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New Year, New Game for business data management

The idea of autonomous technologies has spiked over the past few years with a wide range of different industries incorporating the term in different products, such as vehicles. However, what does ‘Autonomous’ really mean? What kind of impact will it have, and what kind of benefits can we glean from it?.....»»

Category: techSource: thestandard thestandardFeb 14th, 2020

The NBA s new coach s challenge could be a timely tool for teams to wield

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Cleveland’s John Beilein, the only new-to-the-league coach this season, actually got a jump on his 29 rivals in one department. To better familiarize himself with the Cavaliers team he was taking over, Beilein broke from the tradition that has assistant coaches working the sideline at NBA Summer League. When the situation arose in a game in Las Vegas for Cleveland to invoke the experimental “coaches’ challenge” rule, Beilein was the one calling for it. And the one getting shot down. “It was an out-of-bounds play,” Beilein recalled during a break at the coaches’ meetings in Chicago last month. “My player came to the bench saying, ‘It’s definitely our ball.’ I thought, ‘Great, this is why we have it now.’ “We came back out. It was their ball.” There will be a lot of dashed hopes in 2019-20, as well as some pivotal reversals, with the NBA’s adoption of the latest replay wrinkle. As in MLB and the NFL, coaches will have the opportunity to appeal, in real time, certain referees’ decisions. All the “triggers” of the existing replay system remain, but now the teams will have a sense of control. One time each game. “I’ve been a proponent of it for many years, just as an additional layer of security,” said Dallas coach Rick Carlisle, who also serves as president of the NBA Coaches Association. “If a call’s inaccurate for any reason, it’s just an extra chance -- particularly if the game’s on the line -- to get it right. “The question has always been, how to execute it. Where to start. Sounds like this is going to start with a high level of simplicity. Then we’ll see where it goes.” Denver Nuggets coach Michael Malone thought back to 2017-18, when the Nuggets missed the postseason after a loss at Minnesota in the season’s final game. Like every game, there were a handful of what-if moments. “Think about it,” Malone said. “Two years ago, one play could have been the difference for us between the lottery and playoffs. That saves jobs, that gets home/road seeding, there are a lot of things that it can affect.” How the coach’s challenge works For this season, the challenge can be made in three situations: to question a foul called against that team’s player, to dispute an out-of-bounds decision or to question a goaltending/basket interference ruling against that team. The first type applies to the entire game; the others to the first 46 minutes (and first three minutes of overtime), after which the established triggers take over. Challenging a call requires the coach to first call a timeout and then inform the referees he wants a review. There are new court administrators at every game this season to help with the process. Also, fans will notice green “challenge lights” at the scorer’s table -- the one nearest the challenging bench will blink. Beilein said he sought redress a couple of times in Las Vegas, without satisfaction. “They never reversed their decisions,” he said, “but it’s really a good idea to do, to let us have this say in a game. You ask, they review it. If they don’t see it, you just move on with the game. It puts things away, so we’re not grinding away all night on that call. It’s over. It’s done.” If a call is reversed, the challenge is successful and the team’s timeout is restored. If the initial ruling stands, the challenge is deemed unsuccessful and that timeout is gone. Win or lose the appeal, the allotment stays the same: One challenge per team per game. The early chatter among coaches has been, when is the best time to use it? In Sunday’s Hornets-Celtics game, Brad Stevens and James Borrego waited until the final minute. Both challenges failed. “I’ll probably save it till the fourth quarter,” Lakers coach Frank Vogel said. “I’m going to be really excited about it when it helps wins me some games. And I’m going to really hate it when it costs me.” Said Malone: “The funny thing is, we always say, ‘The game never comes down to just the last play. Something that happened in the first quarter was just as important.’ But the reality it, when you get to the last two minutes, if you have the coaches challenge in your pocket, that could come up with a really big play or give you momentum.” The refs’ crew chief will have the final determination of fouls. He or she also will be able to “clean up” the play in question if, for instance, they notice the foul was assessed incorrectly or if a different foul by either side occurred before the one being reviewed. Note: infractions such as 3-second violations or traveling, if uncalled initially, can’t be assessed in a challenge review. The league’s Replay Center in Secaucus, N.J., will adjudicate out-of-bounds and goaltending challenges. Confidence key in using challenge At the NBCA September meetings in Chicago, the feature -- also given a trial run in the G League in recent seasons -- was discussed in a ballroom session with referees and supervisors of the officials. The next day, they all spent time on a basketball court, walking through the particulars. Borrego took advantage of his proximity in Charlotte to talk with Carolina Panthers coach Ron Rivera about his strategy in using the NFL’s version. Those coaches physically throw a red flag to signal their challenge and have time to hear from assistant coaches in a stadium booth upstairs who have seen video to determine their chances of reversal. The NBA won’t have either flags to throw or helpers checking. The coaches will have to alert the refs by twirling their fingers in the air, the current universal symbol for “replay.” They’ll need to act before an opposing player is handed the ball to shoot free throws or toss it inbounds, or before a jump ball. “We haven’t had this conversation with them yet, but players never think they fouled,” Milwaukee Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer said Monday. “It’s never out on them. We’re gonna have to say, ‘OK, did you really not foul?’ Somehow figure out, ‘OK, you have to tell the truth.’ “That kind of feedback from them is going to be important in a challenge situation.” The preseason was only a few days old but, in this era of analytics, Chicago Bulls coach Jim Boylen had his crew gather data on every early challenge. He’s working up a list of situations in which to use it. Late in games? Sure. But not so late that the existing triggers take over for a disputed out-of-bounds play. Then the coach might go home without using it. “You’re always concerned about [burning] the timeout,” Boylen said. “You’d better be sure. Your [viewing] angles better be good.” Not everyone is a fan of the experiment, which will be evaluated after the season by the NBA’s Competition Committee. Some skeptics fret that adding reviews will mean more delays in games that already have replay interruptions. Then there was Monty Williams, the Phoenix Suns’ new coach. Part of his dislike? Genuine empathy for the referees. “I’m not a fan of it at all,” Williams said. “Sometimes it’s to your detriment, but I think human error is part of our game. I know we’re trying to get it right, but sometimes [replay] causes referees to get second-guessed a lot. They already are. “And this is just one more thing for coaches to have to do. Now we’re all going to have to delegate a guy on our bench to monitor things.  “If we’re gonna challenge, I wish it was a segment -- say, the last three minutes of the game. I want to coach. I don’t want to be focused all night on, ‘Should I have challenged [a call made earlier]?’ ” Fans might notice other rules changes and priorities for officials this season: * Coaches will be required to submit their starting lineups earlier now, making them public at least 30 minutes before tipoff. This change is seen largely as a nod to the looming arrival of legal sports betting. Knowing the starters earlier -- and which regulars might be sitting out with injuries or for “load management” -- means more wagers can be made with the most updated information. (A change still can be made if a player gets hurt or aggravates an injury during warm-ups.) * The Replay Center will take over determinations of 2-pointers vs. 3-pointers, operating automatically. * There figures to be a spate of traveling calls early this season. The referees have made that infraction one of their “Points of Education” for 2019-20. That means a “more stringent enforcement” of the existing rule, according to Monty McCutchen, the NBA’s VP, head of referee development and training. The league has gone so far as to include the concept of “the gather” in its rule book now. That -- the moment when a player has full control of the ball and thus the point from which he can take two steps – has been used for years by game officials. But now it has been codified, which helps when discerning variations such as steps taken backward (rather than in forward progress) or in the “Euro-step.” McCutchen noted that, in years past, the NBA game was played through the post at a slower pace. Referees evaluated plays starting with the defenders. Now, with hand-checking long gone and 3-pointers pulling players farther out on the court, the refs’ sequence of viewing plays has shifted to feet, then release, then defender. Other Points of Education for the refs this year have focused on illegal contact initiated by offensive players, “freedom of movement” issues and “respect for the game” moments, which basically are emotional overreactions to calls that exceed allowable guidelines. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2019

The ten most intriguing NBA free agents for 2019

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com We knew that the postseason would affect free agency. But the idea was that the success or failure of certain teams would affect what their free agents' thoughts about staying or leaving. Unfortunately, the last two games of The Finals brought devastating injuries to two of the three most coveted free agents on the market. Kevin Durant, arguably the best player in the world, tore his Achilles in Game 5, just 12 minutes into his return from a calf injury. And Klay Thompson tore his ACL in Game 6. The two injuries will certainly have repercussions beyond the two players and the Golden State Warriors. Maybe they already have. With the Western Conference seemingly wide open next season, the Los Angeles Lakers have reportedly made a deal for Anthony Davis, sending a bevy of young players and future picks to New Orleans so they can team the 26-year-old star with 34-year-old LeBron James ... and maybe another star added in free agency. As always, the free agent market and the trade market are tied together. The pending Davis trade could affect the decisions of players and teams come July 1. And if teams miss out on the free agents they're seeking, they could always fill their cap space by making a trade. With all that in mind, the players listed below aren't necessarily the 10 best free agents (or potential free agents). They're the 10 (actually 12) most interesting in regard to where they're going and what kind of contract they get. For players to be on this list, there needs to be some intrigue regarding their (and/or their team's) decision this summer. That's why Thompson isn't included. 1. Kawhi Leonard, Toronto (Player option) Whether he leaves or not, trading for Leonard last summer was well worth it for the Raptors, who won their first championship, with Leonard averaging 30.5 points per game in the postseason. The Raptors' "load management" program (which limited Leonard to just 60 games in the regular season) clearly worked, and director of sports science Alex McKechnie should be seen as a major asset in the quest to keep Leonard in Toronto. There should be a "run-it-back" sentiment for the new champs, with Danny Green also a free agent and Marc Gasol holding a player option this summer. A short-term deal would make sense, unless Leonard is looking for long-term security, having missed almost all of the 2017-18 season with a leg injury. It's all up to Leonard, maybe the toughest player in the league to read. If he takes his two-way talent elsewhere, the Raptors may have to go in a new direction. Number to know: In the postseason, Leonard had a true shooting percentage of 69.1 percent, the highest mark for a player that averaged at least 30 points per game in the playoffs and won the championship. 2. Kevin Durant, Golden State (Player option) Durant's torn Achilles probably won't scare any team, including the Warriors, from paying him as much as possible. As deep and talented as this free agent class is, the top two guys on this list are in a class by themselves. Rumors have long had Durant ready to leave Golden State and even with his injury, he seems more likely than Thompson to find a new home. But an ESPN report had Thompson's father talking about "unfinished business" after overhearing a conversation between the two injured Warriors. Durant could always put free agency off for a year by exercising his player option and remaining on the Warriors' payroll through his rehab. Number to know: Durant was the first player in NBA history to average 30 points per game in at least 10 playoff games while shooting at least 50 percent from the field, 40 percent from three-point range and 90 percent from the free throw line. 3. Kyrie Irving, Boston The disappointment of the Celtics' season, along with Irving's questionable leadership with a group that underachieved, has taken some of the shine off his star. Irving's injury history also must be taken into consideration. But talent is the most important thing in this league and Irving is one of its most talented players. He's still just 27-years-old and he can still get buckets when buckets are needed. A return to Boston appears far less likely than it did six months ago (especially with Davis being traded elsewhere) and there have been a lot of signals that Irving is bound for Brooklyn. Number to know: In the regular season, Irving had an effective field goal percentage of 56.1 percent with the score within five points in the last five minutes of the fourth quarter or overtime, the second-best mark among player with at least 50 clutch field goal attempts. 4. Jimmy Butler and Tobias Harris, Philadelphia The Sixers lost to the eventual NBA champions on a Game 7 buzzer-beater that bounced on the rim four times before falling through. They're right there. But their starting lineup, which outscored its opponents by more than 21 points per 100 possessions in 334 total minutes (regular season and playoffs), includes three free agents. In regard to future assets, the Sixers didn't give up as much for Butler as they did for Harris. And of course, Butler has more baggage in regard to accepting his role. But, with his defense and his ability to get his own shot, he's is the most important of the three. Harris struggled a bit in the conference semifinals against Toronto and is the least important of the Sixers' three free-agent starters; J.J. Redick's shooting was clearly more critical in the postseason. But Harris isn't easily replaceable and he appears to be the most likely to leave, with a lot of teams looking for versatile forwards. Number to know: In the regular season, Harris shot 41.3 percent on pull-up three-pointers, the second-best mark among 69 players who attempted at least 100. 5. Kemba Walker, Charlotte Walker has expressed some level of loyalty to the Hornets. But immediately after the Davis trade was agreed to, there was a report that Walker would be a "top target" of the Lakers with their cap space. Walker would be an ideal offensive complement to James and Davis, in that he can play off the ball (though he shot less than 35 percent on catch-and-shoot three-pointers last season) and take some of the playmaking burden off of James' shoulders. The Hornets, meanwhile, would likely have a tough time upgrading their roster around Walker, with Nicolas Batum, Bismack Biyombo, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Marvin Williams and Cody Zeller all under contract next season for a total of $85 million. Number to know: Walker led the league with 126 field goal attempts with the score within five points in the last five minutes. That was 43 percent of the Hornets' total (295). His effective field goal percentage on those shots (49.6 percent) ranked 15th among 45 players with at least 50 clutch field goal attempts. 6. D'Angelo Russell, Brooklyn (Restricted) A finalist for the Most Improved award, Russell took a big step forward this season, both in regard to his production and his maturity. He earned himself an All-Star appearance and helped the Nets reach the playoffs with a 14-win increase from last season. He's only 23-years-old and is one of the league's most flammable shooters. But because he doesn't get to the basket or the free throw line very often, Russell is neither all that efficient (his true shooting percentage of 53.3 percent ranked 66th among 94 guards with at least 500 field goal attempts) nor consistent, and he struggled (shooting 36 percent) in Brooklyn's first-round loss to Philadelphia. If the Nets are targeting another ball-handler in free agency (with Caris LeVert and Spencer Dinwiddie already under contract), they'll probably let Russell head elsewhere. Number to know: In the regular season, Russell ranked second with 11.4 pick-and-roll ball-handler possessions per game. He scored 0.89 points per possession as a pick-and-roll ball-handler, the 26th best mark among 44 players that averaged at least five ball-handler possessions. 7. DeMarcus Cousins and Kevon Looney, Golden State Cousins hadn't made it back to 100 percent from his Achilles tear before he suffered a torn quad in his second career playoff game. He made it back for The Finals from that injury and showed flashes of his old self with 14 important points in the Warriors' Game 5 win and a big bucket in the final minute of Game 6. But he also struggled on both ends of the floor at times, and the Warriors were outscored with him on the floor in seven of his eight playoff games. Now he goes back on the free agent market with teams still not sure of what they're getting. Looney is an unrestricted free agent at 23-years-old, and he was the Warriors' most important center this season. The Western Conference champs have Looney's Bird rights, but they could also be spending a lot of money to retain Durant and Thompson (and possibly extend Draymond Green). Another team might have a larger role and more money for an improving young big. Number to know: In the regular season, the Warriors' lineup of Curry, Thompson, Durant, Green and Looney scored 121.5 points per 100 possessions and outscored opponents by 18.7 per 100. Those were the best marks for points scored and point differential per 100 possessions among 40 league-wide lineups that played at least 200 minutes together. 8. Malcolm Brogdon, Milwaukee (Restricted) The Milwaukee Bucks were the best team in the league through the first two games of the Eastern Conference finals. But, with four of their top eight players being free agents (or potential free agents) this summer, they have a lot of work to do if they want to keep Giannis Antetokounmpo surrounded by players who can get it done on both ends of the floor. Brogdon, Khris Middleton and Brook Lopez are the three key pieces. They're all due a pay raise and they all belong on this list. Brogdon is the restricted free agent, but he's also the youngest of the three (he'll be 27 in December) and the one that could be projected into a larger role on another team. Number to know: Brogdon shot 47.5 percent on catch-and-shoot three-pointers, the third-best mark among 223 players who attempted at least 100. 9. Julius Randle, New Orleans (Player option) After five years in the league, Randle is still just 24-years-old. So he's not necessarily a bad fit for David Griffin's plans for the future in New Orleans. But the Pelicans might not be ready to commit the money Randle is seeking (should he opt out of the final year of his contract) after averaging a career-high 21.4 points per game. Defense remains an issue, but Randle has expanded his offensive skill set; he was a respectable 34.4 percent from three-point range this season, taking 18 percent of his shots from beyond the arc (up from six percent over his three previous full seasons). Number to know: Randle averaged 13.2 points in the paint per game, seventh most in the league, and he made more three-pointers (67) than all but one of the six players in front of him. 10. Ricky Rubio, Utah According to Rubio himself, he's not Utah's top priority in free agency. He remains a good defender and one of the league's best passers, but the Jazz need to get more potent offensively if they're going to take the next step. At 31.1 percent, Rubio ranked 153rd in three-point percentage among 163 players with at least 200 attempts. There could be as many as 10 teams (not including the Jazz) in need of a starting point guard this summer, and Rubio could have more value on a team more in need of a distributor. Number to know: The Jazz were 5.8 points per 100 possessions better offensively with both Rubio and Donovan Mitchell on the floor (scoring 110.4 per 100) than they were with Mitchell on the floor without Rubio (104.6). John Schuhmann is a senior stats analyst for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 17th, 2019

Political chaos envelops tennis as French Open approaches

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press Tennis is in turmoil as the French Open approaches. As three-time major champion Stan Wawrinka put it: "Politics have overshadowed the action on the courts." In a letter published Friday in The Times of London, Wawrinka decried his sport's "worrying decline in moral standards" and outlined several aspects of the ongoing drama enveloping the men's tour — and causing more of a racket than the rackets themselves. "I feel compelled to express my views on this regrettable period in our sport," said Wawrinka, who once was ranked as high as No. 3 and is currently 33rd after a series of injuries. "This episode has left many players, myself included, concerned about the direction tennis is heading in." There certainly has been a lot going on behind the scenes with regard to who runs the men's professional tour, and lately it's been spilling into public view. The conversation is sure to continue until a key vote for the ATP board of directors takes place May 14 in Rome — and through the next Grand Slam tournament, which begins at Roland Garros on May 26. Wawrinka slammed the representatives on the board and the player council, saying the problem is not with the governing structure but the caliber of the people in positions of importance. Wawrinka's letter mentions "political chaos" and the "numerous conflicts of interest" that plague tennis. It also prominently discusses a topic about which he already had been outspoken: Justin Gimelstob, the ex-player, coach and TV commentator who resigned from the tour board this week after pleading no contest to misdemeanor assault for attacking a former friend. While Gimelstob's case still was pending, he was allowed to remain in his powerful ATP post. The 42-year-old American was sentenced April 22 to three years of probation, 60 days of community service and a year's worth of anger management classes for what prosecutors said was Gimelstob's attack of Randall Kaplan as they trick-or-treated with their kids in Los Angeles on Halloween in 2017. In a statement to the court, Kaplan said Gimelstob struck him multiple times and threatened to kill him. "There is no place in our sport for those who behave like Justin. The lack of responses from people involved in the game, particularly at the beginning of this saga, when he was charged last December, was alarming," Wawrinka wrote. "This is a situation where silence amounts to complicity." Wawrinka also referred to what he called a "concerted plot" to oust Chris Kermode as executive chairman and president of the ATP. Kermode's departure was announced in March after a vote by the board of directors. Rafael Nadal, who has won 11 of his 17 Grand Slam titles at the French Open, was among those who said they were not consulted before the decision was made to push out Kermode when his current term closes at the end of 2019. "Many players feel that they were not represented properly throughout the last few months, during which so much has happened politically. I agree with them," Wawrinka wrote. "I do not want to be associated with anyone who played a part in this, let alone be represented by them. I want to be represented by people with clear, strong ethical values." Novak Djokovic, who was involved in the Kermode situation through his position as president of the ATP player council, conceded that the business matters might have taken a toll on his performance. After earlier-than-expected losses at Indian Wells and Miami, the top-ranked Djokovic said: "Way too many things off the court. I guess that affected me a little bit on the court.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 4th, 2019

NCAA Season 95: Top NCAA men s volleyball MVP candidate eyes national team spot

University of Perpetual Help sophomore Louie Ramirez is playing on top of his game this NCAA Season 95. He sees it as a chance not only to help the Altas keep their grasp of the crown but also as an opportunity to be noticed and fulfill his ultimate goal of serving the country. The Pangasinense is very vocal in his interest to land a spot in the Philippine men’s volleyball team just like former Altas libero Jack Kalingking, who helped the PHI squad capture the historic silver medal in the 30th Southeast Asian Games last December. “Pangarap ko rin talaga maging part ng national team kasi 'yun nga, parang pumunta ako sa Perps kasi 'yun talaga ang pangarap ko,” said Ramirez, who was recruited by Perpetual mentor and former national team coach Sammy Acaylar. “Kumbaga parang 'yun 'yung susi ba para makalaro sa National team.” Ramirez had a decent debut with the Altas last year, helping Perpetual finish a perfect season. Unfortunately, he was barely noticed playing a less glamorous position at the middle and behind the shadows of Season 95 1st Best Middle Blocker Ronniel Rosales. But when Altas star Joebert Almodiel, the two-time reigning MVP, decided to part ways with Perpetual, Ramirez seized the chance to break out of his shell.  Converted to open spiker to fill the void left by Almodiel, Ramirez did not disappoint. The Hotel and Restaurant Management student averaged 17.7 points per game in the Las Pinas-based squad’s nine-game sweep of the eliminations that propelled Perpetual straight to the Finals for the second straight year. Acaylar admits that Ramirez did struggle during the early part of the season with his new role which he got just a few weeks before the start of the tournament. “You know, to tell you frankly, before nag opening ang NCAA, nagkaroon pa kami ng medyo struggles because nawalan kami ng player,” said Acaylar. “Nagkaroon kami ng struggles din, at least noong cinonvert ko si Louie sa pagiging open spiker, 'yun pala ang nasa puso niya talagang gusto niya mag-open spiker kaya nakuha niya 'yung gusto kong mangyari,” he added. “Nag-adjust siya pero ngayon malinis na siyang gumalaw sa loob.” Now thriving at his new spot, Ramirez is tipped to win the highest individual award. But the Altas scorer just wants to look at the bigger picture. “'Di ko pa iniisip kasi kumbaga lagi naman sinasabi ni coach Sam na, ‘Maglaro para sa team hindi 'yung maglaro para sa sarili. Kumbaga wag niyo isipin 'yung mga award kasi kumbaga 'yung championship talaga. 'Yung mga award parang bonus nalang 'yan para sa aming mga player,’” said Ramirez. Perpetual will wait for its best-of-three Finals opponent as the elimination round resumes on March 16 after a month of halt following the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2020

CEO starts business with P2,500 in capital

Leo Ortiz, the founder and CEO of Rising Dragon Beauty & Wellness Trading Corp., recalls that he started his business with just P2,500 in initial capital.  Today, the 33-year-old serial entrepreneur directly employs 50 and indirectly supports hundreds more in various businesses such as beauty and wellness products, skin care services and restaurant and resort management......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2020

World Cup champion women pushed: Could they beat German men?

By RONALD BLUM AP Sports Writer Carli Lloyd was pushed over and over on differences between women and men. "Do you think the women's national team could beat the German men's team?" U.S. Soccer Federation lawyer Noah Finkel asked during a Dec. 20 deposition. "I'm not sure," the two-time FIFA Player of the Year replied. Finkel inquired about a 2015 email interview Lloyd conducted through her agent's assistant with the website Sportskeeda. "You wrote men are faster and stronger, right?" Finkel probed. "Yeah, if you take those away, yeah, it would be a contest," Lloyd said. Again and again, members of the champion U.S. women's team were pushed to detail distinctions between their sport, which they dominate, and the men's game, where the Americans struggle. Lawyers for the USSF are trying to show it's OK to pay the women differently than the men because the competition is different. The sides made excerpts of depositions public in court filings Thursday night. "The tone during depositions is reflective of the kind of condescension that many USSF officials employ when talking to the players about pay and workplace conditions," said Molly Levinson, spokeswoman for the players, "including the plainly disrespectful and sexist attitudes from USSF and their representatives during CBA negotiations when they refused to offer anything close to equal pay." The women sued last year, alleging the USSF violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Pay Act of 1963 in reaching what they say is an inferior collective bargaining agreement with the women than the deal struck with the American men. They are seeking more than $66 million in damages. The federation maintains the women have many benefits the men lack, including guaranteed salaries, health insurance, paid child-care assistance, pregnancy and parental leave, severance pay and access to a 401(k) retirement plan. Men get paid by the game and tournament, most earning the majority of their income from their club. Reigning FIFA Player of the Year Megan Rapinoe was questioned about her response in an interview she gave to Pod Save America in which she said: "Our pay structure is different. We play different games. We're different rankings in the world. Like, it's just apples to oranges." The USSF said that from fiscal year 2009 through fiscal year 2019, the women's national team had gross revenue of $101.3 million for 238 games, an average of $425,446, and the men grossed $185.7 million for 191 matches, an average of $972,147. The women had a $27.6 million net loss over 11 years and the men lost $3.13 million. "The international soccer environment in which the MNT players compete is far more competitive by many measures than that in which plaintiffs compete," the USSF said in one of its papers filed with the court. "The MNT players have lower odds of succeeding in the face of such greater competition. In short, MNT players must achieve more and/or better results against tougher competition in order to qualify for, and succeed in, tournament competition." Barring a settlement, the trial is scheduled to start May 5 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. The women's five-year labor deal runs through 2021 while the men play under the terms of a contract that expired Dec. 31. During her deposition on Jan. 15, former U.S. coach Jill Ellis testified she was told the men got chartered flights at times and the women didn't. The USSF spent about $10.7 million on hotels for the men and approximately $7.3 milllion on the women during the fiscal years 2012-20. Air travel was about $6.3 million for the women during that period and $14.3 million for the men, many of whom play in Europe. The USSF increased first- and business-class travel for the women in 2017. Speaking during her Dec. 20 deposition, Lloyd talked about personally training with the Medford Strikers' under-18 boys team in New Jersey.  "It's different in the sense that men are bigger, stronger, faster. That's their makeup. There's no -- there's no denying science in that regard," she said. "But I am the most skillful player there. So if you take their speed and athleticism and their strength away, it's the same game." Former USSF President Sunil Gulati, speaking during a Dec. 17 deposition, used a comparison with an NBA star to point out differences. "LeBron James doesn't get a bonus for getting 15 points and for the Lakers finishing out of the playoffs," he said. “The expectations for him are different based on who they're playing against, what — who he is, what the level is.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2020

Franchise group sees innovation as vital for SMEs& nbsp;

The Association of Filipino Franchisers Inc., the home of Filipino home-grown franchisers, believes that the three I’s—Improvement, Integration and Innovation—will be the name of the game for SMEs this year. Many MSMEs have to learn to fully embrace technology by integrating new systems that will help improve and innovate their business......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 15th, 2020

UAAP Season 82: UST Tigresses keeping the fire burning post-Sisi Rondina era

Sisi Rondina is incomparable. However, University of Sto. Tomas is not looking for the next Rondina. What Tigresses head coach Kungfu Reyes wants this UAAP Season 82 is a new leader who will step up to bear the torch left by the reigning Most Valuable Player. “Wala namang pwedeng pumalit kay Sisi,” said Reyes of the heart and soul of UST’s runner-up run last year. “Pero yung spot na pwedeng mag-take over, kung sino namang maga-act as a leader [ang hanap namin].” This is the challenge of Reyes to his wards as they prepare for another shot at the throne that has been elusive to the Espana-based squad since the Tigresses won it all a decade ago. But the mentor is confident that the holdovers and even the incoming Tigresses share the same ferocity, passion and dedication of Rondina. So it won’t be hard finding the next UST leader.       “‘Yung team namin last year is very young ngayon yung naiwan ni Sisi, nahawaan niya yung mga bata ganun din ‘yung mga seniors namin ngayon,” said Reyes, who is also the national women’s volleyball team assistant coach. Ready to prove that they can sustain if not surpass their achievements last year are key holdovers Season 81 Rookie of the Year and go-to-player Eya Laure, team captain Alina Bicar, Caitlyn Viray, Kecelyn Galdones and Ysa Jimenez. Eya Laure, who suited up for the national team in the 30th Southeast Asian Games, will reunite with sister EJ, who is back after a two-year hiatus. The elder Laure’s presence added another scoring option for the Tigresses with 6-foot-2 Fil-Italian Milena Alessandrini still recovering from a knee injury she sustained last year.    Also a welcome addition for UST is rookie Imee Hernandez, who showed a lot of promise in the Tigresses’ runner-up finish in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference. As part of their preparation, UST held training camps in Baguio and Taiwan that yielded favorable results. But having experienced what it was to play in the biggest stage of the tournament, according to Reyes, is their biggest advantage this year and he is confident that this time UST is fully equipped for another shot at the championship. “Hindi namin kaya ituro ‘yung nangyari last year in front of 21,000 spectators, [yung] spotlight, camera sa training,” he said. “’Yung experience na ‘yung madadala namin as a motivation.” “Isang malaking bagay para sa mga bata towards [Season] 82 medyo naka-experience na kahit papaano,” added Reyes.   EYES ON YOU: After a stellar rookie season that saw her average 16.4 points per game and become the most efficient hitter with 35.90% success rate in attacks, Eya Laure’s second run for the black and gold puts her on the spotlight as the face of UST. Her resume which include valuable experience playing for the tricolors in different international tournaments and work on improving her craft will be her biggest advantage – and pressure – as she tries to lead the Tigresses to follow to their impressive run last season. “Ang mindset ko this coming season ay matulangan ang teammates ko, matulungan ang team na ilabas nila ang best performance nila every game,” said Laure. “Maglalaro ako ng best ko.” But Eya stresses that this season is not just about her but about how the Tigresses will work as one to complete an unfinished business last season.          “Naniniwala kasi kami sa team effort. Hindi kakayanin ng isa, dalawa o kahit tatlo nga eh. Yung nagdala sa amin sa Finals is yung team effort,” said Laure.    --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 12th, 2020

Hinduja Global Solutions posts 5 pc growth in Q3 revenues

Mumbai (Maharashtra) [India], Feb 10 (ANI): Business process management major Hinduja Global Solutions (HGS) has posted 5 per cent revenue growth in the third quarter of the current financial year at.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2020

Hinduja Global Solutions posts 5 pc growth in Q3 revenues

Mumbai (Maharashtra) [India], Feb 10 (ANI): Business process management major Hinduja Global Solutions (HGS) has posted 5 per cent revenue growth in the third quarter of the current financial year at.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2020

Marco Polo Ortigas Manila continues road toward sustainability

Marco Polo Ortigas Manila has retained its Silver Certification from EarthCheck for the second consecutive year, in line with the Hotel’s commitment to exercise environmentally-responsible and sustainable business practices in its daily operations. EarthCheck is the world’s leading environmental management and professional services group for the travel and tourism industry. “Doing good for our community, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 3rd, 2020

IT-BPM as RE driver

This year will continue to be a positive year for the Philippine real estate (RE) market despite headwinds, with the Philippine offshore gaming operators (POGO) industry overtaking the IT and business process management (IT-BPM) industry as the main real estate driver. JLL Philippines — the country’s premier real estate services firm — shared its 2019 […] The post IT-BPM as RE driver appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2020

POGOs to overtake IT-BPM as major real estate driver — JLL

The Philippine offshore gaming operators is seen overtaking the IT and business process management industry as the main real estate driver this year......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2020

UK-based International Finance names BPI AMTC ‘Best Asset Manager’

BPI Asset Management and Trust Corporation (AMTC) was named the Best Asset Manager for 2019 by International Finance magazine – a distinction that the company has earned for the third year in a row, and the fourth award since first receiving the honor in 2013. International Finance is a premium business and finance magazine published […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 1st, 2020

UAAP Season 82: Fresh start ito eh -- Jho Maraguinot

Returning Jho Maraguinot is looking at the UAAP Season 82 women’s volleyball tournament as a fresh start, putting her mind away from the pressure of completing unfinished business when she last played for the defending champion Ateneo de Manila University two years ago. Coming back after a year of absence, Maraguinot just wants to pour everything that she could give in her swan song, leaving no regrets when it’s time to formally hang her blue and white jersey. She doesn’t want to dwell on the past heartbreaks when she and the Lady Eagles fell short in the Finals of Seasons 78 and 79 and when Ateneo failed to reach the championship round in Season 80. “Wala naman [sa utak ko]. I guess I needed to move on from it. For me, fresh start 'to eh,” said Maraguinot, who skipped Season 81 to pursue a club career with Sta. Lucia Realty in the Philippine Superliga. For the Alitagtag, Batangas native, what’s important is bringing those valuable lessons she learned to help the Lady Eagles defend their crown. “Ayoko nang dalhin 'yung heartbreaks pero dala ko 'yung lessons na nakuha ko from it. Kasi parang if dalhin ko 'yun, 'di ba sinasabi nila na kapag may galit ka, hindi mo magagawa ng maayos 'yung kailangan mong gawin,” she said. “So for me, kinailangan ko talagang mag move on from it kahit ayaw ko, kahit masakit siya sa akin, marami naman akong natutunan from it. So, gagamitin ko 'yung mga natutunan ko for this season,” added Maraguinot. One of the most explosive scorers during her past tours of duty for Ateneo, Maraguinot admits she is still in the process of bringing back her old form.   “Personally, siyempre lahat naman tayo mataas 'yung standard sa sarili, so I guess 60 to 70 (percent)” Maraguinot’s self-assessment. “And I feel like I'm sakto lang for the season kasi masama rin naman na maaga kang mag-peak. So, I feel like I'm really sakto lang.” With prolific scorer Kat Tolentino also playing in her last year with Ateneo and the addition of high school standout Faith Nisperos, Maraguinot understands her new role under head coach Oliver Almadro.    “Well laging sinasabi sa akin ni Coach O na hindi niya kailangan na kami lang ang pupuntos eh, ang kailangan niya 'yung guidance para sa mga bata,” said Maraguinot. “Kasi nga half of them first time maglalaro, like even my sister [Jaja], first time niya na mag-first six,” she added. “Parang guidance na 'pagdating ng game, kasi iba naman talaga 'yung feel 'pag game time ng UAAP. So 'yun 'yung una niya talagang sinabi sa akin na 'yung maturity sa loob ng court, na kailangan namin i-guide 'yung bata para hindi sila kabahan.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 29th, 2020

NCAA Season 95: Verzosa embraces role as new Queen Bomber

Dolly Verzosa embraces a bigger role for Jose Rizal University in the NCAA Season 95 women’s volleyball competition. The third year hitter not only serves as the Lady Bombers’ top scoring option, but is now taking the responsibility as court leader of a young squad. Verzosa displayed an all-around game as she steered JRU to a come-from-behind, 22-25, 25-19, 21-25, 25-21, 15-8, victory over San Sebastian College on Thursday in the NCAA Season 95 women’s volleyball competition, as the Lady Bomber opened their campaign on a high note.  The skipper delivered 21 points, capped off with the game-clinching down the line attack, while showing great floor defense with 20 digs. “Parang 'yung problema ko lang ngayon is parang bata pa 'yung teammates ko kaya kailangan ko mag step-up as a captain,” said Verzosa, who was JRU's co-captain last year with Karen Montojo.    Verzosa, one of the few holdover from the previous season, accepted that she had to step up to lead the Mia Tioseco-mentored squad, which is composed of a core of freshmen and sophomores.   “Ngayon naging matured [ako] bigla kasi 'yung mga teammates ko mga freshmen,” added Verzosa, who is now stepping out of the shadow of former JRU star and Season 93 MVP Shola Alvarez. Verzosa was instrumental in the fifth set, scoring six points in the deciding frame to help JRU extend its head-to-head winning streak over SSC-R to three. The JRU veteran rallied her squad in the fourth frame and and kept the Lady Bombers together in the fifth, which started tight before the Mandaluyong-based squad pulled away halfway in the decider.  “Sinasabi ko sa kanila na tibay lang. Tibay lang ng loob kasi puro din mga bago eh, kinakabahan pa,” said the management student. She kept reminding her teammates, especially in the crucial stretch of the last two sets of the match, of their goal.   “Sabi ko lang sa kanila na, ‘Gusto nyo nang manalo?’ Kasi yun palagi ang sinasabi ni coach Mia na yung matitira lang naman dito ay yung gustong manalo. ‘Gusto nyo bang manalo?’” she said. “Yun na-motivate sila lalo na kailangan namin ito. Kailangan naming manalo.” Verzosa’s leadership will again be tested on Saturday in a showdown with San Beda University.   ---       Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 16th, 2020

IT-BPM, creative services, halal products pushed as priority exports

The Department of Trade and Industry is pushing electronics, food and beverage, information technology – business process management, creative industries and halal as priority sectors for exports this year......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 15th, 2020

Increase in Filipino data scientists seen amid firms’ demand

INFORMATION technology (IT) system management solutions provider ASG Technologies Group, Inc. sees an increase in the number of Filipino data scientists this year driven by the growing demand from enterprises......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJan 8th, 2020

Whiteside’s return to Miami doesn’t go exactly as planned

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Pres MIAMI (AP) — Hassan Whiteside had a big game and the Miami Heat won. That wouldn’t have seemed so conflicting a year ago. Whiteside is having perhaps the best season of his career now, in his first year with the Portland Trail Blazers. The Heat, at 26-10, are off to their best start since the final season of the LeBron James era in Miami. And on Sunday night (Monday, PHL time), it was Whiteside vs. the Heat for the first time since the trade that sent him to the Trail Blazers this past summer. Whiteside had 21 points and 18 rebounds. The Heat won anyway, 122-111. “It’s been surreal,” Whiteside said of his return to Miami. “It feels so different, you know? Even coming into the building a different way. You know, I didn’t know which way to go. I’ve never even been in this away locker room. I didn’t know what it even looked like.” He got booed early and often by Heat fans, and Whiteside seemed genuinely confused by that postgame. He wasn’t always the most popular Heat player -- despite winning the league rebounding title one season in Miami and winning the blocked shots title another year -- and was often criticized over a perception that he wasn’t always giving his all. Last summer, Whiteside shouted “We’ve got shooters” on social media after the trade to Portland. Heat fans perceived that as a shot at their team, and serenaded him with that same chant in the latter moments of Sunday’s win. “I didn’t really realize they felt it was a diss,” Whiteside said. Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said he still remembers a 90-minute meeting with Whiteside several years ago inside a lounge at the team’s arena. From that meeting, the Heat decided that Whiteside was worth trying to resurrect after years of him bouncing around internationally and in what’s now called the G League. “I developed a strong relationship with Hassan because I’ve arguably spent as much time with him as any other player and I love his story,” Spoelstra said. “I really do. I love guys that have to overcome something or people discount them.” Whiteside hasn’t had to overcome much this season. He’s playing exceptionally well. The NBA started officially recording blocked shots in 1973 and since then only seven players have finished a full season averaging what Whiteside is averaging now -- 15.9 points, 13.9 rebounds, 2.8 blocked shots. It’s pretty much a who’s-who of big men: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (he did it three times), Hakeem Olajuwon, Shaquille O’Neal, Bill Walton, Dwight Howard, Elvin Hayes and Bob McAdoo. Whiteside picked a perfect time to be in their company, given that this is a contract year. His $98 million, four-year deal that the Heat gave him with no reservation is about to run out. And he has been markedly better in every category this season. Points, up. Shooting, up. Free throw shooting, up an astounding 32% -- he was one of the NBA’s worst last season at 45% and is up to 77% this season. Blocks, up. Minutes, up. He says it is a byproduct of more opportunity. Whiteside wanted to play more minutes in Miami. Portland is giving him a workload to his liking. “I’m just out there longer,” Whiteside said. “I’m just out there playing 30 minutes a game. I never felt like my production changed. You guys know better than me. You all can run the per-36 minutes. You can run it every year for my NBA career and it’s going to pretty much stay around the same.” He’s right. Starting with the 2014-15 season, Whiteside’s per-36 averages have ranged basically between 18 to 20 points per game, 15 to 18 rebounds per game. “People here in Miami know what he is capable of doing,” Portland coach Terry Stotts said. “And he’s been doing that for us.” Being traded last summer -- it was a four-team trade, the principal moves being ones that brought Jimmy Butler from Philadelphia to Miami, Meyers Leonard from Portland to Miami, sent Josh Richardson from Miami to Philadelphia and Whiteside from Miami to Portland -- reminded Whiteside of the business side of the game. So is the noise that’s percolating now. Whiteside is in the final year of his $98 million, four-year deal that he signed with Miami. Expiring contracts, like his, tend to be attractive trade chips. The Blazers are only 15-22 this season and could be looking to deal, and have been one of the teams believed to have interest in Cleveland’s Kevin Love. Whiteside’s deal would seem to work if Cleveland wanted to move Love to Portland. If Whiteside is hearing any whispers of what may or may not happen, he insists that he’s not being affected. “All I can control is what I can control,” Whiteside said. “I just play.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 6th, 2020

Stern was a big-city guy and a friend to the small markets

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — David Stern had been NBA commissioner for barely a year when the Knicks won the 1985 draft lottery, sending Patrick Ewing on the way to New York. Skeptics cried conspiracy, that the league rigged the result to bail out the faltering franchise in its largest market. Stern would shrug it off, knowing he wouldn’t do anything illegal to help the Knicks, or any of the big boys. He did far more for the little guys. Cities like Sacramento and New Orleans needed Stern more, and his efforts helped them retain teams that might otherwise have been playing elsewhere. In New Orleans’ case, that even included running the organization at the same time as running a league. “I used to think that he just showed up on draft day and shook hands, but then I got to work with him when I was in New Orleans when the NBA took over the Pelicans. I was amazed how much he did,” said Phoenix coach Monty Williams, who was coaching the team when the league stepped in to run it until new ownership could be found. Tributes flowed for hours Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) after Stern died at 77, from grateful players and teams who benefited from his 30 years of leadership. Most focused on his vision that led to the NBA’s massive worldwide growth, but some had more personal stories to tell about closer to home. Like the Kings, who at times appeared ticketed for Seattle, Southern California, Las Vegas or some other city before Stern rejected the team’s plans to bolt and gave Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson the chance to put together plans for local ownership and a new arena that kept the team in California’s capital city. A street is named in Stern’s honor there. “David will always be remembered as Superman in Sacramento,” owner Vivek Ranadivé said, adding that Stern’s “fierce support of the team and this community is the reason why the Kings stayed in Sacramento. David’s enthusiasm for our city and belief in our fans will never be forgotten.” The Kings played a tribute video Thursday (Friday, PHL time) acknowledging Stern’s role in their revival before their home game against the Memphis Grizzlies, another team in a minor market that’s struggled at times to fill its building after the team relocated there from Vancouver. “David will always be remembered as Superman in Sacramento." In Memoriam - David J. Stern ???? pic.twitter.com/g8cdh2sr14 — Sacramento Kings (@SacramentoKings) January 1, 2020 Business may have boomed better in other places, but one move for the franchise was hard enough. Stern had no interest in another. “Commissioner Stern’s support of Memphis as an NBA market and the resulting arrival of the Grizzlies franchise in 2001 forever changed the trajectory of our city,” the Grizzlies said. “His continued support in standing alongside the Grizzlies organization in its creation of the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Game in Memphis reflected his commitment to using the power of sport to transform lives.” The NBA loves its big stars and benefits from them being in the biggest markets, from Magic Johnson to Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant, and now LeBron James being in Los Angeles, or Michael Jordan playing in Chicago. But Stern and the league admired the parity of the NFL, where small-market squads such as Green Bay, New Orleans, Pittsburgh and Indianapolis have thrived. A better chance of achieving that was a driving force that led to the 2011 lockout, with the league hoping a more favorable salary structure and improved sharing of revenues would give any well-managed team a chance to compete, no matter its location. Teams such as Oklahoma City, Portland and Utah have since been relatively consistent winners, and Milwaukee currently sports the NBA’s best record. Occasionally, it took a larger effort from the league, especially in New Orleans. The NBA has never proven over the long term it will flourish in the city after moving from Charlotte, with Chris Paul and Anthony Davis both eventually seeking to be traded. But even though the Hornets were well-supported in Oklahoma City after playing home games there following Hurricane Katrina, Stern felt it was important to return the team to New Orleans when it was ready to host games again, then sent the 2008 All-Star Game soon after. Later, he had the league take ownership of the franchise from George Shinn until it could find an owner who would keep the team in the city. That situation became uncomfortable when Stern had to make the heavily criticized decision to kill a trade that would’ve sent Paul to the Lakers, but the Pelicans are still there nearly two decades after arriving. “Mr. Stern was a catalyst in professional basketball returning to New Orleans in 2002,” the team said. “His commitment to the New Orleans community and the Gulf South region was further shown when he guided the franchise through an ownership transition to Tom Benson in 2012.” Stern couldn’t win all the fights, failing to convince local leadership to approve arena funding that could have kept the SuperSonics in Seattle, a city whose fans were strong supporters. They moved to Oklahoma City, where the Thunder have been a small-market success. Just the kind Stern liked. ___ AP Sports Writer Beth Harris in Los Angeles contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 3rd, 2020