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Magcalayos wrest control; Chabon, 2 others share lead

Jolo Magcalayo fired a seven-under 65 in near-ideal conditions and pulled away early – six strokes ahead of elder brother Jonas – while three forged ahead in women’s play at the start of the W Express RVF Cup Amateur Golf Championship at Cangolf’s North course here yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarFeb 12th, 2019

LeBron feels love in return to Cleveland, beats Cavaliers

By Tom Withers, Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP) — LeBron James felt only love at home. Making his first trip back to Cleveland since leaving for the second time as a free agent, James was welcomed like a hero on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) and rallied the Los Angeles Lakers to a 109-105 win over the Cavaliers, who played an inspired game against their former teammate but couldn't stop him when it mattered most. James finished with 32 points, 14 rebounds and seven assists. He also scored or assisted on 11 straight points as the Lakers overcame a 99-91 deficit in the fourth quarter. The Cavs had a chance to tie late, but Kyle Korver missed a wide-open three-pointer with 17 seconds left and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope made four free throws in the final 15 to seal it for Los Angeles. From the moment he stepped back onto Quicken Loans Arena floor, his home court for 11 seasons, James was treated like a returning champion. On the night before Thanksgiving, Cleveland said thanks to the Northeast Ohio son, the one who ended the city's 52-year championship drought. "We recognize the fact that certainly this is a big night for the city of Cleveland," Cavs coach Larry Drew said before tipoff, "because a hero has come back." The Cavs, who came in an NBA-worst 2-13, didn't roll over against James and played one of their best games this season. They seemed in control up 99-91 before James, as he did some many times for Cleveland, took over and scored or assisted on 11 straight points to give the Lakers the lead. Jordan Clarkson had 20 points and Tristan Thompson 14 and 15 rebounds for Cleveland. James was the last Lakers player introduced before the game, presented with a line familiar to all Cavs fans: "A 6'8" forward from St. Vincent-St. Mary High School," said arena announcer Sean Peebles. "Welcome home! LeBron James." The crowd roared and stood as James walked out and huddled with his new teammates, who must have wondered what was in store for them. But unlike that ugly night of Dec. 2, 2010, when James returned with the Miami Heat and was subjected to non-stop booing, profane chants and a toxic, charged atmosphere of hatred unlike anything seen before or since, this was a night for celebration — and maybe more closure. James has moved on. Cleveland, too. With 8:09 left in the first quarter, James was saluted by the Cavs with a moving video tribute during a timeout. Images of James' playing days with Cleveland — highlighted by the Cavs' historic comeback to win the 2016 title — were shown along with video clips of his impact on the community, including his opening of the I Promise School in his hometown of Akron. As the crowd stood and showed its affection toward James, "Thank You LeBron" was displayed in large letters on the arena's giant scoreboard. James appeared to be touched by the presentation. He bit his lower lip while walking back onto court and pointed to all corners of the building in appreciation, his chance to reconnect with a fan base he'll always share a special, if not complicated, relationship. Wearing a flat cap, long jacket and boots, James arrived at 5:46 p.m., entering the Q through a security entrance he's passed through many times. He greeted two guards near the door with fist bumps before quickly walking past a large group of photographers to the visitors' locker room. Earlier in the day, James visited his I Promise School, a refurbished elementary for at-risk kids he founded and plans to expand. James came back to Cleveland to face a team in disarray without him. The Cavs have endured a season's worth of issues in just over a month with the firing of coach Tyronn Lue, All-Star forward Kevin Love undergoing foot surgery and the latest drama — disillusioned forward J.R. Smith being excused so Cleveland can try to trade him. TIP-INS Lakers: Coach Luke Walton is impressed with James' knack for blocking out external distractions. "The great ones have that ability," he said. "When they're on the basketball court nothing else matters, other than what they're trying to do. Their focus level seems to somehow get higher with the louder the noise gets. I don't know how. I don't know why." Cavaliers: Did not commit a turnover in the first half. ... Starting G George Hill missed his sixth straight game with a sprained right shoulder sustained on Nov. 4 (Nov. 5, PHL time). Hill has ramped up his on-court workouts in recent days and could be back soon. ... Drew said he was unaware of Smith's comments accusing the Cavs of "tanking." Drew believes his team is playing hard, and promised to nothing but coach his team to win. "To coach to lose, I don't understand that, I don't know how to do that," he said. "I don't know how anybody can do that. That's something I would never, ever do." UP NEXT Lakers: Host Utah on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Cavaliers: At Philadelphia on Friday (Saturday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2018

Petron downs Smart to keep share of lead

Defending champion Petron struggled in form early but recovered its bearing just in time to turn back Smart, 25-23, 25-14, 25-18, Thursday in the Philippine Superliga All-Filipino Conference at the Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan. The Blaze Spikers needed to comeback from six points down in the opening set before settling down and cashing in on their vaunted net defense and deep arsenal to claim their third win in as may outings for a share of the lead with F2 Logistics and Foton. Ces Molina displayed her scoring prowess with 11 kills, three aces and two kill blocks to finish with game-high 16 points for the Blaze Spikers, who will take on F2 Logistics on Saturday. Aiza Maizo-Pontillas played an all-around game with 12 points laced with 11 digs and four excellent receptions while Mika Reyes feasted on quick attacks to score 10 of her 11 markers on kills for Petron.   The Blaze Spikers started out slow, letting the Giga Hitters control most of the opening set. Petron behind energizer Sisi Rondina, who scored nine points, slowly chopped down their 21-16 deficit before crushing the confidence of Smart with a closing rally to steal the frame. With the Blaze Spikers heating up, the second set easily went to Petron as they built a 12-point advantage, 23-11, before sealing the set.   Smart played with urgency in the third and kept the game close until midway in the frame before Petron saw an opening to complete the sweep. Aiko Urdas led the Giga Hitters with 15 points while Jerrili Malabanan and Grethcel Soltones added 12 and 10 markers, respectively, for Smart, which dropped to 1-1 slate. Meanwhile, Foton crushed Sta. Lucia, 25-14, 25-21, 19-25, 25-13, to remain unscathed. Mina Aganon and Arriane Layug powered the Tornadoes with 19 and 17 points, respectively, while CJ Rosario had 10. Jho Maragunot was the only Lady Realtor in double figures with 11 points as SLR suffered its third loss in as many games. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 8th, 2018

Lesser lights take charge in windy Summit Point opener

In an early battle of power and control in tough conditions, unfancied Erwin Arcillas and Dino Villanueva came in unruffled by the wind that blew the early bids of a number of favorites, carding identical 67s in varying fashions to share the lead with Thai Sutijet Kooratanapisan in the $100,000 Summit Point World 18 Challenge yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 31st, 2018

Roaring Tiger

WOODS ON TOP Overall, I felt in control today. I had a lot of control over my shots ATLANTA, Georgia — Tiger Woods delivered easily the loudest roar in ending his round with an eagle three to share the lead on day one of the season-ending Tour Championship in Atlanta. Woods found the green with […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsSep 21st, 2018

Lady Tams blast stags, Wrest PVL solo lead

Far Eastern U finally delivered the win the way it wanted, crushing San Sebastian, 25-15, 25-22, 25-18, yesterday to seize control of the field with a third straight victory in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Collegiate Conference at the Filoil Flying V Center in San Juan last night......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 28th, 2018

Thai ace storms ahead with solid 70

Yupaporn Kawinpakorn pounced on fellow Thais Saraporn Chamchoi and Onkanok Soisuwan’s early struggle and Marvi Monsalve’s par-game to wrest control with a bogey-free two-under 70 for a two-stroke lead after two rounds of The Women’s Championship at the Summit Point Golf and Country Club here yesterday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Thais wrest control in women’s tourney

Saraporn Chamchoi came out of a rain-delayed round with four pars to preserve a four-under 68 as she wrested a one-stroke lead over fellow Thais Yupaporn Kawinpakorn and Onkanok Soisuwan and local bet Marvi Monsalve at the start of The Women’s Championship at the Summit Point Golf and Country Club here yesterday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

‘Beyond’ marks Joey G’s 30-year milestone

    After leaving Side A in 2015, the pop band's former lead vocalist, Joey Generoso, is having just as much fun pursuing a solo career and the freedom that comes with it. "I'm enjoying myself very much. What I like about my current situation is that I have more control over my time and musical direction; I can do whatever I want, whenever I want it. With the band, there are five other heads, and you don't necessarily share the same ideas all the time," he told the Inquirer in a recent interview. Another reason the singer-guitarist decided to go solo is that there's still a yearning in him to grow and discover new things, despite having been in the business for ...Keep on reading: ‘Beyond’ marks Joey G’s 30-year milestone.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 8th, 2018

DeChambeau takes 1-shot lead as Woods lurks at Memorial

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — Bryson DeChambeau finished off a 6-under 66 with birdies on two of the toughest holes, giving him a one-shot lead going into a final round at a Memorial that features Tiger Woods in the mix at Muirfield Village for the first time in six years. Woods was in total control of his shots for the second straight day, only to miss short putts down the stretch that spoiled his run. He was briefly tied for the lead Saturday until three-putt bogeys on the 16th and 18th holes, and he had to settle for a 68. He was five shots behind. Woods wasn't alone in missing short putts. Walking off the course with his first 54-hole lead, DeChambeau couldn't but help but think of the two that got away. He missed a 3-foot birdie putt on the ninth hole, and then missed a birdie putt from 4 feet on the par-5 15th. With the course soft and vulnerable to low scores, it was tough to leave shots on the course. "Just keep thinking about those two 3-footers I missed," said DeChambeau, who was at 14-under 202. "I played great, obviously. Ecstatic about where I am." DeChambeau wasn't even sure where he was when he finished because so many players worked their way up and down the leaderboard over the final two hours. He wound up with a one-shot lead over Kyle Stanley, who bogeyed the 18th hole from the bunker for a 70; Patrick Cantlay, who drove into the creek left of the 18th fairway for a bogey and a 66; and Joaquin Niemann, the 19-year-old from Chile who atoned for one big mistake on the 15th hole with a birdie on the 18th for a 70. Cantlay made two eagles, including a hole-in-one on the par-3 eighth. DeChambeau rolled in a 20-foot birdie on the par-3 16th, the third-toughest at Muirfield Village in the third round, and he hit 9-iron to 5 feet on the toughest hole , the 18th. Six players had at least a share of the lead at some point. Byeong Hun An played bogey-free for a 69 and was two shots behind, while Justin Rose dropped two shots over the last three holes for a 69 and was four back. Woods played the last five holes of the front nine in 5 under, starting with his second eagle of the week. And then he stalled, just like he did on Friday. He didn't make another birdie until the par-5 15th, when his sharp-breaking 15-footer dropped to give him a tie for the lead. That didn't last long. Woods ran his 45-foot birdie putt about 7 feet by on the par-3 16th and missed it coming back, and then closed by missing a 3-foot par putt. "I know I shot 68 today, but again, that's probably the highest score I could have possibly shot," Woods said. "I played really, really well. I played beautifully, actually. Had total control of what I was doing out there and just didn't finish it off." He won the Memorial for the fifth time in 2012, finished 20 shots behind the following year and then injuries took over. He finished in last place in 2015, the last time he was at Muirfield Village. This year has produced the kind of golf Ohio fans are used to seeing. And the weather is about par for Muirfield Village, with more thunderstorms expected Sunday. The final round will be threesomes teeing off earlier than usual to account for the forecast. "The weather is going to be a little iffy," Woods said. "But I'm in a position where if I shoot another good round like I had the last two days, I've got a chance." Rory McIlroy, remarkably, has reason to feel the same way. McIlroy nearly missed the cut, surviving on the number after two days. He played bogey-free for a 64 and wound up just six shots behind. Just like Woods and DeChambeau, he had a few regrets on the greens. McIlroy missed three birdie chances inside 8 feet. Rose has a chance to reach No. 1 in the world with a runner-up finish, depending on what Justin Thomas does Sunday. Thomas shot a 68 with three bogeys and was seven off the lead. Along with making his second ace of the season, Cantlay blistered a 4-iron as far as he can hit it on the par-5 15th, the ball landing just short of the green and stopping 4 feet away. Niemann also made an eagle with a 50-foot putt on the par-5 seventh hole. It was his bid for another eagle that cost him. Going for the green at No. 15, the teenager flared it out to the right and it caught the corner of a creek, leading to bogey. He still was in good shape to win in just his fifth start on the PGA Tour......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2018

UAAP VOLLEYBALL: Carlos goes off for 32 as UP returns to win column

The University of the Philippines pushed University of Sto. Tomas to as far as 31-all the first set on Wednesday at the Filoil Flying V Centre, but was unable to finish it off. There was no more falling short from that point as the Lady Maroons easily copped the next three sets for a convincing 31-33, 25-23, 25-16, and 25-12 victory that gets them back on track in the UAAP 80 Women’s Volleyball Tournament. Tots Carlos was brilliant all match long and wound up with 32 points that powered State U right back onto the win column now at 2-3. Isa Molde was right there with her with 24 markers of her own as they arrested their four-game slide and gained much-needed confidence heading into their last assignment of the first round. UP actually didn’t get off to the best of starts and found themselves down, 10-19, in the first set before, slowly but surely, they clawed their way back to 24-all. “Our opponents are a very good, very aggressive team and we welcome that. We knew it wasn’t going to be easy, but if we kept our heads in the game, we can win,” head coach Godfrey Okumu said. The two teams wouldn’t give an inch to each other and went back-and-forth, still knotted at 31-all until Sisi Rondina and Carla Sandoval willed the Tigresses into getting the set. Despite losing the set, the Lady Maroons seemingly got into their groove in the first and took control of the match starting in the second. The last time UST would actually threaten was back in the third with a 12-11 lead until Carlos and Isa Molde connived for a red-hot 13-2 run that would eventually end as another set won. Nothing changed in the fourth set as State U breezed their way into a share of sixth with a 2-4 record. “We are finding our footing,” Okumu remarked. Also at 2-4 are the Tigresses who were paced by Rondina’s 23 points. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

Perpetual survives scare from undermanned SSC-R

Games Tuesday: (FilOil Flying V Centre, San Juan) 9:30 a.m. -- AU vs. JRU (m) 11:00 a.m. –- AU vs. JRU (w) 12:30 p.m. –- SBC vs. CSB (w) 2:00 p.m. –- SBC vs. CSB (m) 3:30 p.m. – SBC vs. CSB (jrs)   University of Perpetual Help returned to its winning ways but not after facing a tough resistance against a gritty San Sebastian College side Monday in the 93rd NCAA women’s volleyball competition at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. The Lady Altas needed to fend off the scorching comeback attempt of the Lady Stags to eke out a 25-22, 25-23, 7-25, 18-25, 15-11, victory for a 2-1 win-loss record tied with idle Jose Rizal University.  Ma. Lourdes Clemente fired 15 points anchored on 11 attacks and four of Perpetual’s nine kill blocks while Cindy Imbo and Bianca Tripoli added 14 and 12 markers, respectively. The Las Pinas-based squad were in control of the match in the first two sets only to relax in the next two as the Lady Stags took advantage to force a decider. But just like in their loss to JRU the last time out, the severely depleted squad of head coach Roger Gorayeb lost steam in the end while the troika of Clemente, Imbo and Tripoli took over to claim the win in the one-hour, 51-minute duel. The win also made up for Perpetual’s stinging 26-28, 18-25, 27-29 defeat to the San Beda Lady Red Spikers last Thursday. SSC-R, which had eight players on the bench but only seven were able to see action with Julie Tiangco sidelined with a knee injury, dropped its second straight match in three outings tied with Letran. Daurene Santos scored 22 from 16 kills, five aces and a kill block for SSC-R. Dangie Encarnacion had 16, skipper Joyce Sta. Rita played through a sprained right foot she sustained in the second set when she stepped on Clemente’s foot to score 15 while Nikka Dalisay had 12. Meanwhile, Perpetual Help swept SSC-R, 25-19, 25-23, 25-23, for its third straight win in as many games and a share of the lead with Arellano University in men’s play. The Stags slid to 1-2 card.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 15th, 2018

UE holds Adamson scoreless in second quarter for fourth straight win

For all of the 10 minutes of the second quarter on Sunday at the Araneta Coliseum, University of the East surrendered no makes to Adamson University. Riding that rare feat, the Lady Warriors cruised to a 62-44 rout of the hapless Lady Falcons that clinched for them another share of the second spot in the UAAP 80 Women’s Basketball Tournament. The emphatic win tops off what is now a fourth consecutive victory after a season-opening defeat for the girls of Aileen Lebornio. “Magandang panalo to kasi kailangan naming i-boost yung morale ng mga bata habang papalapit nang papalapit na ng second round,” the head coach said. UE claimed control right from tip-off, but only had a seven-point lead, 18-11, at the end of the opening salvo. Then the second quarter rolled along. There, the Lady Warriors completely shut down all of Adamson. There, each and every one of Love Sto. Domingo, Christine Cortizano, Eunique Chan, Bienca Ramos, Joyce Francisco, and Ruthlaine Tacula scored at least two points and outscored all of their opponents. The game was all but over from that point and the UE advantage blew up to as high as 31. In the end, Sto. Domingo had 21 points, 14 rebounds, seven steals, and six assists. Cortizano also added 13 points and 13 rebounds while Ramos contributed her own 10-point, 10-rebound double-double. Meanwhile, Far Eastern University is back to its winning ways after clamping down on the University of the Philippines, 73-49. Valerie Mamaril poured in 15 of her 21 points in the second half to shoot the Lady Tamaraws to 3-3. Their respective losses dropped the Lady Falcons to 1-4 and the Lady Maroons to 0-5. BOX SCORES FIRST GAME FEU 73 – Mamaril 21, Arellado 17, Jumuad 6, Ouano 6, Balleser 5, Quiapo 5, Bastatas 4, De Guzman 3, Antiola 2, Gerner 2, Okunlola 2, Bahuyan 0, Payadon 0, Taguioam 0. UP 49 – Esplana 11, Ordoveza 8, Medina 6, Isip 6, Rodas 5, Pesquera 5, Domingo 4, Lapid 3, Cruz 1, Bascon 0, Tan 0. QUARTER SCORES: 16-13, 31-25, 58-38, 73-49. SECOND GAME UE 62 – Sto. Domingo 21, Cotizano 13, Chan 10, Ramos 10, Francisco 4, Gayacao 2, Tacula 2, Nama 0, Requiron 0, Strachan 0. ADAMSON 44 – Alcoy 14, Araja 9, Rosario 9, Prado 8, Camacho 3, Lacson 1, Aciro 0, Cabug 0, Cacho 0, Gaite 0, Razalo 0, Tacitac 0, Villanueva 0. QUARTER SCORES: 18-11, 38-11, 53-30, 62-44. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 1st, 2017

Jordan s weight reaches farther than court in NC

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CHARLOTTE -- Unlike Mark Cuban and James Dolan, the host of the 2019 NBA All-Star Game was voted in 14 times to participate and played in 13. Quite different from Micky Arison and Glen Taylor, the team owner whose arena and city will be the center of All-Star 2019 averaged 20.2 points in those 13 All-Star appearances, was named MVP three times and posted the first triple-double in the game’s history (1997). And not at all like Steve Ballmer and Joe Lacob, the guy most often credited with making Charlotte All-Star worthy this weekend ignited the annual Slam Dunk Contest with his takeoff from the foul line in 1988. He also regularly irritated former NBA commissioner David Stern into a series of fines for golfing when he should have been sitting through mandatory Friday media sessions. With a level of celebrity as arguably the game’s greatest player ever, morphed now into an off-radar role as owner of the Charlotte Hornets, Michael Jordan remains as famous, as popular and as successful as any or all the active All-Star participants who’ll cavort at the Spectrum Center in the city’s Uptown business district. Ain’t no other NBA owner who can say that. “You think about all these wealthy, successful owners in our league,” said Hornets president Fred Whitfield, “no one knew who any of them were, really, until they bought their team. Everybody in the world knew who Michael Jordan was before he bought his team.” Jordan’s place in the All-Star galaxy in the coming days is reflective of his unique position among those who oversee the NBA’s 29 other franchises. His impact on the team, on its fans, on their city and on the state in returning to his native North Carolina -- he grew up in coastal Wilmington before attending college in Chapel Hill -- to anchor and lend stability to the Hornets will be on full display, even if he’s hard to spot this weekend. It’s all a reminder, too, of the old movie line from a remarkably blessed character, wondering “What do you do when your real life exceeds your dreams?” Most don’t dare to imagine playing in an All-Star Game, never mind hosting one as the owner of the local team. “No,” Jordan told some Charlotte reporters Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), coming forward for one of his few appearances of the week. “As a kid growing up here in North Carolina, the first thing [was] playing basketball. And then things evolved from there -- from the University of North Carolina to Chicago. Obviously you know the history from that. “[The] opportunity to represent North Carolina in an All-Star Game from a different seat is truly amazing. It tells the path that I have taken. It gives me great pleasure to give that back to the community. It’s been a long-traveled road.” The celebration of the league’s brightest stars, and the ubiquitous banners and signage devoted to it will make it even harder than usual to visibly spot signs of Jordan’s ownership of the Hornets. For a typical regular season game, you might spy a flag emblazoned with his well-known “Jumpman” logo. Occasionally he’ll watch part of the game, rarely all, from seats at the end of his team’s bench, though he’s as likely to retreat to his suite atop the arena’s lower bowl. An in-game, timeout scoreboard video meant to stoke the crowd includes shots of GM Mitch Kupchak (“Architect of Champions”) and coach James Borrego (“Elite Pedigree”) but ends right about the time you expect some dramatic silhouette of His Airness to appear. It’s as if Jordan is as protective of his brand in running the Hornets as he is in maintaining its exclusivity in the marketplace. Doesn’t matter, though. His fingerprints are all over the franchise, as a basketball team, as a business enterprise and as a member of the community. On court, Jordan trusts his team Jordan’s greatest notoriety as an owner in a basketball setting may have come in December, when he was courtside for a tense game against Detroit. Guard Jeremy Lamb drained a 22-foot jumper with 0.3 seconds left, sending reserves Malik Monk and Bismack Biyombo onto the floor in celebration of what would be a 108-107 home victory. Trouble was, that sliver of time on the clock. Too many men. The Hornets were whistled for a one-shot technical foul and Jordan impulsively smacked Monk lightly, twice, on the back of the head. Any other owner does that, the player’s agent might file a grievance with the players union. Jordan does it and, thanks to his in-the-trenches, in-the-fraternity credibility, it comes across as a goof. “A tap of endearment,” Jordan called it later in a statement. “It was like a big brother and little brother tap. No negative intent. Only love!" Said Monk: “Big, big, big brother. But it was nothing. He was just playing.” The arc of Jordan’s career and his reputation as a stone-cold competitor make it OK if he wants to vent -- or swipe -- when things don’t go the Hornets’ way. Doesn’t matter that Jordan, who will turn 56 on All-Star Sunday, is old enough to be any of his players' dad. He still carries himself like an athlete, and their frame of reference remains, “That’s Mike.” “I’ve seen kids come up through camps,” said Buzz Peterson, Charlotte’s assistant general manager under Kupchak. “You could say Julius Erving, you could say Larry Johnson, Karl Malone, whatever, and the kids’ eyes are like, ‘Who?’ But you say Michael Jordan, they’re gonna know. That’s the separation there.” Peterson is among Jordan’s closest friends -- he beat him out as North Carolina’s prep player of the year in 1981, won an NCAA title with him as a Tar Heels teammate and is described by those who know both as someone who can disagree with the boss while staying comfortably in the inner circle. For Borrego, Charlotte’s first-year coach, interviewing to run Jordan’s team could have been intimidating. “We’re all human beings -- there’s a presence that comes with ‘Michael Jordan’ when he’s around,” Borrego told NBA.com in January. “But it’s healthy. He comes with a competitive spirit that you feel. “Michael was straight with me from Day 1. When I interviewed, he said, ‘I’m going to give you space to do your job. Whatever you need, you come to me. I’ll give you the resources you need.’ He has not tried to interfere one time. I feel his full support. … We’re starting to speak each other’s language, which is pretty healthy for us now.” Jordan keeps the coach apprised of his interactions with players, Borrego said. Other coaches should have such a resource at the ready. Hornets guard and 2019 All-Star starter Kemba Walker probably has benefited most from Jordan’s counsel. They text frequently, a pinch-me arrangement to this day for Walker. “I grew up wearing Jordans, grew up wanting to be like Jordan,” Walker said recently. “So for me to get this opportunity to be on his team means the world to me. He’s the one who believed in me -- I had no idea where I was going to go on draft night and he traded up for me. I’ve always heard the story, he was the one who actually drafted me. So it’s unbelievable. “He’s such a good dude. He understands what it is to be good. His delivery is always good. Only in a positive way, honestly.” Said rookie wing Miles Bridges: “You think there’ll be a lot of pressure having MJ as an owner. I’d seen how he got on his teammates when he played. So I was nervous, thinking if I had a bad game, he’d go at me like, ‘What’re you doing?’ But after meeting him and bonding with him, I feel like he’s the coolest owner out there. I don’t feel any pressure, I feel like he wants the best for us.” Big man Frank Kaminsky typically sits at the end of the bench, which puts him cheek to cheek with Jordan when he’s courtside. “He’s talking about what he’s seeing out on the court. Talking to the refs,” Kaminsky said. “Things other players don’t necessarily see. He still thinks the game. “You see things on the court that he sees. One game, the roll, pocket-pass, skip to the corner was open. He was saying that. We made an adjustment in a timeout, but he saw it a couple plays before that. At the end of that game, we had a big play that was a roll, pocket-pass, into the corner that put the game away. It worked the way he’d seen it.” The Hornets’ struggles during Jordan’s tenure as owner wouldn’t suggest it -- the last time this organization won a playoff series (2002), Jordan still was a player -- but there is a prestige to playing for his team. It’s not unlike being welcomed onto the list of elite athletes who endorse Jordan Brand. “I’m one of the lucky ones who’s in both,” Kaminsky said. “You’re talking about the most iconic player in sports history -- I might be biased because I grew up in Chicago -- but when you have his approval, it means a lot. You have it in the back of your mind that he wants you here.” Head smack or no head smack. Jordan grows as owner, businessman Basketball is a zero-sum game and the NBA is full of stars, even if none shines quite as brightly as Jordan. But business has room for negotiation and compromise, and deals get struck daily that leave both sides happy. There, Jordan has been beyond clutch. Funnel down everything he’s accomplished -- six NBA championships, the league’s highest career scoring average (30.1), five MVP awards, six Finals MVP, 10 scoring titles, nine All-Defensive team nods -- and it invariably ends with clammy hands. The “wow” factor is real and the Hornets are extremely careful about leveraging it. “It gives our organization a certain cachet,” said Whitfield, another longtime friend who goes back more than 35 years with Jordan. “For him to be majority owner, for him to do it in his home state as a local hometown hero, and to be able to come back and not just lead the team and the rebranding from the Bobcats to the Hornets, but his commitment to the community in giving back, it’s something that’s so special.” That’s a lot to unpack. When Jordan initially signed on with the Hornets, he did so as head of its basketball operations in 2006, purchasing a small minority stake in the team. The team was bad, the business was worse and trending down. “Back in ’08-09, the economy was in the tank and I was mandated to ‘displace’ 42 of our executives here on the business side,” Whitfield said. “When Michael bought the team, we were losing $30 million a year.’ Brought back into the league in 2004 two years after the original Hornets (1988-2002) were moved to New Orleans by reviled owner George Shinn, the Charlotte expansion team was owned -- and nicknamed -- by Bob Johnson, a co-founder of the BET television network. The Bobcats excelled only at losing and were 122 games under .500 in their first five seasons. The front office was understaffed, Spectrum Center (then known as Time Warner Cable Arena) needed renovations almost from its inception and there was a real sense that, if a buyer with deep pockets and a commitment to the area weren’t found, the franchise could be moved. In March 2010, Jordan ponied up the cash to become majority owner. But it says something that the deal stands as one of the few, if ever, instances of an NBA franchise being sold at a discount. Johnson paid $300 million for the team; Jordan purchased it for $275 million. Forbes.com recently had Charlotte worth $1.25 billion -- which ranks 28th. And Jordan reportedly has one of the biggest stakes of all NBA owners, with his share estimated at upwards of 90 percent, possibly as high as 98 percent. That’s a lot of success in nine years, despite the basketball team’s mostly middling performance. “With MJ being with the team, you got instant credibility in the marketplace,” said Pete Guelli, the chief operating officer who started on the job about 10 months before Jordan took ownership. “There had been a lot of uncertainty previously, but with his brand and his resources and his commitment, that just dissipated immediately. It was much, much easier to walk in the door and tell people about our vision for this franchise.” Rebranding the team as “Hornets” gave the franchise an existential boost -- it suddenly had a history again, complete with records, archives and true alumni. The arena got a makeover and, per Guelli, is credited for events there that generate an alleged $1 billion in revenues for local businesses. “Fortunately, we’ve been profitable pretty much since [Jordan took over],” Whitfield said. “That’s huge, especially since we haven’t gotten where we want to be on the basketball side.” Closing a new kind of game now It’s hard to overstate Jordan’s added value, not so much as some corporate or financial whiz but as a presence who brought instant motivation and energy to the staff. He imported executives with whom he had developed relationships at Nike or in other ventures and, after taking early criticism for an uncertain level of involvement, has been more diligent in recent years. “I love seeing him sitting at the end of the bench encouraging his players when he attends a game” said Charles F. Bowman, Bank of America’s market president for Charlotte and North Carolina. “And as a business person what impresses me is that he has empowered his management team to focus not only on the court but also on building bridges with the community. “He had a vision for where he was taking the team and a clear plan to get there. He has hired good people, gives them latitude to make decisions and he expects them to perform. Michael is unique -- the best player ever who is determined to keep getting better year over year as an owner.” The NBA has gotten a taste of Jordan’s growth and transition at some pivotal times. This is the legendary voice of the players who, during rancorous negotiations in the 1998 lockout, countered Washington owner Abe Pollin’s gripes about losing money by telling Pollin to sell his team. By the lockout of 2011, Jordan had moved to the other side of the table. But several members of the National Basketball Players Association’s executive committee saw him not as an opponent or turncoat but as a role model: someone who had transformed himself from employee to employer at the game’s highest level. “The players understood, he had been in their shoes,” Whitfield said. “He’s not forgetting what it meant to be a player. He was in the process of learning what it meant to be an owner.” When the current collective bargaining agreement was negotiated with commissioner Adam Silver and union director Michele Roberts leading the talks, Jordan was an active, powerful voice. He is an influential member of the NBA’s labor relations and competition committees. One Charlotte insider spoke to Jordan’s clout with his fellow owners in getting this weekend’s showcase -- jeopardized by a political squabble in 2017 -- back onto the league’s short list. “There’s no All-Star Game here in Charlotte if it’s not for MJ,” the person said. Last summer in Las Vegas, Silver lauded Jordan for his ability to straddle the basketball and business worlds. “He brings unique credibility to the table when we're having discussions [with the players],” he said, “and even just among the owners, he's able to represent a player point of view… Michael can say, 'Well, look, this is how I looked at it when I was a player, and these are the kind of issues we need to address if we're going to convince players that something is in everyone's interest.’ ” Jordan’s powers of persuasion apparently have been even more impressive in Charlotte and North Carolina. The executives are careful about relying on him too often -- Jordan’s most precious commodity, now that his net worth is estimated to be upwards of $1.7 billion -- is his time. But when they need Mariano Rivera to walk in from the bullpen, he is lights out. “We’ve had corporate sponsors at a golf outing, and he’s been there, maybe stayed at one hole to tell off with everybody,” Whitfield said. Or they’ll invite certain corporate sponsors to one of a few games each season in which “Club 23” is up and running at the Spectrum Center, a private club built for such purposes. They get a chance to visit, talk with and pick Jordan’s brain on the Hornets and much more. “We’ve closed all those deals,” Whitfield said. Then there was the time a local CEO wanted to finalize a sizeable sponsorship deal with the team, and had his No. 2 invite Jordan over to their headquarters for the meetings. Whitfield told the tale: “This guy says, 'You have to come to our office. Our CEO is the man in our business.' But we’re like, 'Nah, typically, CEOs come and meet in Michael’s office or in ‘Club 23’ over here.' He said no, that wasn’t going to work for them. “So Pete Guelli said, 'Let’s make a deal: We’ll take your CEO and drop him off in Beijing. And we’ll drop off Michael in Beijing. Then we’ll see who more people gravitate to. Whoever gets the least people, he has to come to the other guy’s office.'” Point made. Point taken. Said Whitfield: “The guy says, ‘You know what, I got it. We’ll be over 10 o’clock Friday morning.’” A community he calls home The Michael Jordan who once seemed determined to float above cultural and political frays as the most prudent way to serve commerce has not held back in recent years from making his presence felt. He has been more philanthropist than activist and, let’s face it, in times of the most dire need, cash beats talk every time. Charity and investing in the community can be good for business, sure. Making that a priority after Guelli’s arrival and Jordan’s purchase helped the Hornets build bridges with fans and merchants that Shinn and the original franchise’s departure had torched. More than that, though, giving back for Jordan and his team at this point in his life was the right thing to do. And do, and do, and do. The list of charitable and civic efforts Jordan and the Hornets have undertaken is long, with few outside the region or state aware of most of it. Among the highlights: - Donating $2 million to relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Florence, particularly meaningful because of the damage it did in Jordan’s hometown of Wilmington. - Dedicated $7 million in partnership with Novant Health to fund two Michael Jordan Family Clinics, set to open in Charlotte in 2020. - Serving as Make-A-Wish’s Chief Wish Ambassador since 2008, while donating more than $5 million to the organization. His relationship with Make-A-Wish began more than 30 years ago. - Contributing $5 million as a founding donor of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. - Addressing the issue of police shootings and community policing in 2016 by donating $1 million each to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. After the hurricane in September devastated so many homes and businesses in and near Jordan’s roots, he wanted to do more than to stroke a fat check. In a meeting covered by The Associated Press, he met with Stephanie Parker and her family, including four young children, after they lost their apartment in two feet of flooding. A call from the director of the Cape Fear chapter of the Red Cross brought them together. The meeting took place at a Lowe’s home improvement store. “I look around the corner, and it’s Michael Jordan. ‘Oh my God!’" Parker said. “I look at my kids, ‘It’s Michael Jordan!’ I’m not going to lie, some tears came in my eyes, because the first thing that went through my mind was when I was younger, his last game when he was on the Chicago Bulls team, and that flashback just came right in my mind.” Afterward, Jordan was coaxed by the Charlotte Observer to talk about why that disaster resonated so deeply for him. “You gotta take care of home,” he said. “Wilmington truly is my home. Kept thinking about all those places I grew up going to … You don’t want to see any of that anywhere, but when it’s home, that’s tough to swallow.” There’s basketball, there’s business and then there’s real life, which sometimes intrudes in the most desperate ways. “We didn’t know how many people in our community were hungry,” Whitfield said. “There are people in dire need, and it’s special to have that hometown hero have in his heart that ‘This is where I can help.’ “It gives not only him as a person but our organization a platform to really speak out. That commitment is what has made him a special owner, and why he’s even more beloved in our community.” Winning title No. 7 drives Jordan now To date, Jordan’s greatest achievements have come elsewhere, at least since his baseline shot as a freshman propelled North Carolina to the 1982 NCAA championship. Those Bulls championships, the “Dream Team” magnificence, his partnership with that sneaker company in Beaverton, Ore., his Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction, shooting “Space Jam,” all of it -- his legacy has been crafted with others, for others, mostly far from home. (For the record, Jordan, his wife Yvette and their two daughters own a mansion outside Charlotte and an estate in south Florida). “Look, this has always been home for him,” Whitfield said. “Even though he was drafted by Chicago, WGN became a very popular station. And he just continued to elevate, so people in this state were proud to say, even though he’s a Bull, we love him. When the Bulls would come here and play at the old Coliseum, these fans who were avid Hornets fans were all pulling for Michael Jordan. “He’d score, they’d cheer loudly. The Hornets would score, they’d cheer loudly. North Carolina always felt like he was their native son who went off and achieved greatness.” Coming back first to head the franchise’s basketball operations and then as owner, Jordan’s role -- in light of the modest results on the court -- has been custodial. Yes, the club’s improved financial stability is important. But for this driven winner and NBA owner unlike all others, custodial isn’t going to cut it for long. “He did an interview with Cigar Aficionado magazine a while back,” Peterson said, “and the question was asked, ‘What would you like to do?’ And he said, ‘Win a seventh championship. Win as an owner.’ So for me, every day, I’m thinking, here’s a close friend and you want to make your friends happy, right? So each day I think, do the best you can to reach this goal for him.” Said Hornets wing Nicolas Batum: “I understand. He wants to win. He wants to compete since he was born.” It hasn’t been for lack of trying, although Jordan has made sure to keep fiscal responsibility high on every agenda. The team’s payroll for 2018-19 is approximately $122.3 million, which ranks near the middle of the NBA pack. “That Michael Jordan is one cheap dude,” said an impassioned cab driver on a recent airport run. “He’s only going to spend so much and the players they get shows it.” The Hornets never have spent into the league’s luxury-tax, and if Walker is retained when he hits free agency this summer, he’ll likely become the first Charlotte player to sign a full maximum-salary contract (though the five-year, $120 million deal Batum landed in 2016 came awfully close). Injuries and dubious moves have taken a toll, a situation that Kupchak, Borrego and their staffs have been tasked with fixing. Jordan, by all accounts, is engaged yet patient, with a playoff berth and potentially a record above .500 within reach. “I’m sure he feels like,” Whitfield said, “if he were still 30 years old and could lace ‘em up and get out there, he’d help us get over the hump. I think he would cherish it as much or more than the first six. Because I think he realizes how hard it is to get it done. “But it doesn’t bother us if the fans see his frustration sitting next to our bench. It’s important to us that they see he’s not only invested, he’s vested in what our team is trying to do. They can relate to him because they’re feeling that same frustration.” Jordan is theirs again and that’s what matters. For basketball, for business, for community and in time, just maybe, in championship. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News14 hr. 34 min. ago

Filipino Tabeuna equals birdie record at World Super 6 s of India

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Jolo virtual ch Gabasa moves up by 2 - The Manila Times Online

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Pinoy golfer Tabuena equals birdie record at World Super 6

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Curry breaks out of slump, helps Warriors beat Suns

By BOB BAUM,  AP Sports Writer PHOENIX (AP) — Stephen Curry shook off a poor shooting performance by scoring 10 of his 20 points in the fourth quarter and the Golden State Warriors finally broke open a tight game to beat the Phoenix Suns 117-107 on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time). Klay Thompson scored 25 points for the Warriors, who beat the Suns for the 18th consecutive time. Kevin Durant added 21 points and DeMarcus Cousins 18. Kelly Oubre Jr. scored 25 points and Deandre Ayton 23 for Phoenix, which was without scoring leader Devin Booker due to a tight right hamstring. Mikal Bridges and Josh Jackson added 19 apiece for the Suns, who led 85-82 entering the final quarter. Golden State's Draymond Green was ejected after drawing his second technical between the third and fourth quarters. The matchup of the teams at the top and bottom of the Western Conference standings was a lot closer than anticipated — and in large part because it took Curry a while to find his stroke. Through three quarters, Curry was 2-of-12 shooting, including 1 of 8 on 3-pointers. But in the fourth quarter, he was 4 of 5, including 2 of 3 from beyond the arc. Down 94-88, Golden State took control with a 13-0 run — capped by Curry's 3-pointer that put the Warriors up 101-94 with 5:46 remaining. Richaun Holmes' tip-in cut the lead to 101-98 with 4:58 left. But Curry responded with another 3 and Golden State pulled away from there. Phoenix shot out to a 26-9 lead but the Warriors cut it to 31-26 after one quarter. Green's driving layup capped a 13-3 Golden State run that put the Warriors up 60-51 before Oubre's tip-in sliced the Warriors' lead to 60-53 at the break. Phoenix opened the second half with an 11-4 spurt to tie it at 64-64 and it stayed tight the rest of the third quarter. Oubre made one free throw with 4.9 seconds left, missed the second and grabbed the rebound for a dunk that put the Suns up 85-82 entering the final quarter. TIP-INS Warriors: Their 18-game win streak against Phoenix is the second-longest active streak against a single opponent behind only Oklahoma City's 21-game run against Philadelphia. ... Golden State drew three first-half technical: on Green, Cousins and Shaun Livingston. Suns: Booker missed his 15th game of the season. ... Phoenix also was without T.J. Warren (right ankle soreness) and De'Anthony Melton (right ankle sprain). ... Ayton's 818 points through 50 games are third-most in team history, behind Walter Davis (1,169) and Alvan Adams (935). UP NEXT Warriors: host Miami on Sunday night. Suns: at Sacramento on Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 9th, 2019