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Mother arrested for exposing daughter, other teenage girls to cyberpornography

Police arrested a motheron Wednesdayfor allegedly exposing her daughter and other teenage girls to cyberpornography in Barangay Sangat, San Fernando town, 41 kilometers south of Cebu City. Her 15-year-old daughter and two other girls were rescued past4 p.m. Although the law against human-trafficking allows the media to identify the perpetrators, Cebu Daily News has withheld the name of the suspect in this case to protect her daughter. Lawyer John Tanagho, director of the International Justice Mission Cebu Field Office, said the recent operation was the sixth against those allegedly involved in an online sexual operation in Cebu since January 2018. "This operation shows that P...Keep on reading: Mother arrested for exposing daughter, other teenage girls to cyberpornography.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerMay 16th, 2018

Village tanods nab man for killing mother in Pagadian City

PAGADIAN CITY - Tanods of Barangay Banale, Pagadian City arrested Almiro Tinga, 20, in a manhunt operation a day after killing his 47-year-old mother Gina Daniel Tinga, whose body was found by the river at Purok Malunggay, Barangay BanaleSaturday. Barangay tanods searched the area for Almiro after the victim's daughteron Fridaysaw her mother laying face down by the river, where she was washing clothes, Pagadian police investigator P01 Renji Narciso said. Police said the river was 100 meters away from their home in Banale. Gina's daughter, Wellen Jane, brought food to her mother and was surprised to see her lying face down on the ground, and seemed lifeless. The daughter rushed t...Keep on reading: Village tanods nab man for killing mother in Pagadian City.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 14th, 2018

Man stabs, injures wife with ice pick in Mandaluyong

            Mandaluyong City Police officers and village watchers from Barangay Plainview arrested a man shortly after stabbing and wounding his wife with an ice pick on Wednesday.     An initial report by Mandaluyong Police said that prior to the incident, suspect Herman Pang-itan, and his wife Nelia had an argument inside their house at 9 Kislap Street, Barangay Plainview, late Wednesday night.     Police said that as Nelia shouted, their daughter Christine woke up, only to find an ice pick on her mother's body. Christine removed the ice pick and allowed her mother to escape, police said.   ...Keep on reading: Man stabs, injures wife with ice pick in Mandaluyong.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 7th, 2018

One Rohingya’s struggle to empower women in Malaysia – Al Jazeera

Tucked away upstairs at a shopping plaza in this city’s north end is a small storefront turned classroom for dozens of Rohinyga women and children. The sound of these women reciting English phrases, laughing and the occasional cries of kids can be heard in the stairwell. Its founder, Sharifah Husain, 24, said she wanted to do something to help women and children in her community, who are not allowed to work or study in Malaysia. “I noticed we didn’t have a Rohingya women’s organisation that was standing up for women – to be the voice of women,” Husain said. Husain comes from Buthidaung village in Myanmar’s restive Rakhine state. Her father fled to Malaysia when she was five-years old, fearing for his life. Husain was left behind with her mother and two younger siblings. The village was attacked soon afterward, so Husain’s mother took them to Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar – then known as Burma. Her recollection of the traumatic moment when a local mob attacked her village is hazy. It took place almost 20 years ago. But it mirrors the accounts of Rohingya refugees now in Bangladesh, who’ve recently fled the Myanmar’s army clearance operations and local Buddhist mobs. “My mother was arrested in Yangon and sentenced to prison for not having official [identification or travel] documents,” Husain recounted. “This left me in charge.” Husain can’t remember how long she spent in Yangon, but she said she was separated from her siblings and sent north to Mandalay and forced into servitude. She spoke to her father in Malaysia, over the phone, and he agreed to pay human traffickers to bring Husain and her siblings to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia’s largest city. All three, including Husain, were smuggled by land, into Thailand and Malaysia. At that time the Southeast Asia trafficking route wasn’t as defined as it is today. Human trafficking groups in Bangladesh and Thailand now make a lot of money off of poor, desperate refugees fleeing war and violence in Myanmar. Today, the concern faced by the Malaysia government is if it recognises its refugees then that could send a signal to more to make the perilous journey, now taken by sea from Myanmar and Bangladesh to sanctuary in Malaysia, where they don’t face violent persecution. The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, states there are 152,170 registered refugees in Malaysia. The majority are Rohingya, displaced from their homes in Myanmar, like Husain. But the amount of unregistered refugees varies widely from 40,000 to 140,000, according to Asylum Access Malaysia. “The big question is – when are the boats going to come? There’s no indication they will now, but there’s definitely a high possibility that they will. And once new groups arrive, that complicates [the] situation,” said Deepa Nambiar, Asylum Access Malaysia director. UNHCR runs what it calls a “parallel school system” for refugees in Malaysia, allowing children to  access basic, primary-level education. Refugee groups and local faith-based organisations fund these schools, staffed by volunteers. One-hundred and twenty-eight informal refugee schools in Malaysia access funding from the UN. It provides education to 7,154 children, according to UNHCR. Malaysia’s Prime Minister’s Office states 16,809 Rohingya refugee children are registered with UNHCR. This means about 10,000, or more, refugee children in Malaysia are unable to access any form of education. A dozen or so more informal refugee schools exist but rely solely on donations and are understaffed, said Asylum Access. “To live in Malaysia, yes you can live, but you don’t have a future. You are in a box. You can’t go out of the box,” Husain said. Husain has received no formal education in Malaysia. This is remarkable considering her drive to educate refugee women and children. Malaysians are supporting Rohingya Women’s Development Network by volunteering as teachers and support staff. Rohinyga Women’s Development Network started officially last year. But Husain has spent the last decade educating her community’s most vulnerable women and children in their own homes. “I have built up a trust. The men especially trust me. They feel safe sending their wives to our centre because they know me,” Husain said. Word has spread and more refugee families are now attending Rohingya Women’s Development Network classes, where they receive English-language instruction, leadership training and brand new self-defence classes. “We want to stop domestic violence. We want to stop child marriages in the community. We want to build up women’s empowerment,” Husain said. “We really need the Malaysia government to recognise us.” Husain is trying to change the mentality in the Rohingya and wider refugee community in Malaysia, that women and girls can’t study, work, or earn an income. She receives some funding from UNHCR to run programmes but uses her own money to keep them going. “Of course I have support from my family. My father is my hero. My husband is my hero. Both of these men have really pushed me forward,” Husain added. The Rohingya Women’s Development Network has teamed up with Asylum Access Malaysia on a refugee theatre project. This will allow refugee women to educate the community on issues of sexual violence. “What I think is so innovative about Sharifah and the team is that when we were discussing this project they said ‘we need to get men involved’,” Nambiar said. Husain is appealing to others in the refugee community to support initiatives set up by the Malaysia government and civil society groups to help […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 30th, 2017

Man nabbed for rape

SAN FERNANDO, Pampanga , Philippines  – A 57-year-old man has been arrested for allegedly raping his eight-year-old daughter and teenage son in Concepcion, T.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 28th, 2017

Mandaue mother arrested for pimping daughter online

Mandaue mother arrested for pimping daughter online.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 28th, 2017

Cops make more child cybersex arrests, rescues

MANILA, Philippines — Authorities in the Philippines have rescued four girls and arrested a mother and two other women for allegedly livestreaming sexually e.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 12th, 2017

Sexual assault in Japan: ‘Every girl was a victim’ – Al Jazeera

Tamaka Ogawa was about 10 years old when she was sexually assaulted for the first time. It was a public holiday and she was on the subway. A man standing behind her pulled down the band of her culottes and underwear, touched her bare bottom, then pressed himself against her. She recalls feeling shocked and physically sickened. When she reached home, she repeatedly washed the spot where he had pressed himself against her, although she was conscious of not spending too long in the toilet, in case her family noticed that something was wrong. Some years later, on her first day of senior high school, she was groped on the commute home. After that, the groping and sexual assaults &'' men would often stick their hands inside her underwear &'' became a regular occurrence as she made her way to or from school in her uniform. Each time, she would run away, unsure of what to do. &'8220;I thought of myself as a child,&'8221; she reflects. &'8220;I could not understand that adults were excited by touching me.&'8221; It would be improper to express anger towards an adult, she thought, and she worried about attracting attention. Besides, her parents had never spoken to her about such things and how she ought to handle them. She recalls one incident particularly clearly. She was about 15 and on her way to school. A man began to touch her, putting his hand inside her underwear. He was aggressive and it hurt, she remembers. When the train stopped, she got off. But he grabbed her hand and told her: &'8220;Follow me.&'8221; Ogawa ran away. She believes that people saw what was going on, but nobody helped. She felt ashamed and complicit, she says. &'8220;He seems to have thought that I was pleased with his act,&'8221; the now 36-year-old reflects. &'8220;When I was in high school, every [girl] was a victim,&'8221; says Ogawa. &'8220;[We] didn't think we could do anything about it.&'8221; Today, Ogawa, a writer and cofounder of Press Labo, a small digital content production company in Shimokitazawa, an inner-city Tokyo neighbourhood, often writes about Japan's gender inequality and sexual violence issues. In 2015, she began writing about the country's long-standing problem with groping &'' or chikan, in Japanese &'' often experienced by schoolgirls on public transportation. Many victims stay silent, unable to talk about their experiences in a society which, by many accounts, trivialises this phenomenon. But, in the past two years, that has begun to change as more people speak up against it. Yayoi Matsunaga is one of those people. One morning in late January, the 51-year-old arrived at a coffee shop in the bustling neighbourhood of Shibuya with a suitcase of badges. The round badges, designed to deter gropers, feature illustrations such as a schoolgirl peering angrily from between her legs, or a crowd of stern-looking rabbits and include the messages, &'8220;Groping is a crime&'8221; and &'8220;Don't do it&'8221;. Each comes with a leaflet instructing the wearer to clearly display the badges on their bags, to stand confidently and to be vigilant. Matsunaga began her Osaka-based organisation, Groping Prevention Activities Centre, in 2015 after her friend's daughter was regularly molested while taking the train to school. Takako Tonooka, the pseudonym she has used in interviews with the Japan Times, confided in her mother, and the two tried various solutions to stop the attacks. They bought a stuffed toy which says &'8220;Don't do it&'8221; when pulled. They spoke to the police and the railway authorities, who said they would act if it was the same perpetrator &'' but it never was. Tonooka even wore her school skirt shorter and found that she was harassed less. Matsunaga says trains display posters telling groping victims to be brave and to speak up. Tonooka started practising saying &'8220;Stop it&'8221; and &'8220;No&'8221; at home. She began to confront offenders, who would then angrily deny touching her. Onlookers did not help. Eventually, she and her mother created a label to attach to her bag, which says, &'8220;Groping is a crime. I'm not going to give up&'8221; and features a picture of policemen catching perpetrators. It worked. But the label made Tonooka self-conscious, and Matsunaga says boys teased her. Matsunaga decided that Tonooka should not have to fight on her own, so she came up with an idea to involve others by crowdsourcing ideas for anti-groping badges. &'8220;High school girls are really into this 'kawaii' culture so they had to be cute,&'8221; she says. In November 2015 she launched a crowdfunding campaign that attracted 334 donors and raised 2.12 million yen (about $19,000). Then, she ran a badge design crowdsourcing contest. High school pupils, art school students, and freelance designers &'' many telling her it was the first time they'd thought about the issue &'' submitted 441 designs from which Matsunaga selected five. Her organisation gave away about 500 and three police stations handed out more. She now sells them online, for 410 yen ($3.70) each. From March, 11 department stores will stock them and she's aiming to secure more distributors near train stations. Apart from making the badges more widely available, Matsunaga also wants offenders to see them and think: &'8220;The world is changing, some people have started talking about it.&'8221; By involving students, Matsunaga believes she's encouraging them to talk about this issue from a young age. The badges have had a direct effect. Data collected from 70 students [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 9th, 2017

Alcala mother and daughter fall in Quezon shabu bust

By Aaron B. Recuenco and Danny J. Estacio Police arrested the sister-in-law and the niece of former Agriculture Secretary Proceso Alcala after they yielded more than 100 grams of shabu in a drug bust in Tayabas City Sunday night. Agents of the provincial .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsSep 12th, 2016

‘Hungry’ teens rob cabbie

TWO teenage boys were arrested for allegedly robbing a taxi driver at Mandurriao, Iloilo City, late afternoon of Sept 17, 2018. The suspects were reportedly Grade 8 and 9 students of a university in the city. At around 5:30 p.m., the two allegedly flagged down a Melvin Taxi at the Iloilo Business Park. The driver, […] The post ‘Hungry’ teens rob cabbie appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsSep 18th, 2018

Mother, daughter charged with estafa and anti-graft: Mayor denies accusations

GRAFT and estafa charges were filed against Valderrama, Antique mayor Jocelyn Posadas and her daughter for allegedly using her position and influence as former Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) lawyer to secure a private deal for the conversion of an agricultural land in Iloilo to industrial and for subsequent failure to account for funds amounting […] The post Mother, daughter charged with estafa and anti-graft: Mayor denies accusations appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

Two Filipino women arrested over alleged baby-sale deal

Two Filipino women have been charged with child trafficking after one of them allegedly attempted to sell a three-month-old baby to the other. Authorities said the child’s biological mother ha Source link link: Two Filipino women arrested over alleged baby-sale deal.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

Two Filipino women arrested over alleged baby-sale deal

Two Filipino women have been charged with child trafficking after one of them allegedly attempted to sell a three-month-old baby to the other. Authorities said the child's biological mother ha.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

Read the letter Lucy Torres-Gomez wrote for daughter Juliana 16 years ago

MANILA, Philippines – Juliana Gomez celebrated her 18th birthday on September 8, but her mother, former actress and Leyte representative Lucy Torres-Gomez was apparently already preparing for the moment 16 years ago. Lucy penned a letter to her daughter on September 10, 2002, on the set of the talk show, SiS. ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Guard arrested for raping daughter

A 50-year-old security guard was arrested in Barangay Moonwalk, Parañaque City Friday afternoon after he allegedly raped his 17-year-old daughter, an official said yesterday. Source link link: Guard arrested for raping daughter.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 9th, 2018

Guard arrested for raping daughter

A 50-year-old security guard was arrested in Barangay Moonwalk, Parañaque City Friday afternoon after he allegedly raped his 17-year-old daughter, an official said yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 9th, 2018

Cleaning up Tokyo s beaches: An Olympic task

This picture taken on August 1, 2018 shows a mother and her daughter wading in water at Odaiba seaside park in Tokyo Bay. On a blazing hot Tokyo summer day, children squeal with delight as they spl.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

LeBron James says in Kaepernick reference: I stand with Nike

By JOCELYN NOVECK, AP National Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Clutching his young daughter in his arms, LeBron James said he stands with Nike, a clear reference to the company's Colin Kaepernick ad campaign. The basketball superstar — and new Los Angeles Laker — made the remarks as he received an award Tuesday for both his style and his philanthropy from Harlem's Fashion Row. The fashion collective partnered with Nike for the New York event, both a fashion show and an awards ceremony that focused on diversity in the fashion world. The evening culminated in the reveal of the latest LeBron James Nike basketball shoe: a women's sneaker designed by three female African-American designers and inspired by strong African-American women. In emotional remarks, James paid tribute to the three women in his life — his mother, wife and 3-year-old daughter, Zhuri. He noted how his mother had raised him alone, and given him "a sense of pride, a sense of strength, a sense of no worry." "Because of you, Gloria James, I'm able to be in a position today where I can give back and showcase why I believe African-American women are the most powerful women in the world." The NBA star, who was wearing one of his favored shrunken-fit shorts suits by designer Thom Browne, called his daughter "my rock." "People always told me if you ever have a girl, she'll change you," said James, who also has two sons. "I was like, nobody's changing me, I'm a man." But she did, he said. "Not only did she change me, she's made me a better person," James said. "A more dedicated person, a stronger person, I guess a more sensitive person." Closing his remarks, he said he stood "for anybody who believes in change." He added: "I stand with Nike, all day, every day." Kaepernick, the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback, unveiled his first ad of the new campaign Monday. "Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything," it said. The new endorsement deal has sparked vigorous debate, with some fans expressing displeasure over the apparel giant's support of a player known for starting a wave of protests among NFL players against police brutality, racial inequality and other social issues. Some angry fans were even burning and cutting out the signature swoosh logos on their gear — and posting the results on social media. But Kaepernick and his Nike campaign, which marks the 30th anniversary of Nike's "Just Do It," received plenty of support from the fashion world in attendance Tuesday. Bethann Hardison, an activist for diversity in fashion and a former supermodel who was also honored by Harlem's Row, said she was happy with Nike's move. "It's such a divided situation in our world right now," she said of the negative reaction by some fans. "But I'm such a huge, huge, wholehearted supporter of Colin that I'm very proud that someone understands what he's done and (is giving) him some kudos." Prominent African-American designer Tracy Reese said she loved the new Nike campaign. "It was tastefully done," she said. "And really, this is the time to stand up for what you believe in. Colin Kaepernick has done that and I think that we need to follow his example and really go where the heart leads, instead of where everybody expects you to go." Also honored at the ceremony were Harlem streetwear designer Dapper Dan and stylist Jason Rembert. A fashion show highlighted the work of designers Kimberly Goldson, Undra Duncan and Fe Noel, who together helped create the new shoe......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

Golden Grace

The daughter of two superstars. Wife, mother, friend, senator, presidential candidate, showbiz royalty......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

Nine-year-old Indian girl gang-raped, murdered

Indian police have arrested a woman and four others after her nine-year-old stepdaughter was allegedly gang-raped, murdered and mutilated, in the latest horrific crime to shock the country. The child's decomposed body was found on Tuesday hidden behind bushes about a kilometer from her home in the Baramulla district of Indian-administered Kashmir, police said. Her father had reported her missing 12 days earlier. Police said the woman, aged 36, was jealous of her stepdaughter and of her husband's second wife, and on August 24 took the girl to a forested area. There she allegedly directed her own 14-year-old son and his two teenage friends, aged 14 and 19, to take turns in rapi...Keep on reading: Nine-year-old Indian girl gang-raped, murdered.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018