public opinion has become more divided amid the corruption scandal that led to Park's downfall and criticism that the government was pushing ahead without seeking the consent of Seongju residents. Opposition was further inflamed after President Donald Trump said he would make South Korea pay $1 billion for THAAD. Seongju residents say comments by Trump show the United States may be preparing for a pre-emptive strike against North Korea. They worry that if the North retaliates, THAAD would make their county a main target. There's also frustration about an increasingly heavy police and military presence in an area where outsiders had been mostly limited to small groups of weekend golfers. Residents are also concerned about the rumored harmful effects the electromagnetic waves from THAAD's radar might have on them and their crops. Seoul's Defense Ministry calls such worries groundless. &'8220;We have been living very peacefully as farmers, but our daily lives have been shattered after the arrival of this weapon; we can't rest comfortably for a day and can't work without worrying,&'8221; said Kim Yoon&''seong, a 60-year-old melon farmer. He says many younger residents with children are considering leaving Seongju. Residents say at least 13 people were treated at hospitals for injuries including broken bones and teeth after a violent clash last week between dozens of villagers and supporters and some 8,000 police officers who were mobilized to remove them from the road. Three days later, more than a hundred police officers ended an hourslong standoff by swarming a handful of people who had been blocking a mountain path with a tractor to prevent construction equipment from entering the THAAD site. Police detained a man and drove away the tractor as villagers showered them with insults, including &'8220;dogs&'8221; and &'8220;Americans' slaves.&'8221; &'8220;We won't allow any U.S. military and construction vehicles to pass through the two roads,&'8221; said Rev. Kang Hyun-wook, a minister of Won Buddhism, an indigenous form of the religion. The grounds include a site Won Buddhists consider as sacred and are no longer allowed to visit. &'8220;If they fly in (the THAAD parts) with helicopters, then fine, it's their money to spend and we can't do anything about that.&'8221; Several people were hurt in another clash on Sunday as police tried to remove protesters blocking two U.S. military oil trucks from entering the THAAD site. Residents said the trucks turned away because cars protesters had parked to block the road couldn't be towed. Moon, the presidential front-runner, says THAAD's security benefits would be offset by deteriorating relations with China, which sees THAAD's powerful radar as a threat to its own defense. South Korea's largest trade partner, China has [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2017

North Korea, setting stage for talks, halts nuclear, ICBM tests

SEOUL, South Korea --- North Korea announced that it will suspend nuclear tests and intercontinental ballistic missile launches ahead of its summits with Seoul and Washington, but stopped short of suggesting it has any intention of giving up its hard-won nuclear arsenal. The announcement, which sets the table for further negotiations when the summits begin, was made by leader Kim Jong Un at a meeting of the North Korean ruling party's Central Committee on Friday. It was reported by the North's state-run media early Saturday. Kim justified the suspension to his party by saying the situation around North Korea has been rapidly changing "in favor of the Korean revolution" since he...Keep on reading: North Korea, setting stage for talks, halts nuclear, ICBM tests.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 21st, 2018

SKorea minister: North s tests blatant affront to treaty

GENEVA — South Korea's foreign minister says North Korea's sixth nuclear test and 20 ballistic missile launches last year amount to a "blatant affront" to th.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 27th, 2018

S. Korea offers to talk with North on Olympic cooperation

HYUNG-JIN KIM, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea on Tuesday offered high-level talks with rival North Korea to find ways to cooperate on next month's Winter Olympics in the South. Seoul's quick proposal following a rare rapprochement overture from the North a day earlier offers the possibility of better ties after a year that saw a nuclear standoff increase fear of war on the Korean Peninsula. In a closely watched New Year's address, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said Monday that he was willing to send a delegation to the Olympics, though he also repeated fiery nuclear threats against the United States. Analysts say Kim may be trying to drive a wedge between Seoul and its ally Washington in a bid to reduce international isolation and sanctions against North Korea. Kim's overture was welcome news for a South Korean government led by liberal President Moon Jae-in, who favors dialogue to ease the North's nuclear threats and wants to use the Olympics as a chance to improve inter-Korean ties. Moon's unification minister, Cho Myoung-gyon, proposed in a nationally televised news conference that the two Koreas meet Jan. 9 at the shared border village of Panmunjom to discuss Olympic cooperation and how to improve overall ties. Earlier Tuesday, Moon spoke of what he described as Kim's positive response to his earlier dialogue overtures and ordered officials to study how to restore talks with North Korea and get the North to participate in the Olympics. North Korea did not immediately react. But if there are talks, they would be the first formal dialogue between the Koreas since December 2015. Relations between the Koreas have plunged as North Korea has expanded its weapons programs amid a hard-line stance by Moon's conservative predecessors. Last year, North Korea conducted its sixth and most powerful nuclear test and test-launched three intercontinental ballistic missiles as part of its push to possess a nuclear missile capable of reaching anywhere in the United States. The North was subsequently hit with toughened U.N. sanctions, and Kim and President Donald Trump exchanged warlike rhetoric and crude personal insults against each other. Kim said in his speech Monday that North Korea last year achieved the historic feat of "completing" its nuclear forces. Outside experts say that it's only a matter of time before the North acquires the ability to hurl nuclear weapons at the mainland U.S., but that the country still has a few technologies to master, such as a warhead's ability to survive atmospheric re-entry. Talks could provide a temporary thaw in strained inter-Korean ties, but conservative critics worry that they may only earn the North time to perfect its nuclear weapons. After the Olympics, inter-Korean ties could become frosty again because the North has made it clear it has no intention of accepting international calls for nuclear disarmament and instead wants to bolster its weapons arsenal in the face of what it considers increasing U.S. threats. "Kim Jong Un's strategy remains the same. He's developing nukes while trying to weaken international pressure and the South Korea-U.S. military alliance and get international sanctions lifted," said Shin Beomchul of the Seoul-based Korea National Diplomatic Academy. He said the North might also be using its potential Olympic participation as a chance to show its nuclear program is not intended to pose a threat to regional peace. In his address Monday, Kim said the United States should be aware that his country's nuclear forces are now a reality, not a threat. He said he has a "nuclear button" on his office desk, warning that "the whole territory of the U.S. is within the range of our nuclear strike." He called for improved ties and a relaxation of military tensions with South Korea, saying the Winter Olympics could showcase the status of the Korean nation. But Kim also repeated that South Korea must stop annual military exercises with the United States, which he calls an invasion rehearsal against the North. About 28,500 American troops are stationed in South Korea to help deter potential aggression from the North, a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 2nd, 2018

North Korea says won’t give up nukes if US keeps up ‘blackmail’

SEOUL, South Korea --- North Korea said Saturday that it will never give up its nuclear weapons as long as the United States and its allies continue their "blackmail and war drills" at its doorstep. The North's official Korean Central News Agency took the oft-repeated stance as it reviewed the country's major nuclear weapons and missile tests this year. North Korea conducted its most powerful nuclear test to date in September and launched three intercontinental ballistic missiles into the sea in July and November, indicating that it is closer than ever to gaining a nuclear arsenal that could viably target the mainland United States. The aggressive tests have led to more in...Keep on reading: North Korea says won’t give up nukes if US keeps up ‘blackmail’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 30th, 2017

North Korea preparing to launch satellite – report

SEOUL, South Korea – North Korea is preparing to launch a satellite, a Seoul newspaper said Tuesday, December 26 as outside observers warn that the nuclear-armed regime's space programme is a fig leaf for weapons tests. Pyongyang is under multiple United Nations sanctions over its nuclear and missile tests and ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 26th, 2017

NKorean missile frustrates SKorean Olympic preparations

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Just when South Korea thought it was finally creating a buzz for February's Winter Olympics, North Korea fired its most powerful missile yet and re-ignited safety worries about the small mountain town that will host the games not far from the rivals' anxious border. The Pyeongchang Olympics probably aren't in jeopardy because of Wednesday's launch for a number of reasons, including that the North is unlikely to attack the more powerful, U.S.-backed South. Despite its belligerent neighbor, South Korea is also one of the safest places in the world with a wealth of experience hosting international sporting events. Still, the launch, which followed a 10-week lull, was a frustrating development for Pyeongchang's organizers, who have only recently got on track after facing construction delays, controversies over cost overruns and wary sponsors. They can also do little to calm international fears created by North Korea's accelerating nuclear weapons and missile tests. Shortly after North Korea fired the Hwasong-15 into the sea Wednesday, South Korean President Moon Jae-in convened a national security meeting where he ordered government officials to closely review whether the launch could hurt South Korea's efforts to successfully host the Olympics, which begin on Feb. 9. South Korea wants more than a million spectators for the Olympics, which will be held just 80 kilometers (50 miles) from the border, and expects 30 percent of them to be foreign visitors. Organizers have struggled for months to spark enthusiasm for the games locally, where the national conversation over the past year have been dominated by a massive a massive corruption scandal that toppled and jailed the last president and North Korea's flurry of weapons tests. Sung Baikyou, an official from Pyeongchang's organizing committee, on Thursday downplayed worries that North Korea would scare away athletes and visitors to Pyeongchang. Organizers and government officials have held briefings and site inspections for Olympics officials, members and sponsors to reassure them of South Korea's security readiness. The 92 nations that have so far registered to participate in the Pyeongchang Games represent the largest ever Winter Olympics field. And after a slow start, organizers had managed to sell more than half of the available tickets by the end of November. Sung said there hasn't been any talk with the International Olympic Committee about moving or canceling the games. "It wouldn't make sense for anyone to cancel tickets to Pyeongchang because of fears about North Korea," Sung said. "There's no war; bombs aren't being dropped on Pyeongchang." Hyun Jae-gyung, an official from Gangwon province, which governs Pyeongchang and nearby Gangneung, a coastal city that will host the skating and hockey events during the Olympics, said cancelations at hotels and other accommodation facilities in the areas have been few and sporadic and unlikely linked to security concerns. But there's nothing organizers can do if North Korea raises fears even higher with more tests. North Korea has conducted 20 ballistic missile launches just this year, and the tests are becoming increasingly aggressive; some in the South fear that Washington might consider a pre-emptive strike on the North as the intercontinental ballistic missile tested Wednesday may be able to reach anywhere in the continental United States. Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University and a security adviser to South Korea's presidential office, thinks it's highly unlikely that the North will do any significant weapons tests or other aggressive acts that would disrupt the Olympics. After Hwasong-15's successful flight test, delighted North Korean leader Kim Jong Un declared that the country has "realized the great historic cause of completing the state nuclear force." Many experts, including Koh, believe that this suggests the country could soon consider its nuclear program as "enough" and shift the focus to its dismal economy. It would do nothing for heavily-sanctioned Pyongyang to worsen its awful reputation by creating trouble during the Olympics, Koh said. In recent government statements, including the one announced after Wednesday's missile test, North Korea has repeatedly claimed itself as a "responsible" and "peace-loving" nation, something it has been emphasizing since the United States relisted the country as a state terror sponsor, Koh said. "Even if they do conduct a missile or nuclear test during the Olympics, the games will go on as tests don't start wars. But I think there's almost no possibility that they will," said Koh. "If anything, they might have pushed hard to get their tests done before the start of the Olympics." It would help ease worries if North Korea participates in the Pyeongchang Games. While a North Korean figure skating pair qualified for the Olympics in September, it's unclear whether the North will let them compete in the South. North Korea boycotted the 1988 Summer Olympics in South Korea's capital Seoul and has ignored the South's proposals for dialogue in recent months. Securing North Korea's commitment to attend the Pyeongchang Games will be a critical topic at the IOC's next executive board meeting in December, which will be the last one before the start of the Olympics. The IOC has already offered to pay the costs should North Korea decide to participate, and Pyeongchang officials have been talking about granting special entries for North Korean athletes in some ice sports. Kim Kyung-hyup, a lawmaker for South Korea's ruling party, said Thursday that Seoul should consider sending a special envoy to the North to persuade it to participate in the Pyeongchang Games. Other than hoping that North Korea accepts the invitation, organizers are stuck. "If there's any other solution, tell me," Sung said. "It's not like we can jump up and catch North Korean missiles with a net.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 1st, 2017

North Korea leader urges more missile launches targeting Pacific

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un called for more weapons tests targeting the Pacific Ocean, Pyongyang announced Wednesday, a day after hi.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 30th, 2017

North Korea ‘fires’ missile over Japan – Al Jazeera

North Korea has fired a ballistic missile that flew over Japan before plunging into the northern Pacific Ocean, in a step termed by the Japanese prime minister as a &'8220;grave threat&'8221;. The launch appeared to be the first to cross over Japan since 2009, and comes amid ongoing annual military drill being carried out between the US and its close ally in the region, South Korea. The  South's joint chiefs of staff said the missile travelled abouit 2,700km and reached a maximum height of 550km as it flew over the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido and landed in the sea. The projectile was launched from the Sunan region near the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, just before 6am local time on Tuesday (21:00 GMT on Monday), the South Korean military said. Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported that the missile flew over the northernmost main island of Hokkaido and broke into three pieces and fell into the waters 1,180km east of Cape Erimo. The test appeared to have been of a recently developed intermediate-range Hwasong-12 missile, experts said. It is the same sort of missile that North Korean threatened to fire on the US territory of Guam. The Japanese government's J-Alert warning system advised people in northern Japan to take precautions, but NHK said there was no sign of damage. Japan's military did not attempt to shoot down the missile, which passed over Japanese territory at about 6:06am local time (21:06 GMT). There was no immediate comment from North Korea. Shinzo Abe, Japan's prime minister, said the missile launch over its territory was an &'8220;unprecedented, serious and grave threat&'8221;. &'8220;Their outrageous act of firing a missile over our country is an unprecedented, serious and grave threat and greatly damages the regional peace and security,&'8221; he said. In a 40-minute telephone call with US President Donald Trump, he said, the two allies had agreed to &'8220;further strengthen pressure against North Korea&'8221;. Abe said he would also call for an urgent meeting in the UN to discuss further action, strongly demanding stepped up pressures against the reclusive neighbour. Al Jazeera's Wayne Hay, reporting from Seoul, said that although there have been several recent missile launches by North Korea, and there are often launches this time of year due to military exercises between the US and its allies in the region, a missile passing over the Japanese mainland will be seen as a bigger provocation. &'8220;So this will certainly be viewed by Japan, the United States and South Korea as an uptick in the seriousness of the missile launches coming from North Korea,&'8221; he said. North Korea typically reacts with anger to US-South Korean military drills, which are happening now, often staging weapons tests and issuing threats to the two countries via its state-controlled media. But animosity is higher than usual following threats by Trump to unleash &'8220;fire and fury&'8221; on the North, and North Korea's stated plan to consider firing some of its missiles toward Guam. &'160; 183&'160;total views, 183&'160;views today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsAug 29th, 2017

North Korea launches midrange ballistic missile in Japan sea

SEOUL, South Korea (First published 11:55 a.m.) — North Korea launched an intermediate-range ballistic missile Tuesday that appeared to have.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 4th, 2017

North Korea launches multiple surface-to-ship missiles, South Korean military says – Fox News

North Korea launches multiple surface-to-ship missiles, South Korean military says – Fox News.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 8th, 2017

What is South Korea’s take on the killing? – BBC News

Only a few people know why VX was chosen &'' presumably by North Korea &'' as the chemical agent of Kim Jong-nam's assassination, and they're not talking. The (perhaps unwitting) women who smeared his face with the highly toxic oil are unlikely to know much about the substance. And the men who left the terminal in Kuala Lumpur for Dubai even as the victim staggered around seeking medical help are not about to share their secrets with anyone far from Pyongyang. But in South Korea, there is much speculation. Was it a deliberate signal from the North that nuclear isn't the only weapon of mass destruction just over the border? Or was it simply an effective way of killing a reclusive man in a public place? It has certainly raised the temperature in South Korea. Monday's Joongang Daily says: &'8220;The government must take steps immediately to protect the country from chemical weapons dangers.&'8221; The editorial raises the spectre of North Korea supplying terrorists with the substance (in the same way it may have helped Pakistan with nuclear technology and Syria with missile development). The editorial continues: &'8220;North Korea is known to have chemical weapons from 3,000 tonnes to 5,000 tonnes. It could threaten the world if Pyongyang sells any of these weapons to Islamic militants or other extremists to secure hard cash.&'8221; There is no doubt that the attack has sent a tremor of fear through the defector community in South Korea. Fugitives who were previously easy to contact have gone to ground. Thae Yong-ho, the diplomat who defected from the London embassy last year, already had bodyguards as he went incognito around Seoul but they would not have been able to protect him against a seemingly innocent member of the public just coming up and smearing him with a speck of VX. Two years ago, the American ambassador in Seoul was lucky to survive when his face was slashed with a blade in public. How much easier it would be to kill someone with a mere trace of a chemical. The great advantage of poisoning for the assassin is that it can be perfectly targeted and it kills with little immediate fuss. Only scientific examination afterwards reveals the cause. Those behind Kim Jong-nam's killing watched, then left. Alexander Litvinenko, a fugitive spy from Russia, took tea with two former KGB agents in London in 2006 and died three weeks later of poisoning by radioactive polonium-210, believed to have been administered in the cup. The BBC producer, Georgi Markov, was murdered at a bus stop in central London in 1978 but his killer vanished in the crowd seconds after the victim felt the pin-prick from an umbrella used like a syringe to inject the fatal poison. He had been a thorn in the side of the Bulgarian communist government but so simple and bloodless was the killing that nobody was ever identified as the perpetrator. The efficiency of poison as a means of assassination is leading North Korea watchers in South Korea to think that there was no great intention to send a signal by using VX specifically. Koh Yu-hwan, of Dongguk University, thinks that VX was chosen because of its efficiency; North Korea &'' or at least leader Kim Jong-un &'' allegedly wanted Kim Jong-nam dead and VX offered certainty. It also offered the possibility that the death would pass as being from natural causes, at least for the time before a serious post-mortem scientific examination could take place. Chang Yong-seok, of Seoul National University's Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, adds: &'8220;North Korea was already under immense pressure over its efforts to develop nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles, and also its human rights issues. Things will get even more complicated for Pyongyang if its chemical weapons issues are thrown into the mix.&'8221; There are benefits and costs to Pyongyang of being caught red-handed. On the one hand, it would send a signal to dissidents that there will be no escaping the regime's ruthlessness. On the other, it also says to North Koreans that the regime at the top is insecure and fratricidal. News from outside does get into North Korea and the revelation that one ruling Kim was allegedly having his half-brother bumped off could scarcely strengthen the regime in the people's eyes. &'160; As a columnist in Daily NK puts it: &'8220;With the influx of information pouring into North Korea, more of its citizens are learning for the first time of Kim Jong-nam's existence, prompting them to speculate on the motive for the assassination.&'8221; There is some speculation in South Korea about the role of the two women suspected of carrying out the hit job. One researcher told the Associated Press news agency that the theory VX had been mixed from two innocuous chemicals into a deadly combination on the victim's face was unlikely. The expert said that VX could be produced in this way but not reliably. It is more likely that it was applied in its deadly form by people wearing protective gloves. &'8220;The security camera footage shows one of the women heading to the bathroom to wash her hands after attacking Kim. If she touched VX with her bare hands, she wouldn't have had the time to do even that,&'8221; the researcher told AP. If the means of murder is causing debate, the motive is not. In dynasties with hereditary rule, brothers are [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2017

US, South Korean missile destroyers in fresh show of force to North Korea – CNN News

US, South Korean missile destroyers in fresh show of force to North Korea – CNN News.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsSep 26th, 2016

North Korea puts reunion of war separated families in doubt

A TV screen shows a blurred photo of North Korean restaurant workers in China, during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Kore, Friday, July 20, 2018. North Korea said that.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated News17 hr. 57 min. ago

Bolton: US plans to dismantle North Korea nukes in year

WASHINGTON, United States --- The United States has a plan that would lead to the dismantling of North Korea's nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs in a year, President Donald Trump's national security adviser said Sunday, although U.S. intelligence reported signs that Pyongyang doesn't intend to fully give up its arsenal. John Bolton said top U.S. diplomat Mike Pompeo will be discussing that plan with North Korea in the near future. Bolton added that it would be to the North's advantage to cooperate to see sanctions lifted quickly and aid from South Korea and Japan start to flow. Bolton's remarks on CBS' "Face the Nation" appeared to be the first time the Trump admin...Keep on reading: Bolton: US plans to dismantle North Korea nukes in year.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 1st, 2018

South Korea, US to announce suspension of major military drills this week: Yonhap

South Korea and the United States are expected to announce the suspension of “large-scale” military drills this week, with the provision that they would restart if North Korea failed to keep its promise to denuclearize, news agency Yonhap said. South Korea, US to announce suspension of major military drills this week: Yonhap SEOUL – South… link: South Korea, US to announce suspension of major military drills this week: Yonhap.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

Hyundai, other South Korean firms eye NK opportunity

Lotte`s newly built skyscraper in southern Seoul. Photo by Lotte Property and Development SEOUL - The possibility of North Korea opening up is something not just Hyundai Group is preparing for, wit.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Top North Korean official heads to US for pre-summit talks

BEIJING --- A top North Korean official headed to New York on Wednesday for talks aimed at salvaging a summit between Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump on the future of Kim's nuclear program, in the North's highest-level mission to the United States in 18 years. Associated Press reporters saw Kim Yong Chol at Beijing's airport just after noon. South Korea's Yonhap news agency cited diplomatic sources as saying that Kim was on an Air China flight to New York that departed later Wednesday afternoon. Yonhap said Kim, who had arrived in Beijing on Tuesday, was traveling with five other North Korean officials. Kim, one of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's most trusted aides,...Keep on reading: Top North Korean official heads to US for pre-summit talks.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 30th, 2018

Seoul: North Korea committed to US summit, denuclearization

(Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP). In this May 26, 2018, photo provided on May 27, 2018, by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and South Korea.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsMay 27th, 2018

2 North Koreans defect to South – Yonhap

SEOUL, South Korea – Two North Koreans defected to the South across the Yellow Sea on Saturday, May 19, a South Korean news report said, citing a government source. "A small boat was spotted in waters off the north of Baengnyeong Island" near the inter-Korean border, the source told Yonhap news ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 19th, 2018