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Korean Embassy says visa application for PH now only through 35 travel agencies  

Filipinos applying for a visa to South Korea will have to file their applications only at designated travel agencies. In a visa advisory, the Embassy of the Republic of Korea said the following travel agencies will process visa applications startingJuly 1, 2018: Aboex Travel and Tours Adventure International Ark Travel Express Inc. Blue Horizons Travel and Tours Inc. Budget Travel and Tours Inc. Casto Travel Philippines Inc. City Travel & Tours Corporation Come On Phils. Golf & Travel Agency Inc. Constellation Travels, Inc. First United Travel Inc. Getaway Tours International Inc. Grand Hope Travel, Inc. H.I.S (Philippines) Travel Corp....Keep on reading: Korean Embassy says visa application for PH now only through 35 travel agencies  .....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerMay 31st, 2018

Korea visa application in PH only through travel agencies starting July

MANILA, Philippines – Starting July 1, 2018, Filipinos applying for a Korean visa can only do so through designated travel agencies, and no longer at the Korean embassy in Taguig City. The embassy said this is due to the increasing number of Korean visa applicants. "This increase in number of visa ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMay 31st, 2018

Korean Embassy to assign designated travel agencies for tourist visa application

No more long queues as the Korean Embassy in Manila will soon be assigning designated travel agencies to help in facilitating visa applications for Filipinos who want to travel toThe post Korean Embassy to assign designated travel agencies for tourist visa application appeared first on DZRH News......»»

Category: newsSource:  dzrhnewsRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2018

Travel agencies to handle all Korea visa applications from July 1

Filipinos who want to travel to South Korea to get a firsthand experience of Korean culture will no longer need to go to the Korean Embassy for tourist visas......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 31st, 2018

Canadian woman en route to Vermont spa denied entry to U.S., told she needs immigrant visa – CBC News

A Canadian woman travelling on a Canadian passport says she was turned away at the U.S. border and told she needed a valid immigrant visa to enter the country. Manpreet Kooner, 30, is a Canadian citizen who was born to Indian parents in Canada and raised here. She now lives in Montreal's LaSalle borough with her fiancé and works in a science lab at a local college. She told CBC she was on her way from Montreal to a spa in Vermont for a day trip with two friends, who are both white, Sunday afternoon. They never made it. Kooner said she was held at the border for six hours before being turned away. At one point, she said, a border agent told her: &'8220;'I know you may feel like you've been Trumped,'&'8221; an apparent reference to U.S. President Donald Trump. Trump's January executive order barring citizens from seven majority-Muslim countries from entering the country was later blocked in U.S. courts, but has touched off legal battles and confusion around the world. Kooner was told to apply for the visa at the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa. She went to the embassy Monday morning but was told they couldn't help her, and that she would need to talk to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. &'8220;I'm speechless,&'8221; she said. &'8220;There are no answers.&'8221; In a statement, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) said it does not discuss individual cases, but that those who present themselves at ports of entry must prove they fulfill admission requirements, and that admission to the U.S. is at the discretion of the border officers. The statement also says CBP adopted a policy in 2014 that &'8220;prohibits the consideration of race or ethnicity in law enforcement, investigation, and screening activities, in all but the most exceptional circumstances.&'8221; Kooner's story is the latest in a string of recent tales involving Canadian travellers scrutinized or turned away by U.S. border agents. Last month, for instance, a woman from the Montreal suburb of Brossard said she was denied entry after being fingerprinted, photographed and questioned in detail about her religion and her views on Trump. Kooner was reluctant to attribute her situation to racism, but said friends who have reached out to her say that could be the case. &'8220;People have said we need to take that into account here, because unfortunately, yeah, my skin colour is brown,&'8221; she said. Kooner said this summer, her mother was turned away at the border as well, but wasn't told why. Kooner said she was told her mother's issues wouldn't impact her. She first had trouble getting into the U.S. last December, before Trump took office. She was with friends and her fiancé when her car was pulled over for what she was told was a random check, she said. She was made to fill out a number of forms, but was eventually told there was a problem with the computer system and they should return the next morning. When they went back, she was let through without any problems. She said that when she tried to cross Sunday, at Highgate Springs, Vt., an agent checked her passport and said they needed to ask her additional questions. The agent mentioned that she had been stopped in December and asked why she was trying to go through again, Kooner said. She said she told them she's a Canadian citizen, has no criminal record and, before December, never had any issues crossing the border. She also said she was fingerprinted and photographed, and signed a form to withdraw her application for entry to the United States. Though she was told there are no flags on her file, a border agent advised her not to fly to the U.S. without a visa, Kooner said. The reference to Trump came as the agent was explaining the reasons why she was refused entry, she said. The border agent couldn't say what kind of visa she would need, only that she would have to visit the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa to get one. Kooner said that's when she started to cry. CBC News spoke to Kooner's friend Alexandra Adam, who was one of the two women on the trip with her. Adam caught the end of the conversation between Kooner and the border agent and confirmed Kooner was told she likely wouldn't be allowed into the U.S. without a visa. Adam said she was not present when the agent allegedly made the Trump comment. A U.S. Embassy official said most travellers from Canada and Bermuda generally do not need visas for tourism and visits. Canadians who are intending to immigrate or those planning to marry a U.S. citizen are among those who do need visas. Kooner does not fall under either category. U.S. immigration lawyer Leslie Holman said it doesn't appear that there's a reason Kooner would need a visa to get into the country. &'8220;Even if someone has a visa, the ultimate decision as to whether they can enter the United States rests when you seek admissibility, at the time of entry,&'8221; she said. A spokesperson for the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs told CBC News the common category of visa that is used for short term, non-immigrant travel to the United States – including tourism and business – is the B1/B2 visa. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, an average of 1.2 million people a day try to enter the U.S. at all crossings. Of those, an average of between 300 and 500 are denied entry for various reasons. Kooner has spent more than $1,000 on tickets to attend a musical festival in Miami at the end of the month, and planned to return to that city in May for [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 7th, 2017

Trump’s appeal of travel ban suspension pits executive against judiciary – CBC News

A federal appellate court heard arguments Tuesday for and against lifting a block on U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, which has over the last two weeks given rise to mass confusion, legal maneuvres and plenty of human drama. An emergency three-judge panel with the San Francisco-based Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals convened the hour-long telephone hearing at 6 p.m. ET. The case pits the Department of Justice lawyers against lawyers representing Washington state and Minnesota. The states were the plaintiffs in this case, and argued in favour of continuing to suspend Trump's ban. Justice department lawyer August Flentje contended that Trump's executive order, which closes U.S. borders for 90 days to citizens from seven predominantly Muslim nations (Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen) should be reinstated as a matter of national security. Both sides filed their legal briefs ahead of the hearing and had up to 30 minutes to make their case via phone. A quick ruling is expected. These oral arguments were not meant to be about the overarching merits of the travel ban itself. Rather, this hearing focused on the narrow question of whether to uphold a temporary restraining order imposed on Friday by Seattle U.S. District Judge James Robart. The federal judge's injunction, which applied nationwide, effectively put Trump's immigration executive order on ice. Temporary restraining orders are granted as a form of interim relief. The Ninth Circuit will be ruling on the sole question of whether the restraining order was justified until the case is heard on its larger merits. Robart wrote in his decision that the plaintiff states were likely &'8220;to suffer irreparable harm&'8221; if the enforcement of Trump's order was not halted. While the original court challenge of the travel ban was a battle of states vs. the federal government, the case before the Ninth Circuit is being framed as a showdown between two separate but equal branches of the government: the judiciary and the executive branch (president). The Department of Justice argued that the president's executive power to manage immigration in the U.S. is being unlawfully undermined by the judiciary. Trump's Twitter feed was revealing about the way he views the judicial branch. In one missive, he referred to Robart as a &'8220;so-called judge.&'8221; In another, he wrote: &'8220;Just cannot believe a judge would put our country in such peril. If something happens blame him and court system.&'8221; Restraining orders are not typically appealable, notes Yvonne Tew, a professor of constitutional law at Georgetown University. &'8220;But the government is bringing this before the Ninth Circuit, arguing that because of the nature of the case, they should allow it to be appealed before the appeals court.&'8221; In its 15-page legal brief filed on Monday, the justice department put the crux of its argument in its top line: &'8220;The executive order is a lawful exercise of the president's authority over the entry of aliens into the United States and the admission of refugees.&'8221; The line cites the Immigration Act of 1952 to argue the order is lawful. The Act includes a provision giving the president the authority to &'8220;suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or non-immigrants&'8221; if their arrival in the U.S. is deemed &'8220;detrimental&'8221; to U.S. interests. Justice department lawyers also said the courts have taken an &'8220;extraordinary step of second-guessing&'8221; the president's judgment on a matter of national security. While the states asserted that constitutional rights would be violated by the ban, the Justice Department said that the Supreme Court has already ruled that &'8220;an alien seeking initial admission to the United States requests a privilege and has no constitutional rights regarding his application.&'8221; In other words, the department said, foreign nationals aren't protected by U.S. constitutional rights to due process and equal protection. Arguments by lawyers opposing the ban The suit brought by the attorneys general of Washington state and Minnesota warned that lifting the suspension of Trump's immigration executive order would &'8220;unleash chaos again&'8221; by breaking up families, causing disarray in immigration procedures and hurting economies. &'8220;The order also caused immediate harm to Washington's public universities, which are state agencies,&'8221; the 32-page brief said. &'8220;Hundreds of their faculty, staff, and students are from the affected countries.&'8221; Minnesota soon joined the Washington complaint, alleging similar harms. Although the president does have wide discretion on immigration, as outlined in the 1952 Immigration Act, the plaintiffs counter that the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act signed by president Lyndon B. Johnson actually supersedes the older law. That's because under the 1965 Immigration Act, Congress decided to give each country an equal shot at immigration quotas, thereby &'8220;putting in a ban on discriminating based on national origin,&'8221; says David Bier, an immigration policy analyst with the Cato Institute. The 1965 amendment states: &'8220;No person shall receive any preference or priority or be discriminated against in the issuance of an immigrant visa because of the person's race, sex, nationality, place of birth, or place of residence.&'8221; Citing the 1965 legislation, Washington State solicitor General Noah Purcell told the judges Tuesday &'8220;that is a claim that we feel very likely to succeed on&'8221; and would allow the court to &'8220;avoid&'8221; some constitutional issues. Included with the states' filings asking the court to keep blocking Trump's travel ban were amicus (friend of the court) supporting documents. These briefs included statements from: 16 attorneys general; 97 tech companies including Apple, Google and Microsoft; as well as a brief [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2017

Multiple entry, 10-year Japan visa for Filipinos take effect

More Filipinos can avail of 10-year multiple entry visa to Japan starting this month as the country’s embassy in Manila relaxed rules for travel there. The eased visa requirements aim to promote “people-to-people exchanges between Japan and the Philippines,” and make convenient travel to the country, thus promoting tourism. The embassy released rules for getting […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

German reporter who exposed Russia doping ‘won’t be at World Cup’

German journalist Hajo Seppelt, whose investigative reporting exposed Russia's alleged state-sponsored doping, will not travel to the football World Cup tournament out of security concerns, national broadcaster ARD said. World Cup host Russia had initially refused to issue Seppelt a visa, but later relented after massive international pressure, with FIFA stressing the importance of media freedom to President Vladimir Putin's government. But Germany's security agencies have since evaluated the situation and found that it was risky for the journalist to travel to Russia, said ARD in a statement late Wednesday. Representatives from the broadcaster also held talks with Foreig...Keep on reading: German reporter who exposed Russia doping ‘won’t be at World Cup’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 14th, 2018

Visa-free entry for Filipinos for 2018 Winter Games in South Korea – report

MANILA, Philippines – Filipinos can enjoy visa-free travel to South Korea for the 2018 Winter Olympic Games, as part of the country's bid to boost tourism. The South Korean government on Friday, November 3, said it will temporarily allow visa-free entry for tourists from 3 Southeast Asian countries – the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 9th, 2017

DFA Opens Application for Accreditation of Travel and Recruitment Agencies

DFA Opens Application for Accreditation of Travel and Recruitment Agencies.....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsAug 6th, 2017

Venezuela may have given passports to people with ties to terrorism – CNN News

The stunning postcard-perfect vista surrounding Misael Lopez in this town about one hour from Madrid belies his constant anxiety, even fear. That's because the former legal adviser to the Venezuelan Embassy in Iraq is revealing secrets he says his government doesn't want disclosed. &'8220;I'm concerned about my safety and my family's safety everywhere I go,&'8221; Lopez said as he walked the cobble-stoned streets of Toledo. Lopez, 41, says he reported what he says was a scheme to sell passports and visas for thousands of dollars out of the embassy and repeatedly turned down offers to get a cut of the money. But it was the response from his government &'8212; which has denied his allegations &'8212; that surprised him the most. CNN and CNN en Español teamed up in a year-long joint investigation that uncovered serious irregularities in the issuing of Venezuelan passports and visas, including allegations that passports were given to people with ties to terrorism. The investigation involved reviewing thousands of documents, and conducting interviews in the U.S., Spain, Venezuela and the United Kingdom. One confidential intelligence document obtained by CNN links Venezuela's new Vice President Tareck El Aissami to 173 Venezuelan passports and ID's that were issued to individuals from the Middle East, including people connected to the terrorist group Hezbollah. The accusation that the country was issuing passports to people who are not Venezuelan first surfaced in the early 2000s when Hugo Chavez was the country's president, interviews and records show. A Venezuelan passport permits entry into more than 130 countries without a visa, including 26 countries in the European Union, according to a ranking by Henley and Partners. A visa is required to enter the United States. Over the course of the CNN investigation, Lopez provided documents that show he repeatedly told Venezuelan officials about what he discovered. But he said instead of investigating his allegations, the government targeted him for disclosing confidential information. U.S. officials were also made aware of his findings. &'8220;You cannot be a cop, and a thief at the same time,&'8221; Lopez said. &'8220;I decide to be a cop and do the right thing.&'8221; Doing the right thing has cost him. It didn't start out that way. Lopez, a lawyer who worked as a police officer in Venezuela, said he thought becoming a diplomat was a great career opportunity, which would also allow him to serve his country. With that in mind, he moved to Baghdad to start his new life at the Venezuelan Embassy. But, he recalled, he got an unwelcome surprise on his first day in July 2013. His new boss, Venezuelan Ambassador Jonathan Velasco, gave him a special envelope, he said. &'8220;He gave me an envelope full of visas and passports,&'8221; Lopez recalled. &'8220;He told me, 'Get this, this is one million U.S. dollars.' I thought it was like a joke. Then he told me here people pay a lot of money to get a visa or a passport to leave this country.&'8221; About one month later, Lopez said he realized it was no joke. An Iraqi employee of the embassy, who was hired to be an interpreter, told him she had made thousands of dollars selling Venezuelan passports and visas, he said. And he could make a lot of money, too. But Lopez said he told her it was wrong and he refused. The employee pressed the issue, telling him there were thousands of dollars to be made, he said, even discussing an offer to sell visas to 13 Syrians for $10,000 each. And, Lopez, said, she told him he could get a cut of the money, too. Again, he said he refused. &'8220;I suspect it might be terrorists; that's why I reject, of course, immediately,&'8221; Lopez said. And he said it just got worse. Lopez said he was stunned when he found a document inside the embassy. It was a list of 21 Arabic names with corresponding Venezuelan passport numbers and Venezuelan identification numbers. A Venezuelan immigration official told CNN that a cross-check of the passport numbers indicated that the passports are valid and match the names on the list Lopez found &'8212; meaning the people on the list could be able to travel using those passports. But incredibly, a publicly available database in Venezuela examined by CNN shows 20 of the 21 identification numbers are registered to people with Hispanic names &'8212; not the Arabic names listed on the passports. Lopez kept investigating what was going on inside the embassy. He said he even found the case of a convicted drug dealer with an Iraqi identification certificate that appears to show he was born in Iraq. But the man had a Venezuelan passport that said he was born in Venezuela. He kept evidence and notes of what he found. Concerned that the passport and visa scheme was continuing without his knowledge, Lopez investigated the embassy employee who he said had offered to sell passports. He took photos of her desk where he says he found the embassy's official stamp, used to authenticate visas, as well as sheets of papers printed with the Venezuelan government seal. He eventually fired the employee. Lopez did not have any other documents that would confirm the allegations against her. The employee did not respond to repeated requests from CNN for comment. In April 2014, only nine months after he started the job, he emailed a report to Ambassador Velasco about [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsFeb 9th, 2017

Visa application guide: Getting a Schengen visa from the Italian embassy in PH

Visa application guide: Getting a Schengen visa from the Italian embassy in PH.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2017

Expect influx of Israeli tourists in PHL

MANILA, Oct. 4 &'8212; The Department of Foreign Affairs on Tuesday reported that more than 40 Israeli travel agencies participated in a seminar on Philippine tourism organized by the Philippine Embassy in Tel Aviv to promote the Philippines as a new adve.....»»

Category: newsSource:  balitaRelated NewsOct 5th, 2016

British Embassy: UK is not visa-free

The British Embassy in Manila repudiated reports that Filipinos can now travel to the United Kingdom without visas......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2016

Singapore envoy grades her PH stint: ‘The more I learn, the more I don’t know’

In her art-filled residence, Singapore Ambassador Kok Li Peng greeted us in a green polo barong by Silk Cocoon, and invited us for merienda. The meal was cross-cultural, an array of Korean-Mexican tacos from Vatos Urban Tacos and pillowy ensaymada from Mary Grace. Ambassador Kok is a foodie and enjoys Filipino cuisine. She noted how Singaporeans and Filipinos share the love of food. The envoy first tasted sisig at Aracama in BGC and pinakbet at Abe. Many of her food discoveries are travel-related. In Iloilo, where she attended the meeting of trade ministers of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, she tried and liked batchoy. "You have to exercise a lot afterward," she rema...Keep on reading: Singapore envoy grades her PH stint: ‘The more I learn, the more I don’t know’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 6th, 2018

Panelo on structures on PH reefs: Is it true?

Malacaang on Tuesday sought to assure the public that it was looking into reports that China had built weather stations on three Philippine reefs in disputed areas in the West Philippine Sea. Presidential spokesperson Salvador Panelo said the Philippine government would take action on the construction of the Chinese stations once the reports were verified. "The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) is looking into these reports," Panelo, also chief presidential legal counsel, said in a statement on Tuesday. He said the DFA was coordinating with other government agencies and the Philippine Embassy in Beijing to verify the existence of the facilities. Proper validation Panelo ...Keep on reading: Panelo on structures on PH reefs: Is it true?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 6th, 2018

BI requires Sister Patricia Fox to leave PHL, denies her visa extension | News

The Bureau of Immigration has denied with finality Australian nun Patricia Fox's application for the extension of her temporary visitor's visa and has ordered her to leave the country by Saturday, Nov.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2018

BI requires Sister Patricia Fox to leave PHL, denies her visa extension

The Bureau of Immigration has denied with finality Australian nun Patricia Fox’s application for the extension of her temporary visitor’s visa and has ordered her to leave the country by Saturday, November 3. Source link link: BI requires Sister Patricia Fox to leave PHL, denies her visa extension.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2018

Aussie nun to Duterte: He will have his day in court

Australian missionary nun Sr. Patricia Anne Fox remains resolute in the face of an Immigration order denying her visa extension application and requiring her to leave before Nov. 4......»»

Category: newsSource:  davaotodayRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018

Going back to Prague

IT TOOK me 15 years to return to Prague, half of the lifetimes of the people I was working with. We were in the Czech Republic for eight days to film a documentary. After three nights in Prague, the film crew and I would proceed to Litomerice, Mlada Boleslav, Olomouc, Brno, Cesky Krumlov, and Ceske Budejovice. The itinerary was designed by the Czech Embassy in Manila, particularly Ambassador Jaroslav Olša, who is translating Filipino stories into Czech, including one of mine, and sponsored by the Seoul-based Czech Tourism. I mention these parties because you know what they say about the best-laid plans. It’s the unexpected, unintended developments I look forward to: I travel for the stories, the weirder, the better. The post Going back to Prague appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsOct 18th, 2018

US-PHL cooperation leads to arrest of visa fixer

A JOINT investigation by the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines Office of Overseas Criminal Investigations (OCI) and the Philippines National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) Anti-Organized and Transnational Crime Division resulted in the arrest of a visa fixer, Manuel “Nonoy” Bala, on October 5, 2018. On October 5, 2018, OCI requested that NBI investigate two visa […] The post US-PHL cooperation leads to arrest of visa fixer appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsOct 17th, 2018