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Five things we learned from Game 3 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com OAKLAND – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 123-109 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 3 of the 2019 Finals Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) at Oracle Arena: 1. What Stephen Curry learned … Curry was remarkable in Game 3, consciously seizing more of Golden State’s offensive burden to make up for Klay Thompson’s and Kevin Durant’s absences and turning that desperation into something historic. With 47 points, eight rebounds and seven assists, the Warriors point guard became only the ninth man to score at least 45 points in a Finals game. The lesson in that? Curry learned for a night what it has felt like for LeBron James on many such occasions. James put himself on that specific list a year ago when he logged 51 points, eight board and eight assists against Curry’s team in Game 1, same court. Like Curry, James’ team lost that night as well. Struggling mightily in something of a one-against-five predicament is the sort of things James has done often, while Curry never had faced it during Golden State’s five-year run to The Finals. They both -- James in the past and Curry on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) -- had legit NBA players around them. But the responsibility to put up points fell in both cases mostly on their shoulders. This was even a chance to revisit the 2015 Finals MVP selection, which attracted some attention on social media Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) over bogus speculation about the voting process. Andre Iguodala won the award that June, getting seven votes from the panel of media reps to James’ four. Curry got no votes. The point was, Curry had as a single game Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) what James had as an entire series in ’15. He averaged 35.8 points, 13.3 rebounds and 8.8 assists, scoring 38.5 percent of Cleveland’s points (215-of-561) while assisting on 52.7 percent of his teammates’ baskets while he was on the court. Now Curry is the guy in position, if Golden State loses the series, to get a few MVP votes in a losing effort. By the way, Jerry West is the only player to win the Finals MVP trophy in a losing effort. And West is one of the nine to score 45 or more – he did it three times, but his Lakers teams went 1-2 in those games. (The others: Michael Jordan three times, Bob Pettit, Elgin Baylor, Rick Barry, Wilt Chamberlain and Allen Iverson once each. Their teams all won on their big scoring nights.) 2. Is the scoreboard broken? It’s tempting to say that the Warriors’ attack is in broken-record mode, except the resurgence of vinyl might not be sufficient yet to bring that phrase back into the mainstream. So we’ll go with a cultural reference that’s more classic than archaic. Think of The Beatles’ “Revolution 9,” but substitute “109… 109… 109…” Yeah, it’s been about as monotonous and unsatisfying for Golden State as it was on the White Album. At least Warriors coach Steve Kerr was somewhat bemused by his team’s scoreboard consistency. In each game of these Finals, Golden State has scored 109 points. “I just knew we were going to score 109 points because that’s all we’re going to do the rest of this series,” Kerr said. “So if we’re going to keep scoring 109, we got to keep them to 108.” The Warriors kept Toronto to 104 points in Game 2. Some of that was to their credit, some to the Raptors’ misfires and mid-game chill. The simplest stat? Toronto launched 38 three-pointers in both games. The night the Raptors made 11, they lost. When they made 17, they won. Getting Thompson back for Game 4 could make a big difference there. He is one of Golden State’s best defenders. For that matter, Durant’s length could assert itself as a defensive weapon, too, if he comes back later in the series. As for 109 being a winning points total, here is some background: taken in isolation, averaged over a full Finals, that would have been plenty to win 19 of the past 20 championships. The lone exception? In 2017, when Cleveland averaged 114.8 ppg yet lost because Golden State was putting up 121.6 nightly. In 2018, the Warriors averaged 116 points to the Cavaliers’ 101. The only other times a Finals team in the past 20 years averaged within five points of 109 were the Spurs in 2015 (105.6) and in 2007 (104.4) and the Lakers in 2002 (106.0) and 2000 (104.8). Obviously, a few of those were in the game’s relative “dark ages” for use of the 3-ball, but all four won championships. The Warriors are scoring enough points to win. 3. ‘Boogie’ fever has broken   DeMarcus Cousins called his decision to sign with Golden State for a cut-rate contract, while rehabbing from an Achilles injury, his “chess move.” He wound up joining the defending champions and favorite to three-peat, and got his game back in time to contribute. Cousins subsequently suffered a quadriceps injury but returned in time to participate in The Finals. Only thing is, he looked like he was back playing checkers in Game 3. The Warriors center stood out Sunday (Monday, PHL time), scoring 11 points with 10 rebounds, six assists and two blocks. But those numbers drooped to four points, three boards, three turnovers and 1-for-7 shooting in Game 3. Cousins went from plus-12 impact in Game 2 to minus-12 Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). The big man looked a step slow and appeared to be bothered by Toronto’s length, in the forms of Marc Gasol, Pascal Siakam and Serge Ibaka. With little lift these days, he’s playing a little smaller than his 6'11", 270-pound specs. And given how long he was off and the mere eight minutes he got in Game 1, what Cousins did in Game 2 was starting to look more adrenaline-fueled than a reliable return to form. Since Curry handled just about everything else for Golden State in Game 3, he was asked afterward about Cousins’ “regression.” The point guard handled the awkward moment well -- being asked a critical question about a teammate might have tempted Curry to blow it off or lie. Instead, he talked of the Warriors’ shared responsibility on defense and noted a few calls offensively that didn't go Cousins' way. Then Curry added: “Like any great player, if you have a rough game, that resiliency to bounce back and the confidence to know that you can still go out there and impact the game, that’s something that he’ll bring, and we all will follow suit for sure.” 4. Danny Green’s big moment Understandably, when an All-Star and potential Kia MVP candidate gets traded, the deal becomes all about him. Next, folks focus on the key player or players swapped out and how the move might work for the other team. Only then do we play much attention to the guy or guys accompanying the All-Star to his new destination. That’s how it’s been for Danny Green for much of the 2018-19 season. Green and Kawhi Leonard were teammates in San Antonio for seven seasons. They went to two Finals together with the Spurs, winning rings in 2014. But when Leonard wanted out after an injured and rancorous 2017-18, the deal the Spurs put together with Toronto shipped out Danny Green, too. The reality of NBA trades is that salaries must match up, so teammates often become collateral damage to even up the dollar sufficiently to satisfy league rules. Sometimes, a teammate is thrown into a deal because he and the star are chums. A familiar face gives the featured guy some comfort -- or someone to carry his bags. But Green was a helpful playoff performer in his own right with the Spurs -- in his 12 Finals games before this year, he had made 52 percent of his three-pointers. And in 2013 he made 27 of them against the Miami Heat, a Finals record that was his for all of three years until Curry drained 32 in 2016. Green struggled with his shot in the Eastern Conference finals against the Milwaukee Bucks, going 4-for-23 on three-pointers. But his marksmanship early in Game 3 and against near the end of the third quarter propelled the Raptors’ victory. 5. Those rebounds are offensive   Toronto dominated on the offensive glass 15-6 in Game 2 and lost. Golden State dominated on the offensive glass 13-5 in Game 3 and lost. Typically, that’s a positive category for the team that wins it, something coaches hate when the other guys are reclaiming their own misses time and again. But lately, the demerits associated with offensive rebounds have loomed larger than the benefits. You grab a shot you or your teammate missed, that ought to be a good thing. But the Raptors in Game 2 (37.2 percent) and the Warriors in Game 3 (39.6 percent) were beset by inaccuracy, so there were more offensive rebounds to be had, period. The other down side of a generally positive stat is how you go about getting them. If you get overeager and the defense controls the errant shot, you might denude your transition defense. Both the Raptors and the Warriors in Games 2 and 3 respectively built considerable edges in second-chance points off their offensive rebound totals. Toronto had a 23-0 scoring advantage Sunday (Monday, PHL time), yet lost by five. Golden State held it 23-12 Wednesday, yet lost by 14. The losing team in both cases slightly won the battle of fast-break points, but offensive-rebounding strategy still forces a choice on teams. “We have a general kind of rule of thumb that once a shot goes up, we tell our guys to make a really quick, good decision,” Raptors coach Nick Nurse said before Game 3. “Either they're going hard to the offensive rebound or they're going hard to defense transition. … There's certain moments of the game – I mean, some of those late are almost scrambles, right, you're behind five and you're throwing it up there and everybody's trying to rebound, just to keep the game alive as well.” It’s a stat worth watching, even if it’s inversely related lately to the games’ outcomes. Sing it loud, sing it proud ???????? #WeTheNorth pic.twitter.com/8HfjoM9Cht — Toronto Raptors (@Raptors) June 6, 2019 Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 7th, 2019

Five things we learned from Game 1 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com TORONTO – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 118-109 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 1 of The Finals Thursday (Friday, PHL time) at Scotiabank Arena ... 1. So much for ‘glad to be here’ If we thought we had learned one thing about the Toronto Raptors when it comes to the NBA playoffs, it was this: They back their way into most series. Losing the opener was a tradition for this franchise -- they were 3-15 in Game 1s prior to Thursday (Friday, PHL time), dating back to their inaugural playoff run in 2000. Nothing shoves a team closer to elimination in a best-of-seven showdown than a lousy start. That’s why grabbing the opener against Golden State was so essential. Had the Raptors squandered their home-court advantage on the first night, we all would be assuming the worst for these Finals in competitive, stylistic and entertainment terms. Only by rocking the Warriors in Game 1 -- and most impressively, by refusing to cough up all of their 12-point lead in the second half -- could the Raptors generate legitimate excitement for Game 2 and beyond. Had we all been honest (and able to pull this off), we would have begun this series by spotting Toronto to a 1-0 lead -- just to handicap the defending champions and force them to show us something they haven’t in their four previous Finals trips. But such a move would have been demeaning, of course, to the Raptors. Instead, coach Nick Nurse and his affable newbies seized early control themselves. How Portland looked in the Western Conference finals, as if the Trail Blazers had maxed out and were just happy to still be involved? Toronto wanted none of that. It found a way to win when Kawhi Leonard and Kyle Lowry were ordinary at best. And now we have a series worthy of the Larry O’Brien Trophy. 2. Triple-doubles continue to decline in value It’s fun as a game progresses to track stats, whether it’s Pascal Siakam’s absurd 11 consecutive field goals or Stephen Curry’s refusal to miss a free throw. We’re always aware of the leading scorer and his growing point total, particularly as it passes the big round numbers (30, 40, 50…). But Draymond Green’s latest triple-double was a reminder that the bar has been set too low for that stat from its inception. Green finished with 10 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists, which makes it a minimalist’s triple-double at best and more of a statistical fluke than an achievement. Ten assists? That’s strong any night. Ten rebounds? Solid, and necessary if no one else on your roster is claiming more than six. Ten points, though? Come on now. Green had a Jason Kidd triple-double, which isn’t mean to disparage the Hall of Fame point guard but speaks to Kidd’s limitations as a scorer for most of his career. Heck, the Warriors’ versatile forward had six turnovers, inspiring the bad “quadruple-double watch” that Kidd sparked on occasion. What Green didn’t do was put the ball through the net effectively, shooting 2-for-9 overall and 0-for-2 on three-pointers. Yes, his value to Golden State usually doesn’t rise or fall on his scoring, but he could have been more helpful in that area Thursday. When Oscar Robertson averaged a triple-double in 1961-62 (and cumulatively did it over his first six NBA seasons), he was scoring 30 points per game. When Russell Westbrook matched what had been a rare feat two years ago, he too was up above 30 points nightly. But Westbrook has done it the past two seasons as well, with his scoring average dipping below 23 this season. That would seem to be near the minimum -- say, 20 points -- to gush over a player’s triple-double on a given night. We get it, double figures means 10 or more. But 10 points is no big deal at all in the NBA, so it seems silly to celebrate it when it’s the free rider on the triple-double quirk. 3. Don’t double-dawg dare an NBA player Warriors coach Steve Kerr admitted after Game 1 that, by mistake more than by design, his team didn’t defensively do its job well in the early minutes against center Marc Gasol. “Gasol we left a couple times early in the game and didn't rotate, we just gave him a couple of dare shots and he knocked them down,” Kerr said. Daring is not defending, and the Warriors would be well-advised not to do that again to a player as proud and as accomplished as Gasol. He’s struggled at times as a shooter in these playoffs, shooting 34 percent in the Eastern Conference finals while going 2-for-9 on three-pointers in Games 1 and 2 of that series (both losses). It was embarrassing at times to see the affable 7'1" Spaniard miss shots badly, whether he felt that way or not. But Gasol was 10-for-20 on three-pointers entering The Finals, all during the Raptors’ four consecutive victories to eliminate the Bucks. He went 2-for-4 in Game 1 of The Finals, scoring a playoff-high 20 points to help compensate for Leonard’s and Lowry’s muted firepower. Asked about it afterward, on taking such a “dare” personally, the big man shrugged. “If you're open, you got to shoot them. Dare, no dare,” he said. “And then we go from there. If they go in, great. If not you keep taking them with confidence.” That’s speaking truth to a dare. 4. The ratings for Game 1 will soar… … if they can somehow count the number of times the Warriors and the Raptors watch and re-watch the video tape. A big theme heading into this series was the relative lack of familiarity the teams had with each other. Now, that’s a common aspect of The Finals, pitting the champs of opposite conferences and all. But given Golden State’s knowledge of the Cleveland Cavaliers after four consecutive Finals, Toronto is a relative stranger. Beyond that, key players from both sides were absent in the two regular-season meetings. But now they have a whole 48 minutes to dissect, digest and learn from. For the Warriors, who spoke about it the most, they saw things they might not have expected and things they definitely did not like. Such as? Try Siakam’s attacks on the basket (in transition and otherwise), their own inability to be the team that pushes pace and Fred VanVleet as the game’s essential reserve (15 points on a night when his three-point shot was MIA). Green, in particular, sounded as if he was going to binge-watch Siakam’s romp and figure a way to thwart the unorthodox flip shots the forward from Cameroon deployed. “He's become ‘a guy,’” Green said phrasing that as a nod of respect. “He put a lot of work into get there and I respect that. But like I said, I got to take him out of the series and that's on me.” Toronto can make use of the video for as long as the Warriors roster stays the way it is, which means sans Kevin Durant. Which leads into … 5. Who's here (and who isn't)? (And no, we don’t mean LeBron James.) Durant’s continued absence with a calf injury since Game 5 of the Western Conference semifinals became an official problem in Game 1 of The Finals (the team’s first loss without him). Questions that had been bottled up for a couple weeks -- What did you miss most without Durant? How might he have changed your offense or defense? -- came spilling out from the large media crew that covers the NBA’s glamour team. Neither Kerr nor his players took the bait, which was smart. Not only would it look like excuse-making (considering how they hadn’t needed those before), it might have opened a crack of vulnerability into something wider and more troublesome. Durant is out for Game 2, but per a Yahoo Sports report is expected back at the series’ midway point (read: Game 3 or Game 4).  “KD's an all-time great player on both ends of the floor,” Curry said, “so I could sit here and talk for days about what he adds to our roster.  We obviously have proven that when he's out we can have guys step up, and that's going to be the case until he gets back.” Rushing him back would seem desperate, something the Warriors aren’t and shouldn’t be. Plus, it is early in a long series. And it really is irrelevant: NBA players and teams’ medical staffs don’t “rush back” anyone these days. Then again, once they’re ready to play -- as Golden State showed in using DeMarcus Cousins in Game 1 -- there’s no sense in letting talent help languish in street clothes. No time too, either. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 1st, 2019

No need for Malone to sell Nuggets: Their time is now

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com PORTLAND, Ore. — Give Michael Malone credit, the Denver Nuggets coach is as relentless a salesman as there is in basketball. Whether it’s moving speeches delivered to his own team or pleading with television audiences to stand up and take notice of the splendid compilation of talent the franchise has stockpiled in recent years, he refuses to let up. From building the legend of Jamal Murray or waxing poetic about the virtues of Nikola Jokic, the nimble giant prone to triple-doubles on the regular, Malone is prepared to use the bully pulpit to make sure no one overlooks the Nuggets. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] A seven-game series win over San Antonio in the first round produced some of Malone’s best stuff to date, including him trumpeting Jokic as not only a legitimate Kia MVP candidate (true, this season) but also a surefire future Hall of Famer (could be, the way he’s playing). So you had to know Malone was going to be on his Nuggets informercial grind after they refused to lose Sunday (Monday, PHL time) in Portland, bouncing back after losing a grueling four-overtime thriller to the Trail Blazers here Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) with a gritty 116-112 triumph to tie this series at 2-2 headed back to Denver for Tuesday’s (Wednesday, PHL time) critical Game 5. “I’m so proud of our group,” Malone said, after his talented crew showed off the chops needed to regain the homecourt advantage they surrendered in their Game 2 loss at Pepsi Center. “And in the closing moments, I really was confident because in close games this year we were 13-3 [in games] decided by three points or less, best record in the NBA. We’re 12-1 in the second nights of back-to-backs, best record in the NBA. Our guys are tough; to come in here and win this game some 36 hours after losing a four-overtime game speaks to just how tough we are. So I wasn’t worried, we had our starting group out there. “Jamal, who I thought was phenomenal tonight, goes 11-for-11 from the foul line in a hostile environment and really kind of with the series hanging in the balance. You go down 1-3, and we all know how that story ends. I think the confidence of doing the same thing in the first round against San Antonio helped us, but our guys stepped up. We never frayed. We stayed together. And I can’t speak enough about the resiliency and toughness of our team.” And he shouldn’t. The Blazers had won 12 straight games at home dating back to the regular season and were 22-2 on their home floor since January 5. When the Nuggets saw their 10-point lead shrink to just a point with 3:02 to play as Portland closers Damian Lillard (28 points) and C.J. McCollum (29) led the charge, Denver could have easily folded up under the emotional weight of Game 3 and their current predicament. But they proved to be as resilient and tough as Malone said they were. Jokic was brilliant again, collecting his fourth triple-double (21 points, 12 rebounds and 11 assists) in his first postseason, second only to the five Magic Johnson piled up during his rookie season with the Los Angeles Lakers. And Murray was even better, finishing with a game-high 34 points and draining six straight free throws in the frantic closing seconds to seal the win for a Nuggets team that didn’t allow fatigue, a raucous and sellout Moda Center crowd or the pressure to avoid that 3-1 hole rattle them. “It wasn’t the first time,” Murray said of his embrace of the pressure with the game on the line at the line. “I think free throws are my thing. My dad and I do a lot of training [on] free throws. Blindfolded, he’ll talk to me just like how the crowd is, put pressure on me. I take 1,000 free throws in practice to make or or two … and tonight, it ended up being six.” The number Malone focused on afterwards was 11, as in the number of playoff games Murray and Jokic have played in as they continue to establish themselves as postseason stars. “You think about how young we are and and what we are doing, going on the road and winning a tough game in a hostile environment,” Malone said, “and for Jamal to be the centerpiece of that has been phenomenal. If you’re a Denver Nuggets fan, how excited are you about this team now. More importantly, how excited are you for our future? We have a chance to be a really good team for many, many years and Jamal is going to be a big part of that.” The same goes for Jokic, obviously. He’s already an All-Star and is going to end up on the All-NBA first or second team as well as the top five of the voting for Kia MVP after the regular season he put together. That might explains why the entire Nuggets bench froze as they watched him limp to the sideline in the final moments after being kneed in the leg in the final seconds. “Your heart skips a beat,” Malone said. “Nikola is the face of our franchise, but he just got kneed, it was nothing serious and and we were able to hold on for the win.” For all of Malone’s bluster about his group, it’s not even necessary at this stage of the season. The Nuggets earned the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference playoff chase on the strength of a talented and deep roster that might not resonate with casual NBA fans, but is celebrated by those in the know. Touting their accomplishments in real time makes sense for a coach trying to empower his team to believe in themselves in what could and perhaps should be a nice stretch of playoff runs in the future. But anyone paying attention can tell that the future could be now for these Nuggets. A trip to the conference finals one year after they failed to make the postseason field on the final night of the season in what amounted to a play-in game in Minneapolis last April, is a hell of a start. Malone knows it. His team knows it. And so do the Trail Blazers, who are well aware of the opportunity they squandered in a series where wavering confidence by the Nuggets might have been the only advantage they could exploit. “The good thing for us is that we won a game on their court,” Lillard said. “So it’s not like we lose both games there. We’re in a good space, 2-2, we know we’re capable of winning on their floor and that’t what we’ve got to get done. Obviously, it’s disappointing … we didn’t want to let an opportunity like this slip, but it happens. It’s playoff basketball and we’ve got to move forward.” So do the Nuggets, which is where Malone the master motivator comes into play. And just so we’re clear about something, his sell job is genuine. He knows of what he speaks in assessing a young team on the rise, having spent time coaching in Cleveland and Golden State during the formative stages with what would turn out to be teams that made it to The Finals (2007 in Cleveland). He was on Mark Jackson’s Warriors staff when they turned the corner from a lottery team to  playoff outfit (2012-13 season), helping nurture the core group of a team that has won three of the past four NBA titles and become a potential dynasty that no one saw coming at the time. So if Malone sees special things in his current team, it’s his responsibility to shout about it every now and then, both to the basketball public and especially internally. Youngsters like Jokic and Murray, Gary Harris and Malik Beasley, Torrey Craig and Monte Morris and even veterans like Paul Millsap, Mason Plumlee and Game 4 hero Will Barton, who knocked down huge shots to help seal the deal, need to hear the positive reinforcement from their coach. And that’s not even taking into account what absorbing these moments means for Michael Porter Jr., who is spending his rookie season recovering from back surgery, and is certainly going to be a part of that bright future Malone is so passionate about. If anything, this Nuggets team is ahead of schedule, two wins shy of a trip to the Western Conference finals with three games to play. Two of those are coming on their home floor, where Denver compiled the best record (34-7) in the league during the regular season. Maybe Malone is right to speak the Nuggets’ success into existence rather than wishing and hoping for it to come to fruition without a word otherwise. But he won’t have to go all car salesmen on the final day of month much longer. A couple more performances like the one the Nuggets put on Sunday (Monday, PHL time) and this whole thing, the refurbished franchise with all the boxes checked on the roster -- now and for the foreseeable future -- sells itself. Sekou Smith is a veteran NBA reporter and NBA TV analyst. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 6th, 2019

Draxler scores again as PSG wins 1-0 at Rennes

JEROME PUGMIRE, AP Sports Writer br /> PARIS (AP) — Winger Julian Draxler's second goal in as many games showed why Paris Saint-Germain signed him as the defending champion won at Rennes 1-0 in the French league on Saturday. Running onto an astute pass from midfielder Marco Verratti, and without breaking stride, the German curled in a delightful shot from the left of the penalty area into the bottom right corner in the 40th minute. 'It was a great goal,' Verratti said. 'We needed a player like this.' PSG moved level on points with Monaco, which is in second place thanks to a better goal difference and plays on Sunday, as does leader Nice. Draxler joined from Wolfsburg this month in a deal reportedly worth up to 47 million euros (about $49 million), and scored an equally good goal on debut in a 7-0 rout of Bastia in the French Cup last weekend. 'He worked hard, scored a good goal,' PSG coach Unai Emery said. 'He's brought his quality to the team.' The 23-year-old Draxler, a regular for Germany at last year's European Championship, struggled to settle in at Wolfsburg after joining from Schalke early into last season and failed to score this season. His arrival may not be great news for Angel Di Maria, who has been mostly out of form this season and faces tough competition from Draxler on the left wing, and from Lucas on the right. It was a good day for Draxler, but not for Edinson Cavani, who stormed angrily past Emery when he was substituted with 20 minutes left. Di Maria also came on, and fell over backward trying to play a quick pass on a PSG counterattack. PSG won its previous three games, scoring 14 goals and conceding none, but they were at home and against poor sides. A trip to Rennes — which had lost only once at home — offered a much tougher test, especially considering PSG lost four times away from home in the first half of the season. 'It's a big win for us,' PSG midfielder Blaise Matuidi said. 'We're not very confident away from home and needed the points.' PSG started in determined fashion and Cavani should have scored after just 40 seconds. Having missed four chances in midweek when PSG beat Metz 2-0 to reach the League Cup semifinals, Cavani fluffed this one by poking wide of goal after being put clean through. PSG dominated the first half, with Rennes panicking and frequently losing the ball. Verratti was enraged when he was not given a penalty after running onto Draxler's excellent pass and rounding goalkeeper Benoit Costil, who appeared to take him down. But the referee instead gave Verratti a yellow card. 'It's a huge mistake. It was a penalty,' Verratti said. He was still arguing with referee Benoit Bastien as the players prepared to start the second half. Bastien also showed PSG midfielder Thiago Motta a yellow card in the 62nd, although he appeared to fall down as he rounded Costil. 'Well done to the referee for not getting conned,' Costil said after the game. '(Verratti) was falling down before I came out and the second one (Motta's) was even more blatant.' ___ OTHER MATCHES Forward Majeed Waris scored twice as Lorient beat fifth-place Guingamp 3-1 to earn a vital win in its relegation scrap. The win moved the Brittany side off the bottom of the table, with Metz dropping to last ahead of its game on Sunday. Having started the season strongly, Toulouse is drifting further away from the top five after losing at home to Nantes 1-0, with Emiliano Sala scoring. Winger Issiar Dia scored the winner as Nancy climbed up to 11th by beating Corsican side Bastia 1-0. Also, it was Angers 1, Bordeaux 1, and Montpellier 1, Dijon 1. On Sunday, Nice faces Metz, while Monaco has a tough game at Marseille, and Caen hosts Lyon. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 15th, 2017

Federer to meet qualifier Melzer in 1st round at Aussie Open

JOHN PYE, AP Sports Writer br /> MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — While Roger Federer spent his time at Melbourne Park on Saturday talking about his comeback at a news conference, dozens of lower-ranked players were still at work trying to earn a spot in the main draw of the Australian Open. Austrian veteran Jurgen Melzer was among them, along with Americans Noah Rubin and Bjorn Fratangelo. Melzer's reward for his 6-2, 3-6, 6-3 win over Rajeev Ram out on Court 13 was a first-round match on Monday night against 17-time major winner Federer on Rod Laver Arena. Federer has won the Australian title four times, and reached the semifinals or better in 12 of the last 13 years, but hasn't played a match for rankings points since Wimbledon. When the draw was conducted Friday, the 17th-seeded Federer landed on position 24 and had three blank slots above him, reserved for players who advanced through qualifying. Melzer ended up in position 23, while Fratangelo's 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 win over Hiroki Moriya and Rubin's 6-2, 6-4 win over Evgeny Donskoy resulted in them finishing up in positions 21 and 22. They'll meet in the first round, with the winner advancing to the second round to play the winner of the Federer-Melzer match. Melzer and Federer are both 35 and both had significant time off in 2016 with injuries. Melzer, who reached a career-high No. 8 ranking in 2011, missed the first part of last season recovering from surgery on his left shoulder and slipped as low as No. 550. Federer missed the last six months to let his left knee recover and ended the season ranked 16th. Federer didn't know who he'd be playing when he sat down for his pre-tournament news conference. 'Yeah, it would be good to know who I play. I guess I could tell you what I think,' he said. 'Once it's out, it's actually a good thing because then you can start actually mentally preparing for the Aussie Open. Is it a lefty, a righty? It's a big deal. Is he a big server, a grinder? 'A bit of an unknown here the first round because that's the part of the draw I care most about because of having not been playing.' He won't have to do too much research. Federer has a 3-1 record against the left-handed Melzer, winning three times in 2010 but losing their last head-to-head in straight sets on clay in Monte Carlo in 2011. Czech veteran Radek Stepanek, seeded top in the qualifying tournament, had a 6-2, 6-4 win over John-Patrick Smith to reach the Australian Open main draw for the 14th time. He has a 14-13 win-loss record to date, never advancing beyond the third round. His best run at a major was reaching the quarterfinals at Wimbledon in 2006. Among the other qualifiers was Alexander Bublik, who recovered from a break down in the third set to beat deaf South Korean teenager Lee Duck-hee 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. Bublik will play No. 16 Lucas Pouille in the first round. Two Americans were among the women's qualifiers, with Julia Boserup winning through to a first-round match against 2010 French Open champion Francesca Schiavone and Jennifer Brady advancing to her debut in the main draw at a major, where she'll play Johanna Larsson. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 14th, 2017

BLOGTABLE: Making sense of Derrick Rose's ordeal with Knicks

em>NBA.com blogtable /em> Derrick Rose was fined by the Knicks for what amounts to an unexcused absence. What do you make of this whole ordeal? And what does it say about the state of the Knicks today? strong>David Aldridge: /strong> It's a puzzlement, and they don't deal with puzzlements well in Gotham. Rose had to know that this would have been a total non-story if he'd just texted any of either team president Phil Jackson, GM Steve Mills or coach Jeff Hornacek to let them know he needed the night off. So why wouldn't he? That's what's concerns me; he was indifferent to the fallout that he knew would be coming, not to mention the likely damage to his income-earning potential next summer. Does he not care if he's not playing anymore? I'm not saying that's the case, but that's what you allow people to speculate about by doing stuff like this. I don't think it means much to the Knicks because I don't think Rose is going to be there next year, and I didn't think that before all this happened. strong>Steve Aschburner: /strong> I’m not quite sure of the word, but it’s very Knicksy or Knicksish or Knicksian. Take your pick. If I’m Jeff Hornacek, I tell Phil Jackson that Rose or any other player needs to be suspended for twice as many games as he misses when going AWOL. Just as standard club policy, without pay for the whole bunch. If Jackson doesn’t concur, I sit Rose for two games in the wake of his one-game hiatus. Any self-respecting coach should, because the price paid in losing (if that happened) would be less than the price paid over the long haul from continued dysfunction. Rose -- whatever his reason for disappearing, however personally troubling -- behaved childishly by not taking 20 seconds to call or text Hornacek, Jackson or some other Knicks authority. I think he has been overserved a lot of “do what’s right for Derrick” advice since his career-altering knee injury in April 2012 and this is the latest manifestation. That stuff held the Chicago Bulls hostage for a few years and the Knicks must not enable it. strong>Fran Blinebury: /strong> No matter what the family emergency, who wouldn’t pick up the phone and call their employer? Lack of professionalism and responsibility makes for bad leadership. Especially for the guy who was crowing about New York being among the super teams a few months ago. But it fits with the Knicks, who are just a bad team. strong>Scott Howard-Cooper: /strong> em> strong> /strong> /em>The most important thing is that he is safe and his family is safe. When someone suddenly disappears like that, it’s natural for people to think worst-case scenarios, and thankfully none of them appear to have happened. So this conversation is in basketball terms. In that context, what he did was deserving of a suspension and the loss of real money, not simply a fine. Alert the team. If you don’t think you have the time during a crisis, have someone you are talking with alert the team. Have someone call your agent and have the agent alert the team. He had 30 seconds somewhere in there to text his agent, “Family emergency. Can’t get into it now. Tell Phil I will not be at the game and will be in contact tomorrow.” What does it say about the state of the Knicks today? Nothing we didn’t already know. The key read is how hard they try to keep him in free agency after this. strong>Shaun Powell: /strong>This was bizarre, which means, this was Knicks-like. You mean in this age of rapid communication Rose couldn't send a text to the front office or have someone else do it? There's more to this than meets the eye, or maybe Rose's judgment is that screwed up. Either way, this won't reflect well on him next summer in free agency. He and Joakim Noah need to have strong second halves or Phil Jackson's big offseason moves from last summer will amount to very little. strong>John Schuhmann: /strong>No matter how serious the family issue was, there's no excuse for Rose not taking the 10 seconds needed to send a text to his coach. Failing to do was a show of disrespect for Jeff Hornacek, for the organization, and for his teammates. His actions say a lot about him. The Knicks' reaction – not a peep from Phil Jackson, no suspension for Rose – says a lot about the state of the Knicks. So far, they've handled the situation almost as poorly as he has. strong>Sekou Smith: /strong> em> strong> /strong> /em>It was certainly a strange ordeal, Rose disappearing after a morning shootaround the way he did without any word to teammates or team officials. The fine works for me. And the need to be with family at a time of need trumps everything, even a Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) home game at the Garden. But there is a way to do it and a way not to do it. And Rose went about this terribly. He put his teammates, coaches and the organization in a horrible position as the rest of the public speculated as to his whereabouts. The Knicks are struggling mightily right now, on the court and beyond. This Rose affair only reveres to emphasize that fact. strong>Ian Thomsen: /strong> If there was no valid reason for Rose’s behavior, then it is a dangerous sign that the Knicks have not commanded his respect. Too much is unknown about this situation, but here’s one thing that can be said: It has been an awfully long time since the Knicks franchise was held in high esteem,and this latest incident fits into that mosaic of dysfunctionality. strong>Lang Whitaker: /strong> em> strong> /strong> /em>To me this whole saga says more about the state of Derrick Rose than it does about the Knicks. I mean, I'm not sure there's any franchise prepared for their point guard just not showing up an hour before a game starts. Clearly, we still don't know all the details, and there may be extenuating circumstances that totally warranted Rose's reaction. But from what we do understand, it would seem that Rose could/should have gotten word to someone that he was not available to play on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time). .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 12th, 2017

Paris Saint-Germain confirms signing of Germany's Draxler

PARIS (AP) — Germany midfielder Julian Draxler has officially joined Paris Saint-Germain. The French club confirmed Draxler's signing from Wolfsburg on Tuesday in a deal reportedly worth up to 47 million euros (about $49 million). The 23-year-old attacking midfielder signed a deal through June 2021 on Monday, the French club said. Wolfsburg already announced the transfer subject to a medical examination on Dec. 24. 'For the first time in my career, I'm going to discover a new country, a new league, and I'm very proud to take this new step at a club which has become a benchmark in Europe,' Draxler was quoted as saying on PSG's website. Both sides agreed not to disclose the transfer fee. However, German news agency dpa reported a fee of 42 million euros ($43.9 million) with bonuses of up to 5 million euros ($5.2 million). 'The transfer of this highly sought-after Germany international reconfirms just how attractive our club is to the world's most talented players. He has all the qualities to play a major role in the club's project,' PSG chairman Nasser Al-Khelaifi said. Draxler joined Wolfsburg from Bundesliga rival Schalke for about 36 million euros in August 2015, but he never really settled in at the club. His fortunes mirrored that of Wolfsburg. Bundesliga runner-up and German Cup winner in 2015, Wolfsburg is fighting relegation this season, with coach Dieter Hecking and general manager Klaus Allofs both losing their jobs. Draxler had previously looked for a move — resisted by Allofs — and below-par performances saw him whistled at times by the club's own fans. Draxler scored five goals in 34 league games for Wolfsburg. Altogether, he has 23 goals in 153 Bundesliga games, and three in 27 games for Germany. 'I think this step is the right one for all parties,' Wolfsburg coach Valerien Ismael said. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 4th, 2017

Despite losing key players, USJ-R coach believes team has fighting chance in Cesafi 

Cebu City, Philippines—Prior to their game against the erstwhile unbeaten University of Cebu (UC), University of San Jose-Recoletos (USJ-R) head coach Leode Garcia asked his for wards for just one thing: to show more fight. Certainly more than what the Jaguars showed in the 68-93 blowout that they suffered at the hands of the University […] The post Despite losing key players, USJ-R coach believes team has fighting chance in Cesafi  appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News9 hr. 46 min. ago

US wants win vs Swedes, even if it would mean tougher path

By Anne M. Peterson, Associated Press LE HAVRE, France (AP) — Victory is the goal for the United States in its group stage finale against Sweden, even though a loss might give the Americans an easier path through the knockout rounds of the Women's World Cup. "I think it's in our team's DNA to want to win and do really well," defender Abby Dahlkemper said Tuesday, two days ahead of the Group F finale. The defending champion U.S. and Sweden both enter with two wins and have clinched berths in the round of 16. The top-ranked Americans have the better goal difference and with a win or draw would play Spain in the round of 16 and could face No. 4 France in a quarterfinal at Paris' Parc des Princes and No. 3 England in the semifinals. The team that finishes second in the group meets the Netherlands or Canada in the round of 16, then could have a quarterfinal against No. 2 Germany, which would not have the backing of a large home crowd the way host nation France does every match. U.S. coach Jill Ellis says she can't convince her players not to tackle in practice, so asking them to hold back against Sweden is a losing cause. Ellis thinks it is dangerous to try to tailor results based on possible matchups. "We want to win every game, so I think that's where we're at and that's what we want to do," Ellis said. "I think if you get too much into manipulating or planning or overthinking something, I just don't think that that's a good message." The United States has played Sweden six times in the group stage at the World Cup, including a 0-0 draw four years ago in Canada. They met again in the quarterfinals at the 2016 Olympics, where the Swedes — led by former U.S. coach Pia Sundhage — bunkered in on defense and advanced on penalty kicks after a 1-1 draw. It was the earliest exit for the Americans at an Olympics. U.S. goalkeeper Hope Solo infamously called the Swedes "cowards." The only meeting since then was a 1-0 U.S. win in a 2017 friendly at Goteborg. After the U.S. opened with a record-setting 13-0 rout of Thailand, Ellis changed seven starters in a 3-0 win over Chile. "If you want to go far in the tournament, you've got to have (fresh) legs," Ellis said, explaining her rotation. No. 9 Sweden started with a 2-0 victory over Chile and followed with a 5-1 win over Thailand. "It's going to be a completely different match, and it will be very important for us, naturally," Sweden coach Peter Gerhardsson said. "When you go into the second round we'll have more matches against teams like the U.S. rather than matches against the one with Chile. But we have to win the matches to get through it, it's all about how games develop and how players perform but it will be a different match and we will approach it differently tactically." No. 13 Spain made its World Cup debut four years ago and was eliminated in the group stage. "They're both talented," La Rioja defender Celia Jiménez said. "I think any team that qualifies for the World Cup, it's because they're good enough. The U.S. has a really powerful team, they play a direct game, they like to be dangerous, but at the same time I think Sweden is as well a really good team. They also tend to play direct, so they kind of are similar teams.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News17 hr. 20 min. ago

Report: Horford now expected to leave Celtics in free agency

NBA.com staff report Another one of the Boston Celtics' top in-house free agents appears set to not opt into his deal, and is reportedly ready to move on from Boston. Though it was reported earlier Tuesday (Wednesday, PHl time) that Horford was expected to decline his $30.1 million player option for 2019-20, it was tinged toward a potential return. Boston Herald sports reporter Steve Bulpett broke news that contract talks had apparently shifted toward an exit. Major change in the Al Horford situation: Per source close to Horford, his side is no longer discussing a new 3-year deal to stay with the Celtics. He is expected to sign a 4-year free agent contract elsewhere... Story to come. — Steve Bulpett (@SteveBHoop) June 18, 2019 Less than a week ago, Celtics star guard Kyrie Irving decided to not opt into his deal for next season. That leaves the Celtics reportedly preparing for a nightmare scenario in which both Horford and Irving walk in free agency, with nothing to show for their recent run of high-profile asset acquisition. Wojnarowski previously reported Horford and the Celtics had interest in working toward a new deal in July, one that would help Boston's salary cap flexibility. Team president Danny Ainge said in early June that he was hoping to discuss restructuring the All-Star big man's contract, a move he called a priority this summer. A five-time All-Star, Horford averaged 13.6 points, 6.7 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 1.3 blocks per game last season for the Celtics, appearing and starting in 68 games. Overall, the former No. 3 pick in the 2007 draft has averaged 14.1 ppg, 8.4 rpg, 3.2 apg and 1.2 bpg in his career......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News17 hr. 20 min. ago
Category: newsSource:  manila_shimbunRelated News18 hr. 45 min. ago

PDRRMO ready to respond despite possibility of losing JO employees

CEBU CITY, Philippines —With the possibility that some of its staff may be lost after June 28, 2019, the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (PDRRMO) said it will still be ready to respond to incidents any time. At least 19 of the 41-man force of the PDRRMO are job order (JO) employees, whose six-month contracts will […] The post PDRRMO ready to respond despite possibility of losing JO employees appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News22 hr. 20 min. ago

USJ-R hands UC first loss in Partner’s Cup

Cebu City, Philippines—The University of San Jose-Recoletos (USJ-R) Jaguars broke out of their losing slump in incredible fashion as they handed the JoeMang’s Surplus-University of Cebu (UC) Webmasters its first loss of the tournament,  82-79, in the 2019 Cesafi Partner’s Cup on Tuesday, June 18, 2019, at the Cebu Coliseum. Down by double-figures for most […] The post USJ-R hands UC first loss in Partner’s Cup appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News22 hr. 20 min. ago

Globe taps ISOC-led common tower pool

Globe Telecom Inc. has become the first mobile operator in the country to secure a deal with aspiring common tower providers......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 18th, 2019

PBA: Ginebra set to acquire Pringle in mega trade with Northport

Defending champion Brgy. Ginebra gets a new Gin King to bolster its ongoing title defense of the 2019 PBA Commissioner’s Cup. Dealing with Northport, Ginebra is set to acquire point guard Stanley Pringle in exchange for a haul of role players. To get Pringle, Ginebra will give up Sol Mercado, Kevin Ferrer, Jervy Cruz according to a report by Spin’s Randolph Leongson. Northport’s pick for the 2019 Draft is reportedly still being negotiated if itms part of the deal to Ginebra or not. Pringle, a former top pick, has missed quite some time in the Commissioner’s Cup following surgery to remove bon spurs in his feet. Northport has zoomed to a 5-1 record in the mid-season joust without Pringle. Along with Mercado, the Batang Pier get former Growling Tigers in Ferrer and Cruz, reuniting them with former UST coach Pido Jarencio in Northport.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 18th, 2019

Maijers rules 10th Le Tour de Filipinas

LEGAZPI CITY -- Dutch Jeroen Meijers of Taiyuan Miogee Cycing Team of China successfully defended his lead in the fifth and final stage topped by German Mario Vogt of Team Sapura Cycling of Malaysia to snare his first title in three years in the 10th Le Tour de Filipinas that concluded Tuesday in this beautiful Bicol City fronting the majestic Mayon Volcano here. Meijers, 26, was with Singaporean Goh Choon Huat of Terrenganu Inc., TSG Cycling of Malaysia in the peloton that clocked three hours, 34 minutes and 48 seconds to secure the victory with a total clocking of 20:38:07. Goh finished second overall in 20:38:52 while Aussie Angus Lyons of Oliver’s Real Food Racing of Australia in 20:39:45. 7Eleven Cliqq-Air21 by Roadbike Philippines’ Daniel Habtemichael (20:40:20), PGN Road Cycling Team’s Sandy Nur Hasan (20:40:32) and Aiman Cahyadi (20:40:39), Team Ukyo’s Kohei Yokotsuka (20:40:39) and Naoya Yoshioka (20:40:41) and Team Sapura Cycling’s Muhsin Al Redha Misbah (20:40:42) and Taiyuan Miogee’s Li Shuai (20:40:43) rounded up the top 10. “I felt good entering Stage Five, we had a good feeling about it and I know you need to celebrate at the finish line, not before because anything can happen,” said Meijers, whose last manor victory came in France three years back. Vogt topped the 138.1km Stage Five in 3:33:39 and bested Filipino Dominic Perez of 7Eleven and Malaysian Mohd Zamri Saleh of Terengganu Inc TSG Cycing Team of Malaysia, who each timed in 3:34:41. It was the third podium finish for the 27-year-old Stuttgart native after he also ruled Stage Two Saturday and placed third in Stage Four Monday. Vogt eventually finished 12th overall. Team Ukyo clinched the team crown in 61:59:35 and the US$1,200 (P62,400) purse. Taiyuan Miogee wound up second (622:36) and PGN Road Cycling Team (62:03:05) third in this five-stage race sponsored by Air21, Cargohaus, NMM, Ufreight and SPL and backed by the Phl National Police, Armed Forces of the Phl and Disaster Risk Reduction Management Office with Onesports by Cignal as official coveror. Filipino Marcelo Felipe of 7Eleven Cliqq-Air21 by Roadbike Phls slipped from 10th to 11th in 20:43:43 after losing to Li via countback. Li had a better finish than Marcelo in Stage Four, paving the way for the former to steal No. 10. Felipe, however, went home as the best Filipino rider, besting Mark Galedo of Celeste Cycles Bianchi Phls, who won this same race five years ago, Go for Gold’s Jonel Carcueva, who finished 15th and 16th overall, respectively. Meijers’ ascent started in Stage One Friday when bested all comers to win the lap. Meijers lost the Air21 purple jersey for a time in Stage Two when Goh orchestrated the breakaway group only for the latter to get it back at the end of it. And then it was all Meijers from there. Le Tour chair Donna Mae Lina later said she’s looking forward to next year’s 11th edition. “It was a fitting end to Le Tour’s 10th year anniversary and we’re excited for another one next year,” said Lina......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 18th, 2019

Leonard quiet on future as Raptors celebrate with parade

By Ian Harrison, Associated Press TORONTO (AP) — Fresh off leading the Toronto Raptors to their first NBA title, Kawhi Leonard received the key to the city at Monday’s (Tuesday, PHL time) championship parade. For now, however, the two-way star and two-time NBA Finals MVP still isn’t saying whether he’ll use it to keep a door open, or close it behind him and move on. Leonard spent several days partying with his teammates in Las Vegas and Los Angeles after last Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Game 6 clincher, returning to Toronto in time to ride in one of five open-top double decker buses that carried the Raptors along a crowded parade route. A three-time All-Star and two-time NBA defensive player of the year, Leonard is expected to decline the player option on the final year of his contract and become a free agent. Toronto can offer him a five-year deal worth around $190 million, one year and some $50 million more than any other team. Before stepping on stage Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) for a ceremony in the square outside Toronto’s City Hall, Leonard said he hasn’t been thinking about his future. Instead, he’s trying to extend the celebratory vibe as long as possible. “I’m enjoying this” he said. “It’s not time to stress, it’s still time to have some fun. I’ve just been enjoying my experience.” After precisely two months of playoff basketball, Leonard doesn’t have a lot of time left to be a fun guy — free agency gets underway at 6 p.m. on June 30 (6am, Monday, PHL time). “I’m going to take the right time,” he said. “You don’t need too many days to figure it out. We’ll see what happens. Once that time comes, then we’ll all lay the pros and cons out.” Visibly bothered by soreness during stretches of the Eastern Conference Finals against Milwaukee, Leonard declined to say how much pain he endured en route to winning his second career title. “We’re always battling through things,” he said. “You know, knee pains, ankles, fingers. Everybody was just grinding it out.” Injured for all but nine games in his final season with San Antonio, Leonard played 60 regular-season games for Toronto and another 24 in the postseason, upping his minutes once April arrived. While winning a trophy was an obvious success, Leonard said he’s enjoyed all aspects of his season north of the border, even the varied Canadian weather. “It was a good experience, experiencing Mother Nature, all four seasons,” he said. “Man, it was a great experience. Everybody off the court was great. The fans, just meeting people in Canada. It’s been fun.” Fans chanted ‘Stay! Stay! Stay!’ when Toronto mayor John Tory presented Leonard with the key. Later, the festive mood of the event was marred by gunfire. Four people were shot, leading to a stampede. Three people were arrested and two guns were recovered, Toronto police said. Leonard is one of three Raptors starters with uncertain futures. Center Marc Gasol also has a player option, while guard Danny Green is a free agent. Guards Kyle Lowry and Fred VanVleet, and forward Serge Ibaka, are heading into the final year of their deals. Ibaka and Leonard have become friends in their time together as teammates. “I’ve been talking with him a lot during the season and in the playoffs, but after we won, I can see the man is happy,” Ibaka said. “That’s the most important. We play this sport because we want to enjoy and have fun and be happy and be somewhere people love you. I’m sure he feels that people here love him, and after this moment, that’s the most important.” Lowry attended the parade wearing a game-worn Damon Stoudamire pinstripe Raptors jersey. Stoudamire was the first player drafted by Toronto in 1995, and won rookie of the year honors in 1996. Lowry and Stoudamire were teammates in Memphis from 2006 to 2008......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 18th, 2019

Ginebra gets NorthPort s Pringle for Mercado, Ferrer, Cruz

Barangay Ginebra is set to get a major boost in the backcourt with its acquisition of explosive guard Stanley Pringle in a deal with NorthPort that is pending approval from the PBA commissioner......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 18th, 2019

UK shares list in China, a first for foreign firms

LONDON, United Kingdom – Britain and China began selling shares in each others' companies on Monday, June 17, under a landmark deal, Britain's Treasury announced, as London looks to remain a leading financial center post Brexit . The launch of the London-Shanghai Stock Connect marks "the first ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 18th, 2019

NorthPort trades Stanley Pringle to Ginebra

MANILA, Philippines – NorthPort traded injured star guard Stanley Pringle to Barangay Ginebra as head coach Pido Jarencio looks to reunite with his former UST players.  The Batang Pier acquired Solomon Mercado, Jervy Cruz, and Kevin Ferrer from the Gin Kings in a deal that has been approved by ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 18th, 2019