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Man’s last wish: Don’t send flowers, give shoes

SAGINAW, Michigan, United States --- Shoes, not flowers. The final wish of a Michigan man was fulfilled Monday when dozens of children's shoes were donated at his funeral in Saginaw. Dennis Wright of Perry died of cancer at age 61. He had asked mourners to skip flowers and instead give something that could make a difference in someone's life. As a result, the floor at Snow Funeral Home was filled with boxes of new shoes. They will be donated to families that need them. Bryan Wright tells TV station WNEM that his father wore shoes until they had holes when he was growing up in Saginaw. He says Dennis Wright was "always excited" when he could finally get a new pair. The eld...Keep on reading: Man’s last wish: Don’t send flowers, give shoes.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJul 4th, 2018

NCAA: Former Red Lions give an assist to Letran s Jerrick Balanza

The NCAA’s fiercest foes have joined hands to help out ailing Jerrick Balanza. Frankie Lim, San Beda University’s former head coach, and 23 other people who worked with him in his time there have pledged financial aid to Colegio de San Juan de Letran’s Balanza who just recently had successful surgery on a tumor in the temporal lobe of his brain.  “We, the former San Beda Red Lions who played under head coach Frankie Lim and team manager Mike Advani, with Borgie Hermida as team captain, express our solidarity with you during your most challenging time,” they said in the letter they gave to Balanza on Tuesday. The letter then continued, “Please accept this humble assistance from the former San Beda Red Lions. We are one with you, brother! Animo San Beda! Arriba Letran!” The amount was not disclosed in the letter. The other former and current Red Lions who pledged financial aid to the ailing Knight are team manager Mike Advani, coach Ed Cordero, coach Bonnie Garcia, coach Mark Jomaleza, coach JB Sison, coach Mike Sunga, team captain Borgie Hermida,  Yousif Aljamal, Baser Amer, Anjo Caram, James Chua, Rome Dela Rosa, Bambam Gamalinda, Garvo Lanete, Ryusei Koga, Melo Lim, Dave Marcelo, Jaypee Mendoza, Jake Pascual, Kyle Pascual, Shaq Taganas, Chico Tirona, and Jerome Villanueva. Balanza needs Php 500,000 for the brain surgery he had and those who are interested in helping the father of two may send their donations to this account: Bank: BDO Branch: BDO Intramuros Account Name: Colegio de San Juan de Letran, Inc. Account Number: ‎4500003129 --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News12 hr. 49 min. ago

Jimmy Butler made his move - now it s Wolves turn

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press MIAMI (AP) — Jimmy Butler knows that NBA players can force their way into trades. Forcing their way into a trade that suits the player, that’s an entirely different story. Butler has told the Minnesota Timberwolves that he has no intentions of re-signing with the club next summer, his way of saying “trade me now” or “lose me for nothing later.” The Athletic first reported Butler’s decision. It’s a power move that players can make. Thing is, it comes with risk — because what happens next is not up to Butler. This was the lesson learned from the Kawhi Leonard situation, from the Kyrie Irving situation, from the Paul George situation. Leonard supposedly was hoping for a trade from San Antonio to the Los Angeles Clippers. Irving wanted to be sent by Cleveland to either San Antonio and Miami. George was widely assumed to leave Indiana for the Los Angeles Lakers. Leonard is in Toronto , at least for one season. Irving got sent to Boston , and is a free agent next summer. George landed in Oklahoma City, and probably will be there for years. Not a whole lot of people saw those exact moves coming. But the teams did what was best for them. In all three cases, the Spurs, the Cavs and the Pacers got the best deal they could make. Now it’s Butler’s turn. It should be easy to deduce that Butler can see himself with the Clippers, New York or Brooklyn, since all of those teams will have the cap space to give him the $140 million (or $190 million) max contract he’s seeking. Miami would interest him as well, since Butler has raved about the city in the past and he’s still very tight with fellow Marquette alum and former Chicago teammate Dwyane Wade. Toronto is believed to be on his radar. Playing alongside LeBron James with the Lakers is something that hardly anyone in the NBA would sneeze at. A person with knowledge of the Timberwolves’ situation said that Minnesota has been talking to multiple teams, gauging the Butler market. The person spoke to The Associated Press Thursday on condition of anonymity because talks are ongoing. The Timberwolves aren’t exactly in a position of strength, since now everyone knows that Butler wants out and training camps start in a few days. But that doesn’t mean Minnesota doesn’t control how this will play out. When Leonard asked for his trade, the Spurs had the luxury of time and wound up getting a very good deal from Toronto. The Cavs and the Pacers also had plenty of time to work out something to their likings when moving Irving and George. Minnesota doesn’t have that same cushion. That’ll eventually lead to Butler being asked why he waited until the final days of the offseason to inform the team of his unhappiness, because not only did he potentially limit Minnesota’s options but he could have limited his own. “You should always try to get a perennial All-Star,” former NBA forward Caron Butler told TMZ Sports, adding that he thinks Jimmy Butler is “a real winner.” The Timberwolves can basically make any of the following decisions: — Move Butler right away and start camp without distraction; — Hang onto him for a while and see if he changes his mind; — Work out a sign-and-trade; — Make him play out the year. Butler was their leading scorer last season. He’s an All-Star. He helped them end a 14-year playoff drought. Losing him, no matter what they get back, wouldn’t seem to help the Wolves’ chances of returning to the playoffs in a still-loaded Western Conference. Sometimes, even irreconcilable differences work out. Houston won NBA championships in 1994 and 1995, led by Hakeem Olajuwon. People forget that in 1992, he demanded a trade in a very ugly situation sparked by the Rockets thinking that he was faking a hamstring injury. They mended fences and won titles. Most of the time, though, when a player wants out, they get out. Dwight Howard demanded to be traded by Orlando in 2012, and got his way. Shaquille O’Neal wanted to leave the Lakers in 2004, got sent to the Heat, and then eventually forced them to send him to Phoenix. Chris Paul and Chris Webber have forced trades, too. And it’s not a new thing — Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wanted trades and got them. Butler got his trade ball rolling. Where it goes, at least this season, that’s up to Wolves coach and president Tom Thibodeau — whose own future in Minnesota might be hanging by a thread as well right now — more than anyone else. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

Eight breakout players who wowed in PVL s Collegiate Conference

Collegiate volleyball won’t be around until the second semester but the recently-concluded Premier Volleyball League (PVL) Collegiate Conference on ABS-CBN S+A gave us a glimpse of what the girls may be raring to give us once their tournament in their respective leagues finally open. Some girls came out of nowhere to really provide the fireworks in the conference and came away with new fans and admirers thanks to their impressive play on the floor. As the PVL’s Open Conference is about to part its curtains, let’s take a look at the eight collegiate volleybelles who totally captured our hearts thanks to their display of heart and skill.   1.) Tonnie Rose Ponce, Adamson University (Tonnie Rose Ponce (libero) made a mark in the last PVL Collegiate Conference when she bagged a Mythical Six award) Adamson head coach Air Padda is proud of Ponce, her team’s libero, for being the best cheerleader of her teammates on the floor. Even with her small stature, she plays big with a fighting spirit that has endeared her to the fans. It still came as a surprise, however, to the dimunitive Ponce, to be named as one of the Mythical Six and the conference’s Best Libero. Maybe not for Padda, who has always seen the leadership potential of her squad’s cheerleader.   2.) Rosie Rosier, University of the Philippines (The sophomore Lady Fighting Maroon was instrumental in ending the school's 36 year major title drought in the PVL Collegiate Conference) Rosier was instrumental in breaking the UP Lady Fighting Maroons’ 36-year championship drought as the sophomore carried the team on her back in a thrilling five-set Game 1 match with the FEU Lady Tamaraws. She pumped in 15 points via 13 attacks to have probably one of her best birthday celebrations to date, and followed it up with a 10-point output in Game 2 to help her squad bring home the Collegiate Conference crown.   3.) Milena Alessandrini, University of Santo Tomas (Second year Golden Tigress Milena Alessandrini powered the Thomasians in the FInal FOur ddespite nursing a shoulder injury) UST’s Fil-Italian tower introduced herself to Filipino volleyball fans when she won Rookie of the Year in UAAP Season 80. While it’s not easy to be on a different land where everyone speaks a different language, Alessandrini has been quick to adapt to what the coach wants done on the floor based on her performance in PVL. Her best game happened in the Battle for Third against Adamson where she broke out with a 31-point outing, a sign of things to come for the Golden Tigresses’ campaign in the coming UAAP wars.   4.) Celine Domingo, Far Eastern University (Celine Domingo followed up her stellar UAAP season 80 campaign with a masterful PVL Collegiate Conference under Coach George Pascua) Veteran setter Kyle Negrito is FEU’s top player and Jerrili Malabanan is their main weapon, no doubt, but Domingo is poised to take over the team as she continues to make an impact in the net in the recently-concluded PVL Collegiate Conference. The conference’s First Best Middle Blocker has been one of Coach George Pascual’s reliable players that are expected to carry the scoring duties now that super senior Bernadeth Pons’ career with the school is over. Too bad she was set back by a knee injury in Game One of the Finals against UP, which also sidelined her in Game Two.   5.) Jan Daguil, College of Saint Benilde (Jan Daguil (16) was one of the surprises for CSB in the PVL Collegiate Conference) With their MVP, Jeanette Panaga, moving on from her school career, the College of St. Benilde Lady Blazers are hard-pressed to find a replacement. So far, Marites Pablo has emerged as the biggest candidate, but not too far behind is Daguil, who has come up big for them when they needed the points the most. During their battle for a Final Four spot in the recently-concluded PVL Collegiate Conference, Daguil led her team with 15 points, all on kills, to turn back the San Sebastian College-Recoletos Lady Stags.   6.) Joyce Sta. Rita, San Sebastian College-Recoletos (Joyce Sta. Rita is the only holdover remaining for the Lady Stags but she is determined to be their main pillar) Sta. Rita is the only holdover from Coach Roger Gorayeb’s compact 7-woman squad from a year ago in NCAA Season 93, where she was named Second Best Middle Blocker. That did not stop her from being an example to her new teammates as she fought in each set and match to keep the young Lady Stags competitive even if they failed to notch a single win.   7.) Satrianni Espiritu, San Beda University (Satrianni Espiritu (10) looks to be the final piece of the puzzle for the SBU Lady Red Spikers) Everyone talks about SBU stars Cesca Racraquin and the Viray twins. But another player that should be acknowledged is Espiritu, who consistently chipped in to keep the Red Lionesses in contention with her consistent showing game in and game out. If her PVL Collegiate Conference showing translates to the incoming NCAA wars, the other ladies better be shaking in their shoes as the Red Lionesses will be a mighty force to be reckoned with. 8.) Cindy Imbo, University of Perpetual Help System Dalta (With Bianca Tripoli out of commission, Cindy Imbo stepped up in the last PVL Collegiate Conference) Bianca Tripoli is the main pillar of strength for the Lady Altas. It was a shame that she had to limp off the PVL Collegiate Conference due to a mild tear in her quadriceps. Carrying the load for her during her absence is Imbo, who displayed her scoring abilities while their captain was injured. In a crucial game against favorite FEU Lady Tamaraws, Imbo fired away 15 points to lead the team. While they did not win the match, it showed her capability to step up when needed. Watch for these ladies when the 2018 seasons of the NCAA and UAAP women’s volleyball tournaments begin. Meanwhile, stay tuned for more scintillating volleyball action once the PVL resumes with their Open Conference this Saturday (September 22) on S+A, S+A HD, and via livestream......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Celebrating nature in Chinese painting

Artist-teacher Ceasar Cheng recently featured some of his works at the Solaire Resort & Casino, in an exhibit titled "Oriental Brushstrokes II," and sponsored by Solaire and the Confucius Institute of the Ateneo de Manila University. There were colorful paintings of eagles and peacocks, Spanish colonial churches, kalesa and fierce-looking dragons. Flowers of different kinds and colors were in evidence as well. One is bombarded with so many colors at Cheng's exhibit, and the masterful brushstrokes give the paintings a lifelike quality. "When I was in high school, I enrolled in summer courses. It was when Taiwan sent masters to the Philippines to teach traditional Chinese pai...Keep on reading: Celebrating nature in Chinese painting.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 25th, 2018

PBA: Romeo Travis heard about LeBron s Laker move six months before it happened

You might recognize Romeo Travis, you know, the former PBA Best Import and LeBron James' former high school teammate and long-time friend. Yeah he's back in the Philippines to play in the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup for the Magnolia Hotshots. He's changed teams in the PBA, just like his old buddy LeBron in the NBA. And while Travis' change of uniforms in this side of the world came with a little bit of shock, the King's latest decision didn't surprise him one bit. "I wasn't surprised. I wasn't surprised at all," Travis said of LeBron's move to the Lakers. "I heard about it since January, you know? Depending on how [the Cavs'] season went, I wasn't surprised at all," he added. LeBron and Travis were part of their very own "Fab 5" at St. Vincent-St. Mary High School and Akron together with Dru Joyce III, Sian Cotton, and Willie McGee. Travis joined the crew during their sophomore season and they all won multiple state championships together. Travis says they'd remain friends over a decade later and they are in constant communication like normal people. "We're in a group chat. We text all the time in the group chat," he said. "You know, we send funny videos, we're just friends," Travis added. Travis also added that he's happy for his old friend. LeBron's move to the Lakers was seen as something that is more than basketball and Travis is delighted that his old buddy is once again in a great environment. He's confident that the Lakers will exceed expectations in the upcoming NBA season. "Yeah, I'm happy for him. He's happy. He went to where he wanted to be so I'm happy for him, happy for his family. I think it's going to be a good situation," Travis said of LeBron. "They're going to surprise a lot of people with that [Lakers] roster. Because they're going to give a lot of teams defensive problems. They're going to switch everything, they have a hybrid lineup. LeBron at the 5, and that's just scary," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

Breaking Down Gilas vs Kazakhstan

From the get-go, it was obvious that this iteration of Gilas Pilipinas would be a bit different. Coach Yeng Guiao, who could have opted on a more offensively potent starting unit, decided to go with familiarity and defense, starting three players from the Rain or Shine core in Gabe Norwood, Maverick Ahanmisi, and Beau Belga, and inserting JP Erram at center and Stanley Pringle at the point guard spot. The effect was immediately evident, as the corner triple from Norwood off a Pringle assist in the first play of the game set the tone. The trio of Norwood-Ahanmisi-Pringle showed why they are probably one of the strongest, more athletic, quick, and defensive-minded perimeter trios that Gilas has fielded in recent years. Practically switching everything on the outside, they did not allow Kazakhstan any room to operate, nor to get any rhythm from the field while forcing multiple turnovers, with Ahanmisi getting two steals that led to transition layups early. It was a 12-2 start for the Philippines before Kazakhstan could blink. The only thing going for the opposing team was their offensive rebounding, albeit these only prevented further transition baskets from the Philippines, as the Kazakhs couldn’t convert on the put backs. One thing Gilas has to adjust to however, is the way the international referees call the game, as their bigs – Almazan and Belga – got into foul trouble early, and penalty situation allowed Kazakhstan to make some headway from the line despite shooting just 1/13 from the field in the first. It was a low scoring first quarter, with Gilas held scoreless for the last 4 minutes and Kazakhstan unable to capitalize on the penalty situation, missing multiple charities. The quarter ended 16-9, Philippines. The second quarter started with Kazakhstan giving up their 7th turnover, which would be a recurring theme throughout the game thanks to Gilas’ defensive pressure. With 6 steals through the first 15 minutes of the game, Gilas prevented their opponents from getting any rhythm offensively, despite Rustam Yergali coming out more aggressive on the offensive end.  James Yap came off the bench and poured in 7 points in the first half, hitting 1 of Gilas’ 6 first half triples. They were 6/19 from deep while holding Kazakhstan, who is known for their outside shooting, to 1/12 at the half. Defense was once again the key in the 2nd quarter, as Gilas allowed just 11 Kazakhstan points, with themselves scoring 25. They forced 15 turnovers with 11 steals total in the first half, scoring 18 turnover points as a result; while they themselves committed just 5 turnovers, yielding 0 turnover points for the Kazakhs. The only downside was they gave up 18 freethrows to Kazakhstan, who luckily only converted on 11 of them. The half ended with the Philippines holding a commanding 21-pt lead, 41-20. Stanley Pringle was impressive to say the least, running the offense and controlling the pace of the game, living up to the all the accolades thrown his way prior to the Asiad. Kazakhstan came out of the halftime huddle with a lot more urgency, employing full court pressure all throughout the 3rd quarter, and outscoring Gilas 9-5 in the first 2 1/2 minutes. They also continued to hold the rebounding edge, especially on the offensive glass. While the Philippines continued to pressure defensively, doubling the ballscreens, Kazakhstan was able to adjust, hitting the rolling big man on multiple occasions for easy undergoal baskets. It was here that Fil-German Standhardinger went to work, getting offensive rebounds and scoring on back-to-back baskets midway through the 3rd, despite picking up his fourth personal with still 4 minutes left in the quarter. This turned out to be Kazakhstan’s best quarter, and the only one where the breached the 20-pt mark, outscoring Gilas 23-20. Whether it was the adrenaline rush with the arrival of Jordan Clarkson in the venue or an earful from Coach Yeng at the end of the third, Gilas started out much better in the fourth, with Pringle once again leading the charge. He hit back-to-back baskets to get to his game high 18pts to start the fourth period; while Almazan – who had multiple skirmishes throughout the game – also hit back-to-back baskets. By the time Paul Lee hit his 3rd consecutive triple midway through the fourth – his only field goals of the game – the game had been blown wide open on a Gilas 20-9 fourth quarter run, 81-52. At that point everyone started getting into the scoring picture while they kept the defensive intensity and held Kazakhstan to just 16 points in the fourth for an emphatic 96-59 opening day win. It was an impressive start to the tournament for Gilas, despite the absence of Kazakhstan’s best player due to injury, and more so with all that had happened prior to arriving in Indonesia. They now have four days to prepare for a key matchup with powerhouse China. With Clarkson, they get not just another elite athlete on the perimeter, but a legitimate NBA talent in his prime. It will take a lot more than that however, as the game against Kazakhstan showed. There will be no room for error against the huge and athletic Chinese frontline, and their younger guards. Defensively they’ll have to communicate as well, if not better; and our bigs will have to work extra hard to box out their Chinese counterparts. We can’t give up too many fouls, as the Chinese are tremendously better free throw shooters, and putting our already thin frontline in foul trouble will further limit their ability to implement Coach Yeng’s defensive gameplan. Offensively, I’m confident we have the talent to compete or even surpass China in the perimeter, and everyone knows Coach Yeng is a master at bringing out the best in his players. If our guards can wreak havoc and break China’s perimeter defense, and we’ll be able to get open looks both inside and out. If our bigs, Belga, Erram, Standhardinger, Almazan, and Taulava can limit China’s 2nd chance opportunities and give us a decent amount of 2nd looks, then we definitely have a shot. This Gilas squad definitely looks promising. I’m sure glad we decided to send one.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Pay up or else: Spain warns of online sextortion

MADRID, Spain – Spanish police warned on Saturday, August 11, of a massive blackmail campaign to expose web users' supposed visits to porn sites unless they pay up – a technique police calls 'sextortion'. "Criminals send an email in which they give a personal password belonging to the target, and which ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 11th, 2018

Koreas extend conciliatory steps to Asian Games

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — With the Koreas, there's no separating their sports from their politics. The war-separated rivals will take their reconciliation steps to the Asian Games in Jakarta and Palembang, Indonesia, where they will jointly march in the opening ceremony and field combined teams in basketball, rowing and canoeing. "Sports have played the role of peacemaker between the Koreas," said Kim Seong-jo, vice chairman of South Korea's Olympic committee and the country's chef de mission at the Asian Games. "If the combined teams put out good performances and win medals, that would be putting the cherry on the top." North and South Korea have used sports diplomacy this year in a bid to decrease animosity and initiate a new round of global diplomatic efforts to resolve the nuclear standoff with Pyongyang. South Korea leaders consider goodwill gestures as crucial to keep the positive atmosphere alive for what could become a long and difficult attempt to persuade the North to give up its nuclear and missile programs. There's not much Seoul can do beyond such gestures, though, as joint economic projects are out of the question when lifting sanctions against North Korea is far beyond the South's control. The more substantial discussions on the North's denuclearization — including what, when and how it would occur— are always going to be between Washington and Pyongyang. Here's a look at what the Koreas are planning for the Asian Games and their ebbs and flows in sports diplomacy: ___ BLUE FLAGS AND COMBINED TEAMS In the opening ceremony in Jakarta, athletes from North and South Korea will parade together under the flag featuring a blue map that symbolized a unified Korean Peninsula. It will be virtual repeat of the joint march during February's Winter Olympics in the South Korean ski resort of Pyeongchang, minus the gloves, parkas and fur hats. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent hundreds of athletes, artists and government officials to the Pyeongchang Olympics. The Koreas also fielded their first combined Olympic team in women's ice hockey, which drew passionate support from crowds despite losing all five of its games with a combined score of 28-2. At the Asian Games, the Koreas will be expected to deliver more than just feel-good stories. There's pressure for the investment to yield gold. A group of 34 North Korean athletes, coaches and officials have been in South Korea since last month for combined teams in women's basketball and the men's and women's events in rowing and canoeing. Coach Lee Moon-kyu, who has retained a core of South Korean players who won gold at the 2014 Asian Games at home in Incheon, got a first-hand look at North Korean players during exhibitions in Pyongyang in early July. Lee later picked three North Korean players for the Asian Games squad, including center Ro Suk Yong. Lee will also have a North Korean assistant coach on his bench. The Koreans will face Taiwan, Indonesia, Kazakhstan and India in their preliminary group. South Korean forward Lim Yung-hui said the chemistry between the players has been improving. "The Northern players share the same goal of the gold medal and we talk a lot about how we should be putting out a good performance there," Lim said. "We weren't given much time, but we are practicing hard in a positive atmosphere." The Koreas will field combined teams in dragon boat events in canoeing and the lightweight men's four, lightweight men's eight and lightweight women's double sculls in rowing. If a combined team wins gold, athletes on the podium will hear the traditional folk song of "Arirang,"used in both Koreas as an unofficial anthem for peace, instead of their respective national anthems. The Korean athletes are likely to become an attraction at the Asian Games, where the international media will follow closely. At the Pyeongchang Olympics, South Korean figure skater Kam Alex Kang-chan created a media frenzy by taking a selfie with North Korea's Kim Ju Sik and posting it on Instagram. The photo recalled a famous 2016 selfie taken by two North and South Korean gymnasts at the Rio Olympics which International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach described as a "great gesture." ___ THEY DON'T ALWAYS PLAY NICE The Koreas have a history of using sports to foster diplomacy since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War. The 1991 world table tennis championships in Japan were the first time the Koreas fielded a combined team at a major international event. The atmosphere wasn't always friendly, though. During the height of their Cold War rivalry and recurring periods of animosity since, sports often became an alternate political battlefield. North Korean athletes and coaches would reject handshakes with their South Korean competitors and berate South Korean reporters during news conferences. The sports detente of 1991 evaporated when a North Korean athlete who competed at the world judo championships in Barcelona defected and arrived in South Korea amid heavy media coverage. North Korea boycotted the 1986 Asian Games and the '88 Summer Olympics in Seoul, and relations dramatically worsened on the eve of the Seoul Olympics with the bombing of a South Korean passenger jet that killed all 115 aboard in December 1987. The inter-Korean warmth heading into this year's Asian Games contrasts with the awkwardness between the rivals surrounding the 2014 Asiad held in South Korea. Seoul's then-conservative government invited North Korean athletes to compete, but made it clear it had no interest in joint marches or combined teams. North Korean subsequently withdrew an offer to send its all-female cheering squad to Incheon after squabbling with the hosts over costs. North Korean leader Kim did send a senior government delegation to the closing ceremony, but they returned home without meeting then-South Korean President Park Geun-hye. The North was still seething over the Asian Game treatment years later as it gleefully observed Park's presidency crashing over a corruption scandal. "The Park Geun-hye group's mad confrontational racket is to blame for why (the North Korean) visit to Incheon did not result in improved relations," the North said in a statement in April last year. ___ WILL THE GOOD TIMES LAST? Kim has found a willing counterpart in Moon, a liberal who won the presidential by-elections to replace Park last year. Since the Pyeongchang Olympics, Kim has met Moon twice and leveraged the summits to get to U.S. President Donald Trump. After their June summit in Singapore, Kim and Trump issued a vague aspirational goal for a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula without describing specific plans. Sports exchanges and other goodwill gestures are important policy tools for Moon, who wants Seoul to be in the "driver's seat" in international efforts to deal with Pyongyang. The Koreas have also agreed to resume temporary reunions between relatives separated by the war and are holding military talks to reduce tensions across their heavily armed border. "Hopefully, (the Asian Games) will provide an opportunity to use sports to facilitate diplomacy and cooperation," Moon said while meeting Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi in Seoul last month. Seoul's presidential office hasn't announced yet whether Moon would attend the opening ceremony in Jakarta on Aug. 18. Whatever happens in Indonesia or with nuclear negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang, the Koreas will always have those heartening selfies posted by athletes. "Sports can be used to build momentum and trust, but they don't solve fundamental problems," said Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert at Seoul's Dongguk University and a policy adviser to Moon. "There's not much South Korea can currently do, but at least it's trying to actively do the things it can to keep the positive atmosphere alive. ".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Carmelo moves closer to Rockets after reported three-team trade

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst Half a Banana Boat Crew is better than nothing. Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) reported trade of Carmelo Anthony from Oklahoma City to Atlanta as part of a three-team deal also involving Philadelphia -- and which will be followed by the Hawks waiving Anthony -- obviously clears the way for Anthony to join Chris Paul in Houston, as has been rumored for weeks once it became clear OKC had to get rid of Anthony to lower what would have been a lethal luxury tax bill next year. The deal sends guard Dennis Schroder from the Hawks, which drafted him 17th overall in 2013 and who has been Atlanta’s incumbent starter the last two seasons, to the Thunder for Anthony and a Lottery protected (1-14) 2022 first-round pick. In addition, forward Mike Muscala was re-routed from Atlanta to Philadelphia through Oklahoma City, which will receive former first-rounder Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot from Philly. The 76ers will send third-year wing Justin Anderson to Atlanta to complete the deal. Anthony has told people for more than a week that he expects to wind up with the Rockets, according to a league source. The Rockets have been in flux this offseason, losing defensive stalwart and team leader Trevor Ariza in free agency to Phoenix, along with Luc Mbah a Moute, who returned to the Clippers after one season in Houston. The Rockets helped stanch some of their defensive losses by signing 3 and D wing James Ennis (career 36 percent on three's) from Detroit last week. Anthony would not help the Rockets much at the defensive end. But the 34-year-old Anthony can still score, even though his average fell to 16.2 points last season as the Thunder’s third option behind Russell Westbrook and Paul George. Houston’s offense doesn’t need upgrading -- the Rockets were just behind top-ranked Golden State in Offensive Rating last season (112.2), and of course, obliterated the rest of the league in three-point attempts and makes. But after Paul missed the last two games of the Western Conference finals against the Warriors, Houston’s offense bogged down at the worst possible times -- most notably the second half of Game 7, when the Rockets missed a seemingly impossible 27 consecutive three-point attempts. Anthony isn’t a great three-point shooter by any means, but he’s still a load in the post and is still able to get to the foul line -- his last season in New York, when he was more of a primary option, he still averaged almost five free throws a game. The Thunder’s main motivation to trade Anthony rather than use its stretch provision to get his $27.8 million off its books for next season was not just economic, though that was a key factor. OKC will save less money by trading Anthony rather than stretching him, but in doing so the Thunder will also address a major need that was clear to any who’ve watched the team the last couple of years -- an offense that falls apart whenever Westbrook is on the bench. If OKC had just stretched Anthony, it would have had $9.6 million in dead money on its books that it couldn’t have done anything with this year. The Thunder chose instead to take on Schroder’s $15.5 million for next year. Acquiring Schroder, who was obsolete in Atlanta once the Hawks decided to acquire the rights to rookie point guard Trae Young on Draft night, gives OKC a young veteran who can create offense for himself and others when Westbrook needs a blow. Schroder averaged 19.4 points and 6.2 assists last season. But Schroder has to deal with pending legal action against him stemming from an incident last September in DeKalb County, Georgia, in which he and three other men were involved in a fight with another man, who reported suffered a torn ACL and meniscus. The charges against Schroder were recommended to be upgraded from misdemeanor to felony. Assuming the charges are resolved before the start of the season -- a good assumption, or the Thunder would have never signed off on the deal -- OKC will upgrade its roster with a player who will provide incredible versatility as either a top-notch reserve, a player who could start alongside Westbrook or, at the worst, could be moved down the road. Schroder has three years and $46.5 million left on his deal. Atlanta made its intentions for Schroder clear when it picked Young rather than Luka Doncic, whose rights the Hawks sent to Dallas in a Draft night deal, and traded for veteran point guard Jeremy Lin from Brooklyn earlier this month. The Hawks just wanted a first for Schroder, and got one from OKC, which wouldn’t have been able to move Anthony’s whole contract without it. Muscala’s $5 million had to be included to make the deal work financially. He became coveted by Philadelphia after free agent Nemanja Bjelica backed out of a verbal agreement with the 76ers this week. Philly needed a stretch four who could shoot, and Muscala is a career 38 percent three-point shooter. Anderson was a former first-rounder (21st overall in 2015) with the Mavericks whose athletic ability and work ethic have made him a team favorite both in Dallas and Philly. The rebuilding Hawks will give him a look on the wings along with Taurean Prince, DeAndre’ Bembry and first-round pick Kevin Huerter. The Hawks have been shopping veteran forward Kent Bazemore since before this year’s Draft. SiriusXM radio host and longtime NBA reporter Mitch Lawrence was first to report the potential deal between the Thunder and Hawks. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

Rules on cut in calls, texting access rates out by next week, says NTC

The National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) is planning to release its guidelines for lower call and text messaging access rates by next week. NTC Deputy Commissioner Edgrado Cabarios said in a recent interview that this followed the May 11, 2018 order of the Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT) to lower interconnection rates to the "minimum amount." Cabarios said mobile operators PLDT Inc. and Globe Telecom were expected to give their comments by July 13, 2018. He expects the NTC to formulate its guidelines within a week after the said date. The interconnection rate is an access fee charged by a telco to allow their subscribers to call and send te...Keep on reading: Rules on cut in calls, texting access rates out by next week, says NTC.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 11th, 2018

400 e-waste containers abandoned at Thailand ports

BANGKOK --- About 400 cargo containers full of electronic waste, plastic scrap and discarded metal have been left unclaimed at Thailand's two major ports as authorities crack down on illegal e-waste handling. If they are not claimed within the next 15 days, the Customs Department will either dispose of them or send them back to their point of departure. Most of them come from the United States, Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong and China. "Importers have already failed to claim these containers within the 30-day timeframe but we will give them 15 more days," Customs Department spokesman Chaiyut Kumkun said yesterday. He said the next normal step would be to inform the export trans...Keep on reading: 400 e-waste containers abandoned at Thailand ports.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Nigeria complains about video review call against Argentina

By Jerome Pugmire, Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — After going out of the World Cup, Nigeria complained about not being awarded a second penalty in a 2-1 defeat to Argentina on Tuesday. There were about 15 minutes of a tense game remaining, and Nigeria was enjoying a strong spell of pressure at St. Petersburg Stadium, when the latest video review talking point of the tournament came. Marcos Rojo was the only Argentina defender in the penalty box, and under pressure from striker Odion Ighalo lurking behind him, when he jumped high to head Ahmed Musa's deflected cross away from danger. He didn't succeed. Instead, the Manchester United defender completely mistimed the header and the ball ended up glancing off his left arm, and then falling invitingly to Ighalo near the penalty spot. Ighalo had lots of time to pick his spot, but blazed the ball wide of the left post. Nigeria's players were sure it was a penalty, however, and Turkish referee Cuneyt Cakir — who awarded Nigeria a penalty early in the second half — used video to review this one and stood by his initial decision not to award a spot kick, much to the frustration of Nigeria's players. "I don't understand how that was not a penalty," captain John Obi Mikel said. "It was a clear handball. If you look at this game yesterday against Portugal, this was even worse." Mikel was referring to Iran's late penalty against Portugal in a 1-1 draw on Monday — awarded for a handball after a video review — and he felt Rojo got away with it. Rojo went on to score Argentina's late winner to send his side through, and put Nigeria out. "He (Rojo) had the ball and it hit his hand and it was open. Maybe the referee didn't want to give a second penalty," Mikel said. "For us, we've seen the replay, it was a clear handball. He looked at the VAR, the ball hit the hand." Mikel added: "I asked him for explanation, did the ball hit the hand? He said 'Yes." Why is it not a penalty? He did not know." But video replays suggested that there was no intent from Rojo to move his arm anywhere near the ball, as he was looking in a different direction when he headed it sideways. It thus appeared unintentional as Rojo headed the ball inadvertently down onto his arm. While Nigeria coach Gernot Rohr also believed the penalty should have been awarded, he was more understanding of Cakir's position. "I believe it was a hand," he said. "I didn't see the video. It is difficult for a referee to make a good interpretation." But aside from blaming video review, the Super Eagles may also want to look at their own poor finishing at the end......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Bong Go distributes free shoes

SPECIAL Assistant to the President Christopher ‘’Bong’’ Go asked Filipinos to help his “Sapatos ni SAP, Tsinelas Ka-Swap” program which aims to give shoes to deserving poor Filipinos like farmers, students, out of school youths who dream of becoming basketball players someday. The program was formed by individuals and some….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJun 24th, 2018

Portugal can eliminate Morocco from World Cup

MOSCOW --- Cristiano Ronaldo and Portugal can send Morocco to an early World Cup exit on Wednesday. A second straight defeat would ensure elimination for the North African side which has not let an opposing player score in this World Cup campaign since 2015. An own goal by Morocco forward Aziz Bouhaddouz in stoppage-time was decisive in a 1-0 loss to Iran last Friday in a game it mostly dominated. "Because they lost the first game, Morocco will give everything. They have no other choice," Portugal forward Andre Silva said. Portugal's opening 3-3 draw with Spain in a World Cup classic means Morocco must take at least one point before the Spanish play Iran in Wednesday's late game in...Keep on reading: Portugal can eliminate Morocco from World Cup.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

PBA: NLEX still clinging to flicker of hope remaining

With a 2-7 record, the NLEX Road Warriors' playoff hopes are getting slimmer by the minute. However, for coach Yeng Guiao, NLEX will still be trying to hold on to a 'flicker of hope remaining,' if they could win their remaining games against San Miguel and Magnolia, and hope for the best to force a tie at the bottom of the playoff picture. The 11th-seeded NLEX were able to make things interesting in the third quarter, taking a four-point lead briefly against the top-seeded Aces before collapsing in the final quarter. Even though they were not able to last against the Aces, Guiao commended his wards for making the game competitive up until the buzzer, a trait he wants to see the rest of the way. "If we're not lucky enough to make the playoffs this conference we’ll play as hard as we can the last two games and we’ll consider that as preparation for the  next conference...Baka may ano pa, baka-maka-tie ka pa. Meron ka pang playoffs ano? There's still a ficker of hope remaining, so we will hang to that." The six-time PBA champion coach was impressed with Mac Tallo's NLEX debut, who contributed 11 points, 3 assists, 3 steals, and 2 two blocks in his first game in six months, recovering from latent tuberculosis. He also let go of Tallo's blunders, who gave away the ball four times, but he vows to give a strong piece of his mind in the following games. "We have to demand something better out of his judgment, out of his decision-making, I think that will happen ano? Because MVP to sa Cebu, he's a go-to-guy, he can score, he can pass, he's a creator no for the team. And that's exactly what we need even without Kiefer and Kevin." As another project seen by the longtime coach, Guiao sees a combination of former Red Bull guard and Cebu teammate Jimwell Torion and the body structure of former league MVP Willie Miller. "He’s a strong point guard who can withstand a physical game," he said of the comparison for the first-round pick in the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft. Despite trying to fill the shoes of the backcourt of Kiefer Ravena and Kevin Alas, the NLEX mentor is not putting expectations for Tallo, already entrusting him with almost 20 minutes of playing time. "Wala akong pressure sa kaniya. I just want his natural game to develop, I just want him to be able to grasp the system of the team and the philosophy. Kaya binabad ko na siya today." __   Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 15th, 2018

Manuel’s heroics save Alaska, send San Miguel to 0-3 start

Vic Manuel saved Alaska from collapse after his buzzer-beating jumper lifted the Aces over winlesss San Miguel, 105-103, in the PBA Commissioner's Cup Saturday in Dumaguete City. Alaska held a lead that ballooned to as much as 22, 72-50, in the third before the Beermen went on a relentless attack and tie the game at 100 on a Chico Lanete three-pointer with 2:05 left in the game. After JVee Casio scored on a jumper to give the Aces a 103-101 lead with 57 seconds left, Renaldo Balkman countered for the Beermen and tied it at 103 just three seconds later. Antonio Campbell made a crucial swipe to steal the ball from Balkman's hands with 19 seconds left on the clock to ensure Ala...Keep on reading: Manuel’s heroics save Alaska, send San Miguel to 0-3 start.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 19th, 2018

Zverev beats Thiem to win Madrid Open

MADRID (AP) — Second-seeded Alexander Zverev eased past fifth-seeded Dominic Thiem 6-4, 6-4 to win the Madrid Open on Sunday, claiming his second title in a week. The German broke Thiem's opening service games in each set and didn't give his Austrian rival a single break chance to win in 1 hour, 19 minutes. Zverev won his eighth career title and second of the season after also winning the Munich Open last weekend. "It is unbelievable," Zverev said. "This is my third Masters 1000 and I am only 21 years old. It has been an amazing journey." Zverev dominated the entire week in the Spanish capital, not losing a single set en route to victory. Thiem lost his second consecutive final at the Caja Magica. He avenged last year's final loss to Rafael Nadal by beating him in Friday's quarterfinals for the Spaniard's first clay-court loss in a year. Zverev started strongly when Thiem conceded his first service game with a costly double fault. Serving to close out the first set, Zverev trailed 0-30 but used his big serve to force deuce and finally closed out the point when Thiem's return sailed long. Zverev started the second set in similar fashion, hitting a deep forehand that Thiem could only send into the net on the final point of his service game to fall behind a break. It was Zverev's second win in six meetings with Thiem. On Saturday, Petra Kvitova beat Kiki Bertens in three sets to win the women's title......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 13th, 2018

Meet the Sandals That Will Never Give Up on You

I'm the type of person who gets fixated with a pair of flats and end up using it until it wears out completely. And when it finally does, it's heartbreaking and I know you know what I feel. But I guess there are those thatstick around, no matter what---yes, I'm still talking about shoes. I've known about Salt-Water Sandal for a while now and I even vividly remember asking my mom to buy me a pair when I was still in school. Fast forward to a few years later and I'm reunited with another pair. Not gonna lie that I've been using it ever since I got it---almost every day. Heck, even my boss said she bought herself a pair! I recently found out that Salt-Water was originally created ...Keep on reading: Meet the Sandals That Will Never Give Up on You.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 11th, 2018

Shoes that connect with your inner demon

WHILE WE groom our hair and faces according to how we think the world should see us, far too often, our choices in footwear betray who we really are. The legendary shoe designer Roger Vivier once said: “To wear dreams on one’s feet is to begin to give a reality to one’s dreams.” A Marikina-based […] The post Shoes that connect with your inner demon appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsApr 29th, 2018