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NBA rookie sensation Donovan Mitchell to visit Manila

Utah Jazz shooting guard Donovan Mitchell, who is in the running for the NBA 2018 Rookie of The Year, is coming to the Philippines for the first time this June 17.  21-year-old Mitchell— also known by his fans as “Spida”— leads all rookies in scoring per game, with an average of 20.5 points per game. His quick Manila visit will give his Filipino fans a glimpse into his life and how he uses creativity in the challenges he faces as a rookie. “From claiming the 2018 Slam Dunk Champ title to leading in the 2018 NBA Rookie of the Year race, Donovan Mitchell has really inspired our basketball-crazy country and we can’t wait to welcome him to the Philippines,” said Jen Dacasin, Brand Communications and Sports Marketing Manager for adidas Philippines. For the latest news about his visit, follow adidas Philippines on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter......»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnJun 14th, 2018

NBA rookie Donovan Mitchell to visit Manila

Utah Jazz shooting guard Donovan Mitchell, who is in the running for the NBA 2018 Rookie of The Year, is coming to the Philippines for the first time on Sunday.The 21-year-old Mitchell--also known.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJun 15th, 2018

Why top NBA rookie Donovan Mitchell is driving Filipino fans crazy

One of the National Basketball Association’s top rookies from the recently concluded season is coming to Manila and basketball fans are pumped. A look at Utah Jazz rookie sensation Donovan Mitchell’s stunning performance reveals why the basketball-savvy country is giving this newbie the hype that’s usually reserved for superstars. ‘Spida’ in Manila One of the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  interaksyonRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Top NBA rookie Donovan Mitchell to visit Manila

MANILA, Philippines — Utah Jazz shooting guard Donovan Mitchell, one of the top contenders for the NBA 2018 Rookie of The Year award, is coming to the Philippines for the first time this Sunday, June 17.  Nicknamed as “Spida,” the 21-year-old Mitchell leads all rookies in scoring ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Donovan Mitchell a hit in Manila

Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell kicked up a storm during his brief visit to Manila and a highlight was joining the ESPN5 TV panel covering the PBA Commissioner’s Cup “Manila Clasico” game between Barangay Ginebra and Magnolia at the Smart Araneta Coliseum last Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

LOOK: Donovan Mitchell holds mini-clinic, attends PBA’s Manila Clasico

MANILA, Philippines – The Spida is in Manila! Donovan Mitchell, the reigning NBA Slam Dunk Champion and super rookie of the Utah Jazz, visited the Philippines for the first time to promote his shoe brand and have a meet-and-greet with some lucky Pinoy fans last Sunday, June 17. The 21-year old got ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell an athlete since day one

BRIEFLY in town for his “Spida in Manila Tour,” young Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell took time to meet with members of local media where he shared some of his thoughts, including the impressive rookie season he had in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and how growing up in a “sports household” honed the person he has become. The post Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell an athlete since day one appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

Loud Manila Clasico crowd amazes NBA star Mitchell

Donovan Mitchell is as versatile on offense as he can be. Utah's Rookie of the Year frontrunner averaged 20.5 points while shooting at a 43.7 percent clip and 34 percent from deep. Mitchell can fly to the rim with the best of dunkers and he can also shoot like this era's best shooter hitting a total of 187 three-pointers, a rookie record, in the regular season. And Mitchell can practically add "basketball commentator" to his budding resume. Mitchell was part of ESPN 5's broadcast team for the PBA Commissioner's Cup game between Magnolia and Barangay Ginebra Sunday at Smart Araneta Coliseum. "It's just so loud in here," said Mitchell during the broadcast while being rem...Keep on reading: Loud Manila Clasico crowd amazes NBA star Mitchell.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

Donovan Mitchell recruits Paul George, LeBron to Utah Jazz

  MANILA, Philippines – Donovan Mitchell is planning to make the Western Conference even tougher than it already is. The 21-year-old rookie star of the Utah Jazz – who's in Manila for the first time – made his recruitment pitch to incoming free agents LeBron James and Paul George in a ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

Jazz veterans Rubio, Favors questionable for Game 4

NBA.com staff report After suffering a 113-92 blowout loss in Game 3, the Jazz might get the reinforcements they need for a response in Game 4 of the Western Conference semifinals. Ricky Rubio, who suffered a strained hamstring in the final game of Utah's first-round series against Oklahoma City, is questionable for Sunday's (Monday, PHL time) contest against the Rockets. Tomorrow’s @UofUHealth report: Derrick Favors (left ankle sprain) is questionable. Ricky Rubio (left hamstring strain) is questionable. Thabo Sefolosha (right knee surgery) is out. — Utah Jazz (@utahjazz) May 5, 2018 Utah has made do by running more of the offense through rookie sensation Donovan Mitchell and veteran forward Joe Ingles while playing reserves Alec Burks and Dante Exum more minutes. The adjustment was enough to steal Game 2 in Houston before Friday's Game 3 setback. In the first playoff appearance of his seven-year career, Rubio is averaging 14.0 points, 7.3 rebounds and 7.0 assists per contests. The Jazz are hopeful his return will alleviate the defensive attention given to Mitchell, who suffered a 4-for-16 shooting night en route to scoring just 10 points in Game 3. Derrick Favors is also questionable after suffering a sprained ankle in Game 3. The veteran big man has an enjoyed a resurgent season starting alongside All-Defensive center Rudy Gobert. Favors is averaging 10.1 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.2 blocks per contest while shooting 58.7 percent from the field during Utah's playoff run......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 6th, 2018

McCollum scores 26, Blazers end Utah’s 11-game win streak

By Matthew Coles, Associated Press SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — CJ McCollum scored 26 points, Damian Lillard added 24 and the Portland Trail Blazers snapped the Utah Jazz’s 11-game winning streak with a 100-81 victory on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). McCollum and Lillard drove through and around the Jazz defense, which was ranked at the top of the league during their streak. The Jazz finally got within single digits at 90-81 but McCollum scored on three consecutive isolation plays, all contested jumpers. Lillard cooled off from his previous three games, when he shot 42 for 76 and scored more than 44 points a game. But he worked numerous screens and had his Jazz defenders chasing the ball and opening opportunities for the other Blazers. Jusuf Nurkic scored 15 points and Al-Farouq Aminu had 12 for the Blazers. Donovan Mitchell had 21 points for Utah. Rudy Gobert scored 15 and Joe Ingles contributed 12 but the Jazz were sloppy with ball. During their long winning streak, the Jazz consistently came up with loose balls in key scramble situations. Against Portland, the Jazz couldn’t seem to hold on to the basketball, committing 20 turnovers and having numerous rebounds and passes squirt right through their hands. The Blazers have won 4-of-5, with the only loss a blowout to the Jazz on Feb. 11 (Feb. 12, PHL time). After Mitchell trimmed the Portland lead to 53-49, McCollum hit two three-pointers and a runner to spark a 13-2 run. After the Jazz trimmed it back to 11, Lillard’s crossover stepback jumper gave the Blazers an 80-64 lead entering the final period. The Blazers are looking to follow a pattern of strong finishes as they reached the playoffs with 17-11 closing record in 2016 and an 18-8 post-All-Star Game mark in 2017. TIP-INS Blazers: Portland scored 22 points off Utah’s 20 turnovers. ... The Blazers never trailed. ... Portland only allowed six second-chance points and had 14 on their end. Jazz: Ricky Rubio returned after missing three games before the All-Star break with a sore left hip. Conversely, reserve point guard Raul Neto sprained his ankle in shootaround Friday (Saturday, PHL time). ... Gobert got a technical foul in the third quarter after arguing a no-call. RETURN TO PRESENT Darrell Griffith, who has been a mentor to Mitchell and the last Utah player to win the Rookie of the Year award, presented the Slam Dank champion trophy before the game. Both guards played collegiately at Louisville. Griffith played for the Jazz from 1980-91 and is a favorite of more than one member of the Utah organization. “I had a Dr. Dunkenstein Nike poster,” coach Quin Snyder said. “I know him. I know him well.” UP NEXT Blazers: Visit the Phoenix Suns on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time). Jazz: Host the Dallas Mavericks on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2018

When NBA returns, will Warriors’ dominance come back, too?

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press The Golden State Warriors have never lost more than 15 games in a season under Steve Kerr. They could reach that total in the first night after the All-Star break. The Warriors who return Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) aren’t the same ones who dominated the NBA for the last three seasons. The defending champions sputtered into their week off with four losses in their final eight games, falling into second place in the Western Conference behind Houston — ending a three-year run of taking the league’s best record into the break. At 44-14 and loaded with four All-Stars, the Warriors are still very good, but not as good they’ve been. “This year we’ve had a pretty solid season, but feel that we can play a lot better,” Stephen Curry said. “So that’s what we’re trying to do this next 20 games before another championship run.” Their performances against their first two opponents out of the break show how different things have been for these Warriors. The Los Angeles Clippers, who visit Golden State on Thursday (Friday, PHL time), won in Oakland last month after losing the previous 12 meetings in the series. And the Oklahoma City Thunder, Golden State’s opponent Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) in a nationally televised game, have defeated the Warriors by 17 and 20 points already this season. They can become the first team to beat Golden State three times in a season since San Antonio went 4-0 against the Warriors in 2013-14 — the season before Kerr’s arrival. Their spotty play thus far makes Curry appreciate their time at the top even more. “We’ve kind of set a standard of excellence in the league,” he said. “That’s pretty cool to think about sustaining that high level of play for so long.” ___ Some other things to watch when play resumes Thursday with six games: RACE TO THE BOTTOM: While the NBA fined Dallas owner Mark Cuban $600,000 on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) for his public comments about tanking, the Mavericks have plenty of company near the bottom of the standings. Phoenix has lost seven straight to share the worst record in the league with Atlanta at 18-41, and six other teams, including the Mavs, have 20 or fewer victories. The team who finishes last has the best chance to win the draft lottery, though if it’s Brooklyn (19-40), that makes a winner out of Cleveland, which has the Nets’ pick that belonged to Boston after acquiring it in the Kyrie Irving trade. DOMINANT DAVIS: Anthony Davis scored 44, 38 and 42 points in his last three games before the All-Star break, leading New Orleans to victories in all of them. He leads the league with 22 games of 30 points or more and the Pelicans might need him to keep it up, as they are just a half-game ahead of the Clippers for the final playoff spot in the Western Conference. MEN OF MYSTERY: Two of the NBA’s strange absences could be cleared up after the break — or could last through the rest of the season. Spurs star Kawhi Leonard continues to rehabilitate a right thigh injury — the team lists his reason for not playing as “return from injury management” — after he was shut down after appearing in just nine games. Philadelphia guard Markelle Fultz, the No. 1 draft pick, remains sidelined with a right shoulder injury after playing in just four games. Neither player has been ruled out for the season, though there’s not much time left if they’re going to come back. RISING ROOKIES: Utah’s Donovan Mitchell, who won the Slam Dunk contest at the All-Star Game, and Ben Simmons of Philadelphia could be locked in tight race for Rookie of the Year. Both have their teams on the rise, as the Jazz have won 11 straight games to pull within 1 ½ games of eighth place in the West, while the 76ers have won five in a row and are seventh in the East. LONZO AND THE LAKERS: Lonzo Ball is set to return to the Lakers after missing the last 15 games with a sore left knee. While the No. 2 pick was out, the Lakers have used Brandon Ingram in the point guard role and also acquired Isaiah Thomas from Cleveland, so coach Luke Walton will have to figure out how to fit in his prized rookie......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2018

Jazz rookie Mitchell honors Carter, wins slam dunk contest

Rookie Donovan Mitchell of the Utah Jazz put on a show in the slam dunk contest to cap off NBA All-Star Saturday (Sunday in Manila)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2018

Hood scores 29 points as Jazz beat Spurs

SALT LAKE CITY --- Missing their leading scorer for the second consecutive game, the Utah Jazz needed Rodney Hood to score in bunches. He did exactly that, including 11 fourth-quarter points to help Utah end a three-game losing streak. Hood had 29 points and the Jazz fended off multiple comeback attempts by San Antonio to beat the Spurs 100-89 on Thursday (Friday Manila time). Utah played without rookie guard and top scorer Donovan Mitchell, who missed his second consecutive game with a bruised right big toe. "When Donovan is out, I have to be a lot more aggressive," Hood said. The Jazz led most of the way, but the Spurs fought back each time it appeared Utah was ready...Keep on reading: Hood scores 29 points as Jazz beat Spurs.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2017

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2018

Mitchell picks Paul George over LeBron James

Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.net National Basketball Association Rookie of the Year contender Donovan Mitchell of the Utah Jazz has nothing against the formation of so-called super teams in the.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

Mitchell wants to play with LeBron but ‘I’d rather play against him’

Anything can happen during a LeBron James free agency frenzy. In 2010, James took his talents to South Beach and joined forces with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in Miami. Four years later, he returned home to Cleveland to settle an unfinished business. Fast forward to 2018, there have been reports of numerous landing spots for James that almost every NBA city could end up being the King's next home. James' possible destination has been a hot topic not only for the media and fans but also the players themselves that even Donovan Mitchell, the Utah Jazz star rookie, was asked if he would want to play with the three-time NBA champion. "Would I want to play with him? Who wouldn't?" Mitch...Keep on reading: Mitchell wants to play with LeBron but ‘I’d rather play against him’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 17th, 2018

Jazz top rookie Mitchell due

Reigning NBA slamdunk champion and Rookie of the Year leader Donovan Mitchell of the Utah Jazz will arrive on Sunday to grace an event of Adidas, a brand he currently endorses......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Future is now: Tatum, Celtics push Cavaliers to the brink

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com BOSTON - Someone might want to change their All-Rookie team ballot after this one. Jayson Tatum, so young that he actually drinks the Gatorade that’s on the table when he has a podium game rather than leaving it there for cameras and branding, got 99 out of a 100 possible first-place votes from media folks for the newbie honors announced Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). That left him a vote shy of both Philadelphia’s Ben Simmons and Utah’s Donovan Mitchell, the dueling favorites for the NBA’s Rookie of the Year Award when it’s announced next month. If Tatum merely is the Boston Celtics’ favorite rookie, though, that’s plenty. And wherever Simmons and Mitchell are at the moment, their seasons and postseasons are over. The Boston kid still is playing. Tatum scored 24 points, grabbed seven rebounds, dished four assists, pilfered four steals and blocked two shots to led the Celtics to their 96-83 Game 5 victory over the Cleveland Cavaliers Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) at TD Garden. His plus/minus rating of plus-19 was second only to veteran Al Horford’s (plus-22) and in a pivotal game in which his teammates shot a combined 34 percent, Tatum -- who turned 20 on March 3 -- hit three of his seven three-pointers, all but one of his eight free throws and seven of his 15 field-goal attempts overall. “I think his composure [is impressive], he plays above his age,” LeBron James said earlier in the day. “I think the unfortunate events of the injuries that they’ve had have allowed him to, I believe, get better faster than I believe they expected here. It’s given him an opportunity to make ... make mistakes and learn from them and still be on the floor.” Losing Gordon Hayward to a gruesome leg injury in the season’s opening game and having Kyrie Irving limp into knee surgery and the sunset of this season in March did bump most of Boston’s players, the rookie included, up a couple spots in coach Brad Stevens’ pecking order. The No. 3 pick in last June’s Draft, Tatum was going to get his share of playing time. But he wound up becoming the fifth rookie in NBA history, and the first since Stephen Curry in 2009-10, to score at least 1,000 points and hit at least 40 percent of his three-pointers. Only eight previous rookies in Boston’s storied franchise history totaled 1,000 or more points. Jaylen Brown, Boston’s second-year wing, developed in tandem with Tatum. The pair of lithe, skilled players dripping with potential has most of the league’s personnel execs and coaches drooling. Except, with Game 6 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) in Cleveland for the first of two shots at eliminating the Cavaliers, the Celtics are playing as if their future is now. A truism in the NBA is that, by the end of a rookie’s first arduous season, he’s not a rookie anymore. Mix in some force-feeding due to Boston’s two injured stars and now three playoff rounds, and Tatum is racing to the right on his learning curve. “I think that we misuse the word ‘development’ sometimes,” Stevens said. “I think we're in the business of ‘enhancement.’ I think Jayson was ready to deal with everything that comes with this because of who he is and his family and all his coaches before, because he's a very emotionally steady, smart player that was going to perform at a high level above his age. “I don't know that anybody could guess this as a rookie, but you knew he was going to be really good.” Tatum sorta had to be in Game 5. Brown got matched up in a lot of Boston’s defensive coverage of James and picked up his second and third personal fouls in the second quarter. Point guard Terry Rozier looked like his road alter ego, missing 6-of-7 shots in the game’s first 24 minutes. But Tatum -- who averaged 12.7 points against Cleveland in three regular-season meetings but is at 17.2 so far in the East finals -- had 12 points by halftime, helping the Celtics to their 53-42 lead. “I just enjoy playing in the big moments, in the big games,” Tatum said. “I think that’s when I have the most fun, when things are on the line.” It was Tatum racing downcourt to chase down Kevin Love’s errant pass into the backcourt and finish with a layup that had Boston up 74-58. And it was Tatum who drew a foul on Kyle Korver with 3:11 left, prompting Cavs coach Tyronn Lue to pull a weary James. “I thought he was aggressive. I thought he was poised,” Lue said of Tatum. “Even though he was scoring the basketball, he didn’t try to rush or he didn’t press. ... He played like a veteran.” Tatum put in his work defensively Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), but also got as good as he gave. It’s become a familiar tactic for defenders to get physically aggressive with him, trying to exploit what at this stage still is limited strength by NBA standards. His father Justin, a basketball coach in St. Louis, has said he plays tall and hasn’t yet learned to utilize his base. “JR [Smith], Jeff Green, they're playing really hard on Tatum and making it very tough,” Stevens said. “He's had a lot of experiences over the last couple weeks dealing with playoff defense. I thought Milwaukee guarded him exceptionally hard and were really committed when he drove to the rim to having multiple bodies there. I thought that Philly obviously guarded him very hard. It's hard to make plays at this level in these games, and he's done that pretty consistently.” The numbers back that up. Tatum by halftime had become only the sixth rookie in league history to reach 300 points in the postseason, the first since Jack Sikma in 1978. It was his ninth playoff game of 20 points or more, tying him with Mitchell this season and David Robinson in 1990 for second most by a rookie since 1964; Kareem Abdul-Jabbar had 10 in 1970. Tatum, Brown and a few other young Celtics have given credit for the team’s unexpected success -- considering the injuries, anyway -- to Al Horford, the most obvious grown-up in Boston’s locker room. When Horford was asked late Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) what it’s like for him being around “these kids,” he sounded a little like James three years ago. That’s when Irving was hobbling, eventually blowing out a knee that spring, and Kevin Love was done for the playoffs due to a shoulder injury suffered in the first round. That’s also when James looked at the raw help he had from guys such as Tristan Thompson and Matthew Dellavedova, and locked in on the possibility of reaching the Finals. “It's a lot of fun, just because these guys, they want to play the right way,” Horford said. “They play hard. I feel like we hold each other accountable out there. I think that's a big thing.  And when those things happen, it becomes fun. It's fun to me. And there's no coincidence why we're in this position right now.” Youth is being served, at least on the Celtics’ floor. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 24th, 2018

Harden, James, Davis finalists for NBA MVP award

NEW YORK --- Houston's James Harden, Cleveland's LeBron James and Anthony Davis of New Orleans are the finalists for the NBA's MVP award. Harden, who led the league in scoring, has twice been a runner-up for the award, including last year when Russell Westbrook won. James has won the MVP award four times. The three finalists for the individual awards were announced Wednesday. The winners will be announced on June 25 in Santa Monica, California during the NBA Awards show. Davis was also a finalist for Defensive Player of the Year, along with Utah's Rudy Gobert and Philadelphia center Joel Embiid. The other finalists: ROOKIE OF THE YEAR Donovan Mitchell, Utah Ben S...Keep on reading: Harden, James, Davis finalists for NBA MVP award.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 17th, 2018

The five Super Moms behind your favorite athletes

The saying goes “For every great man, there is a great woman.” This holds true in the world of sports, where athletes lean on their moms during their development, through their success, and beyond. Remember when NBA superstar Kevin Durant of the Golden State Warriors received the MVP award for the 2013-2014 season? He offered his award to his mom for her dedication in bringing him up the right way. In the Philippines, our local athletes also cherish their mom as much as they cherish their wins and accolades. Let’s take a look at five super moms who have been caught by S+A’s cameras supporting their children game in and game out.   1.) Mozzy Ravena   But the plan is to show you that i understand. You are appreciated. . . . . . . Happy mother’s day @ravenamozzy ! A post shared by Kiefer Ravena (@kieferravena15) on May 12, 2018 at 4:39pm PDT Mozzy Ravena is always there for her kids. Mozzy Ravena is probably the most prominent sporting mom S+A has caught. Not only is she a former star for the UST Golden Tigresses, she is also the mom of the Ravena siblings who have made a mark in their respective UAAP sports. Kiefer, Thirdy, and Dani Ravena surely have one heck of a super mom that never tire from cheering them on and lecturing them about what it takes to be an ultimate athlete. When Ateneo plays, everyone is sure that Tita Mozzy will be there for her kids.   2.) Lydia De Vega-Mercado Former Filipina super sprinter and national track team mainstay Lydia De Vega-Mercado made sure to support daughter Stephanie's volleyball dream. The former national sprinter, who was considered the fastest woman in Asia during her heydays in the ‘80s, is also the mother of former star DLSU Lady Spiker and current Petro Gazz Angel Stephanie Mercado. While her daughter did not follow in her footsteps and pursued volleyball instead of athletics, it did not stop her from showing up in her Paneng’s games and celebrated her championships as if she just won in a World Championship for the 100m dash.   3.) Susan Teng     Congrats @jeronalvinteng for winning your second championship and being the finals mvp! Great way to end your college career! 👍 A post shared by jeric teng (@tengjeric) on Dec 7, 2016 at 4:21am PST Susan Teng is all out when it comes to supporting her sons during their collegiate careers, never mind that they went to different schools.  When it comes to former UAAP stars and brothers, Jeron and Jeric Teng, their father Alvin is mentioned more being a former professional basketball player. However, as much as the Teng brothers credit their dad for their love and development in the sport, they also heap as much love to their mother Susan, who has been with them every step of the way, starting to when they were still small basketeers.   4.) Pablita Valdez Pablita Valdez made a big decision in letting her precious Alyssa travel to Manila and embark on a journey towards volleyball stardom. Before her daughter even became a national sensation, Pablita, who was a teacher in Batangas, believed that Alyssa was in store for great things when she started playing volleyball. It is that belief that made her decide to bring the younger Valdez to Manila where she can hone her talent and play in tougher situations and competition. That decision has paid off in spades as the volleyball phenom was born and her star’s ascent was meteoric. Every step of the way, Mama Pablita was there for her and we couldn’t thank her enough for giving us an excellent and much-loved star.   5.) Marilyn Mollena It took them 13 years to be together, but for every spike and score, Marilyn Mollena was on the mind of the Lady Beast, Grethcel Soltones.  Mommy Marilyn was the reason why Grethcel Soltones became the “Lady Beast.” Young Grethcel decided to play volleyball during her formative years as she searched for her mom. She thought that it was the easiest avenue to meet her mother after 13 years if she played and got broadcast on TV. She soon got her wish for on her last year with the San Sebastian Lady Stags when Marilyn surprised the Lady Beast during the individual awarding ceremonies and the whole nation even got to witness the touching reunion on TV.    Catch more super moms and also super dads on ABS-CBN S+A as it continues to champion Filipino athletes and sports development through the coverage of sports events and the airing of inspiring features on teams and athletes. For more information and stories, visit ABS-CBN’s sports hub sports.abs-cbn.com and follow us on Facebook and Twitter......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 13th, 2018