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Nationals hard pressed to win vs Qataris

Weather permitting, Team Philippines seeks to keep solo third place in Group F when it plays Qatar Monday in its fourth “home” game in the FIBA World Cup qualifiers at the Smart Araneta Coliseum......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarSep 14th, 2018

Tale of the Tape: How will the Philippines fare against Qatar?

Here we go. The Philippine national men's basketball team will be fighting for their lives so to speak as they take on Qatar in the final window of the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers.   Team Pilipinas needs two wins in the final window to maximize their chances of qualifying to the World Cup, and the dangerous Qataris are the first hurdles our boys have to overcome.   Let's see how our boys measure up on paper.   Frontline: Advantage Philippines   Without Andray Blatche in the previous window, the size and versatility of our frontline was somewhat depleted. Don't get me wrong -- Christian Standhardinger was a beast against Iran, but we missed Dray's playmaking, outside shooting, and rim protection, especially in the shocker of a loss to Kazakhstan.    With the former NBA big man back in the fold alongside 5-time PBA MVP June Mar Fajardo, the Philippines will parade one of the most fearsome frontlines in all of Asia. Add to that seasoned veteran Japeth Aguilar, the sweet-shooting Troy Rosario, and rising star Poy Erram, and, well, head coach Yeng Guiao has the pick of the litter when it comes to the most talented big men in the country.     On the other end, Qatar will likely try to counter with the tandem of Mo Mohammedand Nasser Al-Rayes, who scored a combined 43 points against us in the fourth window. Qatar also has stretch 4 Yehia Abdelhaleem and banger Bosnian-born Emir Mujkic backstopping their primary frontcourt players. Collectively, they aren't as talented as our bigs, but their size can give us fits. It won't be a cakewalk, but the Filipinos should have the edge.     Wings: Advantage Philippines   Qatar has some pretty dangerous perimeter players like Khalid Suliman Abdi and Hassan Mohamed, but even they will find it tough to contend against our very own Gabe Norwood, Marcio Lassiter, Scottie Thompson, and UAAP Finals MVP Thirdy Ravena. Yes, Qatar's wingmen are bigger and have collectively more experience, but our wings have more talent and athleticism.    It'll be an interesting matchup, sure, and if we're talking about sheer firepower, perhaps we can give it to Qatar, but in terms of overall production and versatility, our boys should have the edge.    Thirdy could actually be the x-factor here, since he's a relative unknown to the Qataris. If he can provide a lot of energy and hustle while disrupting Qatar's flow at the perimeter, he would have already done his part.     Backcourt: Advantage Philippines   The Qataris would have already had their hands full with Jayson Castro alone, but when you add Mark Barroca and Paul Lee to the mix, man, it makes for a truly explosive backcourt for Team Pilipinas. Castro's experience and leadership will be critical in this match, but so too will be Lee's shooting and Barroca's all-around brilliance on both ends of the floor.    Qatar is expected to feature Momar Gueye, Moustafa A A Fouda, and perhaps Faris Avdic in this game, and they will all be hard-pressed to matchup well against our backcourt. Still, what Qatar's backcourt may lack in sheer talent, they more than make up for in size, physicality, and youth.    As long as Castro, Lee, and Barroca play true to form, though, they shouldn't have much trouble against the Qatari guards.     Overall, the Philippines will be huge favorites in this matchup, and couple that with how the fans at the Al Gharafa Sports Hall will likely be overwhelmingly pro-Filipino, then, well, it's as if we're actually playing at home. We should expect nothing less than a convincing win over the Gulf champions......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News10 hr. 43 min. ago

Philippines hard-pressed to win vs Qataris

Weather permitting, Team Philippines seeks to keep solo third place in Group F when it plays Qatar Monday in its fourth “home” game in the FIBA World Cup qualifiers at the Smart Araneta Coliseum......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

24 NBA questions before 17-18 tips off

By David Aldridge, TNT analyst The season starts on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time). You’ve been waiting patiently all summer with your questions. Fire away.     1. So … what’s the point of playing this season? The Golden State Warriors are still the prohibitive favorites to repeat this season, next season and into the foreseeable future. But it was good to see a good chunk of the Western Conference -- the Houston Rockets, Oklahoma City Thunder and Denver Nuggets, to name three teams -- not fold before the first card is dealt. That fact alone is incredibly important. The Warriors are still the best team in the West, without question. But if teams don’t even try to get better, or spend money to compete, the whole rationale for playing fades away. The Thunder could have rode Russell Westbrook alone to another first-round playoff loss, watched him walk out the door in free agency next summer and thrown up its hands, plead ‘woe is us and all small-market teams,’ and enjoyed a luxury tax-free life for the next few years. The Rockets could have just kept selling tickets to fans to watch James Harden and his pals shoot 50 threes a game for the next two or three years. It’s an appealing brand of basketball. Denver could have just kept building through the Draft, climbing a few more wins here or there for a while, and snuck into the eighth seed, choosing to be comfortable rather than bold. But they didn’t. They’ve called and raised. In all likelihood, it won’t be enough to beat Golden State. But those teams can sleep well at night. They’re not cheating their players, or fans. 2. So, is OKC now a legit threat to the Warriors? The short answer: no. But it’s closer. Carmelo Anthony will be as good a third option as anyone in the league has, though; he will eat regularly on the weak side as defenses scramble to handle Westbrook-Paul George pick and rolls; a quick seal and ‘Melo will be off to the races. If coach Billy Donovan goes small ball with Patrick Patterson at the five, there will be many nights when OKC drops a 130 spot. Yes, the Thunder’s defense is going to be an issue; while Enes Kanter was a sieve off the bench, he was coming off the bench, playing behind Steven Adams. Anthony will be starting and playing big minutes, many at the four. But it won’t matter most nights when the Thunder is up 20 to start the fourth quarter, after 36 minutes of Westbrook sorties, George 3-pointers and transition dunks, and Carmelo post-ups and spot-ups (he shot 44.8 percent last season on catch and shoot shots. Among forwards who played 30 or more minutes last season, per NBA.com/Stats, only Kevin Durant, Otto Porter and Kawhi Leonard shot better). The Thunder can guard you with George, Andre Roberson and Adams and they can outscore you with Westbrook and George and ‘Melo. They have a solid bench (Patterson, Ray Felton, Jerami Grant, Alex Abrines) and Westbrook won’t be physically spent by the end of the 2018 playoffs. Wait; what am I saying? Of course he’ll be spent. But he’ll also be playing way deeper into May. 3. Did not getting Anthony hurt Houston or nah? The Rockets -- okay, Chris Paul -- wanted this done bad. It won’t hurt Houston in the regular season, when Paul and James Harden will dominate. And while Harden didn’t like Kevin McHale’s critique of his leadership, Mac was spot on. That doesn’t make “The Beard” a bad guy or teammate -- people gravitate to their comfortable roles in life, and CP3 is a natural-born leader. Harden will, one thinks, be more comfortable with slightly less light on him. They’ll do fine playing together and off one another. But the shadow of the Rockets’ implosion from deep -- 29 of 88 on three-pointers the last two games against the Spurs in their Western Conference semifinals series -- still hangs over them. Ryan Anderson was negated in the postseason. There’s a reason CP3 pushed for ‘Melo so hard. The Rockets will need unexpected consistent offense from a P.J. Tucker or Luc Mbah a Moute in May if they have any hopes of playing in June. 4. Can we just start the Cleveland-Boston East finals now? Maybe Toronto, with C.J. Miles shooting 40 percent on 3-pointers to complement Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, will break up what seems inevitable. Maybe Washington, with its super-solid starting five intact, now has the mental toughness to bust past the second round, where it’s been beached three of the last four postseasons. But it doesn’t feel like that. Boston, ultimately, should be a lot better this season than last. It will take a while for coach Brad Stevens to figure out the rotation and whether Jaylen Brown can really stick at the two, but ultimately, the Celtics have two dynamic playmakers/scorers in Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward, and with Al Horford providing the glue at both ends, they’re going to be a load by the end of the season. And while Cleveland will have to wait a while for Isaiah Thomas, the Cavs have more than enough firepower until Thomas can make his debut. Whatever Dwyane Wade has left will be accentuated playing with James, and Kevin Love (holy moly, is he underrated) will feast drawing slower, bigger centers out to him on the perimeter. J.R. Smith doesn’t like losing his starting job to Wade, and he should be ticked. But he nonetheless will help Cleveland’s bench, which will be incredibly difficult in its own right with Tristan Thompson and Kyle Korver complementing Smith. And that’s before Thomas returns, which will put Derrick Rose on that second unit. There won’t be any rest for defenses who’ll then have to contend with a rested James, et al, coming back. It says here that not only will the Cavs not miss Irving offensively, they could be even more diverse and difficult to guard this season. Not to mention that James is supremely motivated to make an eighth straight Finals. 5. Could Curry break his record of 402 3-pointers in a season? At first glance, with Durant and Klay and Draymond (and, now, Nick Young) all needing to get fed as well, it would seem impossible for Curry to best the mark he set two years ago, on the 73-9 regular season team. But consider: coach Steve Kerr thinks a new guy always blossoms in his second year with the Warriors, which means Durant should be even more lethal offensively this year, as the Warriors’ offense reaches an even higher level of efficiency. And the way they move the ball, it’s not a stretch to think that with defenses tripping over themselves to get to Durant, Curry could get into one of those ridiculous grooves that could leave him within striking distance of 402 by the end of the season. 6. Could the last one in the Eastern Conference turn out the lights? The New York Knicks were hardly a power in the East before trading Anthony, but his departure creates one more team that will struggle to win 35 games this season. With the paucity of talent there should be at least four 50-win teams in the East -- Cleveland, Boston, Toronto and Washington -- with the Milwaukee Bucks knocking on the door. 7. Who’s going to regret their offseason? The Bucks were fine off the court -- their new arena is already more than halfway constructed and looks like it’s going to be a gem -- although the surrounding mall that is supposed to be part of the complex is not going up as quickly. But the Bucks didn’t address their bigs-heavy roster and move some of the surplus -- how can coach Jason Kidd keep all of Greg Monroe, Jabari Parker and John Henson happy with Thon Maker scarfing up more and more frontcourt minutes? -- for the shooting Milwaukee still needs. The East is so open, and Milwaukee is so close to breaking through into elite status with Giannis Antetokounmpo an elite performer. 8. Rudy Gay -- sneaky good pickup? Gay says he’s cool starting or coming off the bench for the Spurs, but he’d best as San Antonio’s sixth man, at least to start things. Bringing Pau Gasol off the bench didn’t work so well, so if he’s starting at center, coach Gregg Popovich can’t go small ball with “Cousin” LaMarcus Aldridge at the five and Gay at the four alongside Kawhi Leonard. (Current state of Spurs fans’ cuticles here and here as they consider a season with an extended Klaw absence if this quad injury doesn’t improve soon.) The Spurs could have some serious firepower in reserve if Gay and Patty Mills come off the bench, but Mills or Dejounte Murray will likely have to start at the point until Tony Parker comes back. 9. Speaking of Popovich … Should he and Steve Kerr and Stan Van Gundy stick to sports? No. 10. Who’s gonna be Kia Rookie of the Year? I say Markelle Fultz. What, you thought I was gonna pick against a DeMatha Catholic man? (Actual unretouched photo of me as a sophomore at the most successful high school in the history of the United States may or may not be here). Playing off of Joel Embiid, J.J. Redick, Robert Covington … it’s hard to see Fultz not looking really good when he should have all kinds of room to operate. Lonzo Ball will put up bigger numbers, and Tatum will be on a better team. But Boston was good last year, and Jayson Tatum will likely not play as much as the others. The Sixers are poised for a big jump up in the standings, and that’s always a narrative that voters like and get behind -- which is what will hurt Dennis Smith Jr.'s chances in Dallas. 11. What does Dwyane Wade really have left? Now that the inevitable buyout of Wade’s $24 million deal by the Bulls has led to the equally inevitable trek to Cleveland to play with James, can the 35-year-old Wade still be a significant contributor on a title contender? Given the general dysfunction in Chicago last season, you can dismiss most of the good and bad numbers Wade put up, with two exceptions: he still averaged almost five free throw attempts per game, and he shot 31 percent on 3-pointers -- not great, but more than double his anemic 15.9 percent behind the arc in 2015-16, his last with the Miami Heat. Wade obviously knows the cheat code for how to most effectively play off of James, so he’ll use the regular season to learn his teammates and be ready for the playoffs. But can Wade hold up over seven games defensively if he has to chase, say, Bradley Beal around, or try to deny DeRozan his preferred mid-range spots, and still be productive offensively? 12. Back to the Sixers -- how good will they be? My guess is they’ll pretty good in the 60 or so games I anticipate Embiid will play this season -- I’m assuming several designated off days for him during the season, not another injury. The mix of young talent (Fultz, Embiid, Ben Simmons, Dario Saric, Covington) and crafty vets (Redick, Amir Johnson) should mesh to make the 76ers a very tough team to defend. But Philly has to resolve the Jahlil Okafor situation, and in fairness to him, give him a fresh start somewhere else with a trade as soon as possible. If I were a good team that would be hard-pressed to add a free agent any time soon and feels a player short of true contention -- I’m looking at you, Memphis Grizzlies and Wizards -- I’d work hard to get the new, slimmed-down Okafor on my squad while he’s still on his rookie contract and make him the focal point of a kick-ass second unit. 13. Should we feel some kind of way about the Trail Blazers? I’m picking up what you’re putting down. A full season of the “Bosnian Beast” in the middle, it says here, will vault Portland into the top four in the West. Note I said “full season.” That means Jusuf Nurkic has to give coach Terry Stotts between 65-70 starts for the above premonition to be, as they say in the legal world, actionable. If so, Nurkic’s underrated scoring and passing out of the post will only make Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum that much more deadly out front, along with improving Portland’s defense. Per Basketball-Reference.com, the Blazers were 11.6 points per game better than the opposition with those three on the floor together and a +5 when their regular five-man lineup with Maurice Harkless and Al-Farouq Aminu joined the guards and Nurkic. And that’s pronounced, “Noor-kitch,” accent on Noor. 13. A little movie break ... Kevin Costner’s accent in “Robin Hood” -- worst ever, right? Yes, but Natalie Wood’s in “West Side Story” was painful, too. 14. Many have written the post-CP3 Clippers off. Should they? The Clippers are my darkhorse this season -- if they do the right thing and go small more often. They’re doing it more in practice so far than in games because Danilo Gallinari is working through a foot injury, but Blake Griffin at the five and Gallinari at the four could be spicy during the regular season. That would mean Sam Dekker and/or Wes Johnson would have to become credible and dependable at the three, allowing coach Doc Rivers to play a Pat Beverly-Milos Teodosic backcourt more often, which will just be fun. This would, of course, mean less DeAndre Jordan, and … that may not be the worst thing. Nothing against DJ, who is the best defensive big in the league, bar none. Unfortunately, the NBA isn’t about defense any more -- at least not in the traditional sense. Even someone like Jordan who doesn’t just block shots, but also helps snuff out opposing pick and rolls, becomes less valued by the league’s advanced stats crowd if he doesn’t contribute more offensively. The three has gone a long way to tyrannizing the defense-dominant big man out of the game. (Zach Lowe recommends the Wizards try to get Jordan via trade, and it’s not the first time I’ve heard that name mentioned in connection with Washington, the idea being the only chance the Wizards have of beating Cleveland or Boston is to slow them down enough defensively that Wall-Beal-Porter can try and keep up offensively. Washington is definitely a load when Wall gets locked in on D and creates turnovers, and the idea of Jordan inhaling lobs from Wall is enticing to think about. But the Wizards are not -- not -- going to take on a fourth big contract, and Jordan’s surely going to opt out after this season; he’s rightly expecting a massive payday in 2018, and the Clippers certainly now have motive and means to retain him.) Anyway, some Lou Williams, Austin Rivers and/or Teodosic and Willie Reed off the bench isn’t bad, either. 15. Could Kyle Kuzma be the best rookie on the Lakers this season? Don’t @me, LaVar. Kuzma has followed up a very strong Vegas Summer League with high notes in preseason, averaging better than 19 points per game for the Lakers. He’s been dazzling at times, displaying in-between skills that intrigue, and showing why so many teams were trying to trade back into the first round to get the Utah forward before L.A. snagged him with its second and much less heralded first-round pick last June. And there will be minutes available at the four this season. So far, Kuzma has displayed unusual strength for a rookie and confidence in his ability to score. Of course, he’s inexperienced, and like all rookies, has to differentiate between an open shot and a good shot. The other, more famous first-rounder, Lonzo Ball, will almost certainly be the better all-around player in time. For this year, though … hmmm. 16. What does a Hawks fan have to look forward to this season? Honestly, not much. But they’ll always be well-coached and get better. I’d pick one of the young players, like rookie John Collins or second-year small forward Taurean Prince, and concentrate on them during the season. See what they do with their minutes on the floor, and watch how they gradually expand their games at both ends. Seeing a young guy get better as he gains experience and accepts coaching is one of the great joys of watching the NBA every night. 17. Orlando? What gives there? The team’s new braintrust of Jeff Weltman and John Hammond will need some time to fix the roster -- a mélange of athletic wings that have trouble defending and guards that have trouble shooting. The former is addressed somewhat with the signing of Jonathon Simmons from San Antonio, but I don’t see a solution to the latter with any of the existing backcourt contributors. Unless coach Frank Vogel figures out some way to get more turnovers/runouts from his group, they just can’t get in transition enough for their length and legs to make a difference. 18. New Orleans? What gives there? The short answer is, I have no idea. All of NBA Earth has DeMarcus Cousins out of there one way or another (he’s an unrestricted free agent in ’18 and wants to be on a contender/the Pelicans will never pay him what he wants and will have to trade him by the deadline/no way he and Anthony Davis fit together/Wall agitates for a reunion with his former Kentucky big man in D.C./your departure theory here) by this time next year, but we’ll see what coach Alvin Gentry has come up with for “Boogie” and “the Brow” after a summer to think it over. Rajon Rondo being out hurts their depth, but I have to be honest -- I don’t see how he and Jrue Holiday can possibly work together in a backcourt, and Holiday’s the guy the Pelicans just gave $125 million to, so he should probably have the ball in his hands every night, shouldn’t he? I like Ian Clark and Frank Jackson down there, but that untethered three spot burns a hole in the New Orleans sun. Well, at any rate, should be more fun than watching reruns of My Life on the D-List. 19. Favorite D-List Muppet? Beaker. 20. LeBron is leaving Cleveland again after this season, isn’t he? Everything points to yes, and a relocation to Los Angeles to play with the Lakers or Clippers next year – except … what if the Cavs win it all again this year? That’s not an impossible scenario -- in fact, it’s a pretty simple one to lay out: Cavs run roughshod through the Eastern Conference in the playoffs again, get through a good but hardly great Boston team in the conference Finals and set up a fourth straight encounter with Golden State. It’s easy now to say the Warriors dominated the Cavs in last season’s Finals -- but only if you ignore the fact that Cleveland led by six with just more than three minutes remaining in Game 3, only to see the Warriors score the game’s last 11 points to take a 3-0 lead instead of 2-1. And given that Cleveland vaporized the Warriors in Game 4, a 2-2 series would have meant the Cavs just needed to win once in Oracle -- which they’d done twice in the 2016 Finals -- to have a real shot at repeating. The point is, the difference between the teams isn’t as big as Draymond Green would have you believe; the Cavs have no fear of the Warriors, and Jae Crowder gives coach Tyronn Lue a viable on-ball defender for Kevin Durant, leaving LeBron free to play off of Green. And: that unprotected Nets pick, whether one or three or five or seven, is Cleveland’s best recruiting tool. LeBron knows everyone in college basketball and he can literally pick whoever he’d like to finish his career with in Cleveland before handing over the reins. I’m not saying he’s definitely staying, either -- only that his departure isn’t the lead pipe cinch some would have you believe. The season to come will have a lot to do with his next decision. 21. So, how will the playoffs go this season? Eastern Conference (seeds No. 1-8): Cleveland, Boston, Washington, Toronto, Milwaukee, Miami, Detroit, Philadelphia Western Conference (seeds No. 1-8): Golden State, Houston, Oklahoma City, Portland, San Antonio, Memphis, Utah, Minnesota Eastern Conference semifinalists: Cleveland, Boston, Washington, Milwaukee Western Conference semifinalists: Golden State, Houston, OKC, San Antonio Eastern Conference finals: Cleveland over Boston Western Conference finals: Golden State over OKC (you heard me) NBA Finals: Golden State over Cleveland (in seven games) 22. Tell me something crazy that’s going to happen this season that no one’s predicting! Giannis Antetokounmpo. NBA MVP, 2017-18. 23. Are you high? No, ma’am. 24. So, why 24 questions? As always, we start the season with 24 questions (or predictions, or issues, whatever) in honor of Danny Biasone, the late owner of the Syracuse Nationals, whose discovery in 1954 helped save the league. At that time, the NBA was in the midst of a literal slowdown, in large part by teams that were desperate to figure out some kind of way to stay competitive with George Mikan, the league’s first superstar big man, and his team, the Minneapolis Lakers. Teams would hold the ball for minutes at a time without shooting in an effort to shorten the game and give them a chance to beat Minneapolis late. But the end result was boring -- very boring -- basketball. At the owners’ meetings that year, Biasone came up with an idea. NBA games were 48 minutes long. Biasone figured out that in a normal game, one not waylaid by the slowdown tactics, about 120 shots -- 60 per team -- were taken. So, why not just divide the number of minutes in every game -- 2,880 -- by the number of shots in an average game -- 120 -- to come up with some kind of a time limit in which a team had to shoot. And thus, the 24-second shot clock (2,800/120) was born. With the implementation of the shot clock in the 1954-55 season, scoring went way up, as did the quality of play. Teams were now running up and down the floor in order to try and beat the shot clock, complementing the “fast break” game that many colleges had played for years. But the new style in the pros was immensely popular with fans. And it still is. Plus, there’s just something iconic about that clock counting down every 24 seconds. It’s unique to the NBA. Thus, we ask 24 questions, in honor of the guy who owned a bowling alley as well as the Nationals for much of his adult life, and probably enjoyed the bowling more. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2017

PBA honchos provide moral support to Gilas Pilipinas

PBA commissioner Willie Marcial and board chair Ricky Vargas led the PBA delegation that flew to Doha, Qatar Tuesday, optimistic they would cheer for Team Philippines that would go on to secure a berth in the 2019 FIBA World Cup.  “I have talked to coach Yeng Guiao, and he is confident we can win and make the World Cup. And I believe him,” said Marcial. All the members of the PBA board, except Magnolia’s Rene Pardo, are with the group to provide moral support to Gilas Pilipinas as it tangles with Qatar Thursday in Doha then with Kazakhstan Sunday in Astana.  “We all know that the team is made up of PBA players. So the entire board is flying to Qatar to support the team. We all know in the board how important these two games are for us. We want to win these games,” said Al Panlilio, Meralco’s representative to the PBA board and also the president of the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas. “I have talked to coach Yeng and Andray Blatche separately. They know the task at hand for us. For us to control our destiny, we have to win these two games,” Panlilio also said. “We’re confident especially with Andray Blatche back.” The Nationals and the Qataris square off at the Al-Gharafa Sports Club Multi-Purpose Hall in the Qatari capital. “Hopefully, the Filipinos in Qatar would show up and make it like a home court for us,” said Panlilio. “I hope everybody’s praying, supporting and following the team. We’ll be with them para maramdaman nila ang suporta natin.”   Twelve PBA players make the team with Blatche and Gilas cadet Thirdy Ravena. The PBA players are June Mar Fajardo, Japeth Aguilar, Poy Erram, Raymond Almazan, Troy Rosario, RR Pogoy, Marcio Lassiter, Gabe Norwood, Paul Lee, Scottie Thompson, Mark Barroca and Jayson Castro. Pogoy, however, will still be serving a FIBA suspension in the PHL-Qatar game. He is already free to join the team in their game against Kazakhstan......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2019

Qatar beats Japan in Asian Cup final for first major title

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Long scorned for a lack of soccer pedigree, Qatar will enter the 2022 World Cup as the champion of Asia. The Asian Cup was lifted by Qatar for the first time on Friday after a series of victories on the field just as improbable as winning the vote in 2010 that secured the FIFA showpiece for the small, super-rich Gulf nation. While Japan entered the Asian Cup hotly tipped to win a fifth title, the Qataris hadn't even reached the semifinals before. But confounding the disparity in the FIFA rankings — with Qatar at 93 and Japan at 50 — the Gulf nation won the final 3-1 to claim its first major soccer title. The strong attacking display was a reflection of Qatar's remarkable run over the last month in the United Arab Emirates, scoring 19 goals and conceding only once in winning all seven games. "Qatar today is a top Asian team," goalkeeper Saad Al Sheeb said. "We wrote history." After upsetting the final favorite, players wrapped themselves in Qatari flags in a display of patriotic furor that will have resonated far beyond the stadium in Abu Dhabi. Since joining other Arab countries in cutting diplomatic, economic and travel ties with Doha in 2017, the UAE warned residents that expressing sympathy for Qatar could lead to fines and imprisonment. The UAE is among a quartet of nations accusing its regional foe of supporting extremists, which Qatar denies, and even prevented the team from traveling direct to Abu Dhabi for the tournament. There was even an attempt by the UAE to get Qatar disqualified after losing their semifinal. Tournament organizers confirmed only hours before the final they dismissed a challenge by the UAE against the eligibility of two Qatar players who were born outside Qatar. One of them, Almoez Ali, scored the opening goal against Japan in the 12th minute with an audacious overhead kick. That gave him an all-time tournament record nine goals, surpassing Ali Daei's previous record tally of eight with Iran in 1996. Abdulaziz Hatem doubled Qatar's lead with a curling strike in the 27th. While Qatar conceded its first goal of the tournament in its seventh game when Takumi Minamino netted in the 69th, Akram Afif restored the two-goal cushion in the 83rd from the penalty spot. "It's a huge disappointment," Japan captain Maya Yoshida said. "But we have to learn from this defeat." Victory will give Qatar renewed hope of being able to compete against the globe's best teams when it qualifies for the first time for the World Cup — as hosts — in 2022. "This result doesn't come from nothing," said defender Bassam Al-Rawi, the other player whose eligibility was questioned by the UAE. "It came with lot of effort. It came from determination. It came from immense hard work on the pitch. We were able to win today because we took all the chances." There is an even stronger test for the squad in June when Qatar joins Japan as guest nations at the Copa America. Qatar is in a group with Argentina, Colombia, and Paraguay. "This is one step more to continue developing the team to play another tournament in the summer and to be ready for 2022, to represent Qatar as a very competitive team at the World Cup," Qatar coach Felix Sanchez said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2019

Wild start up in windy LPGT Splendido | The Manila Times Online

The local aces will be hard-pressed to sustain the charge set up by Dottie Ardinas convincing win at Beverly Place last week as they slug it out with the ThaiREAD The post Wild start up in windy LPGT.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsJan 29th, 2019

UAAP Finals: UP s turning point of the season as told by seniors

The genesis of the historic UAAP Season 81 run of the University of the Philippines was not a promising one. Expectations were extremely high on the Fighting Maroons as they entered the season because of various reasons. Coach Bo Perasol was already in his third year since he took over UP's program. In college basketball language, the third year is when all rebuilding work should come to fruition. Bright Akhuetie, the dominant foreign-student athlete who transferred from NCAA to UAAP, was done with residency and could finally suit up for the luntian at pula. UP's prophetic sharp shooter and team captain Paul Desiderio decided to play his fifth year, choosing to close out his collegiate career over the chance to be immediately drafted into the professional ranks. Juan Gomez de Liano was entering his sophomore year with a Rookie of the Year award under his belt and was expected to improve more as a playmaker. Plus, the Fighting Maroons already had a lot of sponsors and financial support. But after the first round of the eliminations, despite all the supposed advantages that were on their side in the beginning of the season, the so-called Final Four contenders still found themselves in the sixth spot with a disappointing 3-4 record. To open the second round, they were slapped with another loss against the Ateneo de Manila University, relegating them to a 3-5 slate. At that point, graduating players Desiderio, Diego Dario, Jarrell Lim, Gelo Vito, and JJ Espanola decided that they were no longer having any of it. They are not going to leave UP as losers again. So they decided to call a seniors only meeting. "People were already doubting us. So kaming mga seniors, nag lunch kami noon sa Frankie's sa UP Town [Center] to meet," said Lim, referring to a popular chicken wings restaurant in the mall across the Diliman campus. "Nag-meeting kami. Parang anong nangyayari? Hindi ito yung season na ineexpect namin, what is happening?" narrated Dario, "So we went in to the details. We made sure na balanced yung insights namin with Paul's perspective, someone who plays a lot, tapos our perspective na usually from the bench, from the outside, kung ano nakikita namin." The seniors did not only talk about team culture or mindset, but they heavily discussed their plays, rotation, and moves - things that are usually considered by the coaching staff. "Yung mga usapan na walang bench production, hindi nakakapag-pahinga si ganito kasi hindi nagpoproduce si ganyan, or mga plays - to the detail talaga yung mga pinagusapan namin," Vito narrated. "Given all our insights, we decided to talk to our coaches," said Dario. However, talking to the coaches was something the seniors were not sure how to do. They did not want to give the impression that they were undermining the authority of their coaching staff, most especially coach Bo's, but at the same time they knew they had to let their insights out. "Noong una, kinakabahan pa kami kasi baka ma-insult sila, na baka coach Bo will feel disrespected. We were really scared of talking to him," shared Lim. "Baka kasi isipin niya 'You don't trust me?" Dario added. The seniors pressed on and forwarded their concerns to their assistant coaches. Eventually, their insights reached Perasol and he called them in for another seniors only meeting. "Kinabahan na kami! Parang hala, anong sasabihin ni Coach? Nag-text si Coach Mo [Gingerich], 'Coach Bo wants to talk to you, Coach Ricky [Dandan] pitched your ideas and he's really positive with it and he wants to meet you guys before practice,'" narrated Vito. The seniors came in to the meeting feeling scared but they came out of it feeling validated. It was a revelation of Perasol's character as a players' coach. The seniors shared that in the meeting, Perasol listened to them and made them feel that their voice mattered. "Doon mo talaga masasabi how coach Bo is as a coach. Sobrang respectful and talagang he really listens to his players. Dun mo talagang masasabi na Papa Bo mo talaga siya," said Lim, "Not even once did we hear any negative response from coach Bo kaya mahal na mahal talaga namin siya, lalo na kaming mga senior kasi siya talaga yung nag lead sa amin sa pagbabago." "He really is like a dad to us, legit," added Dario. Right after the meeting, the changes they wanted to see in the team were implemented right away. Aside from the tweaks in the plays, the seniors decided to alter the mood in their training as well. As Dario described, "We made sure to set the example in practice so from then, go hard kami sa practice. Nagkakapikunan na nga kami minsan sa sobrang intense." What makes that meeting more monumental is that since then, the Fighting Maroons started collecting wins. It was the turning point of the season. From a 3-5 slate, they finished the eliminations in the third spot with an 8-6 record. "Yun yung naging turning point, yun yung puro wins na kami," said Lim proudly. "Natalo lang kami sa Adamson [sa eliminations] tapos puro panalo na," added Vito. UP made it back in the Final Four after 21 years. For the first time in their season, they were meeting the expectations that were set on them in the beginning. But if we are talking about expectations, apparently UP was not just going to meet them, they went on to exceed them.  In the semifinals, they overcame a twice-to-beat advantage held by Adamson University, which earned them a ticket to the Finals against the Ateneo de Manila University. It was their first time back in the Finals after 32 years. They may have failed to win a single game in the heavily lopsided best-of-three Finals series, but they were able to mount a story that will forever remain a classic. They won't deny that this silver finish still glitters like gold, not only to the team, but to the rest of the UP community. The Fighting Maroons' story this season is a testament that winners are not just made in the hardcourt. Winners are made during meetings over chicken wings, in intense team practices, and with coaches who listen. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @the9cruz.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 7th, 2018

DOC VOLLEYBALL: A Battle of Generations

At long last, perhaps the most anticipated finals match in PVL history has been set. Showing dominance and proving why they are the defending champions despite some minor stumbles, the Creamline Cool Smashers barged their way into the Finals uncontested by dispatching a gritty dark horse in the Petro Gazz Angels. On the other hand, proving that their modern approach to the sport can trump experienced veterans, the Ateneo-Motolite Lady Eagles are proving to be one of the most formidable collegiate teams in the country under the helm of a new head coach. While old and new fans of the Ateneo community will be torn between cheering for the former Queen Eagles Alyssa Valdez, Jia Morado and Fille Cainglet-Cayetano and the current Queen Eagles in Bea De Leon, Maddie Madayag and Ponggay Gaston, it is also of particular interest how Creamline head coach Tai Bundit will defend his trophy from his Ateneo successor Oliver Almadro. While Bundit has laid the foundation for a modern approach to the sport during his stint in Ateneo, Almadro on the other hand has taken it a step further in terms of intricacies in attack strategy. The dream finals match couldn’t be more interesting from a technical point of view as it is an arms race of volleyball modernization stemming from similar schools of thought. Creamline Cool Smashers: The OG New School Ever since coach Tai Bundit took the reins for the Ateneo Lady Eagles, the local volleyball scene has been introduced to numerous innovations that inarguably helped ALE seize a pair of crowns in the UAAP. Modern strategies such as the Setter-Open-Middle rotation, libero getting second ball when setter digs, fast pin plays, to name a few. For a good couple of years, the advancements brought about by Bundit have been a bane even for perennial champion coaches in the collegiate scene. As expected, most teams followed suit in order to adapt and challenge the new system introduced. Though the Bundit riddle has been challenged and conquered in the collegiate scene, Tai’s system still holds an iron grip in the professional scene despite everyone else following suit and that is primarily because of his connection with long time apprentices Alyssa Valdez and Jia Morado coupled with supplementation of astounding players in Jema Galanza, Kyla Atienza and Melissa Gohing to name a few. Despite a surprising upset to start of their PVL Open Conference journey, the Creamline Cool Smashers continued to defy odds in exerting dominance given a handicapped line-up for the most part of the season. Regardless of key players like Michele Gumabao, Risa Sato, and Pau Soriano missing action for a number of games, the trio of Valdez, Morado and Galanza have been sufficient in holding off the competition as shown by the team’s performance in serve, passing, setting, and attack – skill departments that are highly influenced by the aforementioned trio. On the other hand, the absences of Sato, Gumabao and Soriano have definitely influenced their sub-par blocking performance since these three players have the major responsibility of setting up the net defense. It is of no surprise that in order to compensate the block, the Cool Smashers have intensified their serving to at least disrupt opponents' attack strategy. Coupled with exceptional floor defense by Atienza in transition, Morado had little difficulties in setting up counter attacks throughout the tournament.   With a full force line-up coming from the semis into the finals, the Creamline Cool Smashers are at their deadliest and all set to defend their crown. With few attack options on the right side as both middles rarely prove threatening with a slide attack, it is expected that the Creamline offense would still be heavy from the left pins care of Valdez and Galanza. The Lady Eagles would certainly load up their tallest players Madayag, De Leon, and Kat Tolentino to shut down the left pin. As such, the most crucial performance that could spell the difference in the finals series would be from opposite player Gumabao. Though Morado usually opts for combination x-plays in the middle to ease off some burden from the left, the Lady Eagles have proven disciplined enough with their block that combination plays rarely work against them. Should Gumabao exert significant threats from the right and if Bundit can develop her right back row attack in time, the Cool Smashers can circumvent one of Ateneo’s strongest suit which is their block and capitalize on their sub-par floor defense to eventually defend the crown. Ateneo-Motolite Lady Eagles: Paving Their Own Path Just when the future of the Ateneo Lady Eagles went uncertain with the exit of Bundit, Almadro’s takeover proved to be a major step in the right direction as witnessed in their remarkable performance for their first major tournament. For a team with a good mix of veterans and rookies, going toe to toe with top club teams in the country bids a bright future for the team as well as making them a significant contender in the upcoming collegiate league. The match-up against their predecessors, the Creamline Cool Smashers, is not just a treat for the fans but for volleyball analysts as well since it will be highly interesting how Almadro has brought about innovations to the framework established by his predecessor and how he will use it to his advantage. Right off the bat, the best change Almadro implemented upon his succession is relegating Kat Tolentino to the opposite position. The right wing couldn’t be a more perfect position for Tolentino since she can maximize her height and power advantage to rack in the points while minimizing burden on her weakness which is floor footwork and defense. While it’s true that we have seen some players shine in the opposite position in the past, Tolentino’s height, power, and ability to be a significant threat even from the back row makes her a cut above the rest. Almadro’s approach of having a tall, dominant, hitter from the right is a step to a modern approach employed even by top foreign teams. Another noticeable shift in Almadro’s system is the lack of reliance on combination x-plays. While some teams employ such strategy as a bread and butter on offense, the Lady Eagles have moved on from the outdated strategy and have only utilized such attack to break monotony. With a tall, dominant hitter from the right and deadly middles given a good pass, setter Deanna Wong is rarely forced to bunch up the attack in the middle in the hopes of confusing the block when she can separate the defense with fast sets to the pins. Almadro’s inclination towards safe and consistent pin play instead of fancy combination plays proves that he is taking the team to a more modernized approach. While the Ateneo-Motolite Lady Eagles have been stellar in both net defense and attack, a glaring limitation too hard not to notice in the sub-par passing and floor defense. No matter how threatening Madayag and De Leon are from the middle, inconsistent passing would severely limit their output and threat imposed from the middle. With Creamline notably deadly from the service line and having a full force line-up that can finally establish a decent wall on the net, it would be of utmost priority for the Lady Eagles to slow down the serve with high passes and consistent distribution of back row and pipe attacks. In a similar way, the Lady Eagles are pressed to be aggressive with the serve as the main advantage of Creamline is consistency in passing care of Gohing. Ateneo-Motolite cannot afford to be lax or careless with the serve as a good pass almost always converts for a point for Morado and company. Though the Lady Eagles have proven formidable with the block, Valdez is still expected to plow and muscle through with her attacks hence Almadro’s ability to quickly adjust the floor defense pattern would spell the outcome of the game for the Lady Eagles. Catch Game One of the PVL Open Conference Finals on December 5, Wednesday, 6 PM on LIGA, LIGA HD, iWant and via livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 4th, 2018

Kuta: in the heart of Bali, Indonesia

You’ll be hard pressed to find a livelier place to visit in Indonesia than the former fishing village of Kuta in Bali, southern Indonesia. I recently had the opportunity to visit Kuta as part of a Familiarization Tour for Visayas and Mindanao Media courtesy of Cebu Pacific, JG Summit Holdings and Aneka Kartika Tours & Travels of Indonesia. And here’s what I think of this “Happy Place”......»»

Category: newsSource:  kagay_anRelated NewsNov 21st, 2018

Mets deGrom gets Cy with record-low wins; Snell takes AL

By Jake Seiner, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — After a season marred by narrow defeats, Jacob deGrom became a runaway winner. The New York Mets ace easily won the National League Cy Young Award on Wednesday night, a reward for a historically fruitless season in Flushing. The right-hander had just 10 victories, the fewest ever by a Cy Young-winning starter. The AL prize also reflected a change in voters’ values, with Blake Snell of the Tampa Bay Rays narrowly beating out past winners Justin Verlander and Corey Kluber for his first Cy Young. Snell pitched just 180 2/3 innings, fewest ever by a Cy Young-winning starter. Over full seasons, Snell is the second starter to win the award with fewer than 200 innings after Clayton Kershaw logged 198 1/3 in 2014. “I definitely think the game has changed in that aspect,” deGrom said. “I feel like it’s just turning more into quality of work and what did you accomplish in those innings,” Snell said. “I think that’s just the way it’s going.” DeGrom easily beat out Washington’s Max Scherzer, who was seeking a third straight Cy Young and fourth overall. DeGrom got 29 first-place votes and 207 points from members of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. Scherzer had the other first-place vote. In his first season after chopping off his distinctive long hair, deGrom cut down hitters from start to finish despite little help from teammates. He had a 1.70 ERA, the lowest in the NL since Zack Greinke’s 1.66 mark in 2015. Yet the 30-year-old right-hander went 10-9, eclipsing the low bar among starters of 13 victories set by the Dodgers’ Fernando Valenzuela in 1981 and matched by Seattle’s Felix Hernandez in 2010. DeGrom allowed three runs or fewer in 29 consecutive starts to close the season, breaking Leslie “King” Cole’s 108-year-old record of 26 such outings. Yet the Mets were 11-18 in those games and 14-18 overall with deGrom on the mound. “My thought process was, ‘Hey, take the ball every fifth day and continue to try to put this team in position to win and control what you can control,’” deGrom said. Hernandez’s Cy Young victory signaled a major shift from voters, who once prioritized pitcher wins. The push toward advanced analytics made deGrom’s candidacy possible, and by September there was little debate deGrom was worthy, even as the Mets regularly wasted his dominance. “This was one of my goals,” deGrom said. “The team didn’t end up where we wanted to be this past season, but you kind of set personal goals, and I think being able to accomplish something that has been a dream of yours is just something special. To be a Cy Young Award winner, you’re in great company, and it truly is an honor.” Perhaps no pitcher had ever been such a hard-luck loser. New York averaged 3.5 runs in games started by deGrom, second only to Cole Hamels for worst support in the majors among qualified pitchers. During one stretch late in the season, the Mets totaled 10 runs over seven of deGrom’s outings, and four of those were driven in by the pitcher himself. DeGrom nearly produced more wins above replacement than actual wins — an unfortunate sabermetric feat that has only been accomplished once, when the Philadelphia Athletics’ Eddie Smith went 4-17 with 4.1 WAR in 1937. Baseball-Reference calculated deGrom for 9.6 WAR. The 2014 NL Rookie of the Year, he became the seventh rookie winner voted a Cy Young, joining fellow Mets Tom Seaver and Dwight Gooden. R.A. Dickey was the only other Met to win a Cy Young. The Mets unveiled a deGrom bobblehead featuring the Cy Young Award shortly after deGrom was crowned. They will give away 25,000 prior to a home game April 7 against Scherzer’s Nationals. Snell got 17 first-place votes and 169 points to 13 first-place votes and 154 points for Verlander. Kluber had 71 points, followed by Boston’s Chris Sale and Houston’s Gerrit Cole. Snell had a 1.89 ERA, third best in the AL since the DH was introduced, trailing only Ron Guidry (1.74) in 1978 and Pedro Martinez (1.74) in 2000. The 25-year-old pitched had 33 1/3 fewer innings than Verlander, but his dominance was enough to sway the electorate. The lefty nicknamed Snellzilla wreaked havoc against the AL’s top lineups. He was 3-0 with a 1.08 ERA in four starts against the World Series champion Red Sox, and 2-0 in two starts each against the Astros and Indians. The Yankees roughed Snell up twice, but he got threw five scoreless innings in a victory Aug. 16. That came during a late-season run of nine consecutive wins for Snell, including a victory against every team in the AL East. He also made five starts against former Cy Young winners and went 3-0 with an 0.59 ERA. Snell was the first player 25-or-younger to win 21 games since Barry Zito in 2002. He was highly regarded as a minor leaguer for his electric arsenal, but subpar control led to struggles during his first two major league seasons. He was even demoted to Triple-A for a month in 2017. It all came together this year. Snell was a stalwart for a most unusual pitching staff, taking the ball every fifth day while manager Kevin Cash successfully experimented with reliever “openers” to start games in between. Snell led the Rays with 31 starts, and no other traditional starter had more than 17. After longtime franchise ace Chris Archer was traded to the Pirates on July 31, Snell went 9-0 with a 1.17 ERA. “I felt with the opener, I had a bigger role on the team,” Snell said. Snell is the second Rays pitcher to win the award, following David Price in 2012. Scherzer went 18-7 with a 2.53 ERA and led the majors with 220 2/3 innings and 300 strikeouts. He was attempting to become the first player since Randy Johnson to win three consecutive Cy Youngs. He got the first-place vote of John Maffei of the San Diego Union-Tribune, 29 seconds and 123 points. Aaron Nola of the Philadelphia Phillies was third with 86 points, followed by Colorado’s Kyle Freeland and Arizona’s Patrick Corbin. Verlander led the AL with 290 strikeouts while going 16-9 with a 2.52 ERA for AL West champion Houston. This is his third second-place finish since winning the Cy Young and MVP in 2011 with Detroit. Kluber was attempting to win his second straight Cy Young and third overall. He went 20-7 with a 2.89 ERA for AL Central champion Cleveland and led the AL with 215 innings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2018

Where do Filipinos go

When asked where they spend their leisure time, Filipinos rarely answer with anything other than the mall or their own homes. An adventurous few might say they go to nightclubs, or museums, or even venture outside the city to swim in beaches and scale mountains. But you would be hard-pressed to find a Manileño who […].....»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsOct 31st, 2018

Senate probe pressed on teachers’ suicides

On World Teachers’ Day yesterday, Sen. Sonny Angara urged the Senate to take a long, hard look into the recent cases of suicides by public school teachers. Angara cited the need to investigate whether the suicides were caused by heavy teacher workload as claimed by a group pushing teachers’ rights and welfare. At the same […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 6th, 2018

Struggling Beermen hard-pressed to win next games

The San Miguel Beermen, used to being at the top, have found themselves almost at the backseat of the Governors’ Cup bus......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 3rd, 2018

AVC Asian Cup: PHI repeats over Kazakhstan for ninth place

Cha Cruz-Behag displayed veteran composure down the stretch to will the Philippines to a hard-fought, 25-13, 23-25, 25-22, 17-25, 15-8 repeat win over Kazakhstan Saturday to salvage a ninth place finish in the AVC Asian Cup at the Korat Chatchai Hall in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. The F2 Logistics team captain scored five of the Filipinas last seven points including the match-clinching crosscourt kill in the PHI second straight win over the young Kazakhstan team. The Philippines closed the tournament at ninth spot to end their campaign on a high note despite being relegated into the Challenge Cup after falling short of advancing in the quarterfinals. Mylene Paat led the Nationals with 18 points built on 12 kills, four aces and two kill blocks, Alyssa Valdez had 17 markers while Cruz-Behag copped 16 markers highlighted by 14 spikes.    Mika Reyes sparked the PHI’s closing charge to push the country’s 8-7 lead into a seven-point gap. After Reyes attack, Cruz-Behag punched in four straight points before the Kazakhs committed an error to give the PHI a 14-7 lead. The Filipinas committed an error in the next play before Cruz-Behag  whipped a killer crosscourt to finish off Kazakhstan, which the Philippines defeated in the group stage in four sets. Overall, the PHI finished with a 2-3 win-loss record while Kazakhstan ended their stint without a single win in five outings. Diana Grokhotova and Dinara Syzdykova posted 16 points each to lead Kazakhstan......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2018

Eight breakout players who wowed in PVL s Collegiate Conference

Collegiate volleyball won’t be around until the second semester but the recently-concluded Premier Volleyball League (PVL) Collegiate Conference on ABS-CBN S+A gave us a glimpse of what the girls may be raring to give us once their tournament in their respective leagues finally open. Some girls came out of nowhere to really provide the fireworks in the conference and came away with new fans and admirers thanks to their impressive play on the floor. As the PVL’s Open Conference is about to part its curtains, let’s take a look at the eight collegiate volleybelles who totally captured our hearts thanks to their display of heart and skill.   1.) Tonnie Rose Ponce, Adamson University (Tonnie Rose Ponce (libero) made a mark in the last PVL Collegiate Conference when she bagged a Mythical Six award) Adamson head coach Air Padda is proud of Ponce, her team’s libero, for being the best cheerleader of her teammates on the floor. Even with her small stature, she plays big with a fighting spirit that has endeared her to the fans. It still came as a surprise, however, to the dimunitive Ponce, to be named as one of the Mythical Six and the conference’s Best Libero. Maybe not for Padda, who has always seen the leadership potential of her squad’s cheerleader.   2.) Rosie Rosier, University of the Philippines (The sophomore Lady Fighting Maroon was instrumental in ending the school's 36 year major title drought in the PVL Collegiate Conference) Rosier was instrumental in breaking the UP Lady Fighting Maroons’ 36-year championship drought as the sophomore carried the team on her back in a thrilling five-set Game 1 match with the FEU Lady Tamaraws. She pumped in 15 points via 13 attacks to have probably one of her best birthday celebrations to date, and followed it up with a 10-point output in Game 2 to help her squad bring home the Collegiate Conference crown.   3.) Milena Alessandrini, University of Santo Tomas (Second year Golden Tigress Milena Alessandrini powered the Thomasians in the FInal FOur ddespite nursing a shoulder injury) UST’s Fil-Italian tower introduced herself to Filipino volleyball fans when she won Rookie of the Year in UAAP Season 80. While it’s not easy to be on a different land where everyone speaks a different language, Alessandrini has been quick to adapt to what the coach wants done on the floor based on her performance in PVL. Her best game happened in the Battle for Third against Adamson where she broke out with a 31-point outing, a sign of things to come for the Golden Tigresses’ campaign in the coming UAAP wars.   4.) Celine Domingo, Far Eastern University (Celine Domingo followed up her stellar UAAP season 80 campaign with a masterful PVL Collegiate Conference under Coach George Pascua) Veteran setter Kyle Negrito is FEU’s top player and Jerrili Malabanan is their main weapon, no doubt, but Domingo is poised to take over the team as she continues to make an impact in the net in the recently-concluded PVL Collegiate Conference. The conference’s First Best Middle Blocker has been one of Coach George Pascual’s reliable players that are expected to carry the scoring duties now that super senior Bernadeth Pons’ career with the school is over. Too bad she was set back by a knee injury in Game One of the Finals against UP, which also sidelined her in Game Two.   5.) Jan Daguil, College of Saint Benilde (Jan Daguil (16) was one of the surprises for CSB in the PVL Collegiate Conference) With their MVP, Jeanette Panaga, moving on from her school career, the College of St. Benilde Lady Blazers are hard-pressed to find a replacement. So far, Marites Pablo has emerged as the biggest candidate, but not too far behind is Daguil, who has come up big for them when they needed the points the most. During their battle for a Final Four spot in the recently-concluded PVL Collegiate Conference, Daguil led her team with 15 points, all on kills, to turn back the San Sebastian College-Recoletos Lady Stags.   6.) Joyce Sta. Rita, San Sebastian College-Recoletos (Joyce Sta. Rita is the only holdover remaining for the Lady Stags but she is determined to be their main pillar) Sta. Rita is the only holdover from Coach Roger Gorayeb’s compact 7-woman squad from a year ago in NCAA Season 93, where she was named Second Best Middle Blocker. That did not stop her from being an example to her new teammates as she fought in each set and match to keep the young Lady Stags competitive even if they failed to notch a single win.   7.) Satrianni Espiritu, San Beda University (Satrianni Espiritu (10) looks to be the final piece of the puzzle for the SBU Lady Red Spikers) Everyone talks about SBU stars Cesca Racraquin and the Viray twins. But another player that should be acknowledged is Espiritu, who consistently chipped in to keep the Red Lionesses in contention with her consistent showing game in and game out. If her PVL Collegiate Conference showing translates to the incoming NCAA wars, the other ladies better be shaking in their shoes as the Red Lionesses will be a mighty force to be reckoned with. 8.) Cindy Imbo, University of Perpetual Help System Dalta (With Bianca Tripoli out of commission, Cindy Imbo stepped up in the last PVL Collegiate Conference) Bianca Tripoli is the main pillar of strength for the Lady Altas. It was a shame that she had to limp off the PVL Collegiate Conference due to a mild tear in her quadriceps. Carrying the load for her during her absence is Imbo, who displayed her scoring abilities while their captain was injured. In a crucial game against favorite FEU Lady Tamaraws, Imbo fired away 15 points to lead the team. While they did not win the match, it showed her capability to step up when needed. Watch for these ladies when the 2018 seasons of the NCAA and UAAP women’s volleyball tournaments begin. Meanwhile, stay tuned for more scintillating volleyball action once the PVL resumes with their Open Conference this Saturday (September 22) on S+A, S+A HD, and via livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

FIBA WORLD CUP: Qatar braces for new environment and new Gilas team

Monday's closed-door game in the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers will be a first for Gilas Pilipinas. It's also going a first for Qatar, the Philippines' opponents in the Group F clash. As both teams prepare for the historic outing, it's sure weird for the visiting Qataris to not see a massive crowd at the Big Dome. Gilas home games tend to be packed after all. "I mean, I'm not sure how many closed door games have been played here in Manila. I think we were looking forward to playing in a packed environment, just for the experience and the atmosphere for the players," head coach Tim Lewis said on the close-door game. "So it will be different, you'll be able to hear everything we say, and I'm sure the game will have a different feel to it, it's hard to say until we actually start playing," he added. Lewis is familiar with how Gilas plays its home games after coaching Thailand in the 2017 SEABA Championships here in Manila. After that, Lewis was also involved with the TNT KaTropa for about a month as a consultant. "I've coached teams where we played in gyms with not many fans. Here, you don't expect that though, especially when you're playing against Gilas," Lewis said. Aside from dealing with a new environment, Lewis and the Qataris also prepare for a new-look Gilas team. Former head coach Chot Reyes is gone and coach Yeng Guiao's Final 12 for Monday feature players not necessarily included in previous Gilas iterations. It doesn't mean that the Philippines got weaker though. "Any Gilas team is gonna be solid, they play in a strong lead, they're well-coached. So I think it's probably not a fair statement to say it's a weak Gilas team," Lewis said. "I think it's a different Gilas team. They're getting to know each other, playing a different system, so you know, the coach is gonna have his own problems in terms of that. But they performed well against Iran and they did a good job in the Asian Games. So the core of that team is together and I'm sure they'll come out and be super competitive," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

Workers urge Roque: Check market prices

Labor groups urged presidential spokesperson Harry Roque on Monday to go to market --- a nod to a nursery rhyme --- to get a sense of how Filipinos were hard-pressed in stretching their budgets amid soaring prices of basic commodities. They issued the challenge after Roque said on Friday that while the 6.4-percent inflation rate in August was higher than usual, "it's nothing to be worried about." The public may not find comfort in the Palace official's assurance as fuel prices have increased anew, a development that can thwart efforts to tame inflation. For the fifth week in a row, oil companies in the country increased pump prices. Prices of diesel, gasoline and kerosene we...Keep on reading: Workers urge Roque: Check market prices.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Bayron, Salvador eye record feat in Aboitiz Invitational

Jay Bayron and Elmer Salvador each gear up for a crack at a record third Aboitiz Invitational crown but hard-pressed to check their erratic games in time for the $100,000 event beginning tomorrow at the Orchard Golf and Country Club’s Palmer Course in Dasmariñas, Cavite......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2018

More considerations on Bottom-Up Investing

Of all the considerations behind the use of bottom-up investing is the argument that it will lead you to companies that perform well regardless of developmental shifts in the economy and macroeconomic landscape. It will help you find companies even in industries hard-pressed by bad economic times but with healthy fundamentals that continually provide profit [...] The post More considerations on Bottom-Up Investing appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

Big firms hard-pressed amid rising interest rates

BIG BUSINESSES in the Philippines could have a hard time coping with rising interest rates, an economic research group said, as this would mean higher costs and a growing debt stock. The post Big firms hard-pressed amid rising interest rates appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 21st, 2018