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NKorean missile frustrates SKorean Olympic preparations

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Just when South Korea thought it was finally creating a buzz for February's Winter Olympics, North Korea fired its most powerful missile yet and re-ignited safety worries about the small mountain town that will host the games not far from the rivals' anxious border. The Pyeongchang Olympics probably aren't in jeopardy because of Wednesday's launch for a number of reasons, including that the North is unlikely to attack the more powerful, U.S.-backed South. Despite its belligerent neighbor, South Korea is also one of the safest places in the world with a wealth of experience hosting international sporting events. Still, the launch, which followed a 10-week lull, was a frustrating development for Pyeongchang's organizers, who have only recently got on track after facing construction delays, controversies over cost overruns and wary sponsors. They can also do little to calm international fears created by North Korea's accelerating nuclear weapons and missile tests. Shortly after North Korea fired the Hwasong-15 into the sea Wednesday, South Korean President Moon Jae-in convened a national security meeting where he ordered government officials to closely review whether the launch could hurt South Korea's efforts to successfully host the Olympics, which begin on Feb. 9. South Korea wants more than a million spectators for the Olympics, which will be held just 80 kilometers (50 miles) from the border, and expects 30 percent of them to be foreign visitors. Organizers have struggled for months to spark enthusiasm for the games locally, where the national conversation over the past year have been dominated by a massive a massive corruption scandal that toppled and jailed the last president and North Korea's flurry of weapons tests. Sung Baikyou, an official from Pyeongchang's organizing committee, on Thursday downplayed worries that North Korea would scare away athletes and visitors to Pyeongchang. Organizers and government officials have held briefings and site inspections for Olympics officials, members and sponsors to reassure them of South Korea's security readiness. The 92 nations that have so far registered to participate in the Pyeongchang Games represent the largest ever Winter Olympics field. And after a slow start, organizers had managed to sell more than half of the available tickets by the end of November. Sung said there hasn't been any talk with the International Olympic Committee about moving or canceling the games. "It wouldn't make sense for anyone to cancel tickets to Pyeongchang because of fears about North Korea," Sung said. "There's no war; bombs aren't being dropped on Pyeongchang." Hyun Jae-gyung, an official from Gangwon province, which governs Pyeongchang and nearby Gangneung, a coastal city that will host the skating and hockey events during the Olympics, said cancelations at hotels and other accommodation facilities in the areas have been few and sporadic and unlikely linked to security concerns. But there's nothing organizers can do if North Korea raises fears even higher with more tests. North Korea has conducted 20 ballistic missile launches just this year, and the tests are becoming increasingly aggressive; some in the South fear that Washington might consider a pre-emptive strike on the North as the intercontinental ballistic missile tested Wednesday may be able to reach anywhere in the continental United States. Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University and a security adviser to South Korea's presidential office, thinks it's highly unlikely that the North will do any significant weapons tests or other aggressive acts that would disrupt the Olympics. After Hwasong-15's successful flight test, delighted North Korean leader Kim Jong Un declared that the country has "realized the great historic cause of completing the state nuclear force." Many experts, including Koh, believe that this suggests the country could soon consider its nuclear program as "enough" and shift the focus to its dismal economy. It would do nothing for heavily-sanctioned Pyongyang to worsen its awful reputation by creating trouble during the Olympics, Koh said. In recent government statements, including the one announced after Wednesday's missile test, North Korea has repeatedly claimed itself as a "responsible" and "peace-loving" nation, something it has been emphasizing since the United States relisted the country as a state terror sponsor, Koh said. "Even if they do conduct a missile or nuclear test during the Olympics, the games will go on as tests don't start wars. But I think there's almost no possibility that they will," said Koh. "If anything, they might have pushed hard to get their tests done before the start of the Olympics." It would help ease worries if North Korea participates in the Pyeongchang Games. While a North Korean figure skating pair qualified for the Olympics in September, it's unclear whether the North will let them compete in the South. North Korea boycotted the 1988 Summer Olympics in South Korea's capital Seoul and has ignored the South's proposals for dialogue in recent months. Securing North Korea's commitment to attend the Pyeongchang Games will be a critical topic at the IOC's next executive board meeting in December, which will be the last one before the start of the Olympics. The IOC has already offered to pay the costs should North Korea decide to participate, and Pyeongchang officials have been talking about granting special entries for North Korean athletes in some ice sports. Kim Kyung-hyup, a lawmaker for South Korea's ruling party, said Thursday that Seoul should consider sending a special envoy to the North to persuade it to participate in the Pyeongchang Games. Other than hoping that North Korea accepts the invitation, organizers are stuck. "If there's any other solution, tell me," Sung said. "It's not like we can jump up and catch North Korean missiles with a net.".....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnDec 1st, 2017

Preparations for Tokyo 2020 Olympics ‘back on track’ after rocky start

TOKYO — On a nondescript patch of land east of Tokyo, cranes are whirring frantically against a city skyscraper backdrop as 200 workers toil on the 2020 Olympic canoe venue. With the Pyeongchang winter games closed, Tokyo is stepping up preparations for the next event on the Olympic calendar, with busy building sites dotted around […] The post Preparations for Tokyo 2020 Olympics ‘back on track’ after rocky start appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsApr 4th, 2018

PSC representatives, Cebu officials meet for PNG 2018

Representatives from the Philippine Sports Commission (PSC) and officials from the Cebu Provincial and City committees met Tuesday to further discuss preparations for the smoothening of the Philippine National Games (PNG), which will be held in the province next month.  The Games, which is widely considered as the Olympic Games of the country, is slated from May 19 to 25 and will feature various athletes aged 16 years old and above. During the coordination meeting, PSC Visayas Executive Director Bobbie Kintanar welcomed everyone for the event and assured that everything will be successful through collective cooperation. "We are positive that the staging of the PNG will be successful," Kintanar said. PSC secretariat chief Annie Ruiz also bared that there will be 21 events in the tournament, including the national sport, Arnis. Sporting events will take place in 12 playing venues around Cebu City, Cebu Province, Naga City, Municipality of Tabuelan, Danao City, Lapu-Lapu City and Mandaue City. There will also be 19 billeting areas to house the athletes for the tourney. Ruiz added that the Commission will be providing weekly updates on their website heading to the event. PSC Visayas Regional Coordinator Nonnie Lopez meanwhile mentioned that three delegates, representing the three major island groups in the country, namely Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao, will be taken from their respective local government units. The Queen City of the South last hosted the PNG in December 1997......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 3rd, 2018

NKorean leader Kim watches performance by SKorean pop stars

SEOUL — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on yesterday watched a rare performance by South Korean pop stars visiting Pyongyang, media reports said, amid thawin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2018

World-record, ultra-thin condom to debut in 2020 Tokyo Games

TOKYO, Japan – Japanese condom makers are ramping up preparations ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, seeing a golden opportunity to showcase their world-record ultra-thin products. For years, hundreds of thousands of condoms have been distributed for free to competitors at Olympic Games in a bid to encourage safe sex ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 21st, 2018

LOOK: Michael Martinez talks about Olympic journey on ANC s Headstart

After his appearance in the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, two-time Olympian Michael Martinez sat down and talked with ANC's Migs Bustos about his journey and the things he endured before qualifying in the quadriennial affair. The Filipino, even though performing a flawless routine, just came up short, finishing 28th in a competition that took the top 24. Martinez was not even supposed to be in this competition, as he was named as a replacement for a Swedish skater that failed to meet requirements. The 21-year old revealed that he even thought of finally hanging up the skates for good after narrowly missing the cut in the 2017 CS Nebelhorn Trophy, where the top six automatically booked a spot in the Winter Olympics. #ANCHeadstart: Filipino figure skater Michael Martinez reveals he considered hanging up the skates for good after narrowly missing the cut for the Olympics. #ANCRecap pic.twitter.com/1LJBDh9kOH — ABS-CBN News Channel (@ANCALERTS) February 20, 2018 After failing to meet the cutoff, Martinez eventually ventured into bodybuilding to improve his body's strength, but eventually had to remove all his gained weight in order to retain the sleeker figure, which is more helpful in his sport. #ANCHeadstart: "Since I made it to Olympics, I have to lose everything." Michael Martinez talks about his preparations for the PyeongChang 2018 after switching to body building before the Olympics. #ANCRecap pic.twitter.com/idMPhbiOfp — ABS-CBN News Channel (@ANCALERTS) February 20, 2018 When the Swedish skater's failure to qualify was announced, Martinez was in great shock since he only had a mere two weeks to prepare for an event that showcases the world's greatest athletic abilities and talents. #ANCHeadstart: Figure skater Michael Martinez recalls getting the call that secured his spot in the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. #ANCRecap pic.twitter.com/C9kbUi3LAf — ABS-CBN News Channel (@ANCALERTS) February 20, 2018 Martinez, who achieved a score of 55.56 points in the short program, added that simply being a representative of the Philippines is already an accomplishment for him, but rued that his placing could have been higher if he had a much longer time to prepare. Despite having asthmatic bronchitis as a child, Martinez says that it did not hinder him from pursuing sports, let alone figure skating, which entails a lot of stamina for a successful and flawless routine......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2018

Pence out to counter NKorean propaganda at Olympic games

SEOUL, South Korea — Vice President Mike Pence is trying to counter North Korean "propaganda" around the Winter Olympics with his own symbolism and rhetoric,.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 9th, 2018

Norovirus at Olympics has officials scrambling, worried

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea --- Signs posted around the Olympic venues urge extreme caution. Nine hundred troops stream into the area to help. Worried organizers sequester 1,200 people in their rooms. Officials are scrambling on the eve of the biggest planned event in South Korea in years --- not because of anything related to North Korea and national security, but in an attempt to arrest the spread of norovirus at the Pyeongchang Games. Local media are fretting over a "virus panic." South Koreans, always quick to air their views online, have poured scorn on the government's response and preparations. Are the games hygienic? What will people think about South Korea? Could this s...Keep on reading: Norovirus at Olympics has officials scrambling, worried.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2018

Seoul: North Korea to send delegation to Olympics in South

By Hyung-Jin Kim, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea agreed Tuesday to send a delegation to next month's Winter Olympics in South Korea, Seoul officials said, as the bitter rivals sat for rare talks at the border to discuss how to cooperate in the Olympics and improve their long-strained ties. The Koreas' first talks in two years were arranged after North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un recently made an abrupt push for improved ties with South Korea after a year of elevated tensions with the outside world over his expanding nuclear and missile programs. Critics say Kim may be trying to divide Seoul and Washington in a bid to weaken international pressure and sanctions on the North. During the talks, the North Korean delegation said it would send an Olympic delegation, which includes officials, athletes, cheerleaders, journalists and others, South Korea's Vice Unification Minister Chun Hae-sung told reporters, according to media footage from the border village of Panmunjom, the venue for the talks. The South Korean delegation, for its part, proposed North Korea send a big delegation and conduct a joint march during the Feb. 9-25 Game's opening and closing ceremonies, Chun, one of the five South Korean negotiators, said. He said South Korea also suggested resuming temporary reunions of families separated by war and offering military talks designed to reduce animosities in frontline areas. South Korea also stressed the need to achieve denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, Chun said. North Korea responded by saying the two Koreas must try to promote peace and reconciliation through dialogue, he said. The two sides were to continue their negotiations later Tuesday at Panmunjom, the only place on the tense border where North and South Korean soldiers are just feet away from each other. A North Korean soldier late last year defected to the South across Panmunjom amid a hail of bullets fired by his comrades. He was hit five times but survived. The meeting began with an amicable atmosphere Tuesday morning, with chief North Korean delegate Ri Son Gwon saying he hopes the talks would give "a New Year's first gift — precious results (of the talks) to the Korean nation." Ri's South Korean counterpart, Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon, said he also hopes they would come up with a "good gift" for people in both Koreas. The overall prospect for the negotiations was still unclear. The two Koreas have a long history of ending key talks without any agreement and failing to follow through with rapprochement accords. An agreement on the North's Olympic participation had been widely expected before the talks began, but the Koreas remain sharply at odds over how to improve their overall ties. North Korea is expected to demand rewards in return for South Korea's offer for family reunions and military talks, like Seoul halting propaganda broadcasts and scaling back or halting military drills with the U.S., observers say. Suspension of the military drills would be unacceptable for Seoul because that would seriously undermine the alliance with its chief ally the United States, which wants to put more pressures on Pyongyang. The North views the drills as a rehearsal for a northward invasion. President Donald Trump on Saturday expressed hope for some progress from the talks and said he was open to talking with Kim himself. But U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley later said the U.S. administration isn't changing its conditions regarding talks with North Korea, saying Kim would first need to stop weapons testing for a "significant amount of time." In his New Year's Day address, Kim said there is an urgent need to improve inter-Korean ties and that he is willing to send a delegation to the Pyeongchang Games. He urged Seoul to halt the military drills with the U.S. and said he has a "nuclear button" to launch missiles at any target in the United States. South Korean liberal President Moon Jae-in, who favors dialogue as a way to defuse the North Korean nuclear standoff, welcomed Kim's outreach and proposed talks at Panmunjom. Kim quickly accepted. "As President Moon has said, the improvement of relations between North and South Korea cannot advance separately from resolving North Korea's nuclear program," Brian Hook, a chief adviser to U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, told reporters in a conference call late Monday Washington time. "And so, we remain focused on our global pressure campaign. That campaign is designed to bring Kim Jong Un to the table for meaningful negations." The Trump administration agreed last week to delay springtime military drills with South Korea until after the Games. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis insisted the delay was a practical necessity to accommodate the Olympics, not a political gesture. Trump and Kim traded bellicose warlike rhetoric and even crude insults last year, as the North conducted it sixth and most powerful nuclear detonation and three tests of intercontinental ballistic missiles. The International Olympic Committee said Monday it has "kept the door open" for North Korea to take part in the Games. IOC spokesman Mark Adams said the registration deadline has been extended and that the Switzerland-based committee supports North Korean athletes in the qualification process, while respecting U.N. sanctions against North Korea......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

S. Korea offers to talk with North on Olympic cooperation

HYUNG-JIN KIM, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea on Tuesday offered high-level talks with rival North Korea to find ways to cooperate on next month's Winter Olympics in the South. Seoul's quick proposal following a rare rapprochement overture from the North a day earlier offers the possibility of better ties after a year that saw a nuclear standoff increase fear of war on the Korean Peninsula. In a closely watched New Year's address, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said Monday that he was willing to send a delegation to the Olympics, though he also repeated fiery nuclear threats against the United States. Analysts say Kim may be trying to drive a wedge between Seoul and its ally Washington in a bid to reduce international isolation and sanctions against North Korea. Kim's overture was welcome news for a South Korean government led by liberal President Moon Jae-in, who favors dialogue to ease the North's nuclear threats and wants to use the Olympics as a chance to improve inter-Korean ties. Moon's unification minister, Cho Myoung-gyon, proposed in a nationally televised news conference that the two Koreas meet Jan. 9 at the shared border village of Panmunjom to discuss Olympic cooperation and how to improve overall ties. Earlier Tuesday, Moon spoke of what he described as Kim's positive response to his earlier dialogue overtures and ordered officials to study how to restore talks with North Korea and get the North to participate in the Olympics. North Korea did not immediately react. But if there are talks, they would be the first formal dialogue between the Koreas since December 2015. Relations between the Koreas have plunged as North Korea has expanded its weapons programs amid a hard-line stance by Moon's conservative predecessors. Last year, North Korea conducted its sixth and most powerful nuclear test and test-launched three intercontinental ballistic missiles as part of its push to possess a nuclear missile capable of reaching anywhere in the United States. The North was subsequently hit with toughened U.N. sanctions, and Kim and President Donald Trump exchanged warlike rhetoric and crude personal insults against each other. Kim said in his speech Monday that North Korea last year achieved the historic feat of "completing" its nuclear forces. Outside experts say that it's only a matter of time before the North acquires the ability to hurl nuclear weapons at the mainland U.S., but that the country still has a few technologies to master, such as a warhead's ability to survive atmospheric re-entry. Talks could provide a temporary thaw in strained inter-Korean ties, but conservative critics worry that they may only earn the North time to perfect its nuclear weapons. After the Olympics, inter-Korean ties could become frosty again because the North has made it clear it has no intention of accepting international calls for nuclear disarmament and instead wants to bolster its weapons arsenal in the face of what it considers increasing U.S. threats. "Kim Jong Un's strategy remains the same. He's developing nukes while trying to weaken international pressure and the South Korea-U.S. military alliance and get international sanctions lifted," said Shin Beomchul of the Seoul-based Korea National Diplomatic Academy. He said the North might also be using its potential Olympic participation as a chance to show its nuclear program is not intended to pose a threat to regional peace. In his address Monday, Kim said the United States should be aware that his country's nuclear forces are now a reality, not a threat. He said he has a "nuclear button" on his office desk, warning that "the whole territory of the U.S. is within the range of our nuclear strike." He called for improved ties and a relaxation of military tensions with South Korea, saying the Winter Olympics could showcase the status of the Korean nation. But Kim also repeated that South Korea must stop annual military exercises with the United States, which he calls an invasion rehearsal against the North. About 28,500 American troops are stationed in South Korea to help deter potential aggression from the North, a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 2nd, 2018

As Olympics near, South Korea agonizes over post-Games costs

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — South Korean officials have ruled out turning a state-of-the-art Olympic skating arena into a giant seafood freezer. Other than that, not much is certain about the country's post-Winter Games plans for a host of expensive venues. As officials prepare for the games in and around the small mountain town of Pyeongchang, there are lingering worries over the huge financial burden facing one of the nation's poorest regions. Local officials hope that the Games will provide a badly needed economic boost by marking the area as a world-class tourist destination. But past experience shows that hosts who justified their Olympics with expectations of financial windfalls were often left deeply disappointed when the fanfare ended. This isn't lost on Gangwon province, which governs Pyeongchang and nearby Gangneung, a seaside city that will host Olympic skating and hockey events. Officials there are trying hard to persuade the national government to pay to maintain new stadiums that will have little use once the athletes leave. Seoul, however, is so far balking at the idea. The Olympics, which begin Feb. 9, will cost South Korea about 14 trillion won ($12.9 billion), much more than the 8 to 9 trillion won ($7 to 8 billion) the country projected as the overall cost when Pyeongchang won the bid in 2011. Worries over costs have cast a shadow over the games among residents long frustrated with what they say were decades of neglect in a region that doesn't have much going on other than domestic tourism and fisheries. "What good will a nicely managed global event really do for residents when we are struggling so much to make ends meet?" said Lee Do-sung, a Gangneung restaurant owner. "What will the games even leave? Maybe only debt." ___ TEARING THINGS DOWN The atmosphere was starkly different three decades ago when grand preparations for the 1988 Seoul Summer Games essentially shaped the capital into the modern metropolis it is today. A massive sports complex and huge public parks emerged alongside the city's Han River. Next came new highways, bridges and subway lines. Forests of high-rise buildings rose above the bulldozed ruins of old commercial districts and slums. The legacy of the country's second Olympics will be less clear. In a country that cares much less now about the recognition that large sporting events bring, it will potentially be remembered more for things dismantled than built. Pyeongchang's picturesque Olympic Stadium — a pentagonal 35,000-seat arena that sits in a county of 40,000 people — will only be used for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Olympics and Paralympics before workers tear it down. A scenic downhill course in nearby Jeongseon will also be demolished after the games to restore the area to its natural state. Fierce criticism by environmentalists over the venue being built on a pristine forest sacred to locals caused construction delays that nearly forced pre-Olympic test events to be postponed. Gangwon officials want the national government to share costs for rebuilding the forest, which could be as much as 102 billion won ($95 million). ___ NO FISH Despite more than a decade of planning, Gangwon remains unsure what to do with the Olympic facilities it will keep. Winter sports facilities are often harder to maintain than summer ones because of the higher costs for maintaining ice and snow and the usually smaller number of people they attract. That's especially true in South Korea, which doesn't have a strong winter sports culture. Not all ideas are welcome. Gangwon officials say they never seriously considered a proposal to convert the 8,000-seat Gangneung Oval, the Olympic speed skating venue, into a refrigerated warehouse for seafood. Officials were unwilling to have frozen fish as part of their Olympic legacy. Gangwon officials also dismissed a theme park developer's suggestion to make the stadium a gambling venue where people place bets on skating races, citing the country's strict laws and largely negative view of gambling. A plan to have the 10,000-capacity Gangneung Hockey Center host a corporate league hockey team fell apart. Even worse off are Pyeongchang's bobsleigh track, ski jump hill and the biathlon and cross-country skiing venues, which were built for sports South Koreans are largely uninterested in. After its final inspection visit in August, the International Olympic Committee warned Pyeongchang's organizers that they risked creating white elephants from Olympic venues, though it didn't offer specific suggestions for what to do differently. Cautionary tales come from Athens, which was left with a slew of abandoned stadiums after the 2004 Summer Games that some say contributed to Greece's financial meltdown and Nagano, the Japanese town that never got the tourism bump it expected after spending an estimated $10.5 billion for the 1998 Winter Games. Some Olympic venues have proved to be too costly to maintain. The $100 million luge and bobsled track built in Turin for the 2006 games was later dismantled because of high operating costs. Pyeongchang will be only the second Olympic host to dismantle its ceremonial Olympic Stadium immediately after the games — the 1992 Winter Olympics host Albertville did so as well. ___ 'MONEY-DRINKING HIPPOS' Gangwon has demanded that the national government in Seoul pay for maintaining at least four Olympic facilities after the Games — the speed skating arena, hockey center, bobsleigh track and ski jump hill. This would save the province about 6 billion won ($5.5 million) a year, according to Park Cheol-sin, a Gangwon official. But the national government says doing so would be unfair to other South Korean cities that struggled financially after hosting large sports events. Incheon, the indebted 2014 Asian Games host, has a slew of unused stadiums now mocked as "money-drinking hippos." It would also be a hard sell to taxpayers outside of Gangwon, said Lee Jae-soon, an official from the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism. Unlike the 1988 Olympics and the 2002 World Cup, which were brought to South Korea after bids driven by the national government, the provincial government led the bid for the Pyeongchang games and it did so without any commitment from Seoul over footing the bill. Under current plans, Gangwon will be managing at least six Olympic facilities after the games. These facilities will create a 9.2 billion won ($8.5 million) deficit for the province every year, a sizable burden for a quickly-aging region that had the lowest income level among South Korean provinces in 2013, according to the Korea Industrial Strategy Institute, which was commissioned by Gangwon to analyze costs. Hong Jin-won, a Gangneung resident and activist who has been monitoring Olympic preparations for years, said the real deficit could be even bigger. The institute's calculation is based on assumptions that each facility would generate at least moderate levels of income, which Hong says is no sure thing. He said that could mean welfare spending gets slashed to help make up the lack of money. South Korea, a rapidly-aging country with a worsening job market and widening rich-poor gap, has by far the highest elderly poverty rate among rich nations, according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development figures. If Seoul doesn't pay for the Olympic facilities, and Gangwon can't turn them into cultural or leisure facilities, it might make more sense for Gangwon to just tear them down. Park said the national government must step up because the "Olympics are a national event, not a Gangwon event.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017

Olympic leader confident Games will go on in South Korea

em>By Eddie Pells, Associated Press /em> LIMA, Peru (AP) — The president of the International Olympic Committee said Friday he remains confident the Winter Games will go on as scheduled in South Korea despite growing tensions on the peninsula, including North Korea's ballistic missile test this week. At the close of this week's IOC meetings, Thomas Bach said the committee will continue to appeal for diplomatic solutions to the problems. The IOC is monitoring deliberations in the U.N. Security Council, which on Friday condemned the North Korean test. 'We see the deliberations of the U.N. Security Council, which are about diplomacy and diplomatic measures and sanctions to resolve this situation,' Bach said. 'So, our position remains unchanged.' The Olympics are scheduled for Feb. 8-25 in Pyeongchang. North Korea's IOC member, Ung Chang, said he hopes the Olympics will go on as planned. When asked if South Korea will be safe for the Olympics, he responded: 'Nobody knows.' Bach will visit the U.N. next week, but will be working on the traditional Olympic Truce declaration. He said the IOC has no plans to be involved in diplomacy over the Korean crisis. 'We will carefully observe,' Bach said. 'We are not getting involved in this.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2017

Trump, Moon agree to boost SKorean missile capabilities

Trump, Moon agree to boost SKorean missile capabilities.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2017

SKorean theme park in China halted amid missile tension

SKorean theme park in China halted amid missile tension.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2017

Main man Usain Bolt touches down in Rio

LONDON Usain Bolt has touched down in Rio de Janeiro, ready to fine-tune his preparations for another bid at an Olympic double in the 100- and 200-meter sp.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 28th, 2016

ABL Finals: Coach Jimmy will have Alab at its best vs. Mono Vampire

Jimmy Alapag is never the type to choose his playoff opponents. He just goes up against whoever that is in front of him. And as his first very Finals opponent as head coach has been finally decided, Coach Jimmy's preparations take a more serious turn. His San Miguel-Alab Pilipinas got fortunate to have homecourt advantage in the ABL Finals; however, it doesn't mean his team drew an easier opponent. After all, it was Alab that took out the defending champion Hong Kong Eastern but it was Thailand's Mono Vampire that swept this season's top seed. "I've learned that basketball gods don't like it when you pick opponents," Alapag said on his Finals matchup. "[With Mono] You got a 7'5" [import] in [Sam] Deguara. [Michael] Singletary, another big time scorer. You got [Jason] Brickman, who I've been a big fan of for a long time, just how he controls the game. It's important for us that we're playing our best basketball," he added. As the Finals near, Alapag is looking at his wards to continue with the effort that allowed to go from 0-3 in the standings to the Finals. Alapag has a gritty group of players and he expects them to stand tough against an equally-gritty Mono Vampire. "When we were down, and people were looking at us and saying last in the ABL, it was their effort, their commitment every day to fight, scratch, and claw our way out of it," he said. "I’m just really proud of the guys’ effort. From our early struggles, it was tough. [Because of] our chemstiry, our guys really believed that we could get in the end. And that has been my message since the beginning, try to keep working every day to try to give us an opportunity until the end," Alapag added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News6 hr. 5 min. ago

US and Russia Want to Avoid Syrian Escalation, But Are They in Control?

The U.S. and its Western allies avoided triggering a wider war in Syria last Saturday when they retaliated with precision missile strikes against President Bashar al-Assad for an alleged chemical weapons attack. But there are plenty of hazards ahead that could draw the big powers, as well as neighboring countries, deeper into the Syria quagmire […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated News7 hr. 31 min. ago

WUGC preparations underway

LUBAO, Pampanga -- The International Golf Federation, led by Nicholas Stewart Shan of South Africa, has completed its technical inspection of the Pradera Verde Golf Club in Lubao, site of the prestigious 17th World University Golf Championship from May 16 to 19. In attendance during the technical inspection were National….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated News19 hr. 17 min. ago

Frank Elizalde tapped as caretaker for swimming

The Philippine Olympic Committee has designated Frank Elizalde, the former International Olympic Committee representative to the Philippines, as temporary caretaker of the Philippine Swimming Inc......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 18th, 2018

Ricky Vargas bares P4 million bonus for Asiad gold

Philippine Olympic Committee president Ricky Vargas yesterday announced additional incentives for gold, silver and bronze medals in this year’s Asian Games in Indonesia as he raised the bar anew – to improve the country’s overall rank, from 22nd overall in 2014 in Incheon, to a place in the top 15 in the quadrennial event set Aug. 18 to Sept. 2......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 17th, 2018

Trump declares ‘mission accomplished’ after strike on Syria

US President Donald Trump has declared “mission accomplished” in the aftermath of a missile strike launched against Syria by the US and allies France and Britain......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 15th, 2018