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Mother dies from burns; husband, 3 kids injured

LIMAY, Bataan: A woman died from burns early morning of Tuesday while her husband and three children suffered burn injuries after the father allegedly set their house here on fire by pouring and igniting gasoline Sunday night or the night before Christmas. Eva Malinao said her younger sister, Bevelyn Malinao, 29, died from severe burns… link: Mother dies from burns; husband, 3 kids injured.....»»

Category: newsSource: manilainformer manilainformerDec 27th, 2017

Councilor’s son dies, wife injured in falling tree incident in Bacolod

BACOLOD CITY -- What was supposed to be a fun outing for the family of a councilor from Pototan town, in a resort in Negros Occidental ended up in a tragedy on Saturday. A seven-year-old boy was killed and his mother was wounded when a centuries-old mahogany tree, toppled by strong winds, hit the windshield of their sports utility vehicle in Bacolod City. Ken Marion Peaflorida died of head wounds while his mother, Maureen, was injured in the right eye. Councilor Kent Roger Peaflorida of Pototan town in Iloilo was driving the Toyota Fortuner to Campuestohan Highland Resort in Talisay City. There were 10 people aboard the vehicle -- five children and five adults, including ...Keep on reading: Councilor’s son dies, wife injured in falling tree incident in Bacolod.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 14th, 2018

Teacher dies in road mishap

CAMP OLIVAS, Pampanga, Philippines — A teacher died while her husband was injured when their car slammed into a tree in Samal, Bataan before dawn yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 1st, 2018

Teacher dies in road mishap

CAMP OLIVAS, Pampanga, Philippines — A teacher died while her husband was injured when their car slammed into a tree in Samal, Bataan before dawn yesterday. Source link link: Teacher dies in road mishap.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsDec 31st, 2017

One Rohingya’s struggle to empower women in Malaysia – Al Jazeera

Tucked away upstairs at a shopping plaza in this city’s north end is a small storefront turned classroom for dozens of Rohinyga women and children. The sound of these women reciting English phrases, laughing and the occasional cries of kids can be heard in the stairwell. Its founder, Sharifah Husain, 24, said she wanted to do something to help women and children in her community, who are not allowed to work or study in Malaysia. “I noticed we didn’t have a Rohingya women’s organisation that was standing up for women – to be the voice of women,” Husain said. Husain comes from Buthidaung village in Myanmar’s restive Rakhine state. Her father fled to Malaysia when she was five-years old, fearing for his life. Husain was left behind with her mother and two younger siblings. The village was attacked soon afterward, so Husain’s mother took them to Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar – then known as Burma. Her recollection of the traumatic moment when a local mob attacked her village is hazy. It took place almost 20 years ago. But it mirrors the accounts of Rohingya refugees now in Bangladesh, who’ve recently fled the Myanmar’s army clearance operations and local Buddhist mobs. “My mother was arrested in Yangon and sentenced to prison for not having official [identification or travel] documents,” Husain recounted. “This left me in charge.” Husain can’t remember how long she spent in Yangon, but she said she was separated from her siblings and sent north to Mandalay and forced into servitude. She spoke to her father in Malaysia, over the phone, and he agreed to pay human traffickers to bring Husain and her siblings to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia’s largest city. All three, including Husain, were smuggled by land, into Thailand and Malaysia. At that time the Southeast Asia trafficking route wasn’t as defined as it is today. Human trafficking groups in Bangladesh and Thailand now make a lot of money off of poor, desperate refugees fleeing war and violence in Myanmar. Today, the concern faced by the Malaysia government is if it recognises its refugees then that could send a signal to more to make the perilous journey, now taken by sea from Myanmar and Bangladesh to sanctuary in Malaysia, where they don’t face violent persecution. The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, states there are 152,170 registered refugees in Malaysia. The majority are Rohingya, displaced from their homes in Myanmar, like Husain. But the amount of unregistered refugees varies widely from 40,000 to 140,000, according to Asylum Access Malaysia. “The big question is – when are the boats going to come? There’s no indication they will now, but there’s definitely a high possibility that they will. And once new groups arrive, that complicates [the] situation,” said Deepa Nambiar, Asylum Access Malaysia director. UNHCR runs what it calls a “parallel school system” for refugees in Malaysia, allowing children to  access basic, primary-level education. Refugee groups and local faith-based organisations fund these schools, staffed by volunteers. One-hundred and twenty-eight informal refugee schools in Malaysia access funding from the UN. It provides education to 7,154 children, according to UNHCR. Malaysia’s Prime Minister’s Office states 16,809 Rohingya refugee children are registered with UNHCR. This means about 10,000, or more, refugee children in Malaysia are unable to access any form of education. A dozen or so more informal refugee schools exist but rely solely on donations and are understaffed, said Asylum Access. “To live in Malaysia, yes you can live, but you don’t have a future. You are in a box. You can’t go out of the box,” Husain said. Husain has received no formal education in Malaysia. This is remarkable considering her drive to educate refugee women and children. Malaysians are supporting Rohingya Women’s Development Network by volunteering as teachers and support staff. Rohinyga Women’s Development Network started officially last year. But Husain has spent the last decade educating her community’s most vulnerable women and children in their own homes. “I have built up a trust. The men especially trust me. They feel safe sending their wives to our centre because they know me,” Husain said. Word has spread and more refugee families are now attending Rohingya Women’s Development Network classes, where they receive English-language instruction, leadership training and brand new self-defence classes. “We want to stop domestic violence. We want to stop child marriages in the community. We want to build up women’s empowerment,” Husain said. “We really need the Malaysia government to recognise us.” Husain is trying to change the mentality in the Rohingya and wider refugee community in Malaysia, that women and girls can’t study, work, or earn an income. She receives some funding from UNHCR to run programmes but uses her own money to keep them going. “Of course I have support from my family. My father is my hero. My husband is my hero. Both of these men have really pushed me forward,” Husain added. The Rohingya Women’s Development Network has teamed up with Asylum Access Malaysia on a refugee theatre project. This will allow refugee women to educate the community on issues of sexual violence. “What I think is so innovative about Sharifah and the team is that when we were discussing this project they said ‘we need to get men involved’,” Nambiar said. Husain is appealing to others in the refugee community to support initiatives set up by the Malaysia government and civil society groups to help […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Isabel Granada dies

Isabel Granada has died almost two weeks after slipping into a coma in Doha, Qatar because of an aneurysm. A radio report said Granada, 41, died Saturday night. Her husband, Arnel Cowley, confirmed the news in his Facebook post. “She has been a fantastic wife, mother and daughter. She always did her best in everything [...] The post Isabel Granada dies appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsNov 4th, 2017

Baby boy is Kaye’s top priority

  Kaye Abad has played mother roles onscreen a handful of times in the past. But, approximately three months from now, she'll get to be one---"finally"---to a baby boy. "I wanted to have a son first, so I was happy when I found out I was having one." Kaye, who's married to actor Paul Jake Castillo, told reporters at a recent "gender reveal" party mounted by the baby product brand Aprica in Cebu City, where the couple is based. "I want to have two kids, but my husband wants three! We'll see about that." The 35-year-old actress was initially worried that she would have a difficult time getting pregnant. "I'm not exactly at the ideal age, so I couldn't help thinking about ...Keep on reading: Baby boy is Kaye’s top priority.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 17th, 2017

ISIS claims London terror attacks that killed 7; police arrest 12 in raids – Fox News

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the latest London terror attack through its propaganda wing Amaq News Agency, the SITE intelligence group reported Sunday. The terror network reportedly claimed a &'8220;detachment&'8221; of its fighters crashed a rented van into a crowd of people on London Bridge before going on a stabbing rampage Saturday night, killing seven people and wounding nearly 50 others. However, ISIS gave no evidence to back up its claim. Earlier on Sunday, British Prime Minister Theresa May condemned the “evil ideology” behind the London attacks. May addressed the attacks Sunday after a meeting of the government’s COBRA emergency committee. She called for a tougher stance against extremists and tougher controls on cyberspace to prevent its use by extremists. She said the measures were needed because “terrorism breeds terrorism” and attackers copy each other. Counterterrorism police carried out raids in east London and arrested 12 people in connection with the attacks. &'8220;Searches of a number of addresses in Barking are continuing,&'8221; London Metro Police said as the raids were being conducted. The homes raided included one belonging to one of the three terrorists who carried out the attacks, Sky News reported. &'8220;He's lived here for about three years,&'8221; neighbor Damien Pettit said. &'8220;He's one of our neighbors. I've said hello in passing more than 50, 60 occasions. He has two young kids. He was a very nice guy.&'8221; ISIS has claimed responsibility for a series of attacks in recent years &'8212; but police have pushed back in some instances. The terror network announced it was behind the deadly attack on a casino and shopping complex in the Philippines last Friday &'8212; but Manila police said the killer was a Filipino gambling addict heavily in debt, with no terror links. Saturday’s horror began around 10 p.m. local time when a white van veered off the road and barreled into pedestrians on London Bridge. The van’s three occupants then jumped out with large knives and attacked people at bars and restaurants in nearby Borough Market, police said. Elizabeth O’Neill said her son was stabbed in the stomach by a man who approached him and yelled “this is for Islam.” Daniel O’Neill, 23, suffered a 7-inch knife wound, she said, according to Sky News. He was recovering. &'8220;He had just stepped outside the bar for a second and a man ran up to him and said 'this is for my family, this is for Islam' and stuck a knife straight in him,” the mother said. Gerard Vowles, 47, told local media that he saw the three attackers stabbing a woman at the south end of London Bridge. He said he threw chairs, glasses and bottles at the attackers in a bid to stop them. &'8220;They went 'this is for Allah' and then they just started stabbing her multiple times,” he told Sky News. The Guardian quoted Vowles as saying, “They kept coming to try to stab me. They were stabbing everyone. Evil, evil people.” He added, according to the paper, &'8220;I want to know if this girl is still alive. I've been walking around for an hour and a half crying my eyes out. I don't know what to do.&'8221; Brad Myers, an American vacationing in London, told “Fox &'38; Friends” Sunday that he had just taken some pictures and was about to walk along the Thames River when he heard a noise. “Then I saw the van come on to the pavement and continue along the side of the road just right where I was a few moments before, just mowing down pedestrians,” he said. “Everyone was in shock,” he said. What he saw reminded him of the truck attack in Nice, France. “It’s crazy to think I was right there,” Myers said. Eight police officers killed the attackers after arriving on the scene within eight minutes. The officers fired 50 shots, London's assistant police commissioner Mark Rowley said at a press briefing Sunday, calling the number unprecedented. One of the bullets struck an innocent bystander. The person was recovering in a hospital. Rowley said that the officers had no choice. &'8220;The situation these officers were confronted with was critical &'' a matter of life and death &'' three armed men, wearing what appeared to be suicide belts, had already attacked and killed members of the public and had to be stopped immediately,&'8221; he said. It turned out the suicide belts were fake. Rowley said the van had been rented recently by one of the attackers. May said 48 people were injured and many had life-threatening injuries. Thirty-six remained hospitalized Sunday. A courageous cop was one of the wounded. He confronted the three knife-wielding terrorists armed only with a baton. He was stabbed in the face, head and a leg. He was in stable condition. British Transport Police Chief Constable Paul Crowther said of the officer that &'8220;it became clear that he showed enormous courage in the face of danger.&'8221; Crowther added that &'8220;for an officer who only joined us less than two years ago, the bravery he showed was outstanding and makes me extremely proud.&'8221; Those killed included a Canadian and a French national. May said the Thursday's national election would be held as scheduled because &'8220;violence can never be allowed to disrupt the democratic process.&'8221; Major parties suspended national campaigning Sunday out of respect for the victims. Speaking to Fox News from London, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly said the latest [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 5th, 2017

War on drugs in Maguindanao town: ma, 2 kids killed; 2 younger ones still in hospital

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 03 May) &'8212; A mother and her two children were killed while her two younger children are still recuperating at the provincial hospital of Maguindanao following a joint police-military operations in Barangay Panadtaban, Rajah Buayan town Tuesday afternoon against suspected drug personalities including the husband and father of the slain and [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2017

Why ISIS offered to kill this 4-year-old girl – CNN News

&'8220;I want my mommy,&'8221; Hawra' mumbles while cradled in the arms of her grandmother, Aliya. The four-and-a-half-year-old's lips barely move to form the weak but desperate plea. Her face is etched with small wounds, gauze wrapped around her throat and leg over burns that have yet to heal. She can't open her eyes; there is shrapnel in one of them, the other painfully closed. Doctors don't know if she will be able to see properly again. Her grandmother is lost for words. Tears start to fall. In one of the March 17 airstrikes, Hawra' suffered a broken leg and shrapnel to the face and lower back. She may never see again. &'8220;I am thinking it's better to be dead. I am thinking to die, rather than a life like this. (Hawra') was like a little flower. She would play and run. Now, she how has no mother, no eyes,&'8221; Aliya says. Hawra's mother was killed, we are told, in an airstrike on March 17. There were multiple US coalition-led strikes that day in their west Mosul neighborhood, where allegations of civilian casualties have since emerged. The series of airstrikes are now under investigation by both the US and Iraqi governments. But a US defense official has said that, so far, there has been no indication of a breakdown in US military procedures governing airstrikes. So far, 141 bodies have been recovered at the site of the airstrike on March 17, Col. Mohammad Shumari, head of Iraqi civil forces, told CNN on Thursday. He added: &'8220;There are still bodies under the rubble.&'8221; In reality, the number is probably much higher. &'8220;It was a mass killing,&'8221; Aliya says through her tears. Ala'a Al-Tai describes how he and his mother, Aliya (sitting on the left), pleaded with ISIS fighters to let them leave and find treatment for his wounded daughter, who is now recovering at West Erbil emergency hospital. Ala'a Al-Tai, Hawra's father, describes that day and the street their home was on. He says there was a row of houses that led to an intersection where ISIS fighters had gathered. The houses are interconnected by rat lines &'8212; holes carved out of the walls that are 40 centimeters wide and 100 centimeters high (about 15 inches wide by 39 inches high) &'8212; and allow ISIS fighters to move undetected. &'8220;ISIS did that?&'8221; I ask. &'8220;No, they (ISIS) made us do it,&'8221; Ala'a responds. The tunnels offered the families a shelter. Around 30 people, including women and children, sought refuge in a single home at one end of the street. Before the fighting broke out, little Hawra' along with her mother and two relatives used the rat lines to move through three buildings and return to their house to bake bread, wash and grab more clothes. the shooting intensified and then the strikes started. &'8220;There was dust everywhere,&'8221; Ala'a tells us.  &'8220;My mother started to scream &' Rocks and debris were falling down on the house we were in. She said go see what happened.&'8221; Three homes on the block were leveled including the one with his family still inside. Ala'a says all that was left of his wife was her left leg attached to her torso. He covered her with a blanket and saved his daughter. All he could hear was his daughter's feeble cry. &'8220;I could just hear her voice,&'8221; he recalls. &'8220;There was a block that had fallen on her. There was also a metal frame &'8212; that's what lodged the shrapnel in her face and her eyes. I screamed for her mother, my aunt and uncle but no response.&'8221; Pulling her from the rubble, she was barely recognizable; she was black and looked charred. They begged the ISIS fighters to allow them to leave. Instead, an Iraqi ISIS member offered to kill his little girl, Hawra'. &'8220;He (an Iraqi ISIS member) said 'I could just shoot her,'&'8221; Ala'a remembers. &'8220;He said 'why do you want to save her, she's going to die anyways.'&'8221; They even pleaded to go further into ISIS territory in pursuit of medical assistance, but Ala'a says an Egyptian ISIS member, who he thinks was the head of that unit, told them they couldn't leave because ISIS were using the remaining civilians as human shields. 16-year-old Fatima lies in a bed at a the same Erbil hospital with a broken back. She was injured in an airstrike in the last two weeks though she doesn't recall specifically which. She only remembers being pulled out of the rubble afterwards. Ala'a tried to clean Hawra' up; she was moaning as he tried to give her some water. He adds: &'8220;I saw my wife the next day, I saw her leg and her intestines so I covered her in a blanket and left.&'8221; It took three days for the Iraqi security forces to liberate the neighborhood. Three days to get his little girl medical help. Others helped by burying the bodies of his wife, aunt and uncle. Hawra' plays with her doll while recovering in hospital. It is not yet known if she will recover her sight. She keeps asking for her mother who died in the airstrikes on March 17. That was not the deadliest of the strikes that day. Around the corner, a multi-story building was also brought down, where more than 100 people are believed to have sheltered. And these are hardly the only allegations of civilian casualties. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 2nd, 2017

5 students, mom hit, wounded by SUV

FIVE elementary students and a mother were injured after being hit by a sports utility vehicle (SUV) while crossing the street in Sta. Cruz, Manila the other night. The victims were identified as Mark RV Suringa, 11, of 1280 Tambunting Street; John Clarence Eusebio, 10, of 1249 Tambunting Street; Rain….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated News4 hr. 38 min. ago

Hard work, family, and tocino the key ingredients to Fil-Am cyclist’s success

Coryn Rivera, said to be the only cyclist with Filipino roots to be taking part in the European circuit, is back at where it all began for her. “It’s good to be back,” she said with a small smile during her welcome lunch on Monday at the Shang at the Fort in Taguig. The name Rivera resonated with Filipinos when she won the Prudential RideLondon Classique a year ago. Then, her origins were unknown until ABS-CBN’s Gretchen Ho, who was part of the country’s delegation in London, inquired about them. While now an American citizen, the 25-year-old’s parents are full-blooded Filipinos who remain proud of their roots. Their eldest of two children only shares the same sentiment. “It’s cool to be a person with an ethnic background. I think I’m the only one with Filipino blood to be there (European circuit),” Coryn said. Rivera is now part of professional cycling team Sunweb which is very much active in the European circuit. In all of her races, a big part of her preparation remains Filipino to the core. “I still love tocino and tapa for breakfast with banana ketchup. I’m still very much into Filipino culture even though I was born in the (US),” she said. Of course, it has been parents Wally and Lina who have made sure that such is the case. “Breakfast is very important so I would make sure she always had her rice and tocino,” the latter shared. With that simple yet loving act, the elder Riveras have made it clear that they are fully behind their big-time source of pride who only stands at 5-foot-3. And clearly, that has made all the difference in the world. “We always support Coryn. I think that’s why she succeeds – because we support her 110 percent,” Lina said. That all-out support has impacted Coryn in more ways than one. “She saw us work hard to get to where we are. We also don’t spoil our kids – we make them work hard to get to where they are,” her mother said. She then continued, “We do everything on our own and she’s just the same way.” Indeed, it has been the example set by her hardworking parents that Rivera follows to this day wherever she is – be that in the Tour of Flanders in Belgium or in the hills of Tagaytay. “My parents are role models. They are hardworking and that’s what I want to be,” she said. And so, the American citizen cyclist remains Filipino at heart – even though she is yet to string together a Tagalog sentence. Asked about the native language of her parents, she answered, “I understand it really well, but as far as speaking it, I’m still practicing.” Good thing then that she will have some time to practice as Rivera will participate in the upcoming PRUride PH 2018 from January 11 to 14 in Subic, Zambales. Backed by British life insurer Pru Like UK, PRUride PH 2018 is expected to be one of the biggest cycling events in the country as it will be spread over two areas and span two weekends. In Subic, veteran pedal-pushers such as George Oconer and Marella Salamat will join Rivera in taking part in the 160 km PRUride Professional Road Race. The event continues a week later in McKinley West in Taguig where next iterations of the Criterium races first held a year ago will ensue. PRUride PH 2018 has been sanctioned by PhilCycling, the national governing body for the sport of cycling. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 8th, 2018

Clashes in Cairo after detainee dies at police station

CAIRO, Egypt –  Clashes erupted between Egyptian protesters and policemen on Saturday, January 6, outside a Cairo police station over the death of a young man in custody, security sources said. The protesters torched 10 cars including 3 police vehicles, they said. Nine people were injured and 40 people arrested in the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 6th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Berlin zoo polar bear cub dies after 26 days

BERLIN — Berlin's Tierpark zoo says a baby polar bear born last month has died, less than a year after its mother lost another cub......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 3rd, 2018

Algeria breast cancer survivors shunned as ‘half-women’

As if losing a breast to cancer was not traumatic enough, Algerian mother-of-three Linda was then spurned by her husband for being "mutilated" and a "half-woman." "Cancer? It's nothing compared with being rejected after 18 years of marriage," the 50-year-old medical assistant said, still clearly upset years later. Linda is one of hundreds of Algerian women to have been abandoned by their husbands or fiances after being diagnosed with breast cancer, a charity says. Thousands of women are found to suffer from the disease every year in Algeria, leaving many with no option but to surgically remove a part of their body deeply associated with their feminity. Hayat says her fian...Keep on reading: Algeria breast cancer survivors shunned as ‘half-women’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 2nd, 2018

Teacher dead, husband injured as car hits tree

SAMAL, Bataan: Just hours before the New Year, a car crashed into a tree along the MacArthur Highway in Barangay Santa Lucia here, pinning to death a public school teacher and seriously injuring her husband at dawn of Sunday. Relatives said an attending doctor pronounced Gloria Garcia, 40, Samal High School teacher, dead at the [...] The post Teacher dead, husband injured as car hits tree appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsDec 31st, 2017

Lusting after married coworker

Dear Emily, I have a pretty officemate who is married with four children. We're both 43 years old. I am also married with three young kids. Her husband is abroad working as a seaman. She is really very attractive and very sweet. Whenever she asks me for a favor, I always grant her request. She is always on my mind---even in my dreams. She shows such sweetness to me in the office. She even calls me sweetheart publicly, which I've tried to ignore. I keep praying that I be spared all thoughts of her since I know it is not morally right. I've heard of some illicit relations between office workers who fall in love or lust after each other. I will definitely not allow this to happen t...Keep on reading: Lusting after married coworker.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 31st, 2017

Man seeks help in finding missing 7-year-old niece

Al Nikko Labiaga, a 27-year-old kitchen helper working in Greenhills in San Juan, hugged and kissed his seven-year-old niece, Ayesha Mae, goodbye just before going to work on Tuesday, Nov. 21. He had no idea that Ayesha will go missing. Neighbors in Barangay West Crame in San Juan, where the Labiagas live, last saw Ayesha playing with other kids at the barangay basketball court at around 5 p.m. Al said one of his nieces, Mae-mae, was washing the dishes just before 5 p.m. when Ayesha woke up from a nap and ran outside to play. He said Mae-mae had asked her mother, Al's older sister Jing-jingto look after the child. But at around 5:30 p.m., when Al got home from work, Ay...Keep on reading: Man seeks help in finding missing 7-year-old niece.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 30th, 2017

Sue Grafton, writer of popular ‘alphabet’ mysteries, dies

LOS ANGELES, United States --- Sue Grafton, author of the best-selling "alphabet series" of mystery novels, has died in Santa Barbara. She was 77. Grafton was surrounded by family, including husband Steven Humphrey, when she died Thursday after a two-year battle with cancer, her daughter, Jamie Clark, posted on the author's website. "Although we knew this was coming, it was unexpected and fast. She had been fine up until just a few days ago, and then things moved quickly," the posting said. Grafton began her "alphabet series" in 1982 with "A is for Alibi." Her most recent book, "Y is for Yesterday," was published in August. "Many of you also know that she was adamant that...Keep on reading: Sue Grafton, writer of popular ‘alphabet’ mysteries, dies.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 30th, 2017

Alma Orlina, one of PH s top high jumpers of 1980s, dies at age 55

MANILA, Philippines - Christmas is a day for togetherness and joy. But at midnight of December 25, Alma Orlina, one of the top high jumpers of the 1980s, was rushed to the Philippine Heart Center by her husband Jose Alison and children. A few hours ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 25th, 2017