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Las Vegas shooter s note might have had shooting calculations

LAS VEGAS  — Investigators believe a note found in the Las Vegas gunman's hotel room contained a series of numbers that helped him calculate more precise sho.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarOct 8th, 2017

Las Vegas shooter's note contained calculations to maximize kills – CBS

Las Vegas shooter's note contained calculations to maximize kills – CBS.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 8th, 2017

2018-19 NBA.com Rookie Survey

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com It will be difficult for this year's rookie class to live up to the standard set by the class of 2017. Last season, we saw the debuts of Donovan Mitchell, Ben Simmons and Jayson Tatum, future All-Stars who not only put up good numbers in the regular season, but also impacted in the playoffs as well. De'Aaron Fox averaged more points and assists than 2016-17 Rookie of the Year Malcolm Brogdon and didn't even make Second Team All-Rookie last season. This year's class, at least according to the class itself, has the potential to be just as deep. In the annual Rookie Survey, 20 different players were tabbed as the answer for one -- or both -- of the first two questions: "Who will be the Rookie of the Year" and "Which rookie will have the best career." Big men were taken with five of the first seven picks in the Draft, but a lot of eyes will be turned toward Atlanta, where 6-foot-2 guard Trae Young will hope to make Hawks general manager Travis Schlenk look smart for trading the No. 3 pick (Luka Doncic), picking up an extra pick, and selecting Young at No. 5. For now, Young has the support of his fellow rookies, who named the 19-year-old former Oklahoma star as the class' best shooter and best playmaker. For the 10th time in the last 12 years, NBA.com sat down with the rookie class at the annual Rookie Photo Shoot at the New York Knicks' practice facility. This year's group (of 36) answered seven questions about their class, as well as a few about the current player they most admire and what they're expecting as they make the jump to the NBA. NOTE: Players were asked not to vote for themselves, college teammates or NBA teammates. (Some still did, and those votes were discounted.) * * * Who will be the 2018-19 Kia Rookie of the Year? 1. DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix -- 18%     Collin Sexton, Cleveland -- 18% 3. Luka Doncic, Dallas -- 9%     Kevin Knox, New York -- 9% 5. Mohamed Bamba, Orlando -- 6%     Devonte' Graham, Charlotte -- 6%     Michael Porter Jr., Denver -- 6%     Trae Young, Atlanta -- 6% Others receiving votes: Marvin Bagley III, Sacramento; Troy Brown Jr., Washington; Wendell Carter Jr., Chicago; Hamidou Diallo, Oklahoma City; Harry Giles, Sacramento; Jaren Jackson Jr., Memphis; Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio Last year: Dennis Smith Jr. – 26% Worth noting: In the first nine years of this survey, at least one player got at least 24 percent of the vote. The only time the rookies got this right was in 2007 (the first year of the survey), when Kevin Durant received 54 percent of the vote. Which rookie will have the best career? 1. Wendell Carter Jr., Chicago -- 13% 2. Kevin Knox, New York -- 10%     Jerome Robinson, LA Clippers -- 10% 3. DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix -- 7%     Mohamed Bamba, Orlando -- 7%     Mikal Bridges, Phoenix -- 7%     Collin Sexton, Cleveland -- 7%     Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio -- 7% Others receiving votes: Marvin Bagley III, Sacramento; Miles Bridges, Charlotte; Troy Brown Jr., Washington; Hamidou Diallo, Oklahoma City; Donte DiVincenzo, Milwaukee; Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, LA Clippers; Devonte' Graham, Charlotte; Jaren Jackson Jr., Memphis; Michael Porter Jr., Denver; Trae Young, Atlanta Last year: Lonzo Ball, Jayson Tatum -- 18% Worth noting: This is the fifth straight year that a Duke guy has earned the most votes on this question, with Carter joining Jabari Parker (2014), Jahlil Okafor (2015), Brandon Ingram (2016) and Tatum. Which rookie was the biggest steal at where he was selected in the Draft? 1. Keita Bates-Diop (48), Minnesota -- 13% 2. Michael Porter Jr. (14), Denver -- 10%     Lonnie Walker IV (18), San Antonio -- 10% 4. Jalen Brunson (33), Dallas -- 6%     Gary Trent Jr. (37), Portland -- 6% Others receiving votes: Grayson Allen (21), Utah; Mohamed Bamba (6), Orlando; Miles Bridges (12), Charlotte; Bruce Brown (42), Detroit; Jevon Carter (32), Memphis; Hamidou Diallo (45), Oklahoma City; Donte DiVincenzo (17), Milwaukee; Luka Doncic (3), Dallas; Jacob Evans (28), Golden State; Devonte' Graham (34), Charlotte; De'Anthony Melton (46), Houston; Svi Mykhailiuk (47), L.A. Lakers; Jerome Robinson (13), LA Clippers; Mitchell Robinson (36), New York; Mo Wagner (25), L.A. Lakers; Robert Williams III (27), Boston; Trae Young (5), Atlanta Last year: Donovan Mitchell -- 19% Worth noting: This question got the biggest variety of answers, and we'll see if Bates-Diop gets a chance to crack Tom Thibodeau's typically-short rotation in Minnesota. Last year's rookies certainly got this one right. Which rookie is the most athletic? 1. Zhaire Smith, Philadelphia -- 24% 2. Hamidou Diallo, Oklahoma City -- 15%     Josh Okogie, Minnesota -- 15%     Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio -- 15% 5. Marvin Bagley III, Sacramento -- 6%     Miles Bridges, Charlotte -- 6% Others receiving votes: DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix; Mikal Bridges, Phoenix; Bruce Brown, Detroit; Donte DiVincenzo, Milwaukee; Michael Porter Jr., Denver; Collin Sexton, Cleveland; Robert Williams III, Boston Last year: Dennis Smith Jr. -- 44% Worth noting: We'll have to wait to see just how athletic Smith really is. He just had foot surgery to repair a Jones fracture, the same injury that forced Simmons to miss the season after being drafted. Which rookie is the best shooter? 1. Trae Young, Atlanta -- 47% 2. Kevin Huerter, Atlanta -- 13%     Svi Mykhailiuk, L.A. Lakers -- 13% 4. Gary Trent Jr., Portland -- 9% 5. Grayson Allen, Utah -- 6%     Donte DiVincenzo, Milwaukee -- 6% Others receiving votes: Aaron Holiday, Indiana; Kevin Knox, New York Last year: Luke Kennard -- 49% Worth noting: As usual, this question garnered the closest thing to a consensus. In fact, Young received more votes on this question (15) than any other player received on the first seven questions total. Which rookie is the best defender? 1. Jevon Carter, Memphis -- 29% 2. Mohamed Bamba, Orlando -- 14% 3. Josh Okogie, Minnesota -- 11% 4. Mikal Bridges, Phoenix -- 9% 5. Jaren Jackson Jr., Memphis -- 6%     Collin Sexton, Cleveland -- 6% Others receiving votes: DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix; Bruce Brown, Detroit; Wendell Carter Jr., Chicago; Hamidou Diallo, Oklahoma City; Melvin Frazier Jr., Orlando; Mitchell Robinson, New York; Omari Spellman, Atlanta; Gary Trent Jr., Portland; Lonnie Walker IV, San Antonio Last year: Josh Jackson -- 26% Worth noting: Carter is another rookie who just had surgery. But it was to repair a torn ligament in his right thumb and he's such a good defender that his fellow rookies gave him twice as many votes as any other player despite his absence at the Rookie Photo Shoot. Which rookie is the best playmaker? 1. Trae Young, Atlanta -- 35% 2. Jalen Brunson, Dallas -- 15% 3. Luka Doncic, Dallas -- 9%     Shai Gilgeous-Alexander -- 9%     Collin Sexton, Cleveland -- 9% 6. Troy Brown Jr., Washington -- 6%     Aaron Holiday, Indiana -- 6% Others receiving votes: Devonte' Graham, Charlotte; De'Anthony Melton, Houston; Michael Porter Jr., Denver; Jerome Robinson, LA Clippers Last year: Lonzo Ball -- 72% Worth noting: Young is the first player in the 10 years of the Rookie Survey to get the most votes in both the "Best shooter" and "Best playmaker" questions. He's also one of five rookies – Diallo, Porter, Sexton and Walker are the others – to receive votes on five of the first seven questions this year. Sexton was the only one to receive more than one vote on at least four questions. What will be the biggest adjustment for you, playing in the NBA? 1. Speed or pace of the game -- 31% 2. Schedule/Length of season -- 24% 3. Physicality (size and strength of opponents) -- 19% 4. Travel -- 10% 5. Lifestyle/Time management -- 8% Also receiving votes: Conditioning, Playing NBA defense, Not having the ball as much Last year: Physicality (size and strength of opponents) -- 37% Worth noting: The top four answers on this question have been pretty consistent over the last few years. What is the most important skill you need to develop? 1. Ball-handling -- 19%     Shooting -- 19% 3. Defense -- 14% 4. Playmaking/Reading the defense -- 11% 5. Everything -- 8% 6. Motor/Work ethic -- 6%     Strength -- 6%     Time management -- 6% Also receiving votes: Basketball IQ, Communication, Confidence, Leadership Last year: N/A Worth noting: Good news for coaches: "Defense" got five times as many votes as it did last year. Who is your favorite player in the league? 1. LeBron James, L.A. Lakers -- 29% 2. Stephen Curry, Golden State -- 9%     Kevin Durant, Golden State -- 9% 4. Giannis Antetokounmpo, Milwaukee -- 6%     Chris Paul, Houston -- 6%     Dwyane Wade -- 6%     Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City -- 6% Others receiving votes: Kobe Bryant; DeMarcus Cousins, Golden State; Anthony Davis, New Orleans; Paul George, Oklahoma City; James Harden, Houston; Jrue & Justin Holiday, New Orleans/Chicago; Kyrie Irving, Boston; Jusuf Nurkic, Portland; John Wall, Washington; Nick Young, Last year: LeBron James -- 31% Worth noting: James has been on a different team each time he has led this category, while Bryant is still getting votes two years after his retirement. John Schuhmann is a staff writer for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

Authorities: Las Vegas Shooter Acted Alone, Had No Motive

LAS VEGAS - Officials closed their investigation Friday of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, concluding the gunman acted alone, with no discernible motive.Stephen Paddock,.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

Authorities: Las Vegas Shooter Acted Alone, Had No Motive

LAS VEGAS - Officials closed their investigation Friday of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, concluding the gunman acted alone, with no discernible motive.Stephen Paddock,.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

Comm. Silver, NBPA say competitive imbalance not a problem

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com LAS VEGAS -- First came the backlash. Next, backlash to the backlash. By Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), much of the whipsawing over competitive balance -- or more accurately, imbalance -- as an NBA problem rising to the level of crisis had calmed down. Yet powerful voices from the league’s summer nerve center could not dismiss it entirely as an issue meriting closer inspection. “I'm not here to say we have a problem,” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said Tuesday after the Board of Governors meeting. “And I love where the league is right now. [But] I think we can create a better system.” Neither Silver nor Michele Roberts, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association, sounded an alarm in their separate news conferences about what many see as a widening gap between the league’s haves and have-nots. Roberts, in fact, seemed to feel that all is well and that talent inequality is in the eye of the beholder. “Competitive balance, it almost depends on what your favorite team is,” said Roberts, who was rehired as head of the players union in another four-year contract announced Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “I don’t hear anybody in the Bay Area worrying about competitive balance. I also don’t hear the people in Philadelphia worrying about competitive balance, or Houston. “We’ve got great teams. And it’s never been the case, as far as I’m concerned, where I was not able most of the time to predict what teams were going to be in the Finals.” The topic came up in precisely that context before the Finals last month when Silver was asked about Golden State and Cleveland meeting in the championship series for the fourth consecutive year, a first in any of the major professional sports leagues. It reared its head again this month soon after free agency opened on July 1, with events conspiring to make insiders wonder about a growing disparity among teams. LeBron James’ signing with the Los Angeles Lakers was the biggest move in what appeared to be a continuing shift of strength into the league’s Western Conference. That was followed by the news that DeMarcus Cousins, New Orleans’ All-Star center, had joined the champion Warriors. That signing sparked the initial backlash, a rich-getting-richer cry that pointed not to Cousins’ one-year deal for $5.3 million in 2018-19 salary but the fact that the Warriors will spend in excess of $20 million for it when luxury taxes are counted. Golden State had the NBA’s fattest payroll in 2017-18 of $137.5 million, despite a $99 million salary cap, thanks to various exceptions in the prevailing “soft cap” system. “I don't necessarily think it's per se bad that the Warriors are so dominant,” Silver told reporters, not long after discussing the “competitive landscape” with the owners. “As I've said before, we're not trying to create some sort of forced parity. What we really focus on is parity of opportunity. And a fair point could be made in the tax system, when certain teams are spending significantly more than others, that that's not parity of opportunity.” The counter-backlash came from folks who rushed to the Warriors’ and Cousins’ defense, correctly noting that neither did anything wrong, conducting their business within the rules as specified by the collective bargaining agreement between the owners and the players. That CBA is the object of endless study and imagined revision, with amendments possible if negotiated prior to the end of the current deal after the 2023-24 season. Shooting for a “hard cap” likely would be a tough sell to players accustomed to the freedom of movement they currently enjoy. “It's not necessarily [Roberts’] issue,” Silver said in response to the union director’s characterization. “I think it's on me and our Labor Relations Committee, ultimately, to sit with the players and their committee and convince them that there may be a better way of doing things.” Silver mentioned Charlotte owner and legendary NBA superstar Michael Jordan, chairman of that Labor Relations Committee, as a valuable resource in addressing owners’ and players’ competition concerns. Both sides have valid arguments. Interest in the NBA never has been higher by almost any metric chosen, from selected TV ratings and licensing revenues to the game’s growth globally. Attendance at the MGM Resorts Las Vegas Summer League keeps pushing higher, with fans eager to see top rookies, second-year players and relative free-agent unknowns chasing their pro hoops’ dreams. The valuations of the 30 NBA franchises, of course, all have soared beyond $1 billion, according to Forbes.com, with the Knicks, the Lakers and the Warriors all estimated to be worth more than $3 billion. Longtime NBA observers such as TNT’s David Aldridge wrote a column this week that argued on behalf of dominant teams, anyway, saying that they actually drive rather than depress fan interest. As for any inability to win games or titles, he laid the blame for that on poor franchise management. The Knicks and the Clippers have all sorts of big-market advantages but haven’t won any championships lately (or at all in the Clippers' case). For Roberts, whose players reap 51 percent of NBA basketball-related income that tops $7 billion annually, business is good, period. “I’m excited about this new season,” she said Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “This free agency, there’s been a lot to write about so we’re all, I think, looking forward to what’s going to happen come October. “To the extent that people are predicting the end of the game, I just don’t think so. I would be surprised if Adam called me to say, ‘What the hell are we going to do?’ I think he’s as happy as I am. ... I think we’re in good shape.” Critics note Golden State’s on-court dominance in winning the last two championships. It only took nine NBA Finals games --one over the minimum -- while facing arguably the league’s best player in LeBron James. But those same critics seem to foget that the Warriors were pushed to the full seven games in the conference finals, and actually faced elimination twice before beating the Rockets. “I recognize what Michele's saying,” Silver said. “But at the same time, if you talk to players in the league, and I've talked to plenty of individual players as well, they want to be in the most competitive league possible too.” For every player on the Warriors' roster -- or the Rockets, the Thunder, the Celtics or the Sixers -- there are five or six on teams that realistically have no chance of chasing a ring or the Larry O’Brien Trophy. Cleveland went to four straight Finals thanks to James; no one envisions the Cavaliers getting back any time soon. “Maybe there are some players who think they’re on a second-class team,” said Sacramento wing Garrett Temple, one of the NBPA vice presidents. “But most players I’ve played with or been around, their thought process is, ‘We’re gonna get our team to become one of those first-class teams.’ It’s more of a challenge. More so than, ‘We need them to disband so we can make everybody equal.’ Because we’re competitors.” That really is the crux of the issue. Silver and some franchises want most of the competition to come on the floor, in games, in full view of fans who believe their teams can sufficiently compete. The league’s current title contenders are fine with a system that allows them to compete all the way to the top, with an owner stroking gargantuan checks to crowd out rivals. “Let me make clear that under the current system we want teams to compete like crazy,” Silver said. “So I think the Warriors within the framework of this deal should be doing everything they can to increase their dominance. That's what you want to see in a league. “You want teams to compete in every way they can within the rules.” Silver addressed a variety of topics that were came from the BOG agenda, including: -- Change is coming on multiple fronts, most notably in the league’s age limit. That seems likely to be re-set back to 18 years old from 19, permitting players to enter the league from high school. It’s a move that the NBA should be better equipped to handle with a near 30-for-30 farm-system affiliation with its G League. It also fits with the findings of an NCAA task force that cites dissatisfaction with “one-and-done” college players. Said Silver: “My personal view is that we’re ready to make that change.” -- The start of free agency, annually triggered at midnight ET on July 1 (12:00pm, July 1, PHL time), will be moved to a daytime or prime time opening bell. It’s one of those traditions that no one thought to change, Silver said. -- The league’s investigation into the Dallas Mavericks’ sexual harassment issues should be completed by the end of the month. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

Las Vegas shooter’s girlfriend said she handled ammo

LAS VEGAS --- The girlfriend of the gunman behind the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history told authorities they would probably find her fingerprints on bullets because she sometimes helped him load ammunition magazines. An FBI agent tells a judge in warrant documents made public Friday that Marilou Danley wasn't arrested when she returned to the U.S. from the Philippines days after the Oct. 1 shooting, and that she was cooperating with investigators. Her boyfriend, Stephen Paddock, shot himself dead after firing from a Las Vegas Strip casino into a concert crowd, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds. The agent says in the Oct. 3 document that there was no evidence ...Keep on reading: Las Vegas shooter’s girlfriend said she handled ammo.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

24 NBA questions before 17-18 tips off

By David Aldridge, TNT analyst The season starts on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time). You’ve been waiting patiently all summer with your questions. Fire away.     1. So … what’s the point of playing this season? The Golden State Warriors are still the prohibitive favorites to repeat this season, next season and into the foreseeable future. But it was good to see a good chunk of the Western Conference -- the Houston Rockets, Oklahoma City Thunder and Denver Nuggets, to name three teams -- not fold before the first card is dealt. That fact alone is incredibly important. The Warriors are still the best team in the West, without question. But if teams don’t even try to get better, or spend money to compete, the whole rationale for playing fades away. The Thunder could have rode Russell Westbrook alone to another first-round playoff loss, watched him walk out the door in free agency next summer and thrown up its hands, plead ‘woe is us and all small-market teams,’ and enjoyed a luxury tax-free life for the next few years. The Rockets could have just kept selling tickets to fans to watch James Harden and his pals shoot 50 threes a game for the next two or three years. It’s an appealing brand of basketball. Denver could have just kept building through the Draft, climbing a few more wins here or there for a while, and snuck into the eighth seed, choosing to be comfortable rather than bold. But they didn’t. They’ve called and raised. In all likelihood, it won’t be enough to beat Golden State. But those teams can sleep well at night. They’re not cheating their players, or fans. 2. So, is OKC now a legit threat to the Warriors? The short answer: no. But it’s closer. Carmelo Anthony will be as good a third option as anyone in the league has, though; he will eat regularly on the weak side as defenses scramble to handle Westbrook-Paul George pick and rolls; a quick seal and ‘Melo will be off to the races. If coach Billy Donovan goes small ball with Patrick Patterson at the five, there will be many nights when OKC drops a 130 spot. Yes, the Thunder’s defense is going to be an issue; while Enes Kanter was a sieve off the bench, he was coming off the bench, playing behind Steven Adams. Anthony will be starting and playing big minutes, many at the four. But it won’t matter most nights when the Thunder is up 20 to start the fourth quarter, after 36 minutes of Westbrook sorties, George 3-pointers and transition dunks, and Carmelo post-ups and spot-ups (he shot 44.8 percent last season on catch and shoot shots. Among forwards who played 30 or more minutes last season, per NBA.com/Stats, only Kevin Durant, Otto Porter and Kawhi Leonard shot better). The Thunder can guard you with George, Andre Roberson and Adams and they can outscore you with Westbrook and George and ‘Melo. They have a solid bench (Patterson, Ray Felton, Jerami Grant, Alex Abrines) and Westbrook won’t be physically spent by the end of the 2018 playoffs. Wait; what am I saying? Of course he’ll be spent. But he’ll also be playing way deeper into May. 3. Did not getting Anthony hurt Houston or nah? The Rockets -- okay, Chris Paul -- wanted this done bad. It won’t hurt Houston in the regular season, when Paul and James Harden will dominate. And while Harden didn’t like Kevin McHale’s critique of his leadership, Mac was spot on. That doesn’t make “The Beard” a bad guy or teammate -- people gravitate to their comfortable roles in life, and CP3 is a natural-born leader. Harden will, one thinks, be more comfortable with slightly less light on him. They’ll do fine playing together and off one another. But the shadow of the Rockets’ implosion from deep -- 29 of 88 on three-pointers the last two games against the Spurs in their Western Conference semifinals series -- still hangs over them. Ryan Anderson was negated in the postseason. There’s a reason CP3 pushed for ‘Melo so hard. The Rockets will need unexpected consistent offense from a P.J. Tucker or Luc Mbah a Moute in May if they have any hopes of playing in June. 4. Can we just start the Cleveland-Boston East finals now? Maybe Toronto, with C.J. Miles shooting 40 percent on 3-pointers to complement Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, will break up what seems inevitable. Maybe Washington, with its super-solid starting five intact, now has the mental toughness to bust past the second round, where it’s been beached three of the last four postseasons. But it doesn’t feel like that. Boston, ultimately, should be a lot better this season than last. It will take a while for coach Brad Stevens to figure out the rotation and whether Jaylen Brown can really stick at the two, but ultimately, the Celtics have two dynamic playmakers/scorers in Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward, and with Al Horford providing the glue at both ends, they’re going to be a load by the end of the season. And while Cleveland will have to wait a while for Isaiah Thomas, the Cavs have more than enough firepower until Thomas can make his debut. Whatever Dwyane Wade has left will be accentuated playing with James, and Kevin Love (holy moly, is he underrated) will feast drawing slower, bigger centers out to him on the perimeter. J.R. Smith doesn’t like losing his starting job to Wade, and he should be ticked. But he nonetheless will help Cleveland’s bench, which will be incredibly difficult in its own right with Tristan Thompson and Kyle Korver complementing Smith. And that’s before Thomas returns, which will put Derrick Rose on that second unit. There won’t be any rest for defenses who’ll then have to contend with a rested James, et al, coming back. It says here that not only will the Cavs not miss Irving offensively, they could be even more diverse and difficult to guard this season. Not to mention that James is supremely motivated to make an eighth straight Finals. 5. Could Curry break his record of 402 3-pointers in a season? At first glance, with Durant and Klay and Draymond (and, now, Nick Young) all needing to get fed as well, it would seem impossible for Curry to best the mark he set two years ago, on the 73-9 regular season team. But consider: coach Steve Kerr thinks a new guy always blossoms in his second year with the Warriors, which means Durant should be even more lethal offensively this year, as the Warriors’ offense reaches an even higher level of efficiency. And the way they move the ball, it’s not a stretch to think that with defenses tripping over themselves to get to Durant, Curry could get into one of those ridiculous grooves that could leave him within striking distance of 402 by the end of the season. 6. Could the last one in the Eastern Conference turn out the lights? The New York Knicks were hardly a power in the East before trading Anthony, but his departure creates one more team that will struggle to win 35 games this season. With the paucity of talent there should be at least four 50-win teams in the East -- Cleveland, Boston, Toronto and Washington -- with the Milwaukee Bucks knocking on the door. 7. Who’s going to regret their offseason? The Bucks were fine off the court -- their new arena is already more than halfway constructed and looks like it’s going to be a gem -- although the surrounding mall that is supposed to be part of the complex is not going up as quickly. But the Bucks didn’t address their bigs-heavy roster and move some of the surplus -- how can coach Jason Kidd keep all of Greg Monroe, Jabari Parker and John Henson happy with Thon Maker scarfing up more and more frontcourt minutes? -- for the shooting Milwaukee still needs. The East is so open, and Milwaukee is so close to breaking through into elite status with Giannis Antetokounmpo an elite performer. 8. Rudy Gay -- sneaky good pickup? Gay says he’s cool starting or coming off the bench for the Spurs, but he’d best as San Antonio’s sixth man, at least to start things. Bringing Pau Gasol off the bench didn’t work so well, so if he’s starting at center, coach Gregg Popovich can’t go small ball with “Cousin” LaMarcus Aldridge at the five and Gay at the four alongside Kawhi Leonard. (Current state of Spurs fans’ cuticles here and here as they consider a season with an extended Klaw absence if this quad injury doesn’t improve soon.) The Spurs could have some serious firepower in reserve if Gay and Patty Mills come off the bench, but Mills or Dejounte Murray will likely have to start at the point until Tony Parker comes back. 9. Speaking of Popovich … Should he and Steve Kerr and Stan Van Gundy stick to sports? No. 10. Who’s gonna be Kia Rookie of the Year? I say Markelle Fultz. What, you thought I was gonna pick against a DeMatha Catholic man? (Actual unretouched photo of me as a sophomore at the most successful high school in the history of the United States may or may not be here). Playing off of Joel Embiid, J.J. Redick, Robert Covington … it’s hard to see Fultz not looking really good when he should have all kinds of room to operate. Lonzo Ball will put up bigger numbers, and Tatum will be on a better team. But Boston was good last year, and Jayson Tatum will likely not play as much as the others. The Sixers are poised for a big jump up in the standings, and that’s always a narrative that voters like and get behind -- which is what will hurt Dennis Smith Jr.'s chances in Dallas. 11. What does Dwyane Wade really have left? Now that the inevitable buyout of Wade’s $24 million deal by the Bulls has led to the equally inevitable trek to Cleveland to play with James, can the 35-year-old Wade still be a significant contributor on a title contender? Given the general dysfunction in Chicago last season, you can dismiss most of the good and bad numbers Wade put up, with two exceptions: he still averaged almost five free throw attempts per game, and he shot 31 percent on 3-pointers -- not great, but more than double his anemic 15.9 percent behind the arc in 2015-16, his last with the Miami Heat. Wade obviously knows the cheat code for how to most effectively play off of James, so he’ll use the regular season to learn his teammates and be ready for the playoffs. But can Wade hold up over seven games defensively if he has to chase, say, Bradley Beal around, or try to deny DeRozan his preferred mid-range spots, and still be productive offensively? 12. Back to the Sixers -- how good will they be? My guess is they’ll pretty good in the 60 or so games I anticipate Embiid will play this season -- I’m assuming several designated off days for him during the season, not another injury. The mix of young talent (Fultz, Embiid, Ben Simmons, Dario Saric, Covington) and crafty vets (Redick, Amir Johnson) should mesh to make the 76ers a very tough team to defend. But Philly has to resolve the Jahlil Okafor situation, and in fairness to him, give him a fresh start somewhere else with a trade as soon as possible. If I were a good team that would be hard-pressed to add a free agent any time soon and feels a player short of true contention -- I’m looking at you, Memphis Grizzlies and Wizards -- I’d work hard to get the new, slimmed-down Okafor on my squad while he’s still on his rookie contract and make him the focal point of a kick-ass second unit. 13. Should we feel some kind of way about the Trail Blazers? I’m picking up what you’re putting down. A full season of the “Bosnian Beast” in the middle, it says here, will vault Portland into the top four in the West. Note I said “full season.” That means Jusuf Nurkic has to give coach Terry Stotts between 65-70 starts for the above premonition to be, as they say in the legal world, actionable. If so, Nurkic’s underrated scoring and passing out of the post will only make Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum that much more deadly out front, along with improving Portland’s defense. Per Basketball-Reference.com, the Blazers were 11.6 points per game better than the opposition with those three on the floor together and a +5 when their regular five-man lineup with Maurice Harkless and Al-Farouq Aminu joined the guards and Nurkic. And that’s pronounced, “Noor-kitch,” accent on Noor. 13. A little movie break ... Kevin Costner’s accent in “Robin Hood” -- worst ever, right? Yes, but Natalie Wood’s in “West Side Story” was painful, too. 14. Many have written the post-CP3 Clippers off. Should they? The Clippers are my darkhorse this season -- if they do the right thing and go small more often. They’re doing it more in practice so far than in games because Danilo Gallinari is working through a foot injury, but Blake Griffin at the five and Gallinari at the four could be spicy during the regular season. That would mean Sam Dekker and/or Wes Johnson would have to become credible and dependable at the three, allowing coach Doc Rivers to play a Pat Beverly-Milos Teodosic backcourt more often, which will just be fun. This would, of course, mean less DeAndre Jordan, and … that may not be the worst thing. Nothing against DJ, who is the best defensive big in the league, bar none. Unfortunately, the NBA isn’t about defense any more -- at least not in the traditional sense. Even someone like Jordan who doesn’t just block shots, but also helps snuff out opposing pick and rolls, becomes less valued by the league’s advanced stats crowd if he doesn’t contribute more offensively. The three has gone a long way to tyrannizing the defense-dominant big man out of the game. (Zach Lowe recommends the Wizards try to get Jordan via trade, and it’s not the first time I’ve heard that name mentioned in connection with Washington, the idea being the only chance the Wizards have of beating Cleveland or Boston is to slow them down enough defensively that Wall-Beal-Porter can try and keep up offensively. Washington is definitely a load when Wall gets locked in on D and creates turnovers, and the idea of Jordan inhaling lobs from Wall is enticing to think about. But the Wizards are not -- not -- going to take on a fourth big contract, and Jordan’s surely going to opt out after this season; he’s rightly expecting a massive payday in 2018, and the Clippers certainly now have motive and means to retain him.) Anyway, some Lou Williams, Austin Rivers and/or Teodosic and Willie Reed off the bench isn’t bad, either. 15. Could Kyle Kuzma be the best rookie on the Lakers this season? Don’t @me, LaVar. Kuzma has followed up a very strong Vegas Summer League with high notes in preseason, averaging better than 19 points per game for the Lakers. He’s been dazzling at times, displaying in-between skills that intrigue, and showing why so many teams were trying to trade back into the first round to get the Utah forward before L.A. snagged him with its second and much less heralded first-round pick last June. And there will be minutes available at the four this season. So far, Kuzma has displayed unusual strength for a rookie and confidence in his ability to score. Of course, he’s inexperienced, and like all rookies, has to differentiate between an open shot and a good shot. The other, more famous first-rounder, Lonzo Ball, will almost certainly be the better all-around player in time. For this year, though … hmmm. 16. What does a Hawks fan have to look forward to this season? Honestly, not much. But they’ll always be well-coached and get better. I’d pick one of the young players, like rookie John Collins or second-year small forward Taurean Prince, and concentrate on them during the season. See what they do with their minutes on the floor, and watch how they gradually expand their games at both ends. Seeing a young guy get better as he gains experience and accepts coaching is one of the great joys of watching the NBA every night. 17. Orlando? What gives there? The team’s new braintrust of Jeff Weltman and John Hammond will need some time to fix the roster -- a mélange of athletic wings that have trouble defending and guards that have trouble shooting. The former is addressed somewhat with the signing of Jonathon Simmons from San Antonio, but I don’t see a solution to the latter with any of the existing backcourt contributors. Unless coach Frank Vogel figures out some way to get more turnovers/runouts from his group, they just can’t get in transition enough for their length and legs to make a difference. 18. New Orleans? What gives there? The short answer is, I have no idea. All of NBA Earth has DeMarcus Cousins out of there one way or another (he’s an unrestricted free agent in ’18 and wants to be on a contender/the Pelicans will never pay him what he wants and will have to trade him by the deadline/no way he and Anthony Davis fit together/Wall agitates for a reunion with his former Kentucky big man in D.C./your departure theory here) by this time next year, but we’ll see what coach Alvin Gentry has come up with for “Boogie” and “the Brow” after a summer to think it over. Rajon Rondo being out hurts their depth, but I have to be honest -- I don’t see how he and Jrue Holiday can possibly work together in a backcourt, and Holiday’s the guy the Pelicans just gave $125 million to, so he should probably have the ball in his hands every night, shouldn’t he? I like Ian Clark and Frank Jackson down there, but that untethered three spot burns a hole in the New Orleans sun. Well, at any rate, should be more fun than watching reruns of My Life on the D-List. 19. Favorite D-List Muppet? Beaker. 20. LeBron is leaving Cleveland again after this season, isn’t he? Everything points to yes, and a relocation to Los Angeles to play with the Lakers or Clippers next year – except … what if the Cavs win it all again this year? That’s not an impossible scenario -- in fact, it’s a pretty simple one to lay out: Cavs run roughshod through the Eastern Conference in the playoffs again, get through a good but hardly great Boston team in the conference Finals and set up a fourth straight encounter with Golden State. It’s easy now to say the Warriors dominated the Cavs in last season’s Finals -- but only if you ignore the fact that Cleveland led by six with just more than three minutes remaining in Game 3, only to see the Warriors score the game’s last 11 points to take a 3-0 lead instead of 2-1. And given that Cleveland vaporized the Warriors in Game 4, a 2-2 series would have meant the Cavs just needed to win once in Oracle -- which they’d done twice in the 2016 Finals -- to have a real shot at repeating. The point is, the difference between the teams isn’t as big as Draymond Green would have you believe; the Cavs have no fear of the Warriors, and Jae Crowder gives coach Tyronn Lue a viable on-ball defender for Kevin Durant, leaving LeBron free to play off of Green. And: that unprotected Nets pick, whether one or three or five or seven, is Cleveland’s best recruiting tool. LeBron knows everyone in college basketball and he can literally pick whoever he’d like to finish his career with in Cleveland before handing over the reins. I’m not saying he’s definitely staying, either -- only that his departure isn’t the lead pipe cinch some would have you believe. The season to come will have a lot to do with his next decision. 21. So, how will the playoffs go this season? Eastern Conference (seeds No. 1-8): Cleveland, Boston, Washington, Toronto, Milwaukee, Miami, Detroit, Philadelphia Western Conference (seeds No. 1-8): Golden State, Houston, Oklahoma City, Portland, San Antonio, Memphis, Utah, Minnesota Eastern Conference semifinalists: Cleveland, Boston, Washington, Milwaukee Western Conference semifinalists: Golden State, Houston, OKC, San Antonio Eastern Conference finals: Cleveland over Boston Western Conference finals: Golden State over OKC (you heard me) NBA Finals: Golden State over Cleveland (in seven games) 22. Tell me something crazy that’s going to happen this season that no one’s predicting! Giannis Antetokounmpo. NBA MVP, 2017-18. 23. Are you high? No, ma’am. 24. So, why 24 questions? As always, we start the season with 24 questions (or predictions, or issues, whatever) in honor of Danny Biasone, the late owner of the Syracuse Nationals, whose discovery in 1954 helped save the league. At that time, the NBA was in the midst of a literal slowdown, in large part by teams that were desperate to figure out some kind of way to stay competitive with George Mikan, the league’s first superstar big man, and his team, the Minneapolis Lakers. Teams would hold the ball for minutes at a time without shooting in an effort to shorten the game and give them a chance to beat Minneapolis late. But the end result was boring -- very boring -- basketball. At the owners’ meetings that year, Biasone came up with an idea. NBA games were 48 minutes long. Biasone figured out that in a normal game, one not waylaid by the slowdown tactics, about 120 shots -- 60 per team -- were taken. So, why not just divide the number of minutes in every game -- 2,880 -- by the number of shots in an average game -- 120 -- to come up with some kind of a time limit in which a team had to shoot. And thus, the 24-second shot clock (2,800/120) was born. With the implementation of the shot clock in the 1954-55 season, scoring went way up, as did the quality of play. Teams were now running up and down the floor in order to try and beat the shot clock, complementing the “fast break” game that many colleges had played for years. But the new style in the pros was immensely popular with fans. And it still is. Plus, there’s just something iconic about that clock counting down every 24 seconds. It’s unique to the NBA. Thus, we ask 24 questions, in honor of the guy who owned a bowling alley as well as the Nationals for much of his adult life, and probably enjoyed the bowling more. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2017

Paul Lee reflects on career, bares the secret to success in the PBA

When Paul Lee was drafted by Rain or Shine as the second overall pick in the 2011 PBA Draft, he had no time to celebrate. Right after getting selected, the 6'0" shooter out of UE recalled the moment the late Roehl Nadurata, the then-top deputy of Rain or Shine, tapped him and immediately asked: "Condition ka ba?" The question was immediately followed up by a stern command. "Oh, bukas shooting na tayo ha." Lee, of course, obliged. But he was left asking himself "Wala ba kong time na makapagcelebrate muna sa family ko naman?"  The 29-year-old guard from Tondo reflected on his PBA career, and his journey so far during an interview with Mico Halili in The Score. Now entering his eighth season in the PBA, Lee looked back at that conversation and the lessons it carried as one of the defining moments in his career.   "Sobrang laking bagay na nakuha ako ng Rain or Shine tsaka yung nahandle ako ni Coach Yeng [Guiao] at Coach Roehl Nadurata so doon ko natutunan lahat ng sinasabi nilang hard work," he said. Seven years and three championships later, Lee is just thankful for being taught the secret to playing the game within the game, the right way.  "Blessed din ako na umabot ako sa point na nakapag seven years ako sa PBA, then still kicking pa rin habang nasa gitna ng career natin, just continue to work hard, 'yun lang naman sikreto dun," he said. Lee also bared that skill alone cannot guarantee a long and successful career. "Stay humble lang, then marunong kang makisama sa mga teammates mo, coaching staff at sa management. Kasi hindi enough yung magaling ka lang eh," he said. With all of his accomplishments, including that sensational 2018 PBA Governors' Cup championship run with the Magnolia Hotshots and the conference's Best Player award, Lee has one more thing to learn.  "Sana marami pa kong matutunan kila kuya Ping and PJ, kung pano makarating sa ganun kahaba yung career talaga," he said. Check out more from Paul Lee's insightful interview:   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2019

PBA 43 Review: Is Rain or Shine still a contender?

The PBA's 43rd season was a loooooong one. Seriously, it started December of 2017 and it ended December of 2018. That's 12 months of almost non-stop basketball. But with the current PBA season finally drawing to a close, it's time we look back at how each team fared in 2018. Today, we take on the Rain or Shine Elasto Painters   WHAT NOW? Rain or Shine won a title just two years ago. Easy to forget that now with all the turnover the team has experienced. While the changes were not as drastic as last season when head coach Yeng Guiao and star guard Paul Lee left, ROS still had to deal with quite a few movements this season. As one of the steadier teams over the last couple of seasons, this season for the Elasto Painters was anything but steady. The top-2 movements were the departures of guards Jericho Cruz and Don Trollano, two more losses from Rain or Shine's last title team. The Elasto Painters also had to deal with the Raymond Almazan AWOL situation, which coincided with the team's collapse in the Governors' Cup. Finally, guard Chris Tiu is now contemplating retirement. All of that development and drama and still, Rain or Shine is one of the top-5 teams in terms of cumulative standings this season. Their playoff streak continued in the Philippine Cup and the Elasto Painters even took the number 1 seed in the Commissioner's Cup, which eventually allowed the team to represent the country in the Asian Games. The reinforced Elasto Painters finished in 5th place. The Governors' Cup performance was downright ugly but for next season, ROS should remain as contenders. The Elasto Painters still feature one of the stronger guard rotations in the league, but questions about their frontline and the team's ceiling persist. Just what can Rain or Shine accomplish in 2019? We'll find out soon enough.   Rain or Shine ELASTO PAINTERS in the 2017-2018 PBA Season Philippine Cup: 6-5 (5th place) Commissioner's Cup: 9-2 (1st place) Governors' Cup: 3-8 (10th place) Overall: 20 wins and 21 losses. Two playoff appearances, one semifinals.   POST DRAFT NOTE: Loaded with guards, ROS took San Beda forward Javee Mocon in the first round. Mocon should fit right in with the Elasto Painters, giving the team size, shooting, and championship pedigree. ROS also added Jjay Alejandro and Paul Varilla for more scoring and Kent Lao for insurance at the forward spots. All these rookies however, will have to fall in line as the Elasto Painters feature a veteran squad. Still, that's not such a bad thing as Rain or Shine now has some nice depth and they can take time to develop all these players or maybe use them as trade pieces.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 28th, 2018

Reasons to watch 2018 slate of NBA X mas day games

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com Bucks vs. Knicks (1am, PHL time) Why you should be watching: Two words; Giannis Antetokounmpo. The most dominant force in the league this season resides in Milwaukee. That’s right, the Greek Freak sits atop the Kia Race to the MVP Ladder heading into the Christmas Day showcase games. And with good reason. The Bucks are riding the wave their dynamic superstar forward has created in his first season in Mike Budenholzer’s system. Open it up and enjoy because … The Bucks are more than a one-man show. Antetokounmpo should be joined on the All-Star team this season by Khris Middleton, who is playing at that level, and point guard Eric Bledsoe is shooting better than he ever has in Budenolzer’s aggressive, shooter-friendly system. Watching the Bucks try and set a record for three-pointers taken and made should be entertaining enough. But the Knicks will offer some entertainment value of their own as they attempt to match the Bucks shot-for-shot with Tim Hardaway Jr. leading the way. The gift we’re hoping for is … The Knicks could use a statement win before a global audience to jump start the post-Christmas portion of their season-long grind. The Bucks have spent most of this season frightening the competition, both in the Eastern Conference and beyond. They’ve got the gift that’ll keep on giving for years in Antetokounmpo, who’ll get another chance to show the basketball public that what they’ve hard about a contender rising in the Central Division is real. Thunder vs. Rockets (4am, PHL time) Why you should be watching: Do we really need anyone to remind us to tune in for every Russell Westbrook-James Harden matchup for the foreseeable future? Didn’t think so. The matchup of the last two Kia MVPs winners is enough of an incentive to lock in on this one. And the fact that the Thunder occupy the space in the standings most thought was reserved for the Rockets only adds to the intrigue. Open it up and enjoy because … The real showstopper in this one isn’t either one of the MVP winners. Thunder swingman Paul George is the player you need to lock in on as he continues his dark horse MVP campaign for a much-improved team (the Thunder are light years away from the group that started the season 0-4). There are few soap operas better right now than the Rockets, who are dealing with yet another injury to All-Star point guard Chris Paul (hamstring) and a failure to play up to expectations that threatens to swallow up their season before Santa’s finished off his cookies and milk. The gift we’re hoping for is … What Westbrook and Harden wear into the building is worth a few moments of your time as these two fashion-forward superstars never fail to make an impression. But it’s the competitive fervor on the court that should provide the ultimate viewing pleasure. The Thunder would love to take over the position the Rockets held last season, as the legitimate threat to the Golden State Warriors’ stranglehold on the Western Conference throne. In the absence of a Christmas tilt against the two-time defending champs, the Rockets make an ideal fill in. Sixers vs. Celtics (6:30am, PHL time) Why you should be watching: The Eastern Conference version of Thunder-Rockets, the schedule makers look pretty good slotting the Sixers and Celtics in this spot. No one relishes an opportunity to take down a projected heavyweight the way the Sixers do (what else would you expect with Jimmy Butler and Joel Embiid leading the charge?). The suddenly chummy Celtics, however, appear to be the team most eager to prove that they are indeed who we all thought they were in the summer, when they were the consensus pick to ascend to the top of the heap in place of Cleveland. Open it up and enjoy because … Kyrie Irving has embraced his role as the leader of this disjointed Celtics bunch in ways that fans in Cleveland have to be enjoying with an eyebrow raised. Kyrie trying to convince his young teammates to follow his lead is rich, given his reluctance to do exactly that when he was in their shoes. As far as rivalries go, this is perhaps the day’s deepest and most volatile. The Sixers are still smarting from that playoff ouster at the hands of the Celtics. And they won’t have ant sympathy for the Celtics as they continue their search for good health and better chemistry. The gift we’re hoping for is … A Ben Simmons-Kyrie point guard duel will make this game shine even brighter than usual. And they’re both more than capable of going off on the big stage. But the real treat here is going to be watching Jimmy Butler and Jayson Tatum match wits in what could be a preview of fireworks to come in a potential playoff matchup. Tatum’s sophomore season has been a bit choppier than expected. And Butler, whose shown a penchant for schooling youngsters (teammates and opponents) is surely betting on himself in this game within the game. Lakers vs. Warriors (9am, PHL time) Why you should be watching: With all of the recent history dripping off of this LeBron James-Warriors rivalry, the inclusion of the Los Angeles Lakers into the mix only serves to take this spectacle to the next level. LeBron insists this isn’t a measuring stick game for the upstart Lakers, not against a Warriors juggernaut that has won three of the last four Larry O’Brien trophies. Yeah, whatever you say big fella. Folks who haven’t watched a minute of NBA basketball season will be tuned into this one. Count on it. Open it up and enjoy because … Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant have moved into that cosmic zone that only the all-time greats are capable of locating (see their work in their Monday, PHL time win over the Los Angeles Clippers for proof). We already know how the superstars respond in a matchup of this nature. The great unknown is how the likes of Kyle Kuzma, Brandon Ingram and Lonzo Ball will react to the marquee spotlight at Oracle Arena. The Lakers’ youngsters have thrived at times and struggled at others in their first season inside the LeBron bubble. But they haven’t seen anything like what they’ll experience in Oakland on this night. The gift we’re hoping for is … Draymond Green hasn’t had a true breakout game since returning from his extended injury absence. With Lance Stephenson in uniform on the other side, the opportunity for fireworks would appear to be extremely high. We’d settle for some Finals-level intensity from both of the world class agitators in the building. That and vintage performances from LeBron, Steph, KD and Klay Thompson are expected. Anything else beyond that is really gravy on the best basketball meal of the day. Trail Blazers vs. Jazz (11:30am, PHL time) Why you should be watching: We’re dubbing the nightcap of the Christmas Day showcase the “Respect Bowl.” The Trail Blazers are always on the hunt for more respect and the Jazz, one of the trendy summer picks as a team poised to become a contender in the Western Conference this season, could stand to show a little self-respect in the way they tackle the remainder of this season. Open it up and enjoy because … Second-year Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell is suffering from the same sophomore spell that has plagued Jayson Tatum in Boston. It’s one thing to surprise the basketball world as a rookie and another to come back better and even more dangerous the second time around. We’re betting on Spider showing up and showing out for the Christmas Day crowd. Never one to shy away from a challenge, Damian Lillard will not allow someone else to steal the spotlight from him. He warmed up for Mitchell and the Jazz by finishing off Luka Doncic and the Dallas Mavericks Sunday night. You know his swagger travels, so expect to see his competitive best against Mitchell and the Jazz. The gift we’re hoping for is … Joe Ingles stealing the show would make for an ideal end to a day full of some the league’s biggest and brightest superstars. And the sweet-shooting Jazz swingman is one of the league’s criminally underrated stars. It would also be nice to see the rest of that Jazz team we expected to make things interesting this season make an appearance. Christmas Day games have always served as a launching pad/turning point for teams willing to dive in. And the Blazers and Jazz both seem like prime candidates to take advantage of the opportunity. Sekou Smith is a veteran NBA reporter and NBA TV analyst. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 25th, 2018

UAAP: Not Juan, not Javi, the best-shooting GDL is still in UPIS

Jordi Gomez de Liano caught fire for the University of the Philippines Integrated School to end the first round of the UAAP 81 Juniors Basketball Tournament. Jordi GDL dropped a career-best 27 points to go along with three rebounds and three assists in a losing effort for the Junior Maroons. He did so all while launching and hitting on 7-of-9 of his long-range missiles. “It feels great, but I know I can do a whole lot better. I got a career-high, but we lost so it doesn’t really matter,” he said afterward. Nonetheless, also post-game, kuya Javi was nothing but proud of the fourth GDL. He was quick to add, however, referring to his little brother’s hot shooting, “Got it from me.” Indeed, Jordi’s sniping for UPIS is pretty much the exact role Javi has for UP. In fact, their percentages from there are both above average with Jordi at 38 percent and Javi at 47.5 percent. The younger GDL, however, will have a leg up on his kuya as the former has already totaled 19 triples with the second round still to come in the Juniors tournament while the latter shot a total of 19 threes throughout the recently concluded Seniors season. More than that, Jordi is also on pace to hit more treys than another older brother of his in Juan. If he keeps this up, the Junior Maroon is on track for at least 38 triples – the Fighting Maroons’ second-year standout had 37 threes for the year. Of course, Juan is also nothing but proud of his little brother. “They still lost,” he began, frank as always. He then continued, “But he played really well. I’m really happy for him because he’s really been working on his game.” Still, the UAAP 81 Seniors Mythical selection wants to see much more from the 15-year-old, 6-foot-5 GDL. “I’ve been telling him to be aggressive and to attack the rack. He’s relying too much on his outside game, but he should use his length,” he said. For his part, Jordi said he is doing nothing but welcome all the advice he is getting from his kuyas – whether that be on-court or off-court. “My brothers are definitely giving me pointers on my shot and also a lot of different things whether it’s basketball or life in general,” he said. He then continued, “That’s why I cannot thank them enough for what they have done to make me the person I am today.” Make no mistake, though, in his eyes, the UPIS sniper said he can best his big brothers in UP anytime and every time. As he put it, in true GDL fashion, confidently expressed, “I definitely think that I’m the best shooter among the GDLs,” he expressed. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 21st, 2018

UAAP Finals: Too short, weak, slow Anton Asistio graduates as a champion

Anton Asistio was never a star Ateneo Blue Eagle. In his four years playing for the Ateneo de Manila University, he was never the type to rack up big shots, which can send the whole blue-and-white crowd to celebration. But in Asistio's last game as a Blue Eagle in UAAP Season 81, where they sealed back-to-back champion status against the University of the Philippines, he experienced what it was like to be given such immense attention. Ateneo supporters in the Araneta Coliseum chanted "A-sis-tio! A-sis-tio!" in honor of the graduating point guard. Ateneo crowd chanting "Asistio! Asistio!" #UAAPFinals pic.twitter.com/ZErL4wicEh — Danine Cruz (@the9cruz) December 5, 2018 Anton Asistio graduates as a champion. #UAAPFinals pic.twitter.com/JJPydFVaFb — Danine Cruz (@the9cruz) December 5, 2018 "Surreal. I was never the main guy pero nagkataon I'm the only one graduating so it was a wonderful experience. Parang sobrang naging emotional ako noon," he said. He may be basking in the glory of graduating as a champion in Season 81, but the path leading up to this beautiful exit was not pretty for the 5-foot-8 point guard. Moments after the championship festivities, he reflected about his very far from perfect UAAP career. "When I was first year and second year, I made it to the line-up and that was my dream ever since I was a kid. Pero it wasn't how I saw myself because I wasn't really playing," said one of Ateneo's homegrown talents who started playing as early as grade school. Due to being small and not much of a great ball handler, Asistio was a benchwarmer in his first two years. It became worse when he was relegated to Team B the next year. "And then my third year, I was sent down to Team B, but instead of seeing it as a downgrade, I looked at it as an opportunity, an opportunity to get better, kasi the fact that they sent me down means na may kulang pa ako as a player," he said. Come his fourth chance to play, the arrival of a foreigner Tab Baldwin as their new head coach, who had zero prejudices about the players, signalled new beginnings for Asistio. "Then lucky enough, in my fourth year a new head coach was appointed, si Coach Tab. And I knew it was another chance, so it was a clean slate for everyone. He's a foreigner, so he didn't really know anyone," he narrated. Baldwin took a chance on him and he delivered. "'He's too short, he's too weak, he's too slow, and he can't handle the ball.' And this is all true, and he knows it. And so at least I had to give him a fair shot and tell him those things. And so what did we end up with? We ended up with a guy who got in the weight room, changed his body, changed his mentality, continued to be a great shooter, became very dependable handling the ball, and also is one of our more dependable defensive players," shared the Ateneo mentor. "So of course, he's sitting here today as a graduating senior with all the laurels that he deserves because he worked his tail off to get them," credited Baldwin. Now, the short, weak, and slow point guard that hardly made a dent in Ateneo's past campaigns closed his UAAP career as a champion. From being a liability, he has turned himself into an asset defensively and most especially, offensively. In his last season, he posted averages of 7.6 points, 1.8 three pointers a game on a 43-percent shooting clip beyond the arc. This makes him the third best scorer of Ateneo this season. Interestingly, his last championship was won against his former coach who relegated him to the Team B, Bo Perasol. "Medyo nakakatawa lang na si Coach Bo pa nakalaban ko. Actually, thankful ako kay Coach Bo kasi kung hindi dahil sa kanya hindi ako magpepersevere. Naging motivation ko rin yun. I'm the kind of guy who when I'm going after something, I use everything that I can as motivation and I guess that is just one of them," he said.  Looking forward, Asistio eyes a spot in the PBA D-League or the MPBL to continue his basketball career. On top of that, he plans to also finish his Masters Degree in Communication in Ateneo. Five years ago, Asistio couldn’t even get his own minutes, then his own spot in the roster. But look at him now, he was given a grand exit of a two-time UAAP champion. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @the9cruz.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 6th, 2018

CHAMPIONS AT LONG LAST: Reliving UP’s successful 1986 UAAP revolt

It was the year of People Power, a revolution like no other. And, who would think that such an “uprising” has spilled onto collegiate basketball the same year as the stronghold of the UE Red Warriors was overran? What other ball club can best depict this EDSA Spirit than the 1986 UP Fighting Maroons? Its putsch in the UAAP was carefully plotted since legendary coach Joe Lipa took over the coaching reigns in 1981. This began fierce onslaught only a year later when the Maroons made a rare march into the UAAP Finals against the UE, which boasted a fearsome shooter named Allan Caidic. Title contender Led by the high leaper, Vincent Albino, the Maroons made that shocking feat, yet succumbed to the Warriors’ fiery offensive and lost. But, UP showed nevertheless they had what it takes to be a title contender. And the rebuilding continued in 1983 when UP successfully recruited two big names in the NCAA--Ronnie Magsanoc and Eric Altamirano, stalwarts of the 1982 juniors champs San Beda Red Cubs. With Magsanoc directing plays and Altamirano scorching hot from all angles, UP further advanced in its ferocious plan of taking over the UAAP. But Glenn Capacio and Harmon Codinera of FEU frustrated the upstarts and dealt UP a painful loss in the Finals after being so close to winning the championship. Missing link Their frustration became deeply rooted as the Maroons stumbled the next couple of years finding that “missing link” to glory. And months after a dictatorship was toppled, UP’s powerful missing piece to its years of rebuilding came walking into the Maroon bench—the sensational 6’4” center Benjie Paras, also a hotshot alumnus of San Beda. Paras became the answered prayer since the Maroons had players with an average height of 6’1” at the time, surely a no-match against the burly inside operators of other UAAP teams. Now with a dominating center manning the paint, UP was set to finally chase that dream. And also they had an answer to the best big man of that era, Jerry Codinera, who had puzzled opponents with his shiftiness, defensive prowess (called the Defense Minister in the PBA), exceptional perimeter shooting, and versatility. Best starting five Also, UP has the best starting five in the league, all of them from that sensational Red Cubs basketball program concocted by coach Ato Badolato—Paras, Magsanoc, Altamirano, Joey Mendoza and Duane Salvatierra—with the sweet-shooting sixth man Joey Guanio, a rookie from La Salle Greenhills, providing added artillery and standout Ramil Cruz bringing in his outstanding all-around play. Despite this, however, their title shot wasn’t smooth sailing. Codinera and the Warriors defeated them twice in the eliminations and UE came close to a sweep that would automatically serve them the trophy. But a loss to rival FEU in the last game in the eliminations paved the way for UP, who landed second place after winning a knockout match against the Tamaraws, for that hard-earned slot in the finals. They were however saddled with a twice-to-win disadvantage. Title hungry This didn’t matter to the Maroons, as their hunger for the title brought out the best in them. With thousands of UP supporters trooping to the ULTRA in October 1986, the Maroons were unstoppable. Using a merciless zone, the Maroons were able to stifle Codinera from doing his thing in the paint. This led to UP’s emphatic decisive win in Game 1, 86-75, that arranged a winner take-all championship match three days later. And, in that rubber match, with the whole venue filled with UP students and alumni, from students, faculty, administrators to virtually the entire political spectrum to even former Diliman Commune leaders in the 1970s all coming in droves to cheer them on, how can the Maroons fail them? Altamirano’s true worth From the first time the buzzer sounded, the Maroons never allowed the Warriors to even move an inch, with its prolific scorer Altamirano showing his true worth. After subbing for a fouled out Magsanoc with a good four minutes left to play in the match, Altamirano shone with his playmaking skills and blazing marksmanship with his 27 points leaving the Warriors with no room to breathe. He ended up the tournament MVP that year. Paras likewise prevailed in his giant duel with Codinera with 19 points and 10 rebounds. With an insurmountable lead going into the final seconds, and coach Lipa reaching to the sky in triumph, the buzzer sounded with UP winning by nine points, 98-89. More than a dream come true And their first UAAP title in 47 years is now in their hands, more than a dream come true for the national cage mentor and the UP community he served. It brought a startling “revolution” into fruition, with UP taking over the reigns of the UAAP. Unfortunately, however, the celebration was short-lived, with the Ateneo, La Salle, and UST dynastic runs succeeding their memorable feat. Now 32 seasons later, UP has a chance to finally taste that sweet, scintillating victory again......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 29th, 2018

Protesters march after death of man who wasn’t mall shooter

HOOVER, Alabama --- Protesters on Saturday marched through an Alabama shopping mall where police killed a black man they later acknowledged was not the triggerman in a Thanksgiving night shooting that wounded two people. An officer shot and killed 21-year-old Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford, Jr. of Hueytown while responding to the Thursday mall shooting. Police said Bradford was fleeing the scene with a handgun. Hoover police initially told reporters Bradford had shot a teen at the mall, but later retracted the statement. "We knew that was false," said stepmother Cynthia Bradford when she heard police were blaming him for the shooting. She described her stepson, who went by E.J....Keep on reading: Protesters march after death of man who wasn’t mall shooter.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 25th, 2018

Barea, Mavs pull away in 4th for 113-104 win over Celtics

By SCHUYLER DIXON,  AP Sports Writer DALLAS (AP) — J.J. Barea held the shooter's pose for several seconds before big center DeAndre Jordan picked him up and carried him to the bench , the diminutive Dallas guard high-fiving everybody along the way. It just felt like a big 3-pointer in the Mavericks' sixth straight home victory. Barea scored 20 points and tag-teamed with Wesley Matthews on back-to-back 3s to take control in the fourth quarter of a 113-104 victory over the Boston Celtics on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time). "I was mad that I missed the one before that one, went in and out on me," Barea said. "First time I think I've been lifted up from the other side of the court all the way to the bench. We're having fun." Harrison Barnes also had 20 points, teenage rookie Luka Doncic totaled 15 points and matched Barea with eight assists, while starting at point guard with Dennis Smith Jr. sidelined by a wrist injury, as the Mavericks (9-9) got back to .500 with their seventh win in nine games. It's the latest Dallas has been .500 or better since the end of the 2015-16 season, and it's the first six-game home winning streak for the Mavericks in almost two years. Jayson Tatum scored 21 points and Kyrie Irving and Marcus Smart had 19 apiece for the Celtics, who followed a win with a loss in a back-to-back for the third straight time this season a night after winning in Atlanta. Boston was without Gordon Hayward, who sat with soreness in his surgically repaired left ankle, in part because of playing on consecutive nights. Just like a Dallas team coming off consecutive woeful seasons, the Celtics (10-10) are at .500 coming off two straight trips to the Eastern Conference finals. "We don't impose our fear and will on teams," said Smart, who had to be held back from fans by Irving in the final seconds against his hometown team. "Last year, teams when they came in and played the Celtics, they knew they were in for a fight. This year, teams can't wait to play us and that's a problem." The Mavericks led by five starting the fourth quarter but pushed the lead to 106-90 on those consecutive 3-pointers from Barea and Matthews, who had 15 points after missing three straight games and four of the past five with a left hamstring strain. Doncic looked like a natural at the point from the start with five assists in the first quarter while making all three of his 3-point attempts for nine points. In one sequence, he sent Marcus Morris lunging toward the basket with a fake away from the ball, then watched Irving fly past him by faking the shot before making a 3. Irving got rolling in the second quarter, scoring nine points on 4-of-5 shooting while helping cut an 11-point deficit to three at halftime (59-56). DECKING DONCIC Doncic was doing enough for the Celtics to feel the need to try to knock him off his game in the third quarter. Jaylen Brown put a forearm in Doncic's chest when he was looking another direction while running up the floor and sent the 19-year-old sprawling. Brown's move came after Doncic intercepted a pass in transition near midcourt, drove to the baseline and slipped a pass to Jordan for a dunk. Jordan was given his second technical for hanging on the rim, but officials ruled it a non-unsportsmanlike technical, allowing Jordan to avoid an ejection as he finished with 14 points and 13 rebounds. Brown received an offsetting technical on a video review for the blindside hit on Doncic. CHIPPY LATE, TOO Doncic had to be separated from Brown after getting knocked to the floor, and there was another dustup when Smart shoved Maxi Kleber not long after they were part of a jump ball in the final seconds, long after the outcome had been decided. Smart was assessed a technical. TIP-INS Celtics: Al Horford returned after missing his first game of the season to rest a sore left knee. He had eight points and eight rebounds. ... Brown scored 16 points, and Morris added 13. ... Irving was 9 of 24 from the field with six assists and five turnovers. Mavericks: F/C Dwight Powell missed his third straight game with a left knee injury. ... Coach Rick Carlisle said Smith sprained his right wrist in a loss to Memphis two games earlier. He played but was limited in a win over Brooklyn. UP NEXT Celtics: At New Orleans on Monday. Mavericks: At Houston on Wednesday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 25th, 2018

Mall shooter dead, girls hurt

HOOVER, Ala. — A man was shot and killed by a police after a fight at an Alabama mall resulted in gunfire that injured a teen and a 12-year-old girl. A police statement said the shooting occurred shortly before 10 p.m. Thursday at the Riverchase Galleria in Hoover, outside Birmingham. The statement said two Hoover […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2018

Green scores in last second to lift Raptors over Magic 93-91

By Bill Fay, Associated Press ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Danny Green made a fade-away jumper with less than a second remaining to lift the Toronto Raptors over the Orlando Magic 93-91 on Tuesday night (Wednesday, PHL time). "Danny Green for the win... YES HE DID!" The @Raptors newcomer nails the GAME-WINNER to improve to 14-4 on the season! #WeTheNorth pic.twitter.com/7BKDyA9qlz — NBA (@NBA) November 21, 2018 Green caught Kyle Lowry's inbound pass with 2.3 seconds left, pulled up on the left side of the lane and hit a jumper with 0.5 seconds remaining. Orlando's Nikola Vucevic missed on a 67-foot heave as time expired. Kawhi Leonard led Toronto with 18 points, and Pascal Siakam had 15. Serge Ibaka added 14 points and nine rebounds, and Green finished with 13. Evan Fournier led the Magic with 27 points, 22 of them in the second half when he was about the only offense Orlando could generate. Aaron Gordon had 16 points, and Vucevic had 14 points and 18 rebounds for the Magic, who ended a three-game winning streak. Fournier drove past Green for a tying dunk with 2.3 seconds left. The Raptors took a full timeout, and Green scored on the ensuing inbound. Neither team had it going offensively for most of the game, especially in the fourth quarter. The Magic missed 11 straight field-goal attempts in a four-minute stretch early in the period. Their only points were two free throws from Jonathan Isaac, but the drought didn't cost them much. Toronto could only put together a three-pointer from Green and a layup by Jonas Valanciunas during that stretch to take an 80-77 lead. The teams traded baskets from there until Ibaka drilled a jumper from the top of the key to put Toronto in front 91-89. Toronto led by 18 during a first half when both teams struggled to find or maintain an offensive rhythm. The Raptors made enough shots to jump out to a 40-22 advantage in the middle of the second quarter, as Orlando labored under 30 percent shooting. The Magic finally got some rhythm and cut the deficit to 10 by halftime, then caught Toronto by the middle of the third. Fournier started the second half with a three-pointer, the first of six three's in the period for the Magic. Another triple from Fournier tied it at 59 with 5:05 left, and his free throw gave Orlando a 75-73 lead going into the fourth. Fournier had 14 points in the quarter. TIP-INS Raptors: Toronto didn't have a player reach double-figure scoring in the first half. ... Toronto got 17 second-chance points. Magic: Backup F Terrence Ross, the hottest shooter on the Magic over the last five games, was just 2-of-10 against his old team. ... The Magic shot only 41.5 percent for the game. UP NEXT Raptors: Finish a four-game road trip at Atlanta on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time). Magic: Start a six-game Western Conference swing in Denver on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 21st, 2018

PBA: Aces survive Bolts late game scare to tie series, 1-1

Alaska weathered Meralco’s comeback scare to escape with a 100-95 Game 2 win to knot the the best-of-five 2018 PBA Governors’ Cup semifinals series Tuesday night at the MOA Arena. The Aces leaned on the steady hands of JVee Casio inside the last 18.5 seconds of the match to put the game away while Simon Enciso, who waxed-hot in the first half, sealed the win from the line and snap the Bolts' seven-game winning streak.    Game 3 is on Thursday at the Cuneta Astrodome. Mike Harris was a workhorse for the Aces as the reinforcement poured in 37 points on 13-of-21 field goal shooting while hauling down 19 rebounds. Enciso scored 23 points while Chris Banchero flirted with a triple double with 13 markers, 11 rebounds and eight assists for Alaska, which missed only one free throw of its 21 attempts. "A heck of a win. I'm just happy to win. Now we got a best-of-three," said Aces head coach Alex Compton, whose squad rebounded from a 97-92 Game 1 setback.      Allen Durham brought down a once 20-point Bolts deficit to only seven points, 86-79, with just 3:44 left on a lay-in. Mike Harris brought it back to nine, 90-81, with a floater before Chris Newsome completed a three-point play followed by a dagger three-pointer by Baser Amer to breathe down the Aces’ necks, 90-87, with 1:52 left. Newsome was called for a goaltending on the next play, Amer split his free throws before Durham slammed it home to close the gap, 92-90, with 50 ticks left. Harris sank a jumper to put Alaska up by four but Durham quickly answered with a basket off a timeout for a 94-92 count with 28 seconds remaining.         Meralco was forced to give up a foul and sent Alaska’s steady free throw shooter Casio on the line. But Newsome uncorked a corner pocket triple to cut the Bolts’ deficit to 96-95. Casio added two free throws to put the Aces lead back to three with seven seconds left. Amer heaved a long three before Enciso put the icing on the cake from the line.    Picking up from where they left off in the first 24 minutes of action, the Aces went on a tear to open the third period as they opened a 66-46 gap with 4:31 left off a Vic Manuel split from the stripe. Enciso led Alaska’s locals in the first half, scoring 13 points including a step-back jumper over the outstretched hands of Anjo Caram that gave the Aces a 47-40 cushion at the half. Enciso shot five-of-7 from the field including three from beyond the rainbow arc for the Aces, which in the first half shot 20-of-41 from the field compared and forced Meralco to commit 11 turnovers that Alaska converted to 19 markers. Alaska sparked a 13-4 blitz in the last five minutes of the second quarter after trailing, 34-36, with 5:56 left.   The scores:  Alaska (100) -- Harris 37, Enciso 23, Banchero 13, Manuel 7, Baclao 6, Racal 5, Casio 4, Exciminiano 3, Teng 2, Thoss 0. Meralco (95) -- Durham 24, Salva 20, Amer 14, Hugnatan 12, Tolomia 10, Newsome 6, Caram 4, Canaleta 3, Faundo 2, Dillinger 0, Ballesteros 0. Quarters: 23-21, 47-40, 74-60, 100-95.    --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 13th, 2018

NCAA Finals: It could ve been a better Finals -- Robinson

Lyceum of the Philippines University head coach Topex Robinson accepted the fact that San Beda University pushed their backs against the wall after taking Game 1 of the NCAA Season 94 seniors basketball Finals. Robinson admitted that they were shooting bricks, committing turnovers and seemed to have lost the energy and drive while allowing the three-peat seeking Red Lions chase them out of the MOA Arena during the match. But what ticked the mentor the most was the event that happened outside of the basketball court just 24 hours before tipoff that put a handicap on LPU in the biggest stage of the season. The Pirates marched into the war without its most important weapon in CJ Perez after the league slapped him with a one-game ban for failing to notify the NCAA that he filed an application for the PBA Draft.     “The reason it's painful for us is because CJ didn't do anything wrong. Hindi naman siya nag-ligang labas. Kung naglarong labas sana siya at nahuli, I would accept that. But I don't know,” said Topex. “The kid didn't do anything wrong.” Without Perez, LPU was deprived of a player that has been averaging 18.7 points, 8.2 rebounds, 3.9 assists, and 3.3 steals per game. San Beda won the game, 73-60, and even Red Lions head coach Boyet Fernandez did some math and thought that the complexion of the championship rematch opener could be a bit different if Perez was there.  “With CJ there, if you look at it, we only beat them by 13 so idagdag mo 18 ni CJ, talo pa kami,” said Fernandez. Robinson agreed. “It could've been a better Finals,” he said. “It's no guarantee that we're going to win but you want your best player in the game. He deserves to be there. That's just the way I feel.” “I'm speaking on my behalf, not of the school. I'm speaking as a father to a son that lost an opportunity to play in the Finals,” added a disappointed Robinson. “I don't know how you call it but life is really unfair. We have to accept the fact that again, we have a game to play.” Robinson also cited a precedent that happened back 11 years ago when then Red Lion Yousif Aljamal got away with a season ban after being drafted in the PBA as No. 8 overall pick by Air21 while the season was still ongoing. San Beda filed a Temporary Restraining Order and the NCAA retracted from its decision as Aljamal eventually helped the Red Lions win its second title under then mentor Frankie Lim.  “If they had a chance that back in 2007... Kumbaga, if those are the rules, it has to be the rules. Kumbaga, yun lang ako. Wag yung pabago bago. Kung nagawa na yun dati, pinayagan at nagawan ng paraan, yun lang sana,” said Robinson. “I don't want to put the blame on whoever makes those rules. We're just here to follow them I just hope there will be consistency. If there's players at fault, let them face it. “’Wag nilang itago yung mali at gagawan nila ng paraan. Yun lang sa akin. I'm speaking on my behalf again. If they're gonna hate me, so be it,” he continued. “I'm speaking here not as a coach of LPU but as a father to CJ and I just feel about the pain he has to go through.” “He's there helplessly watching the game from wherever. Kung may ginawa sanang mali eh. Kung nag-drugs yan o gumawa ng kalokohan.” LPU will have a week to prepare for a bounce back and Perez will be back in action for Game 2 on Monday. “We're excited to have CJ back. I hope he doesn't enter the draft again,” said Robinson on a lighter note. “He'll be ready for Game Two.”   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 6th, 2018

Threeforall: Bucks become latest team to set a 3-point mark

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press The best 3-point shooter who ever lived, at least in terms of volume, is Ray Allen. Boston used to have him. Milwaukee used to have him. And he doesn’t figure into either franchise’s greatest single-game 3-point barrage. With NBA records being set from 3-point range this season — Golden State’s Klay Thompson has already busted the mark for 3s in a game with 14, one more than the standard his fellow Warriors sharpshooter Stephen Curry established in 2016, the league is well on its way to making more shots from beyond the arc than ever before. The record, set last season, is 25,807. The NBA is on pace this season to make about 27,300 shots from 3-point land. Now, not even three full weeks into this season, five teams have broken their own franchise record for 3s in a game. The most recent entry into that club was Milwaukee, which connected on 22 3s — on 56 tries, as opposed to 39 from inside the arc — in its 144-109 win over Sacramento on Sunday (Monday, PHL time). The Bucks used 13 players, with everyone trying at least one shot from 3-point range and 11 connecting on at least one triple. It was the second time this season the Bucks tried more 3s than 2s. Number of times in Bucks history that happened before this season? Zero. “We’ll just hopefully keep pushing that record, whatever it is,” Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer said. “See if we can get more. ... Good for us to know that we’re pushing that envelope and we want to be great behind that 3-point line.” The Bucks aren’t alone in their quest for 3-point greatness. Boston, which has had 3-point stars like Larry Bird, Paul Pierce, Antoine Walker and Allen in its rich history, made a team-record 24 3-pointers last week against the Bucks. The Celtics came into this season with 19 3s in a game being their franchise mark; they’ve made 19 or more twice already this season. “We took what the defense gave us,” Celtics coach Brad Stevens said after the barrage of 24 3s. Fueled by Thompson’s 14 3s in Chicago, the Warriors set a team record that night with 24 makes from deep. Atlanta set a team mark with 22 3-pointers against Cleveland, and Utah connected on its record of 19 in a loss to Golden State. “This is the NBA right now,” Miami coach Erik Spoelstra said. Curry is shooting more 3s per game than ever, making more 3s per game than ever — and doing it more accurately than ever. He’s already made 59 3s through the Warriors’ first 10 games, and is shooting 51 percent from deep. Curry is fifth all-time in 3-pointers made with 2,188. Allen is the record-holder with 2,973, a mark Curry is on pace to get in about two years. MUST GET 100 In this NBA, if a team doesn’t score 100 points, they’re not winning. Then again, getting to 100 doesn’t guarantee anything either. Teams that score 100 points or more are 134-99 this season, meaning they win 57.5 percent of the time. Those who don’t score 100 are 5-40, or winning 11.1 percent of the time. That’s a big change from recent years. Last season, teams over 100 won 62.2 percent of the time, and teams that didn’t score 100 won 20.8 percent of the time. A decade ago, those scoring 100 won at a 69.4 percent clip, and those not reaching the century mark won 30.8 percent of the time. THE WEEK AHEAD A six-pack of games to watch this week ... — Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, Monday (Tuesday, PHL time): Jimmy Butler had the Clippers among those on his radar when this trade saga started. — Philadelphia at Indiana, Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time): Joel Embiid’s numbers are fantastic, but Myles Turner is another great young big guy. — Milwaukee at Golden State, Thursday (Friday, PHL time): Bucks have been one of the season’s top early stories, and now get the ultimate test. — Boston at Utah, Friday (Saturday, PHL time): This will be Gordon Hayward’s 262nd time playing in Salt Lake City, and his first in a Celtics uniform. — Houston at San Antonio, Saturday (Sunday, PHL time): Spurs are 14-7 in last 21 with Rockets, and the teams play three times before Christmas. — Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, Sunday (next Monday, PHL time): Hawks rookie Kevin Huerter was LeBron James’ scrimmage teammate at a Nike camp in 2015. ON THE MOVE Now that the Tyson Chandler buyout by the Phoenix Suns has been completed, he’s expected to be on the Los Angeles Lakers’ roster later this week once he clears waivers. Portland coach Terry Stotts, who was a Dallas assistant when Chandler was with the Mavericks, said it’ll be a good move for the Lakers. “I like Tyson Chandler,” Stotts said. “Great teammate, obviously that was a few years ago but he impacts the game at the defensive end. He’s a great locker room guy. ... He’s all about winning. So, any team that has Tyson is going to be better for it.” ___ AP Sports Writer Anne M. Peterson in Portland, Oregon contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 5th, 2018