Advertisements


Category: lifestyleSource: abscbn abscbnApr 16th, 2018

Travel Goals: Pinoy athletes celebrate the New Year in style

With most of the major sports leagues in the Philippines currently on a break to start 2019, some of your favorite athletes took some time to unwind before another year of grinding fully begins. Star athletes flew to different parts of the Philippines and the world to unwind, checking off their travel goals before they reach their actual career goals this year. Some of the reigning UAAP women's volleyball champions DLSU Lady Spikers trekked to the Summer Capital of the Philippines to soak up some fresh air before their title defense in UAAP season 81 this February.         View this post on Instagram                 •Gon’ slay, okay• - @beyonce . . . 📷 @_maylunaaa A post shared by Ernestine Tiamzon (@ernietiamzon) on Jan 6, 2019 at 2:13am PST           View this post on Instagram                 All smiles, 2019 💞 A post shared by May Luna (@_maylunaaa) on Jan 5, 2019 at 8:12pm PST Meanwhile, former Lady Spikers Dawn Macandili and Kim Kianna Dy both travelled abroad to enjoy nature and to surprise a loved one, respectively.  The multi-awarded libero went to Australia with her family, while KKD flew to Japan to surprise her boyfriend, Marck Espejo, who has been reaching goals playing in the Japan V. Premier League.         View this post on Instagram                 “Di na maka-solo” -Donato (2018) A post shared by Dawn Macandili (@dawn_macandili) on Dec 31, 2018 at 2:45am PST           View this post on Instagram                 Yannn, ginagalit niyo kasi si Dudut eh 😑🤣 —— Kidding aside, never been more proud of you! Watching you play the same level even internationally makes me so proud. It was worth every second & mile just to see and be with you ❤️ see u in 4 months ❤️ A post shared by Kim Kianna Dy (@kiannady) on Jan 6, 2019 at 12:57am PST Woman In Action Gretchen Ho tagged along fellow former Ateneo Lady Eagles Jem Ferrer and Dzi Gervacio as they scaled Mount Pamitinan in Rodriguez, Rizal.         View this post on Instagram                 Started my year right 🤙🏻🏞 All is well, all is well ☺️ #womaninaction ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ There have been a lot of things going on with my career and personal life. People know I like pursuing my passions no matter how difficult they are. But despite my #womaninaction lifestyle, I still make sure to get my #adulting right!! - - @prulifeuk’s #PRULifeYourTerm makes it easy for me to reach my financial goals as it is the ONLY renewable term insurance in the country that can be upgraded with an investment component rider. Happy to move forward as secure as I can be :) #prulifeuk - While it’s good to make the most of “NOW”, we must not lose sight of the future. Here we go! #2019 #mountainclimbing #mountaineering #philippines #mountpamitinan #rizal #montalban #mtpamitinan A post shared by Gretchen Ho (@gretchenho) on Jan 7, 2019 at 4:50pm PST           View this post on Instagram                 Fearless. A post shared by Jamenea Ferrer (@jemferrer) on Jan 5, 2019 at 10:16pm PST Michele Gumabao got a much-deserved break after a successful Premier Volleyball League title run with the Creamline Cool Smashers, posing while in an unidentified, but picturesque island.         View this post on Instagram                 And so another adventure begins ☀️ 👙@soakswimwearph 📸 XT100 @fujifilmph @fujifilmphlifestyle #ShowMeYourWorldXT100 #FujifilmPHXMicheleGumabao #fujifilmlifestyle A post shared by Michele Gumabao (@gumabaomichele) on Jan 7, 2019 at 3:23am PST Olympian Hidilyn Diaz made sure to promote her hometown of Zamboanga in her #TravelGoals post, endorsing the wonderful 11 Islands in Zamboanga Peninsula.         View this post on Instagram                 Kung nasa Zamboanga Peninsula kayo baka maconsider niyong pumunta sa Onse isla at malamawi. Suggestion ko magdala kayo ng mat or duyan para makapagsunbath kayo at matulog under the coconut tree or under the sun then marinig niyo ang waves and air. Sobrang refreshing and relaxing! 📸 @imjulius 😎 🌴 🏝 🏖 #Zamboanga #vacation A post shared by Hidilyn Diaz OLY (@hidilyndiaz) on Jan 6, 2019 at 3:45am PST The entire Ildefonso family bonded in Japan capturing some IG-worthy photos along the way.        .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 8th, 2019
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 9th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 7th, 2018

PBA 43 Review: Suspended surge at NLEX

The PBA's 43rd season was a loooooong one. Seriously, it started December of 2017 and it ended December of 2018. That's 12 months of almost non-stop basketball. But with the current PBA season finally drawing to a close, it's time we look back at how each team fared in 2018. Today, we take on the NLEX Road Warriors.   SUSPENDED SURGE After a problematic first season under new head coach Yeng Guiao, NLEX hit the jackpot in the 2017 PBA Draft. Armed with the no. 2 pick, the Road Warriors made the obvious choice and took guard Kiefer Ravena, arguably the most PBA ready prospect to make the jump in forever. He was PBA ready alright. Kief wasted little time in helping NLEX turn things around. With Ravena at the lead, the Road Warriors had their best tournament in the PBA so far and made the semifinals of the Philippine Cup, pushing the Magnolia Hotshots to six games. That’s pretty much the best part of NLEX’s season though. The Road Warriors failed to have a strong finish in the semis series against the Hotshots after Kevin Alas tore his ACL early in Game 5. With Alas out, NLEX’s emerging K&K backcourt tandem was decimated. And after Ravena’s shock suspension from FIBA, the K&K, and in essence NLEX’s whole season, was lost. Ravena was slapped with an 18-month ban by FIBA for doping. Ravena took a protein drink with prohibited ingredients prior Gilas Pilipinas’ home win over Japan in the 2019 FIBA Asia Qualifiers in February. The suspension covers all basketball activities, including the PBA. With that development, NLEX naturally spiraled out of control in the Commissioner’s Cup, leading to an early elimination. The Road Warriors did well enough in the Asia League Summer Super 8 in Macau, finishing in the semifinals, to help set up a strong run in the Governors’ Cup. But with most of its key pieces gone, NLEX flamed out in the quarterfinals and a season that started with so much promise ended in bitter defeat. Patience will be a virtue for NLEX moving forward, but once the Road Warriors finally feature a complete lineup, the team’s suspended surge can hopefully continue in 2019 and beyond.   NLEX ROAD WARRIORS in the 2017-2018 PBA Season Philippine Cup: 6-5 (6th place) Commissioner’s Cup: 2-9 (11th place) Governors’ Cup: 5-6 (8th place) Overall: 13 wins and 20 losses. Two playoff appearances, 1 Semifinals.   POST DRAFT NOTE: NLEX used two first round picks to select Paul Desiderio and Abu Tratter. Both rookies didn’t play one game for the Road Warriors. NLEX used the two rookies as trade bait and eventually nabbed center Poy Erram from Blackwater. Erram certainly gives the Road Warriors a top center and he should be instrumental in NLEX as the team waits to feature a complete lineup with the K&K tandem.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 1st, 2019

PBA: Lee drills game winner as Hotshots take crucial 3-2 lead

Leethal weapon indeed. Paul Lee drilled the game winner Friday as the Magnolia Hotshots survived the Alaska Aces, 79-78, in Game 5 of the 2018 PBA Governors' Cup Finals at the Big Dome. Down one with 11 seconds to go, Romeo Travis was blocked by Best Import Mike Harris on his way to the basket. Fortunately for Magnolia, Lee picked up the loose ball and calmly drilled an open baseline jumper for a 79-78 lead with 1.3 seconds to go. Travis then stopped Harris on a fadeaway in Alaska's final possession and the Hotshots moved on to one win away from the title after taking a crucial 3-2 lead. "Aatakihin ako sa puso," head coach Chito Victolero said with a sigh of relief post-game. "It was a great game, one of the classics in terms of the PBA Finals. I want to commend my players for their mental toughness. We are tired but it was all about heart," he added. Magnolia was up eight, 74-66, with less than five minutes to go. However, the Aces would slowly pick up steam and would score 10 straight to take over, 76-74, in the final 1:17. The Hotshtos were in trouble late too but Lee managed to stop a 3-on-1 Alaska break before finding Ian Sangalang for a crucial and-one play with 18 seconds left for a 77-76 Magnolia lead. Alaska would answer back via two Mike Harris free throws, setting up the final Magnolia play that ended with Lee's clutch jumper. Before the wild fourth quarter, Magnolia dominated the first half, leading by as many as 17 points, 51-34, behind a strong second quarter. Alaska would quickly respond to start the second half, firing a 20-2 run for a 60-55 lead in the third period. Sangalang led the Hotshots with 20 points followed by Mark Barroca with 14. Jio Jalalon added 13 in a big bounce back game. Lee finished with 11 points and his game-winner was being his only basket in the second half. For the Aces, Mike Harris led the way with 26 points. Game 6 is set for Wednesday at Ynares Antipolo.   The Scores: MAGNOLIA 79 -- Sangalang 20, Barroca 14, Jalalon 13, Lee 11, Travis 10, Herndon 6, Dela Rosa 4, Reavis 1, Melton 0, Brondial 0, Simon 0. ALASKA 78 -- Harris 28, Enciso 13, Racal 13, Pascual 6, Exciminiano 5, Cruz 4, Banchero 3, Casio 2, Teng 2, Manuel 2, Baclao 0, Galliguez 0. Quarters: 29-28, 53-40, 65-62, 79-78.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 14th, 2018

Five swoon-worthy Korean actors to watch out for

Five swoon-worthy Korean actors to watch out for.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 13th, 2018

Adventures at Resorts World Sentosa

KISS, hug and give rubdowns to a dolphin. Sip exotic tea while a sizzling slab of Miyazaki tenderloin wagyu beef cooks right in front of you. Sleep in a nature-inspired hotel with swoon-worthy views of a coast. All of these and more await at Singapore’s Resorts World Sentosa. If you’re arriving for the first time–like… link: Adventures at Resorts World Sentosa.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 1st, 2018

The Sunday Breakfast Club to Brew Eco-Friendliness

There’s something stirringly beautiful about the mornings that Sundays make. Swoon-worthy Adam Levine sings of a Sunday morning and how he never wants to leave. A certain classic film sits five students down in weekend detention and end up having the unlikeliest, most potent of friendships. On Sunday, God rested after building the world from […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJul 24th, 2018

Column: This version of Woods seems like a nostalgia act

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland --- All around him on a windy summer day on the links of Carnoustie, the leaders were imploding as Tiger Woods moved into the lead at the turn. It felt like old times at the British Open, as familiar as his Sunday red shirt and the swarm of fans that cheered his every shot. Then Woods imploded, too, and there's something that's become increasingly familiar about that. If this was the Woods of 15 years ago, he likely would be "the champion golfer of the year," as they say over here, and have his name on the claret jug a fourth time. The fans felt this could be the culmination of the comeback. Twitter told late-rising Americans to get to their screens, and fans at ...Keep on reading: Column: This version of Woods seems like a nostalgia act.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2018

PBA: No regrets for Vic Manuel as Alaska ousted from Commissioner s Cup

Vic Manuel's magical Commissioner's Cup run is over. Emerging as one of the top offensive threats for the Alaska Aces, he scored 20 points in 11 straight games, including a career-high 35 markers against the Magnolia Hotshots. His flawless moves on the post have been a revelation, mentored by one of the best centers the league has ever had, Danny Ildefonso. During the eliminations, the 'Muscle Man' normed 24.2 ppg on 58.2 FG%, 6.4 rpg, and 0.9 apg, which made him a frontrunner for the Best Player of the Conference award. However, things started to change in the semis where his 20-point streak was cut short abruptly in Game 1 against San Miguel, where he just tallied 16 points.  Not a bad outing, really.  Unfortunately for Manuel, it became a turning point in the race which counts statistics through the semifinals, thus elevating reigning MVP June Mar Fajardo to the overall leader in the tally, including a 26-point, 12-rebound, two-assist, two-block performance in the series closer. For Manuel, an earlier exit than what he had expected was not a problem for him, as he proved himself to one of being the most feared weapons of coach Alex Compton's balanced attack. "Pero yun nga sabi ko, proud talaga ko sa team namin, sa mga teammates ko, lahat kami nagtulong tulong kasi hindi lang naman ako. Lahat kami nagtulong tulong para makarating dito." "Masaya na ako, naipakita ko. Okay na ako doon. Yun nga sabi ko, nakapasok kami sa semis. Kahit na na-short kami. Ayun lang kuntento na ako. Masaya na ako," the hulking forward added after the game. With key guys like Calvin Abueva (suspension), minutes and assists leader Chris Banchero (family emergency) and original import Antonio Campbell (called up to play in the NBA Summer League), Manuel was proud his team was able to hold the fort and fought tooth-and-nail against the reigning champs. Despite the great performance this conference, the 6'4 forward dispelled questions that his showing has elevated him to the upper echelon, vowing to keep grinding until he proves himself otherwise and avoids injury. Being one of the focal points of the Alaska offense in their rough-and-tumble semis, Manuel was given the go-signal by coaches Compton and Ildefonso to pace the attack, and that has given him a renewed sense of pride for himself. Now that his Commissioner's Cup journey is over, Manuel hopes to be included in the national team's replacement squad for the second window of the FIBA Qualifiers and finally don the 'Pilipinas' jersey for five-on-five, full-court basketball. "Bakit hindi? Syempre tutulong tayo sa bansa natin. Ready lang ako kung tatawagin nila ako. Syempre willing naman ako para maglaro sa Pilipinas. Sa 3x3 nga, ininvite nila ako naglaro ako, doon pa sa Gilas? Syempre, mas masarap maglaro sa 5-on-5, alam natin yun." __   Follow this writer on Twitter, @philipptionary......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2018

Coach of England wins the nation s heart by being a nice guy

By Danica Kirka, Associated Press LONDON (AP) — In an age of tattoos, tongue piercings and tensions over Brexit, a soft-spoken man in a dark blue waistcoat and striped tie is uniting England amid dreams of victory in soccer's World Cup. Coach Gareth Southgate is the buttoned-down leader of a new generation of players who speak softly and let their victories silence critics. And England supporters have found that refreshing after years of underperforming teams led by stars such as David Beckham, who became as much a celebrity as an athlete. "He's very much about a team spirit. It's more about the collective — you can see it in the way he deals with the squad," said Paul Willis, who was in the stands last Saturday in Samara, Russia, when England reached the semifinals with a 2-0 victory over Sweden. "We had superstars, but we didn't have a team." Southgate's focus on teamwork and civility has made him an unlikely icon in a country that is deeply divided by bitter arguments over plans to leave the European Union and a widening gap between rich and poor. England Captain Harry Kane may be the tournament's leading scorer, but fans are donning waistcoats and ties — even as the country enjoys an unusually hot summer — in homage to Southgate as pundits extol the 47-year-old coach's calm leadership. "He has shown us the value of courtesy, kindness, hard work and that most derided of virtues, niceness," columnist India Knight wrote in the Sunday Times. "He has redefined not just how to be a manager, but how to be a man." Southgate displayed his character after England's July 3 victory over Colombia, offering a supportive hug to Colombian player Mateus Uribe after his miss in a penalty shootout helped England advance. The England coach understood Uribe's agony, having missed a similar shot at the 1996 European championships. The moment of empathy also reminded the country how Southgate once lampooned his own failure with a Pizza Hut commercial in which he wore a bag over his head to shield his identity from angry fans. Southgate's compassion sparked a hashtag for the coach's real and imagined acts of kindness such as "#GarethSouthgateWould stop and help you put the chain back on your bike even if he was all dressed in his waistcoat and late for the game." Southgate became manager less than two years ago after the Football Association's first choice was forced out after unguarded comments to undercover reporters. Since then he has quietly ushered out the last of the old stars and brought together a group of youngsters who modestly shrug off compliments and give kudos to their teammates. Perhaps more importantly, he recognized the contribution of the fans, something that had been eroded during the superstar era. After every game, Southgate and his players walk across the field to applaud the supporters who have traveled to Russia to cheer for the team. "We had lost a bit of connection," Willis, a 57-year-old fan from Birmingham, said of past regimes. "That is now back. All the team and the back room applaud our input to the game." That has also translated into huge support back home in football-mad England. At least 20 million people, 38 percent of England's population, watched Saturday's victory over Sweden, according to figures from the BBC. Commentators say the actual number was much higher because so many people watched the game on huge screens in parks and shopping centers. London authorities are inviting 30,000 fans to the city's Hyde Park for a screening of Wednesday's semifinal against Croatia. Fearing demand will far exceed that, authorities stressed that only those with tickets should come to the park. Ticket services reported hundreds of people were trying to dump theater tickets for Wednesday because they had more pressing business elsewhere. Social media sites are urging fans to wear waistcoats — please don't call them vests — to the office ahead of the big match — a "Waistcoat Wednesday" if you will. Marks & Spencer, the official tailor to the England team, says sales of the grandfatherly garments have doubled during the World Cup. Rio Ferdinand, one of the previous "golden generation" of players who is now a commentator for the BBC, has been leading the cheers for this year's team, asking fans to post video of their beer-throwing, chest-bearing, flag-waving celebrations after the win over Sweden. On Sunday, Ferdinand tweeted his own mea culpa for past failures, while also highlighting Southgate's unique contribution. "Why weren't the golden generation... the golden generation???" he tweeted. "We as players look at ourselves first...we never performed....but sometimes you have to be allowed to perform! Gareth is allowing this current @England to do this." That's paying off. Kane, who turns 25 later this month, has scored six goals in the tournament. Dele Alli, 22, came back from injury to score the team's second goal against Sweden. Fabian Delph, 28, played the last 15 minutes of Saturday's game after missing the previous game against Colombia because Southgate allowed him to go home for the birth of his third child. Southgate himself recognizes the contributions of everyone, from the physiotherapists to the players who push their teammates in practice but rarely get into a game, even to fans back home. "Our country has been through some difficult moments recently in terms of its unity, and I think sport has the power to do that and football in particular has the power to do that," he said. "So for us, we can feel the energy and we can feel the support from home, and that's, that's a very special feeling. It's a privilege." Barring that, it does help to have a snappy waistcoat. "Quite frankly, I don't care what he wears," Willis said. "He can wear a tutu if we carry on winning.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 11th, 2018

Weekly PC download charts: ‘PUBG’, ‘GTA V’, ‘FFXV’ and ‘Jurassic World’ hold steady during sales

With week two of an annual mid-year sale taking place on PC gaming's Steam download service, its top five remains largely unchanged from the week before; "Wreckfest" charges to the top of the GamersGate ranking, while Filipino-inspired horror "Tanggal" sneaks up on Itch.io number one "Baldi's Basics". The second week of the Steam Summer Sale sees its revenue-based top five best-seller chart unchanged, save for "Grand Theft Auto V" and the "PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds" Sanhok Event Pass swapping places in positions 2 and 3 respectively. Otherwise, "PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds" itself, lavish fantasy adventure "Final Fantasy XV", and the recently released dinosaur theme park ...Keep on reading: Weekly PC download charts: ‘PUBG’, ‘GTA V’, ‘FFXV’ and ‘Jurassic World’ hold steady during sales.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2018

Lifestyle Buzz: Brave June s Gush Of Rains With These Must-Haves And Special Promos!

Summer has ended, but the fun and excitement aren't over yet!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 13th, 2018

Spieth in mini-slump heading to Shinnecock Hills, US Open

By Barry Wilner, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Lots of folks have become accustomed to seeing Jordan Spieth's name atop leaderboards, particularly at golf's majors. So has Spieth. Yet since winning the British Open last July, Spieth barely has been a factor on the weekends. He believed third-place finishes in Houston and at the Masters had indicated a turnaround heading into this week's U.S. Open. But since Augusta, his best showing in five tournaments is a tie for 21st at the Byron Nelson, and he twice missed cuts, including most recently at the Memorial. Not quite the stuff that rocketed Spieth to the top of golf, with Masters and U.S. Open wins in 2015, and his third major last summer at Royal Birkdale. "Yeah, I think my patience has been tested, just not going into Saturday or Sunday with a legitimate chance to win but maybe once," Spieth said Tuesday at Shinnecock Hills. "Technically the Masters, I didn't really have a chance. The back nine, I ended up giving myself a chance. "Yeah, just the limited number compared to previous years of chances I've had on the weekends has been frustrating." Spieth, 24, always has been mature as a competitor and person. When he went after the career Grand Slam for the first time last year at the PGA Championship, he wound up 10 shots back. No one contemplated he wouldn't have won another PGA Tour title since, missing two cuts before the Masters and two more after. While exasperated, Spieth, as always, believes he is close to the way out of this mini-slump — for him, at least. "Over the last, since probably in between Austin (a first-round elimination by Patrick Reed in match play) and Houston was a really big weekend for me of settling down and getting back on the right track with things," he said. "And recognizing that it's a long career, and, you know, results aren't going to come by wanting them to come. They're going to come by being obsessed with the process, getting back to the basics, being an athlete, figuring out within the swing, the intricacies of the game. Kind of the stuff — the reason I love to practice — that's what's going to kind of bring it back, and results aren't everything." Maybe not, except that when the results have been so spectacular so quickly, they become how you are measured by the public. Spieth has won 11 times in his first five full seasons, including those three major championships. His putting skills are envied by many of his peers. So are his analytical breakdowns of shots, holes, his swing. His optimism that all will be right again is praise-worthy — and probably accurate. "I feel like my game is in the best shape it's been in a long time, including last year," he said. "And my results don't necessarily speak towards that, but I feel that way, and so I'll stick with the process, and they'll surely come at some point." If that point is this week, Spieth must outshoot not only the sentimental fan choices (Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson) but all of those young guns who have begun to grab majors: Reed, Justin Thomas, Brooks Koepka. "It almost feels like I'm back in high school and college," Spieth joked. "These are the same guys we used to battle it out with then, and I'd win one, then they would win one. It's just blown up now because there was no coverage; no one really cared to watch us back then, and now people do. "But it's nothing different than what we've kind of been doing with each other for a number of years. It's really cool to be out here doing it, but I don't think we ... think of it as a totally different experience than anything we've always kind of done.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 13th, 2018

LeBron s free agency decision could swing NBA s balance of power

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CLEVELAND -- These combo coronation-funerals can be tricky. Imagine the crowning of a new monarch where the royal subjects couldn’t stop chattering about the freshly deposed or deceased predecessor. Where the traditional cry of continuity and succession, “The king is dead! Long live the king!” got flipped, with what was overshadowing what is. That’s pretty much how it went Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) at Quicken Loans Arena, with the Golden State Warriors’ latest NBA championship having to share the stage with speculation, instantly revved up, about LeBron James and the choice he’ll soon make about his next employer. The Warriors are the kings, claiming pro basketball’s throne yet again by completing a sweep of James’ Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2018 Finals. But of course, James is the King, and as so many of us learned in sophomore English – thanks, CliffsNotes! – “Uneasy lies the head (of those who fret and obsess about the future whereabouts of the NBA superstar) that wears a crown.” Long live the kings! The King is ... gone? There was so much energy before, during and after Game 4 Friday (Saturday, PHL time) poured into the last game/next game conjecture about James, the Cavaliers and seismic shifts in the league’s 2018-19 landscape that even the player’s surprise reveal near the end of the night – a bruised and bandaged right hand – couldn’t derail it. Turns out, as James ‘fessed up, the sore shooting paw was an injury he had been playing with ever since Game 1 in Oakland eight days earlier. He had “self-inflicted” it in a fit of pique when he smacked a whiteboard in the visitors’ dressing room at Oracle Arena after Cleveland’s overtime loss in the series-setter, an outcome driven at least in part by some teammates’ mistakes and an arcane wrinkle in the NBA’s replay rules regarding block/charge fouls. Despite the hordes of media people chronicling every waking detail of the Finals, James had kept the injury on the down-low (along with the possibility that J.R. Smith’s nickname amongst his Cavs teammates might be “whiteboard”). The cameras zoomed in and clicked in a paparazzi frenzy of motor drives every time James raised the hand, wrapped in black tape, above the table during his postgame podium remarks. Whether a legit Page-2-the-rest-of-the-story factor in the championship series or a too-late alibi, the contused hand wound up as a sidebar to where James plans to be using it when training camps open in a few months. As of Friday (Saturday, PHL time), it had been 95 months since “The Decision,” the 2010 announcement that James made in a tone-deaf vanity TV production that he was taking his talents from Cleveland to South Beach. Nearly 47 months had passed since he broke the news of his return in a Sports Illustrated ghost-written essay, envisioning much of what actually has unfolded in the four years since. Now savvy insiders and casual observers alike presume James will be on the move again, pushed to leave the franchise he has defined in an urgent search for more and better talent with which he can compete. As in, y’know, some horses, some horses, his kingdom for some horses. James’ free-agency process next month (he can opt out of a $35.6 million deal in the final season of his current contract) is expected to dictate the market of player movement this summer like an oversized domino. It easily could swing the balance of power, if not quite at Golden State’s lofty level then immediately below it. The monster he helped create Dr. Frankenstein eventually was done in by his macabre creation, and it can similarly be argued that James has no one but himself to blame for the predicament in which he again finds himself. He set in motion the machinery of the super team, after all, when he chose to join forces with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in Miami eight years ago. Oh sure, the Boston Celtics in 2007-08 got there first by luring Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen to join Paul Pierce, but that was about knitting together three stars, all age 30 or older, for what would be their last best chance to win in an extremely limited run. That group won one title, went to two Finals in three seasons and was done, Allen leaving to join James & Co. with the Heat while Garnett and Pierce morphed into trade chips for Boston POBO Danny Ainge. When James, Wade and Bosh teamed up, they were in their basketball primes and their initial giddy boasts of “not four, not five, not six” championships turned off fans league-wide as much for its portent as its pretension. That crew went 4-for-4 in Finals, winning two rings before James, nudged by staleness and chafing as well as his grand plan for northeast Ohio, went home. From there, a line can be drawn through the ill-conceived 2012-13 L.A. Lakers of Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash, Dwight Howard and Pau Gasol all the way to this season’s Houston Rockets of James Harden and Chris Paul and the talent-gorged Golden State roster. James was the centerpiece as Cleveland replicated the Big Three concept around him with Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love, two younger, playoff-stymied All-Stars. The new-look Cavaliers went to the Finals in their first season together and clambered atop the basketball world to win the franchise’s first NBA title by the end of the second, becoming the first team in league history to do so after digging a 1-3 hole in the best-of-seven series. In that moment, regardless of the two Finals trips that followed, James’ bill was stamped: Paid In Full. Misguided fans might burn his jersey if he leaves again, but James burned the mortgage after that Game 7 in Oakland in 2016 as far as any remaining obligation to fulfill. “I came back because I felt like I had some unfinished business,” he said after elimination Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “To be able to be a part of a championship team two years ago with the team that we had and in the fashion that we had is something I will always remember. Honestly, I think we'll all remember that. It ended a drought for Cleveland of 50-plus years, so I think we'll all remember that in sports history.” James added: “When you have a goal and you're able to accomplish that goal, it actually – for me personally – made me even more hungry to continue to try to win championships. And I still want to be in championship mode. I think I've shown this year why I will still continue to be in championship mode.” In other words, James intends to sustain his high level of performance. He expects to win. And he presumably will do whatever – and go wherever – is necessary to achieve that. There’s no perfect fit So what does that mean for the NBA’s best player (never mind what the annual MVP balloting says in any given season)? It means this: compromise. There is no ideal situation, certainly no easy answer to the guesswork surrounding James’ looming free agency. He could transform any of the 30 teams, but not without some trade-offs for him, for them or for both. Most of them won’t be in play. Teams in markets such as Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Portland, Sacramento, the Twin Cities and so on can’t scratch James’ itches for either championship-worthy depth chart or spotlight. New York and Chicago, among the biggies, are out of synch with his timeline. Toronto? No way James is resettling his brand north of the border, and given his stated desire for teammates who have not just sufficient basketball skills but also mental toughness, well, the Raptors teams he and the Cavs have dominated do not qualify. The Boston club that stretched Cleveland to seven games in the Eastern Conference finals is built for the long haul and would have to surrender much of that to adjust to James’ career calendar. There’s a little Kyrie problem lurking there and, truth be told, the Celtics look to be on their way and are doing just fine without the 33-year-old heading, one of these years, toward decline. At some point in each of the 2018 Finals’ final three days, James spoke admiringly of the Warriors and the San Antonio Spurs title teams that blocked his path whether in Miami or Cleveland. He was at it again even as the Warriors were dousing the opponent’s locker room at The Q with Moet champagne. “I made the move in 2010 to be able to play with talented players, cerebral players that you could see things that happen before they happened on the floor,” James said. “When you feel like you're really good at your craft, I think it's always great to be able to be around other great minds as well and other great ballplayers. “That's never changed. Even when I came here in '14, I wanted to try to surround myself and surround this franchise with great minds and guys that actually think outside the box of the game and not just go out and play it.” Where might James find that now or recruit that swiftly? Hard to say. There are asterisks and “buts” everywhere: * If he were to sign with the Houston Rockets, James would be hitching his star to Chris Paul, a buddy with an injury history that’s about the mirror opposite of his own. He would be teaming up with an elite coach in Mike D’Antoni, something he’s never had (though Miami’s Erik Spoelstra was just young and unproven, on his way to big things). But it also would require another big ask of James Harden, who had to adapt last summer to Paul’s arrival and need for the ball. * If James chooses the Lakers, he has the chance to hit reset with the league’s glitziest franchise, in a market that can meet his every off-court wish and where he and his family already own one or more ultra-comfortable homes. The Lakers have young talent to help James transition into a lower-usage veteran’s role, favored status as a destination team for other top free agents and the salary-cap space to get it done this summer with the likes of Paul George or his pal Paul. But that roster might not be capable of insta-contending, which could burn a season or two when James’ clock most definitely is clicking. * If it’s San Antonio, James could link up with the elite coach in Gregg Popovich, where the winning culture is in the DNA rather than some acquired taste. The Spurs have talent, particularly if Kawhi Leonard finds happiness again there. But they might not have enough to rattle the Warriors’ cage. And for all their professed admiration, James and Popovich might both fare better by keeping their relationship long-distance vs. the 82-game grind. * If it’s Golden State? Perish the thought. The NBA might have to board up itself if competitive balance were capsized to that extent. And as Draymond Green shrewdly noted on Thursday (Friday, PHL time), if James climbed aboard, it likely would require him and several other Golden State teammates to be dispatched to parts unknown. * If James prefers to stay East, where the winning comes easier, he could pick Philadelphia. The Sixers have two foundational young stars at positions that matter most, center Joel Embiid and point guard Ben Simmons. But Simmons is a non-shooter at the moment, the antithesis of what makes a great complementary LeBron teammate. As for Embiid, James never has had to play off of and service a top center. And Philly might feel like a basketball-only move, with the hungriest and most demanding of any new fan base he would embrace. * If it’s Miami – wait, could it be Miami? Could he go second-home again? The Heat always strive to be competitive and offer a talent base deep enough for the East and lots of familiarity. But they also have players such as Hassan Whiteside and Dion Waiters whose mental approaches don’t seem to fit the model James was cooing about in Golden State and with the Tim Duncan-era Spurs. * That brings us to Cleveland, where it’s possible James might choose to remain. Staying with the Cavaliers, after leading them to four Finals and that heady 2016 title, would be the easiest choice as far as pressure to win. He owes these fans nothing anymore – in fact, had the bargain been offered to them in 2010 (“LeBron will leave and win elsewhere for four years, but will come back and deliver a championship and four Finals trips”), most would have grabbed it. Here, James and the fans who have watched him even through the interruption develop from ridiculously touted high schooler to one of the world’s most famous athletes could grow older together. Then he could partner up and buy the team from owner Dan Gilbert for a long-term future. Certainly, staying has a certain place in his and the rest of the James clan’s hearts. “The one thing that I've always done is considered, obviously, my family,” he said at series end Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “Understanding especially where my boys are at this point in their age. They were a lot younger the last time I made a decision like this four years ago. I've got a teenage boy, a pre-teen and a little girl that wasn't around as well. So sitting down and considering everything, my family is a huge part of whatever I'll decide to do in my career, and it will continue to be that.” It’s worth noting that as James contemplates his options as a modern pursuer of championship excellence, the prospect of him moving again qualifies at some level as a failure. Not just by the support system in Cleveland, where he and Gilbert have their friction and James gets snidely mentioned as the team’s unofficial GM and head coach, but by him too. He’s the one who went off to seek his “college education” in south Florida in what it takes to win, whether on the court, in the front office or in and around the seams 365 days a year, straight out of the Pat Riley handbook. The teams about which James talks so glowingly in Oakland now and in San Antonio then have cultures he covets, stability up and down the flowchart he craves. In Cleveland, for a variety of reasons, his team has been incapable of establishing and maintaining that to a lasting degree. He is part of that missed opportunity and he has to own it, no matter if he goes or stays. James is inseparable from the dynamic of the Cavaliers’ ever-changing and often melodramatic roster maneuvers. Spending big, swapping out draft picks to import current stars and supporting players, and overvaluing secondary guys like Smith and Tristan Thompson are risks the Warriors and the Spurs largely avoided thanks to shrew drafting and laudable continuity. The Cavs’ scrap heap, by contrast, is high with traded picks, scuttled plans, panic deals, short-term patches and folks such as former coach David Blatt and former GM David Griffin. And maybe James could have nurtured a little better relationship with All-Star point guard and 2016 title sidekick Kyrie Irving, enough to have kept Irving from bailing on them all with his trade demand last summer. Now he’s on the verge of casting about again, prioritizing what matters most for however long he continues to play. James is more at peace with it than he was before, particularly in 2010, and surely can enjoy the leverage he wields and the riches it delivers. But there is a burden there as well, one that could be seen as completing a circle. So many of the NBA’s greatest stars have been stuck playing and living in the Age of LeBron, right? Their paths to the Finals blocked, on one whole side of the league, by him and his? Well, LeBron James is stuck now in the Era of the Warriors, freshly swept and anxious to close the gap. What goes around comes around, though the key more pressing of the big W’s now is, where? Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

Lifestyle Hotshots: The Next Face Of Philippine Sportscasting Is Cutie Martin Javier!

Perseverance and timing equals ABS-CBN S+A personality's winning formula!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 25th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 22nd, 2018

Lifestyle Hotshots: Ex-DLSU Green Archer Martin Reyes Finds New Love In The Business Of Digital

We caught up with DLSU’s hot Green Archer and found out what he’s been up to!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 21st, 2018

Lifestyle Hotshots: Meet Gerald Anderson s Equally Beguiling And Talented Lookalike From Indonesia!

Ladies, meet host, model, trainer, and vlogger Donovan Coates!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 17th, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 17th, 2018