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Netflix Renews Korean Original ‘Busted!’ for a Second Season, PLUS: Watch a Video Clip of EXO’s Sehun Vs. the Claw Machine!

Netflix, the world’s leading internet entertainment service, has announced that its first Netflix original Korean variety show Busted! I Know Who You Are will be returning for a second season. Netflix will continue to team up with producers Cho Hyo-jin, Chang Hyuk-jae, and Kim Ju-hyung of Company SangSang. Featuring an all-star cast of Yoo Jae-suk, […].....»»

Category: newsSource: metrocebu metrocebuJun 6th, 2018

WEEKLY WATCH: Trailer for Episode 11 of K-Drama ‘Mr. Sunshine;’ Two New Episodes to Premiere This Weekend

Netflix has revealed the episode 11 preview trailer for the Korean original series Mr. Sunshine, a 24-episode drama from the creators of the global hit series Goblin and Descendants of the Sun. Ae-sin continues her fight as the member of the resistance as she fights with a mysterious masked figure, while Hina and Dong-mae, who […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

HOF preview: Moss went deep to ignite Vikes, transform NFL

By Dave Campbell, Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The ball was flying down the field often for Minnesota during that drizzly night in Green Bay, and Randy Moss kept going over and past the defense to get it. Five games into his NFL career, Moss was a star. He was a revolutionary, too. There was no moment that better defined his arrival as the league's premier deep threat than that breakout prime-time performance against the two-time reigning NFC champion and bitter rival Packers. "Seeing Randall Cunningham smile, seeing him energetic," Moss said, reflecting on his five-catch, 190-yard, two-touchdown connection with Cunningham that carried the Vikings to a 37-24 victory. "It was just a great feeling." When the Vikings landed in Minnesota, his half-brother, Eric Moss, who was briefly his teammate, wondered about celebrating the big win. "I said, 'Going out? No, I want to go home,'" Moss said. Then defensive tackle John Randle tapped him on the shoulder. "Man, we're going to party tonight!" Moss said, recalling Randle's pronouncement to the rookie. "That's when I finally understood what it really meant to the guys for us to go into Lambeau and win." Twenty years later, with Moss set to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame this weekend after being elected in his first year of eligibility, the swift, sleek and sometimes-sassy wide receiver has finally understood the depth of his impact on the game and the privilege of opportunity to serve as a celebrant of the sport. "I came into the league with, I guess, my head not really screwed on my shoulders properly," Moss said recently on a conference call with reporters. Over time, the "homebody-type guy" from tiny Rand, West Virginia, who ranks second in NFL history in touchdown receptions (156) and fourth in receiving yards (15,292), learned how to soften some of the edges he's carried since he was a kid. "I've been able to open myself up and meet more people, be able to travel the world," said Moss, who's in his third season as an ESPN analyst. "Football here in America is a very powerful sport, and just being in that gold jacket, hopefully I can just be able to continue to reach people and continue to do great things." Moss will become the 14th inductee from the Vikings, joining former teammates Cris Carter, Chris Doleman, Randall McDaniel and Randle. He'll be the 27th wide receiver enshrined at the museum in Canton, Ohio. That's a three-hour drive from his hometown, but it's sure a long way from poverty-ridden Rand where Moss and his sports-loving friends played football as frequently as they could in the heart of coal country next to the Allegheny Mountains just south of the capital city, Charleston. "It was something that just felt good. I loved to compete. I just loved going out there just doing what kids do, just getting dirty," Moss said. He landed at Marshall University after some off-the-field trouble kept him out of Florida State and Notre Dame, and he took the Thundering Herd to what was then the NCAA Division I-AA national championship in 1996. Several NFL teams remained wary of his past, but Vikings head coach Dennis Green didn't flinch when Moss was still on the board in the 1998 draft with the 21st overall pick. Moss never forgot the teams that passed on him, with especially punishing performances against Dallas, Detroit and Green Bay. "I just carried a certain chip on my shoulder because the way I grew up playing was just basically having a tough mentality," Moss said. "Crying, hurting, in pain? So what? Get up, and let's go." The Vikings finished 15-1 in 1998, infamously missing the Super Bowl by a field goal. The next draft, the Packers took cornerbacks with their first three picks. Moss never escaped his reputation as a moody player whose behavior and effort were often questioned. That led to his first departure from Minnesota, via trade to Oakland in 2005. The Raiders dealt him to New England in 2007, when the Patriots became the first 16-0 team before losing in the Super Bowl, to the New York Giants. After a rocky 2010 for Moss, including being traded by the Patriots and released by the Vikings, he took a year off. He returned in 2012 to reach one more Super Bowl with the San Francisco 49ers. Moss was not a particularly physical player, but for his lanky frame he had plenty of strength. His combination of height and speed was exceptional, and his instincts for the game were too. Carter taught him how to watch the video board at the Metrodome to find the ball in the air, and he had a knack for keeping his hands close enough to his body that if the defensive back in coverage had his back to the quarterback he couldn't tell when the ball was about to arrive. In an NFL Films clip that captured a sideline conversation between him and Cunningham during one game, Moss yelled, "Throw it up above his head! They can't jump with me! Golly!" For Vikings wide receiver Adam Thielen, who has lived his entire life in Minnesota, was a sports-loving 8-year-old in 1998 when Moss helped lead the Vikings to what was then the NFL season scoring record with 556 points. The first team to break it was New England in 2007 with, again, Moss as the premier pass-catcher who set the all-time record that year with 23 touchdown catches. "It's fun to look back at his career and watch his old film. I love when that stuff pops up on Instagram, to be able to watch some of those old Randy plays that made me want to play this game," Thielen said. "I try to emulate him as much as I can.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

WATCH: ‘Stranger Things’ teaser trailer is an 80s-style ad for Starcourt Mall

MANILA, Philippines – The first teaser trailer for Stranger Things season 3 is out, but instead of showing the old gang and the usual Hawkins haunts, the video decides to advertise the brand new Starcourt Mall. Released by Netflix on July 16, the video comes neon '80s graphics, a boppy synth-pop ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 17th, 2018

Sleuthing with Sehun

SEOUL---"I don't think I'm the best detective," Sehun confessed. The K-pop idol talked about his role as a dancing detective who solves (gasp) murder cases in Netflix's first Korean variety show, "Busted." And instead of playing sleuth with the EXO squad, Sehun worked with a motley crew of A-listers who are not exactly Sherlock Holmes either. Yoo Jae-suk (dubbed the National MC), Ahn Jae-wook (an entertainment expert whose resum includes TV dramas and musicals), Kim Jong-min (lead of coed group Koyote), Lee Kwang-soo (our favorite funnyman), Park Min-young (K-drama royalty) and Kim Se-jeong (from girl group Gugudan) were his newest costars in this crazy mystery-reality-variety ...Keep on reading: Sleuthing with Sehun.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 4th, 2018

Netflix Reveals the Launch Date for Its Star-Studded K-Variety “Busted!”

Netflix, the world’s leading internet entertainment service, announced today that its first Netflix Original Korean variety show Busted! I Know Who You Are will launch on May 4, available exclusively to Netflix members globally. Busted! is a new type of K-variety where 7 main cast members position themselves as bumbling detectives that set out to solve a fun-filled […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsApr 5th, 2018

WATCH: Nobody lives forever in ‘Altered Carbon’

MANILA, Philippines — Netflix just released the official trailer of its original series “Altered Carbon “ Season 1......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 25th, 2018

NFL wants players to play with a free mind

By Rob Maaddi, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — The NFL doesn't want players worrying about getting flagged or fined. "You gotta play," NFL football operations chief Troy Vincent said Tuesday at the league's fall meetings. "You hope that no player is thinking about a rule. We want them to play (with a) free mind where you're just free and you play." Chiefs rookie linebacker Breeland Speaks said he didn't take Tom Brady down because he was concerned about a roughing-the-passer penalty in the fourth quarter of Kansas City's 43-40 loss at New England on Sunday night. Brady eluded Speaks and ran 4 yards for a touchdown to give the Patriots the lead. "We watched that video and watched that play and Tom did what we've seen Tom do a thousand times," Vincent said. "He stepped up in the pocket and the defender didn't make a play or didn't create a sack, but you don't want any player thinking about a penalty or being fined but you hope that he would make that adjustment on some of the things we've put in place and that's not just for his opponent's protection but for his as well." Overall, roughing-the-passer calls are down since the competition committee clarified to game officials the techniques used in such hits during a conference call last month. There were 34 roughing calls through the first three weeks and 19 in the three weeks since the call. Vincent said the league didn't advise officials to cut down on the calls, but emphasized to them making sure they see it clearly. "If you don't see the complete play, don't call it," Vincent said. "That was a directive from the competition committee. That was always the point of emphasis but after the (conference) call and after watching the video, the committee and our coaches (said): 'If you don't see the complete play, we ask that you leave the penalty in your pocket.'" Packers linebacker Clay Matthews was penalized three times in the first three weeks for roughing the passer, including two of which that appeared to be normal tackles. Matthews suggested the league has gone soft and argued that defensive players no longer know what constitutes a legal hit. Dolphins defensive end William Hayes tore his right ACL trying to avoid landing on Raiders quarterback Derek Carr. "Every time we emphasized a call, you see more calls in the preseason and first (few) weeks and then you see an adjustment, and a leveling out of calls," said Atlanta Falcons CEO Rich McKay, the head of the league's competition committee. "We're not going to apologize for trying to protect players we think are in a vulnerable state." Some other things we learned on the first day of the NFL's fall meetings: MORE FINES THAN FLAGS: There have been only six penalties for illegal use of the helmet, but Vincent said between 10-12 players have been fined for such hits and almost 70 warning letters have been issued to players about using the crown of their helmet to initiate a hit. "We told officials if they don't see all three elements of it, we can fine it on Monday and we'll get the conducted corrected," McKay said. "I think the players have adjusted, the officials have adjusted and I know the coaches have adjusted." CONCUSSIONS DOWN: Concussions in preseason were down from 91 to 79, a 13 percent decline. Concussions on kickoffs were zero in the preseason, down from three. Concussions in practices were down from 23 to 9. Jeff Miller, the league's executive vice president of health and safety initiatives, credits a reduction plan the NFL put into place last year, improvements in helmets in part spurred by the league ratings of helmets and banning of some, rules changes such as the "helmet rule" and the kickoff rules, and the education of players. "We're certainly optimistic about the results," said Dr. Allen Sills, the NFL's medical director. "We'll continue with more in-depth analyses of concussions." HELMET BAN: Miller said there were some 230 helmets players used in 2017 that ranked in the red area, meaning they were banned for new league players in 2018 and will be banned for every player next season. Through Week 3 of this season, about 40 were still in use that were grandfathered in. He noted "it's sometimes hard to make a change," but added that players won't have a choice after this season regarding those helmets. ADVANTAGE, OFFENSE: Teams are scoring more than ever. The number of points (4,489), touchdowns (504) and touchdown passes (328) are the most in league history through six weeks. McKay credited the performance of young quarterbacks and the emphasis on calling illegal contact and defensive holding penalties. Illegal contact penalties are up from 11 to 36. After six weeks in 2016, there were 30 such calls. "We didn't like the way it was going last year and it led to passing yardage going down," McKay said. "As defenses get more aggressive and grab more, yards go down." Vincent said he expects scoring to "normalize" as teams see more film on the young quarterbacks and he noted weather conditions later in the season could make an impact. "I believe some of the defenses and coordinators will adjust," Vincent said. "Players are adjusting all the time and you just need game footage to see what people can and can't do." PARITY IS GOOD: Games have been closer through the first six weeks. So far, 54 games have been decided by one score, tied for the most in league history at this point. There have been 28 games decided by three points or fewer, second-most at this point. "Those are good stats for us because fans want to watch and attend close games," McKay said. ___ AP Pro Football Writer Barry Wilner contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2018

WATCH: Smashing Pumpkins Halloween-themed video for new song Silvery Sometimes

Frontman Billy Corgan directs the clip, in which Mark McGrath of Sugar Ray plays a host who dares the band to spend a night in a haunted house for charity. The band members find themselves in a num.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsOct 16th, 2018

WATCH: Ariana Grande’s pet pig is the star of ‘Breathin’ video

Ariana Grande has released the latest visual for her album "Sweetener," this time setting the track "Breathin" to a three-minute video featuring her pet pig, Piggie Smalls. Compared to the highly produced and stylized videos for "No Tears Left to Cry" and "God is a Woman," this one is a low-tech ode to her tiny pig, who simply (and adorably) walks around on a bed for the full three-minute clip. Grande's fianc, Pete Davidson, previously talked about the couple's newly adopted pig in aninterviewwith Seth Meyers. Grande, he explained, "was like 'I want a pig' and then an hour later it was just there," later calling Piggy Smalls "a bougie pig." "I want it to get bi...Keep on reading: WATCH: Ariana Grande’s pet pig is the star of ‘Breathin’ video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 11th, 2018

James captivates crowd in his Los Angeles Lakers debut

By Bernie Wilson, Associated Press SAN DIEGO (AP) — LeBron James rubbed his hands in chalk powder at the scorer’s table, yelled “Yes!” to ecstatic fans in the first few rows and the Los Angeles Lakers’ new era was underway. Playing in the same arena where Magic Johnson made his regular-season debut for Los Angeles 39 years ago, James captivated the crowd from the start of the Lakers’ exhibition opener Sunday night (Monday, PHL time), a 124-107 loss to the Denver Nuggets. The opening tip came James’ way and he tapped it to fellow newcomer Rajon Rondo, who threw an alley-oop pass to JaVale McGee for the game’s first score. James missed his first shot, a turnaround fadeaway, but then made a no-look bounce pass from about 27 feet out to Brandon Ingram for a dunk. A minute later, James hit a long three-pointer. He finished with nine points, three rebounds and four assists in just more than 15 minutes. Lakers fans hope James’ arrival will turn things around after the worst half-decade in the franchise’s lengthy history. He left the Cleveland Cavaliers for a four-year, $153.3 million free-agent deal with the Lakers. He, Rondo and fellow veterans McGee, Lance Stephenson and Michael Beasley signed to team with the Lakers’ talented young core. James was the focus on and off the court Sunday night (Monday, PHL time). He was cheered from the minute he ran onto the court with his new teammates for warmups. He played the first eight minutes before being subbed out. When he came back in midway through the second quarter, he was greeted by cheers. As he stood near the scorer’s table during a video review, a fan yelled: “LeBron, we love you!” and the superstar responded with a hang-loose sign. Asked before the game what stands out about James, coach Luke Walton said, “His intelligence. He sees everything. He knows even before drills. He knows where he’s going. His work ethic. He’s out there pre-practice with the guys, post-practice with the guys. Taking care of his body in the weight room. “He’s the ultimate professional.” The Lakers’ regular-season opener is Oct. 18 (Oct. 19, PHL time) at Portland. Their home opener is two nights later against Houston. This was another big night for an L.A. basketball team at San Diego’s sports arena. In 1975, John Wooden coached his final game here, leading UCLA to its 10th NCAA title in 12 seasons. In 1979, Johnson made his NBA debut when Los Angeles beat the then-San Diego Clippers in the season opener. After Kareem Abdul-Jabbar made a buzzer-beating sky hook, Johnson hugged the center like they’d just won the championship. Seven months later, they did win the NBA title. Johnson is now the Lakers’ president of basketball operations and James was the prized acquisition of an offseason roster revamp. As a kid, Walton used to watch his father, Bill, play for the Clippers, although the Hall of Famer’s years in his hometown were largely marred by injuries......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 1st, 2018

WATCH: ‘House of Cards’ trailer has Robin Wright at center stage

NEW YORK --- The trailer for the next season of "House of Cards" is missing Kevin Spacey and declares: "The reign of the middle-aged white man is over." The trailer released Thursday depicts Robin Wright's Claire Underwood taking over as president after her husband's death in the Netflix series. Spacey, who played the late President Frank Underwood, was fired from the show after several employees accused him of inappropriate behavior. And actor Anthony Rapp last year accused Spacey of sexual misconduct when he was 14 and Spacey was 26. Spacey tweeted an apology for what he labeled drunken behavior. The sixth and final season of "House of Cards" will be available on the stre...Keep on reading: WATCH: ‘House of Cards’ trailer has Robin Wright at center stage.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 29th, 2018

NBA 2K League holds first expansion draft

NBA 2K League press release SECAUCUS – The NBA 2K League held its first expansion draft today at the NBA office in Secaucus, New Jersey. The league’s four expansion teams, affiliates of the Atlanta Hawks, Brooklyn Nets, Los Angeles Lakers and Minnesota Timberwolves, recently announced their NBA 2K League names as Hawks Talon GC, NetsGC, Lakers Gaming and T-Wolves Gaming, respectively. Each of the four expansion teams selected two players from a pool of 68 players who participated in the inaugural season and were not protected by their original team. All expansion draftees will join their new teams for the 2019 season. The expansion draft was a two-round snake draft, meaning that the second round had the inverse order of the first round.  With the first pick, Hawks Talon GC selected Connor “Dat Boy Shotz” Rodrigues, who spent his first season in Portland with Blazer5 Gaming.  NetsGC selected second, T-Wolves Gaming selected third and Lakers Gaming selected fourth. The complete list of round-by-round selections and team-by-team selections can be found below. The draft order was determined by a draft lottery earlier this month, which was conducted by drawing ping-pong balls in random order from the official ball machine that is used for the NBA Draft Lottery. From Sept. 27 to Oct. 10, all 21 teams will have the opportunity to make trades, and the original 17 teams can retain additional players from their 2018 rosters in exchange for 2019 draft picks. For more information on offseason player protection, additional player retainment, and trade rules, click here. The date of the 2019 NBA 2K League Draft will be announced in the coming months. The 2019 NBA 2K League Draft order is subject to change based on trades and additional player retainment.  For more information about the NBA 2K League, visit NBA2KLeague.com and follow @NBA2KLeague on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2018

Netflix Renews ‘Insatiable’ for Season 2 Debby Ryan Thanks Filipino Fans for Their Support

In a special message for her Filipino fans, Debby Ryan announced that Netflix has renewed the dark comedy Insatiable for a second season. “Hello and my love to the Philippines! You guys have shown such amazing support for Insatiable season 1 and for Patty’s journey, and because of all your interest, now we get to […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Ready to Celebrate? ELITE is Coming to Netflix on October 5

Welcome to the world of ELITE! Coming of age dramas, interrelations, different class struggles, love and a murder to be solved! ELITE launches globally on Netflix October 5, 2018. Watch the ELITE date announcement video HERE. The shows marks the reunion of La Casa de Papel’s (Money Heist) María Pedraza, Miguel Herrán, and Jaime Lorente, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsSep 9th, 2018

Apple to adapt Korean American novel ‘Pachinko’

In the wake of "Crazy Rich Asians", another Asian American novel is to be adapted, this time as a TV series. Apple Video has ordered a first season inspired by the novel "Pachinko" by Korean American Min Jin Lee, published in 2017. The cast for the drama series will largely consist of Asian actors. Apple won't go down without a fight in the streaming platform wars. According to the The Hollywood Reporter, the company has just acquired the rights to the novel "Pachinko", which it plans to transform into a TV series for Apple Video. The Cupertino giant is counting on the project, based on the bestseller by Min Jin Lee, to increase its share of the growing Asian streaming market. ...Keep on reading: Apple to adapt Korean American novel ‘Pachinko’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

PBA: Ginebra now the powerhouse, says San Miguel’s coach Leo

Ginebra put an end to San Miguel’s hopes for a Grand Slam this season. On Wednesday, Gin Kings dethroned the Beermen in six games in the 2018 PBA Commissioner’s Cup. Leo Austria, the head coach of the now-dethroned champions, only had high praises for the new kings of the conference. “We fell short because they played like a well-oiled machine. They kept on running. They kept on passing. They kept on making layups,” he told reporters post-game. The multi-titled mentor then went on to single out Ginebra reinforcement Justin Brownlee who was a thorn on the side of San Miguel all throughout and had 31 points, 19 rebounds, seven assists, four blocks, and two steals in the title-clinching win. “I think the big factor is Brownlee – he can do it all. He can play the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (positions),” he shared. He then continued, “Any team will have a problem matching up with him because if you put bigger guys on him, he will play in the perimeter and if you put smaller guys, he will play in the shaded area.” And so, with the Gin Kings winning the Commissioner’s Cup and all set to defend the title in the upcoming Governor’s Cup, for the first time in a long time, the Beermen are seeing another team ahead of them. So much so that coach Leo said that Ginebra is the powerhouse for the next conference. “They’re the team to watch next conference because the import height limit is only 6-5 and they will have a lot of advantage because they have the size,” he said before mentioning Greg Slaughter, Japeth Aguilar, Joe Devance, and even big guard Scottie Thompson as reasons. He then continued, “I’m thinking that they are really a threat. They are emerging as the powerhouse team.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 8th, 2018

Rodgers gets Packers up to speed in practice vs. new defense

By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — Aaron Rodgers' no-look touchdown pass is still the talk of Green Bay Packers training camp. The defense was called for offsides to give Rodgers a free play during a two-minute drill in practice Thursday. The play was going left. Rodgers was looking left. But he threw the ball to his right. Touchdown, Geronimo Allison. The play looks even better on film to coach Mike McCarthy. "I think you appreciate it more when you watch the video. I know I did, because he spoils you," McCarthy said Friday. "You don't have too many practices around here where he doesn't make that throw where you're just like, 'OK, file that onto the library. That's the way you want to teach it.'" Packers fans who dared to worry about Rodgers' seven interceptions during the first five days of camp can breathe easy. The two-time NFL MVP likes how the offense has worked in the first week. "Well, I'm working on things in training camp. I'm working on throws, whether it's looking or no-looking. Trying different plays that we we're working in," Rodgers said. A 7-9 finish last season ended a streak of eight straight playoff appearances for the Packers. The offense struggled while Rodgers was out with broken collarbone, and the defense had familiar problems against the pass. McCarthy overhauled the coaching staff after the season, which included bringing back Joe Philbin as offensive coordinator. Philbin was the coordinator when the Packers won the Super Bowl in the 2010 season. "We've done a medium overhaul of some offensive concepts, so working on some new stuff and trying to get on the same page with receivers," Rodgers added. An added wrinkle for Rodgers is the new looks in practice from coordinator Mike Pettine's defense. His units have finished in the top 10 in the league when he's been in charge. "Well, they're just so multiple. They have a lot of different pressures and types of pressures," Rodgers said. "They're giving you pressures where they can actually get home. We haven't had that issue in a while, where they scheme pressures to have a free guy on the play." It gives the linemen good practice for the regular season, too, since the NFC North-rival Minnesota Vikings are among teams that run pressures similar to what the Packers' defense is doing now. "So the protection elements for offense are really challenged by his defense, which is great for us," Rodgers said. Getting Bryan Bulaga back will help too. The veteran right tackle was activated off the physically-unable-to-perform list on Friday and returned to practice on a limited basis for the first time since tearing his right ACL in Week 9 last year. "I am very optimistic about Week 1, I really am," Bulaga said. "I still have some work to do to get to it but it's definitely looking better than it did, say, four months ago, even though I thought I'd still get to that point." His return would solidify a right side of the line that will already have a new starter at guard. Bulaga is a steady, reliable presence up front who has played in big spots with Rodgers. "He's a pro's pro. He knows how to play the game," Rodgers said. "Unfortunately, he's sustained a couple of tough injuries. But when he's out there, he's a rock." At its best, a starting five with Bulaga gives Rodgers just enough time to get out of trouble and outside the pocket, where the quarterback might be most dangerous. As he showed with his no-look TD throw to Allison. NOTES: WR Jake Kumerow, an undrafted free agent in his second year out of Division III Wisconsin-Whitewater, continues to impress with his hands and route-running ability. He could be a long shot to make the roster, especially after the Packers drafted three receivers this year. But the 6-foot-4 Kumerow has earned some reps with the first-string offense and caught Rodgers' attention. "So there's going to be some tough decisions when the cutdown happens," Rodgers said. "We drafted three guys, so. If you're playing today, you'd like him on the field.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

Grizzlies unveil new uniforms with FedEx as jersey sponsor

By Clay Bailey, Associated Press MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Simply redesigning uniforms wasn't enough for the Memphis Grizzlies. They seized the opportunity to change so much more. Everything from logos to color schemes to the way their court at FedExForum will have a new look this season, part of the team's most significant reimaging since 2004. All that and the Grizzlies also added FedEx to the jersey as the team's corporate sponsor. The unveiling ceremonies Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) at FedExForum for the media and key fans even included a FedEx courier delivering packages containing the new jerseys. "A month ago, we did this photo shoot (with the new uniforms), and I just loved them," said second-year forward Dillon Brooks, who along with guard Mike Conley, served as models in a video for the new uniforms. "I even tried to put one in my bag and take it home. But obviously, it came out." As for Conley, often on the cutting edge of fashion, also gave the uniforms a nice review: "My professional opinion is I look great," he said drawing laughs from the crowd. The uniforms are primarily darker blue and white, and the Grizzlies kept a baby blue known as Beale Street Blue "statement" uniform in the mix. The team's grizzly bear logo adorns the side of the darker blue uniform shorts. All of the uniforms have a blue collar representative of the team's grit-and-grind characteristics, a mentality the Grizzlies hope to resurrect this season. Among other changes were logo characteristics, including outlining the main grizzly bear head logo in "steel gray" to accentuate the fierceness in the bear's eyes. The team's claw ball emblem was rotated where the three middle claws around the ball now form an M for Memphis. The court now will feature planks going side-to-side rather than the length of the floor. "We're a city that cuts against the grain; we're going to have the only court in the NBA that cuts against the grain," said Jason Wexler, the Grizzlies president of business operations. "Every single court in the NBA runs goal to goal. We're going to run the opposite direction because that's what we do. Anytime we can make Memphis stand out, we make Memphis stand out." Adding a partnership with FedEx, headquartered in Memphis, seemed natural, said David J. Bronczek, president and COO of FedEx Corp. "When you have the FedExForum and you have the Grizzlies, it just makes sense to have FedEx (on the uniform)," Bronczek said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

Nowhere To Go But UP

Akhuetie secures the defensive rebound! In one motion, turns and makes the outlet pass to Juan Gomez De Liaño streaking from the wing… before he even puts the ball on the floor he makes another forward pass to Paras who then takes a power dribble from the 3-point line, takes two steps and then soars for the tomahawk slam… Two possessions later, it’s a ball screen set by Akhuetie for Juan at the left wing. The defender – who fights over the screen – is left behind; as Bright’s man tries to hedge, Akhuetie sucks the help defense in with a strong roll to the hoop. Juan whips a pass to the right corner to an open Ricci Rivero, who shot fakes, gets his man in the air, drives baseline and eludes the last defender with his trademark euro-step to the middle, before kissing the layup softly off the glass… Deep in the fourth period, UP enters the ball into Akhuetie in the post. He backs his man down, and after a couple dribbles, sees the double team from the middle and makes a kickout pass to a wide open Javi GDL at the top of the key. The weakside defender rushes to close out against an open 3, but Javi passes it off to his brother Juan at the wing, who knocks down the booming triple!   These are just some of the plays that UP fans will bask in the glory of come UAAP Season 82, when their highly-touted all-UAAP 5 are finally all eligible to suit up for the Fighting Maroons. Before we get ahead of ourselves however, let’s dial it back and take a look at each of these players at this point of their college careers and what they bring to the Diliman stable. Javi Gomez De Liaño A product of the UPIS system, Javi is the first of the De Liaño brothers to play in the Seniors division after a successful stint in the high school ranks. Although not as highly-touted as his younger sibling, Javi is a stretch 4, standing 6’5” with lots of length and athleticism, and a reliable outside touch. Definitely one of Coach Bo’s blue-collar glue guys, who has stepped up his game (8.3ppg, 5.9rpg, 30% 3P% 21.2mpg in S80) as his minutes have increased. He will play both ends of the floor, can defend an opponent’s best scoring big or forward, and will be Mr. Intangibles on the court. Juan Gomez De Liaño Season 80’s Rookie of the Year, Juan GDL is already one of the UAAP’s most exciting and explosive players to watch. Arguably the most athletic and shifty guard in the league today, he’s a natural born scorer who can finish at the rim but has also shown the ability to run a team and make great decisions. While he needs to raise his 3pt shooting percentage to the high 30’s to be a real threat from the outside, he has that same winner’s mentality as his fellow fighting Maroon, Mr. “Atin to!” Paul Desiderio. Bright Akhuetie The two-time NCAA Mythical Five member and former Perpetual Help double-double machine could easily be the most dominant big man in the UAAP after Ben Mbala. Not only will he bring the much needed inside scoring UP has sorely lacked for the past several years, but he will immediately be a dominant inside presence on both ends of the floor – commanding double and even triple teams on offense, and altering shot after shot as the last line of UP’s defense. After serving a year of residency after transferring from UPHSD, Akhuetie is surely raring to stamp his mark in the UAAP, much like he did in the NCAA during his two seasons with the Altas. Ricci Rivero The biggest surprise and recruiting coup this summer belonged to UP Diliman, if only for the transfer of Ricci Rivero from DLSU. The prized former LSGH swingman was already making waves as the possible next King Archer when his career at Taft was cut short due to out-of-court issues. But on the court, Rivero has dazzled UAAP fans the past two years with a combination of athleticism and finesse not seen in decades. His natural scoring ability (12.9ppg, 35% 3P%, 5.9rpg, 1.6apg in Season 80) and trademark euro-step have left many defenders bewildered, and have unleashed a social media fandom unlike any we’ve seen so far. Kobe Paras As if the UP Community didn’t already have enough to watch out for in season 82, they pulled off another big catch when Kobe Paras, son of former UP legend Benjie Paras, committed to Diliman just early this month. Another LSGH product, Kobe played for the Creighton Bluejays in the US NCAA and has represented the country in multiple FIBA tournaments, including a gold medal finish in the 2017 SEA Games. Another prolific and high-flying scorer, Paras stands 6’6” but plays the wing position; and while he has a respectable outside touch, he is more known for his thunderous finishes, as a 2-time FIBA 3x3 dunk champion. With Paras and Rivero, UP would have the most athletic wing combination the UAAP has seen in years.   BUT, before we get ahead of ourselves, let’s remember that basketball is still won by an entire team, and not just the five on the floor, star-studded as they may be. And more importantly, not only will UP be able to seriously contend for the final four and even a championship in Season 82, they could in fact contend for one as early as this Season 81. Paul Desiderio, their undisputed leader, will be playing out his final year, coinciding with Akhuetie’s first year with the team. Together with the GDL brothers, Jun Manzo, Noah Webb, Gelo Vito, Diego Dario, Jan Jaboneta,  Jerson Prado, Jarrell Lim, and even Will Gozum, among others, UP will have its deepest roster in more than a decade; and will definitely be a favorite to finally barge into the Final Four. Thus, while Season 82 is ripe with championship promise; as early as now, there is nowhere to go but UP for the Fighting Maroons.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 27th, 2018